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Mod-01 Lec-01 Introduction to Polymers
 
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Polymer Chemistry by Dr. D. Dhara,Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry,IIT Kharagpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in
Views: 37918 nptelhrd
Mod-05 Lec-16 Polymerization Techniques (Contd.)
 
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Science and Technology of Polymers by Prof. B. Adhikari,Department of Metallurgy and Material Science,IIT Kharagpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in
Views: 2270 nptelhrd
Lec 28 | MIT 3.091 Introduction to Solid State Chemistry
 
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Organic Glasses - Polymers: Synthesis by Addition Polymerization and by Condensation Polymerization View the complete course at: http://ocw.mit.edu/3-091F04 License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 31623 MIT OpenCourseWare
Mod-03 Lec-08 Principles of Polymer Synthesis (Contd.)
 
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Science and Technology of Polymers by Prof. B. Adhikari,Department of Metallurgy and Material Science,IIT Kharagpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in
Views: 708 nptelhrd
✅ Polymer बहुलक types, property, structure Everything at one Place Part 1 10S0513 ✅
 
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Polymer बहुलक https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=pcv135 Please click on like button 👍 for support our video. P C VERMA Please Click to link below for View all Playlist of our Channel at https://www.youtube.com/user/pcv135/playlists science, science articles, science news, science daily, science pictures, science and technology, science research articles, science and technology information, science and technology definition, science and technology in india, science and technology development, about science and technology essay, importance of science and technology, science and technology topics, science and technology difference, what is science and technology pdf, science daily chemistry, latest science news, science news, science news for students, world science news, interesting science articles, science daily physics, science daily biology, science daily zoology, science news 2017, science news 2018, science news 2019, short science articles, latest science news, interesting science articles, science class 10, science class 11, science class 12, science notes, science notes in hindi, importance of science and technology, science and technology topics, technology introduction, science and technology definition, science and technology in india, science and technology history, science in everyday life examples, science and technology examples #EDUCATION, #ONLINE, #LECTURE, #STUDY, #TIPS, #TOPPER, #ONLINESTUDY, #VIDEOLECTURE, #PHYSICS, #MATHEMATICS, #ENGLISH, #BIOLOGY, #COMPUTER, #SCIENCE, #CHEMISTRY, #SCIENTIST, #ONLINEEDUCATION, #SUBSCRIBE, #TUTORIALS, #CLASSLECTURE, #REALCLASS, #CLASSROOM, #BESTLECTURE, #BESTTEACHER, #BESTPROFESSOR, #STUDYFROMHOME, #ENGLISHGRAMMAR, #HINDI, #BANKING, #UPSC, #APTITUDE, #EGOVERNANCE, #PUZZLE, #ELECTION, #BOARD educational, educational video, best video for education, What is a polymer and what is it made of? What is a polymer molecule? What is polymer with example? What best describes a polymer? What do you understand by polymer? What are the 4 types of polymers? What are polymers used for in everyday life? What are three types of polymers? What are the different types of polymers? How is a polymer made? Is DNA An example of a polymer? Why is a polymer? Is plastic a polymer? Is DNA a polymer? Is DNA a biological polymer? What is Protein A polymer of? Is enzyme a polymer? What is the difference between a plastic and a polymer? Is polymer stronger than plastic? Is glass a polymer? What is the use of polymer? What do polymers do? Is honey a polymer? Is water a polymer? Is sugar a polymer? Is hemoglobin a polymer? What is a polymer of amino acids? What are natural polymers? What is polymer example? What are the two types of polymer? What are the classification of polymers? What type of polymer is polythene? What are most polymers made from? How many classes of polymers are there? Is cotton a polymer? What are the applications of polymers? Why is polymer useful? What is the importance of polymers? What is the polymer of a protein? Is RNA a polymer? What is made of polymer? What exactly is a polymer? What do you mean by polymer structure? What is polymer made of? What are some polymers? What are not polymers? What are properties of polymers? Is a protein a polymer? Is hair a polymer? What does a polymer do? What material is polymer made from? Where does Polymer come from? Are Polymers strong? What type of polymer is Teflon? Is Kevlar a polymer? What are the two main types of polymers? What are the advantages of polymers? What is the main source of polymers? What are polymers give example? Why is a polymer good for storage? What is polymer backbone? What is the basic structure of a polymer? What is polymer and classification? What is meant by polymer concrete? How many types of polymers are there? What is polymer biology? What are polymer products? Why is protein a polymer? Is glucose a polymer? What are the three main types of polymers? What are polymers used for? What are polymers made of? What do you mean by polymer? What is polyester polymer concrete? What is polymer modified grout? What is meant by ferrocement? What is PHBV polymer? How is polymer made? Is Pyrex a polymer? Is Bakelite a polymer? Is glass a polymer or ceramic? Is Diamond a polymer? What foods are polymers? Is Salt a polymer? What is the major source of common polymers? Why are polymers good for storage? Which polymers occurs naturally? Is carbon a polymer? How are polymers held together? What are organic polymers? What is polymer JS? What are synthetic organic polymers? Why are polymers so strong? How are polymers broken down? Do all polymers have carbon? What is carbon Fibre reinforced polymer used for? Are all polymers carbon based? What are examples of natural polymers? What do you mean by natural polymer? What is not a natural polymer? Are polymers safe? What are the two types of polymers? Why do polymers absorb water? How are water molecules pulled into the polymer?
Views: 31806 PRAGYA PROJECT KANKER
Polymer
 
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A polymer (/ˈpɒlɨmər/) (poly-, "many" + -mer, "parts") is a large molecule, or macromolecule, composed of many repeated subunits. Because of their broad range of properties, both synthetic and natural polymers play an essential and ubiquitous role in everyday life. Polymers range from familiar synthetic plastics such as polystyrene to natural biopolymers such as DNA and proteins that are fundamental to biological structure and function. Polymers, both natural and synthetic, are created via polymerization of many small molecules, known as monomers. Their consequently large molecular mass relative to small molecule compounds produces unique physical properties, including toughness, viscoelasticity, and a tendency to form glasses and semicrystalline structures rather than crystals. The term "polymer" derives from the ancient Greek word πολύς (polus, meaning "many, much") and μέρος (meros, meaning "parts"), and refers to a molecule whose structure is composed of multiple repeating units, from which originates a characteristic of high relative molecular mass and attendant properties. The units composing polymers derive, actually or conceptually, from molecules of low relative molecular mass. The term was coined in 1833 by Jöns Jacob Berzelius, though with a definition distinct from the modern IUPAC definition. The modern concept of polymers as covalently bonded macromolecular structures was proposed in 1920 by Hermann Staudinger, who spent the next decade finding experimental evidence for this hypothesis. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 796 Audiopedia
Polymer | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polymer 00:02:36 1 Common examples 00:04:05 2 Synthesis 00:05:47 2.1 Biological synthesis 00:06:38 2.2 Modification of natural polymers 00:07:50 3 Properties 00:08:45 3.1 Monomers and repeat units 00:09:56 3.2 Microstructure 00:10:33 3.2.1 Polymer architecture 00:11:36 3.2.2 Chain length 00:13:49 3.2.3 Monomer arrangement in copolymers 00:15:58 3.2.4 Tacticity 00:16:26 3.3 Morphology 00:16:42 3.3.1 Crystallinity 00:18:23 3.3.2 Chain conformation 00:18:52 3.4 Mechanical properties 00:19:12 3.4.1 Tensile strength 00:19:46 3.4.2 Young's modulus of elasticity 00:20:34 3.5 Transport properties 00:20:56 3.6 Phase behavior 00:21:04 3.6.1 Melting point 00:21:41 3.6.2 Glass transition temperature 00:22:13 3.6.3 Mixing behavior 00:24:40 3.6.4 Inclusion of plasticizers 00:25:34 3.7 Chemical properties 00:27:35 3.8 Optical properties 00:28:36 4 Standardized nomenclature 00:29:39 5 Characterization 00:31:38 6 Degradation 00:34:12 6.1 Product failure Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A polymer (; Greek poly-, "many" + -mer, "part") is a large molecule, or macromolecule, composed of many repeated subunits. Due to their broad range of properties, both synthetic and natural polymers play essential and ubiquitous roles in everyday life. Polymers range from familiar synthetic plastics such as polystyrene to natural biopolymers such as DNA and proteins that are fundamental to biological structure and function. Polymers, both natural and synthetic, are created via polymerization of many small molecules, known as monomers. Their consequently large molecular mass relative to small molecule compounds produces unique physical properties, including toughness, viscoelasticity, and a tendency to form glasses and semicrystalline structures rather than crystals. The term "polymer" derives from the Greek word πολύς (polus, meaning "many, much") and μέρος (meros, meaning "part"), and refers to a molecule whose structure is composed of multiple repeating units, from which originates a characteristic of high relative molecular mass and attendant properties. The units composing polymers derive, actually or conceptually, from molecules of low relative molecular mass. The term was coined in 1833 by Jöns Jacob Berzelius, though with a definition distinct from the modern IUPAC definition. The modern concept of polymers as covalently bonded macromolecular structures was proposed in 1920 by Hermann Staudinger, who spent the next decade finding experimental evidence for this hypothesis.Polymers are studied in the fields of biophysics and macromolecular science, and polymer science (which includes polymer chemistry and polymer physics). Historically, products arising from the linkage of repeating units by covalent chemical bonds have been the primary focus of polymer science; emerging important areas of the science now focus on non-covalent links. Polyisoprene of latex rubber is an example of a natural/biological polymer, and the polystyrene of styrofoam is an example of a synthetic polymer. In biological contexts, essentially all biological macromolecules—i.e., proteins (polyamides), nucleic acids (polynucleotides), and polysaccharides—are purely polymeric, or are composed in large part of polymeric components—e.g., isoprenylated/lipid-modified glycoproteins, where small lipidic molecules and oligosaccharide modifications occur on the polyamide backbone of the protein.The simplest theoretical models for polymers are ideal chains.
Views: 6 wikipedia tts
Polymer | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Polymer 00:02:36 1 Common examples 00:04:05 2 Synthesis 00:05:46 2.1 Biological synthesis 00:06:37 2.2 Modification of natural polymers 00:07:50 3 Properties 00:08:44 3.1 Monomers and repeat units 00:09:55 3.2 Microstructure 00:10:31 3.2.1 Polymer architecture 00:11:34 3.2.2 Chain length 00:13:40 3.2.3 Monomer arrangement in copolymers 00:15:48 3.2.4 Tacticity 00:16:16 3.3 Morphology 00:16:32 3.3.1 Crystallinity 00:18:12 3.3.2 Chain conformation 00:18:42 3.4 Mechanical properties 00:19:02 3.4.1 Tensile strength 00:19:35 3.4.2 Young's modulus of elasticity 00:20:23 3.5 Transport properties 00:20:45 3.6 Phase behavior 00:20:54 3.6.1 Melting point 00:21:30 3.6.2 Glass transition temperature 00:22:02 3.6.3 Mixing behavior 00:24:29 3.6.4 Inclusion of plasticizers 00:25:23 3.7 Chemical properties 00:27:24 3.8 Optical properties 00:28:24 4 Standardized nomenclature 00:29:27 5 Characterization 00:31:48 6 Degradation 00:34:22 6.1 Product failure Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A polymer (; Greek poly-, "many" + -mer, "part") is a large molecule, or macromolecule, composed of many repeated subunits. Due to their broad range of properties, both synthetic and natural polymers play essential and ubiquitous roles in everyday life. Polymers range from familiar synthetic plastics such as polystyrene to natural biopolymers such as DNA and proteins that are fundamental to biological structure and function. Polymers, both natural and synthetic, are created via polymerization of many small molecules, known as monomers. Their consequently large molecular mass relative to small molecule compounds produces unique physical properties, including toughness, viscoelasticity, and a tendency to form glasses and semicrystalline structures rather than crystals. The term "polymer" derives from the Greek word πολύς (polus, meaning "many, much") and μέρος (meros, meaning "part"), and refers to a molecule whose structure is composed of multiple repeating units, from which originates a characteristic of high relative molecular mass and attendant properties. The units composing polymers derive, actually or conceptually, from molecules of low relative molecular mass. The term was coined in 1833 by Jöns Jacob Berzelius, though with a definition distinct from the modern IUPAC definition. The modern concept of polymers as covalently bonded macromolecular structures was proposed in 1920 by Hermann Staudinger, who spent the next decade finding experimental evidence for this hypothesis.Polymers are studied in the fields of biophysics and macromolecular science, and polymer science (which includes polymer chemistry and polymer physics). Historically, products arising from the linkage of repeating units by covalent chemical bonds have been the primary focus of polymer science; emerging important areas of the science now focus on non-covalent links. Polyisoprene of latex rubber is an example of a natural/biological polymer, and the polystyrene of styrofoam is an example of a synthetic polymer. In biological contexts, essentially all biological macromolecules—i.e., proteins (polyamides), nucleic acids (polynucleotides), and polysaccharides—are purely polymeric, or are composed in large part of polymeric components—e.g., isoprenylated/lipid-modified glycoproteins, where small lipidic molecules and oligosaccharide modifications occur on the polyamide backbone of the protein.The simplest theoretical models for polymers are ideal chains.
Views: 8 wikipedia tts
Organic chemistry
 
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Organic chemistry is a chemistry subdiscipline involving the scientific study of the structure, properties, and reactions of organic compounds and organic materials, i.e., matter in its various forms that contain carbon atoms. Study of structure includes using spectroscopy and other physical and chemical methods to determine the chemical composition and constitution of organic compounds and materials. Study of properties includes both physical properties and chemical properties, and uses similar methods as well as methods to evaluate chemical reactivity, with the aim to understand the behavior of the organic matter in its pure form , but also in solutions, mixtures, and fabricated forms. The study of organic reactions includes both their preparation—by synthesis or by other means—as well as their subsequent reactivities, both in the laboratory and via theoretical study. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 161 encyclopediacc
History of organic chemistry | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organic_chemistry 00:02:08 1 History 00:07:18 2 Characterization 00:09:32 3 Properties 00:09:59 3.1 Melting and boiling properties 00:10:55 3.2 Solubility 00:11:51 3.3 Solid state properties 00:12:28 4 Nomenclature 00:14:09 4.1 Structural drawings 00:14:41 4.2 History 00:15:12 5 Classification of organic compounds 00:15:22 5.1 Functional groups 00:16:22 5.2 Aliphatic compounds 00:17:51 5.3 Aromatic compounds 00:18:37 5.4 Heterocyclic compounds 00:20:00 5.5 Polymers 00:21:43 5.6 Biomolecules 00:23:09 5.7 Small molecules 00:23:40 5.8 Fullerenes 00:24:46 5.9 Others 00:25:13 6 Organic reactions 00:26:44 7 Organic synthesis 00:28:21 8 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9853123815707532 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Organic chemistry is the chemistry subdiscipline for the scientific study of structure, properties, and reactions of organic compounds and organic materials (materials that contain carbon atoms). Study of structure determines their chemical composition and formula. Study of properties includes physical and chemical properties, and evaluation of chemical reactivity to understand their behavior. The study of organic reactions includes the chemical synthesis of natural products, drugs, and polymers, and study of individual organic molecules in the laboratory and via theoretical (in silico) study. The range of chemicals studied in organic chemistry include hydrocarbons (compounds containing only carbon and hydrogen), as well as compounds based on carbon, but also containing other elements, especially oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus (included in many biochemicals) and the halogens. In the modern era, the range extends further into the periodic table, with main group elements, including: Group 1 and 2 organometallic compounds involving alkali (lithium, sodium, and potassium) or alkaline earth metals (magnesium) Metalloids (boron and silicon) or other metals (aluminium and tin)In addition, contemporary research focuses on organic chemistry involving other organometallics including the lanthanides, but especially the transition metals zinc, copper, palladium, nickel, cobalt, titanium and chromium. Organic compounds form the basis of all earthly life and constitute the majority of known chemicals. The bonding patterns of carbon, with its valence of four—formal single, double, and triple bonds, plus structures with delocalized electrons—make the array of organic compounds structurally diverse, and their range of applications enormous. They form the basis of, or are constituents of, many commercial products including pharmaceuticals; petrochemicals and agrichemicals, and products made from them including lubricants, solvents; plastics; fuels and explosives. The study of organic chemistry overlaps organometallic chemistry and biochemistry, but also with medicinal chemistry, polymer chemistry, and materials science.
Views: 30 wikipedia tts
Organic chemist | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organic_chemistry 00:02:26 1 History 00:08:18 2 Characterization 00:10:49 3 Properties 00:11:19 3.1 Melting and boiling properties 00:12:22 3.2 Solubility 00:13:24 3.3 Solid state properties 00:14:05 4 Nomenclature 00:15:58 4.1 Structural drawings 00:16:33 4.2 History 00:17:07 5 Classification of organic compounds 00:17:18 5.1 Functional groups 00:18:24 5.2 Aliphatic compounds 00:20:03 5.3 Aromatic compounds 00:20:54 5.4 Heterocyclic compounds 00:22:29 5.5 Polymers 00:24:25 5.6 Biomolecules 00:26:03 5.7 Small molecules 00:26:37 5.8 Fullerenes 00:27:51 5.9 Others 00:28:22 6 Organic reactions 00:30:04 7 Organic synthesis 00:31:52 8 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9399415919678026 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Organic chemistry is the chemistry subdiscipline for the scientific study of structure, properties, and reactions of organic compounds and organic materials (materials that contain carbon atoms). Study of structure determines their chemical composition and formula. Study of properties includes physical and chemical properties, and evaluation of chemical reactivity to understand their behavior. The study of organic reactions includes the chemical synthesis of natural products, drugs, and polymers, and study of individual organic molecules in the laboratory and via theoretical (in silico) study. The range of chemicals studied in organic chemistry include hydrocarbons (compounds containing only carbon and hydrogen), as well as compounds based on carbon, but also containing other elements, especially oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus (included in many biochemicals) and the halogens. In the modern era, the range extends further into the periodic table, with main group elements, including: Group 1 and 2 organometallic compounds involving alkali (lithium, sodium, and potassium) or alkaline earth metals (magnesium) Metalloids (boron and silicon) or other metals (aluminium and tin)In addition, contemporary research focuses on organic chemistry involving other organometallics including the lanthanides, but especially the transition metals zinc, copper, palladium, nickel, cobalt, titanium and chromium. Organic compounds form the basis of all earthly life and constitute the majority of known chemicals. The bonding patterns of carbon, with its valence of four—formal single, double, and triple bonds, plus structures with delocalized electrons—make the array of organic compounds structurally diverse, and their range of applications enormous. They form the basis of, or are constituents of, many commercial products including pharmaceuticals; petrochemicals and agrichemicals, and products made from them including lubricants, solvents; plastics; fuels and explosives. The study of organic chemistry overlaps organometallic chemistry and biochemistry, but also with medicinal chemistry, polymer chemistry, and materials science.
Views: 3 Subhajit Sahu