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Confidentiality In A Post Quantum World: the case of LEDAkem and LEDApkc
 
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A Google TechTalk, 2018-12-05, presented by Alessandro Barenghi ABSTRACT: This talk will present LEDAkem and LEDApkc, a key agreement scheme and a public key encryption scheme resistant against attacks with both classical and quantum computers. In this talk I will present the schemes and report recent results on how we can automatically generate key sizes and cryptosystem parameters tailored for a desired security level, providing practical performance figures. About the speaker: Alessandro Barenghi is currently assistant professor at Politecnico di Milano, and one of the proposers of the LEDAkem/LEDApkc cryptoschemes to the NIST post-quantum standardization initiative.
Views: 1023 GoogleTechTalks
Physics of Light: "Photons" 1959 PSSC; John King, MIT; Electromagnetic Radiation
 
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Support this channel: https://www.patreon.com/jeffquitney Physical Science Study Committee Films (PSSC) playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_hX5wLdhf_KuXqv0QzMoNQYgR_nBxETx Physics & Physical Sciences playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_hX5wLdhf_JKIMNk88rKCkhpK73_qmHY "MIT Professor John G. King uses the photomultiplier and the oscilloscope to demonstrate that light shows particle behavior. He describes the photmultiplier, demonstrates amplification, and discusses the reasoning required to understand the final outcome." Originally a public domain film, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photon Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ A photon is an elementary particle, the quantum of the electromagnetic field including electromagnetic radiation such as light, and the force carrier for the electromagnetic force (even when static via virtual photons). The photon has zero rest mass and always moves at the speed of light within a vacuum. Like all elementary particles, photons are currently best explained by quantum mechanics and exhibit wave–particle duality, exhibiting properties of both waves and particles. For example, a single photon may be refracted by a lens and exhibit wave interference with itself, and it can behave as a particle with definite and finite measurable position and momentum. The photon's wave and quanta qualities are two observable aspects of a single phenomenon, and cannot be described by any mechanical model; a representation of this dual property of light, which assumes certain points on the wavefront to be the seat of the energy, is not possible. The quanta in a light wave cannot be spatially localized. Some defined physical parameters of a photon are listed. The modern concept of the photon was developed gradually by Albert Einstein in the early 20th century to explain experimental observations that did not fit the classical wave model of light. The benefit of the photon model was that it accounted for the frequency dependence of light's energy, and explained the ability of matter and electromagnetic radiation to be in thermal equilibrium. The photon model accounted for anomalous observations, including the properties of black-body radiation, that others (notably Max Planck) had tried to explain using semiclassical models. In that model, light was described by Maxwell's equations, but material objects emitted and absorbed light in quantized amounts (i.e., they change energy only by certain particular discrete amounts). Although these semiclassical models contributed to the development of quantum mechanics, many further experiments beginning with the phenomenon of Compton scattering of single photons by electrons, validated Einstein's hypothesis that light itself is quantized. In 1926 the optical physicist Frithiof Wolfers and the chemist Gilbert N. Lewis coined the name photon for these particles. After Arthur H. Compton won the Nobel Prize in 1927 for his scattering studies, most scientists accepted that light quanta have an independent existence, and the term photon was accepted. In the Standard Model of particle physics, photons and other elementary particles are described as a necessary consequence of physical laws having a certain symmetry at every point in spacetime. The intrinsic properties of particles, such as charge, mass and spin, are determined by this gauge symmetry. The photon concept has led to momentous advances in experimental and theoretical physics, including lasers, Bose–Einstein condensation, quantum field theory, and the probabilistic interpretation of quantum mechanics. It has been applied to photochemistry, high-resolution microscopy, and measurements of molecular distances. Recently, photons have been studied as elements of quantum computers, and for applications in optical imaging and optical communication such as quantum cryptography...
Views: 32623 Jeff Quitney
AQC - 2016 Quantum vs. Classical Optimization - A Status Report on the Arms Race
 
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A Google TechTalk, June 27, 2016, presented by Helmut Katzgraber (Texas A&M) ABSTRACT: To date, a conclusive detection of quantum speedup remains elusive. However, recent results from quantum Monte Carlo simulations, as well as the D-Wave 2X quantum annealer show a scaling that clearly outperforms state-of-the-art classical simulated annealing. In this talk an overview of recent benchmarks, as well as attempts to "tickle" any quantumness out of quantum annealing machines is given. Furthermore, we present a generic framework to validate benchmarks and to detect parameter regimes where quantum annealing might excel over classical heuristics. As such, we provide capabilities to aide in the search for the "killer" application for quantum optimization technologies. Finally, an overview of different sequential, non-tailored, as well as specialized tailored classical state-of-the-art algorithms is given. Current quantum annealing technologies must outperform these to claim the crown in the race for quantum speedup. Presented at the Adiabatic Quantum Computing Conference, June 26-29, 2016, at Google's Los Angeles office.
Views: 2030 GoogleTechTalks
Lecture - 16 Power Flow - I
 
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Lecture Series on Power System Analysis by Prof.A.K.Sinha, Department of Electrical Engineering,IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 92469 nptelhrd
Mod-01 Lec-10 Hamiltonian dynamics (Part 1)
 
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Lecture Series on Classical Physics by Prof.V.Balakrishnan, Department of Physics, IIT Madras. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 84638 nptelhrd
AQC 2016 - Quantum Monte  Carlo vs Tunneling vs. Adiabatic Optimization
 
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A Google TechTalk, June 27, 2016, presented by Aram Harrow (MIT) ABSTRACT: Can quantum adiabatic evolution solve optimization problems much faster than classical computers? One piece of evidence for this has been their apparent advantage in "tunneling" through barriers to escape local minima. However, I will argue that quantum Monte Carlo is at most polynomially slower than stochastic quantum adiabatic optimization under a wide variety of settings. I will then discuss some prospects for demonstrating quantum supremacy with a near-term quantum computer. I will explain the difficulties in achieving this using adiabatic evolution and will explain the possibility of achieving this with low-depth quantum circuits. Presented at the Adiabatic Quantum Computing Conference, June 26-29, 2016, at Google's Los Angeles office.
Views: 996 GoogleTechTalks
2011 Frontiers of Engineering: Ultra Low Power Biomedical and Bio-inspired Systems
 
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National Academy of Engineering 2011 U.S. Frontiers of Engineering Symposium September 19-21, 2011 Google, Inc. Mountain View, California Ultra Low Power Biomedical and Bio-inspired Systems September 21, 2011 Presented by Dr. Rahul Sarpeshkar. ABSTRACT: Google hosted 100 attendees of the 2011 Nat'l Academy of Engineering's U.S. Frontiers of Engineering symposium (FOE) at our Mountain View office and Dinah's Garden Hotel in Palo Alto. The symposium is an annual three-day meeting that brings together 100 of the nation's outstanding young engineers (ages 30-45) from industry, academia, and government to discuss pioneering technical and leading-edge research in various engineering fields and industry sectors. About the speaker: Dr. Rahul Sarpeshkar is an Associate Professor of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His talk discusses how analog, RF, and bio-inspired circuits and architectures have led to and are leading to novel systems for ultra-low-power biomedical applications. Examples from systems for bionic ear processors for the deaf, brain--machine interfaces for the blind and paralyzed,body sensor networks for cardiac monitoring, and in circuits for systems biology and synthetic biology were also presented.
Views: 7944 GoogleTechTalks
Jacob I. Torrey: From Kernel to VMM
 
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This presentation provides a cohesive overview of the Intel VT-x virtualization extensions from the perspective of a kernel developer. It finishes by outlines AIS, Inc.'s DARPA CFT MoRE effort. MoRE was an effort that examined the feasibility of utilizing TLB splitting as a mechanism for periodic measurement of dynamically changing binaries. The effort created a proof-of-concept system to split the TLB for target applications, allowing dynamic applications to be measured and can detect code corruption with low performance overhead. Jacob I. Torrey Senior Research Engineer / Colorado Site Lead Computer Architectures Lead
Views: 4909 Dartmouth
Mod-01 Lec-44 Numerical methods in conduction contd...
 
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Conduction and Radiation by Prof. C.Balaji, Department of Mechanical Engineering, IIT Madras For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 4662 nptelhrd
7. Solutions of Nonlinear Equations; Newton-Raphson Method
 
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MIT 10.34 Numerical Methods Applied to Chemical Engineering, Fall 2015 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/10-34F15 Instructor: James Swan This lecture talked about the system of non-linear equations. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 7423 MIT OpenCourseWare
8. Systems Integration and Interface Management
 
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MIT 16.842 Fundamentals of Systems Engineering, Fall 2015 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/16-842F15 Instructor: Olivier de Weck Interface management is the primary focus and students learned various approaches to conduct interface management for system integration. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 4435 MIT OpenCourseWare
Alán Aspuru-Guzik: "Billions and Billions of Molecules"
 
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Alán Aspuru-Guzik visited the Quantum AI Lab at Google LA on May 12, 2015 and gave this talk: "Billions and Billions of Molecules: Molecular Materials Discovery in the Age of Machine Learning" Abstract: Many of the challenges of the twenty-first century are related to molecular processes such as the generation, transmission, and storage of clean energy, water purification and desalination. These transformations require a next generation of more efficient and ecologically-friendly materials. In the life sciences, we face similar challenges, for example drug-resistant bacterial strains require novel antibiotics. One of the paradigm shifts that the theoretical and experimental chemists needs to embrace is that of accelerated molecular discovery: The design cycles need to be sped up by the constant interaction of theoreticians and experimentalists, the use of high-throughput computational techniques, tools from machine learning and big data, and the development of public materials databases. I will describe three projects from my research group that aim to operate in this accelerated design cycle. First, I will describe our efforts on the Harvard Clean Energy Project (http://cleanenergy.harvard.edu), a search for materials for organic solar cells. I will continue by talking about our work on developing organic molecules for energy storage in flow batteries. Finally, I will describe our work towards the discovery of novel molecules for organic light-emitting diodes. If time permits, I will talk about molecular networks related to the origins of life. Bio: Professor Alán Aspuru-Guzik is currently Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Harvard University. He began at Harvard in​ 2006 and ​was promoted to Full Professor in 2013. Alán received his B.Sc.​ Chemistry from the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) in 1999. He received the Gabino Barreda Medal from UNAM. ​He obtained a PhD in Physical Chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley in 2004, under Professor William A. Lester, Jr., he was a postdoctoral scholar in the group of Martin Head-Gordon at UC Berkeley from 2005-2006. In 2009, Professor Aspuru-Guzik received the DARPA Young Faculty Award, the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar award and the Sloan Research Fellowship. In 2010, he received the Everett-Mendelsson Graduate Mentoring Award and received the HP Outstanding Junior Faculty award by the Computers in Chemistry division of the American Chemical Society. In the same year, he was selected as a Top Innovator Under 35 by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Review magazine. In 2012, he was elected as a fellow of the American Physical Society, and in 2013, he received the ACS Early Career Award in Theoretical Chemistry. He is associate editor of the journal Chemical Science. Professor Aspuru-Guzik carries out research at the interface of quantum information and chemistry. In particular, he is interested in the use of quantum computers and dedicated quantum simulators for chemical systems. He has proposed quantum algorithms for the simulation of molecular electronic structure, dynamics and the calculation of molecular properties. He recently has proposed two new approaches for quantum simulation: the variational quantum eigensolver and the adiabatic quantum chemistry approach. He also proposed the demon-like algorithmic cooling algorithm. He has studied the role of quantum coherence in excitonic energy transfer in photosynthetic complexes. Alán has been involved as a theoretician in several experimental demonstrations of quantum simulators using quantum optics, nuclear magnetic resonance, nitrogen vacancy centers and recently superconducting qubits. ​Alán develops methodology for the high-throughput search of organic materials, especially organic materials. This has led to his discovery of candidate molecules for high mobility organic semiconductors, organic flow battery molecules and high-performance molecules for organic light-emitting diodes. Alan is very interested in the interface of machine learning and material discovery and has carried out the largest set of quantum chemistry calculations to date.
Views: 12702 GoogleTechTalks
AQC 2016 - Simulated Quantum Annealing Can Be Exponentially Faster Than Classical
 
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A Google TechTalk, June 27, 2016, presented by Elizabeth Crosson (Caltech) ABSTRACT: Simulated Quantum Annealing Can Be Exponentially Faster Than Classical Simulated Annealing: Cost functions with thin, high energy barriers can exhibit exponential separations between the run-time of classical simulated annealing, for which thermal fluctuations take exponential time to climb these barriers, and quantum annealing which can in some cases pass through such barriers efficiently, arguably by taking advantage of quantum tunneling. In this talk we will describe a proof which demonstrates that the Markov chain underlying SQA can efficiently sample its target distribution and find the global minimum of such a spike cost function in polynomial time. This result provides evidence for the growing consensus that SQA inherits at least some of the advantages that arise from tunneling in QA, and we will emphasize techniques in the proof which contribute to a further understanding of both the equilibrium distribution and the nonequilibrium dynamics of SQA. Presented at the Adiabatic Quantum Computing Conference, June 26-29, 2016, at Google's Los Angeles office.
Views: 1142 GoogleTechTalks
What is PHOTON? What does PHOTON mean? PHOTON meaning, definition & explanation
 
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✪✪✪✪✪ WORK FROM HOME! Looking for WORKERS for simple Internet data entry JOBS. $15-20 per hour. SIGN UP here - http://jobs.theaudiopedia.com ✪✪✪✪✪ ✪✪✪✪✪ The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiopedia_8069473 ✪✪✪✪✪ What is PHOTON? What does PHOTON mean? PHOTON meaning - PHOTON pronunciation - PHOTON definition - PHOTON explanation - How to pronounce PHOTON. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A photon is an elementary particle, the quantum of all forms of electromagnetic radiation including light. It is the force carrier for electromagnetic force, even when static via virtual photons. The photon has zero rest mass and as a result, the interactions of this force with matter at long distance are observable at the microscopic and macroscopic levels. Like all elementary particles, photons are currently best explained by quantum mechanics but exhibit wave–particle duality, exhibiting properties of both waves and particles. For example, a single photon may be refracted by a lens and exhibit wave interference with itself, and it can behave as a particle with definite and finite measurable position and momentum. The photon's wave and quanta qualities are two observable aspects of a single phenomenon, and cannot be described by any mechanical model; a representation of this dual property of light, which assumes certain points on the wavefront to be the seat of the energy, is not possible. The quanta in a light wave cannot be spatially localized. Some defined physical parameters of a photon are listed. The modern concept of the photon was developed gradually by Albert Einstein in the early 20th century to explain experimental observations that did not fit the classical wave model of light. The benefit of the photon model was that it accounted for the frequency dependence of light's energy, and explained the ability of matter and electromagnetic radiation to be in thermal equilibrium. The photon model accounted for anomalous observations, including the properties of black-body radiation, that others (notably Max Planck) had tried to explain using semiclassical models. In that model, light was described by Maxwell's equations, but material objects emitted and absorbed light in quantized amounts (i.e., they change energy only by certain particular discrete amounts). Although these semiclassical models contributed to the development of quantum mechanics, many further experiments beginning with the phenomenon of Compton scattering of single photons by electrons, validated Einstein's hypothesis that light itself is quantized. In 1926 the optical physicist Frithiof Wolfers and the chemist Gilbert N. Lewis coined the name photon for these particles. After Arthur H. Compton won the Nobel Prize in 1927 for his scattering studies, most scientists accepted that light quanta have an independent existence, and the term photon was accepted. In the Standard Model of particle physics, photons and other elementary particles are described as a necessary consequence of physical laws having a certain symmetry at every point in spacetime. The intrinsic properties of particles, such as charge, mass and spin, are determined by this gauge symmetry. The photon concept has led to momentous advances in experimental and theoretical physics, including lasers, Bose–Einstein condensation, quantum field theory, and the probabilistic interpretation of quantum mechanics. It has been applied to photochemistry, high-resolution microscopy, and measurements of molecular distances. Recently, photons have been studied as elements of quantum computers, and for applications in optical imaging and optical communication such as quantum cryptography.
Views: 32332 The Audiopedia
Experimental Studies on a Single Microtubule (Google Workshop on Quantum Biology)
 
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Google Workshop on Quantum Biology Experimental Studies on a Single Microtubule: Investigation of Electronic Transport Properties Presented by Anirban Bandyopadhyay October 22, 2010 ABSTRACT Using nanotechnology we have studied electronic transport properties of a single microtubule (MT) under direct current/bias (DC) and alternating current (AC) of varying frequencies. Our study ranged from 10 K to the room temperature. At specific, 1) spontaneous MT growth under AC signal that led to Froelich Condensation, 2) ballistic electronic transport under DC and AC signal, 3) ferroelectric MT properties under DC signal. Applications of MT as a multilevel information processing and memory device (beyond binary logic) will be discussed. I will present our rigorous study to unravel the origin of room temperature coherent transport in terms of band energy diagrams where point contacts between valence and conduction band triggers transport of electrons/quasi particles. Finally, I will describe challenges and resolution of detection of MT topological qubits based on Hemchandra/Fibonacci MT geometry at physiological temperature. About the speaker: Dr. Anirban Bandyopadhyay completed his doctorate in supramolecular electronics at IACS, Kolkata, India, in 2005. He is a permanent scientist in NIMS, Tsukuba Japan. In 2008, he and his colleagues invented nano brain an artificial molecular processor that mimics a fundamental hardware feature of our neural network. Apart from holding executive positions in particular scientific organizations and editorial board of information related journals, he is involved in setting up a global platform for creating a super-intelligent molecular machine "Bramha". For details about his works, and publications please visit www.anirbanlab.co.nr
Views: 14693 GoogleTechTalks
💡 Зарядное Устройство Авто Аккумулятора Предпусковое 《ЗУ 12В АИДА 8s》 + Режим хранения
 
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https://motorstate.com.ua/oborudovanie-avtoservisa Купить по выгодной цене Зарядное Устройство Авто Аккумулятора Предпусковое 12В АИДА 8s Режим хранения АИДА-8s —автоматическое импульсное десульфатирующее зарядно-предпусковое устройство для АКБ 32-160А*час. с режимом хранения. Аида Заряд производитель зарядных с 2002 г. НАЗНАЧЕНИЕ 1.1. Зарядное устройство (ЗУ) «АИДА-8 S» представляет собой импульсное ЗУ нового поколения и служит для циклического импульсного заряда в автоматическом режиме 12В необслуживаемых и обслуживаемых аккумуляторных батарей (АКБ) емкостью от 32 до 160 А•час током 1А, 4А или 8А, для десульфатации засульфатированных АКБ, для длительного поддержания АКБ в заряженном состоянии, для предохранения их от сульфатации и перезаряда, а так же для хранения АКБ в межэксплуатационный период. 1.2. ЗУ способно заряжать АКБ, разряженные практически до 0В, «реанимируя» их короткими импульсами тока силой 1А, 4А или 8А. 1.3. ЗУ «АИДА-8» можно применять в составе систем резервного бесперебойного питания, дизель-генераторов (режим «безопасного хранения АКБ»), а также в качестве блока питания 13В 7А. 1.4. ЗУ «АИДА-8» имеет предпусковой режим током 8А для облегчения запуска двигателей в холодное время года. 1.5. ЗУ «АИДА-8» имеет тепловую защиту от перегрузок, защиту от коротких замыканий и перенапряжений. От обратной полярности ЗУ защищено плавким предохранителем. Зарядка автомобильного аккумулятора зарядным устройством Аида, это самый безопасный способ заряда и имеет полезные свойства, восстанавливает АКБ, продлевет срок его службы. ТЕХНИЧЕСКИЕ ХАРАКТЕРИСТИКИ Напряжение питающей сети: ~ 50 Гц 150÷240 В Потребляемая мощность: не более 150 ВА Напряжение включения не ниже 14,8 В ± 0,2 В Напряжение отключения не выше 15,6 В ± 0,2 В Средний ток заряда 1, 4 или 8 А Напряжение режима хранения / блока питания 13,6 В± 0,2 В Ток режима хранения / блока питания до 8А Диапазон рабочих температур: от -10 до +40 оС Габаритные размеры: 95 х 65 х 170 мм Масса: не более 0,6 кг Преимущества — Алгоритм циклического импульсного заряда с эффектом десульфатации защищает АКБ по окончанию заряда от саморазряда, сульфатации, перезаряда и коррозии за счет имитации цикла заряд-разряд. Происходит улучшение параметров АКБ: разрушается начавшаяся сульфатация, улучшается структура электродов, уменьшается внутреннее сопротивление АКБ, увеличивается стартовый ток, уменьшается расслоение электролита и выравнивается его плотность в банках. В результате АКБ восстанавливает свою емкость и служит дольше. — Заряд автомобильной АКБ аналогичен заряду мобилки: подключил и забрал когда удобно — перезаряда не происходит — по окончанию заряда устройство переходит в режим поддержания АКБ в заряженном состоянии или переводится в буферный режим безопасного длительного хранения. — Буферный режим безопасного длительного хранения батарей всех систем для поддержания максимальной производительности. Батарея заряжается, а затем неограниченно долго поддерживается в заряженном состоянии малыми токами при постоянном напряжении 13,8В. Применяется для хранения АКБ в буферном режиме по окончанию зарядки или в межэксплуатационный период, например, для зимнего хранения, а так же в системах резервного бесперебойного питания и т. д. — Заряд АКБ ВСЕХ СИСТЕМ: кислотных, гелевых, щелочных (в том числе для лодочных эл. моторов). — Заряд с эффектом десульфатации протекает под контролем напряжения на клеммах АКБ не допуская повреждения электрооборудования автомобиля и самой АКБ, что позволяет заряжать батарею не снимая ее с автомобиля. — Не нужен амперметр: ток по мере заряда АКБ поддерживается электроникой неизменным и нет необходимости его добавлять. — Заряжает АКБ разряженные даже до 0В. — Предпусковой режим постоянным током 8А для подготовки АКБ к запуску двигателя в холодное или другое неблагоприятное время года. Во время пуска его не нужно отключать от АКБ. — Блок питания на напряжение 13В и ток нагрузки до 8А (например, для питания автохолодильника или 12В лампы-переноски от сети 220В). — 3 способа десульфатации: щадящий — малыми токами при постоянном напряжении, циклическим импульсным зарядом — за счет спадания избыточного зарядного напряжения и интенсивный — циклическим импульсным зарядом асимметричным током. — Защита от коротких замыканий, тепловая защита от перегрузок. От обратной полярности защищено плавким предохранителем. — Малые габариты (9565*170мм) и вес. Обеспечивает свои электрические характеристики при напряжении питающей сети от 150 до 240В. 👉 https://goo.gl/pSv51W ПОДПИШИСЬ - будь в теме!!! Подписывайся на наши паблики! ✔️ Instagram https://www.instagram.com/motorstate_com_ua/ ✔️ Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Motorstate.cis ✔️ Vkontakte https://vk.com/motorstate #Моторстейт #Аида8s #Аида #Обзор #Аккумулятор #ЗарядноеУстройство #Зарядка #Автомобиль #Распаковка #ИмпульсноеЗарядноеУстройство #ЗуАккум #ЗарядкаАккумулятора #КакЗарядитьАккумулятор #ЗарядАккумулятора #Хранение #ПодНагрузкой #ЗарядноеАида #ЗарядныеУстройства
Views: 524 MotorState
AQC 2016 - Quantum Monte Carlo Simulations and Quantum Annealing
 
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A Google TechTalk, June 27, 2016, presented by Guglielmo Mazzola (ETH Zurich) ABSTRACT: The only computational method capable to simulate Quantum Annealing (QA) for realistic and large scale problems is Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC). In this talk I will discuss if QMC, at its finite-temperature path-integral level, can be representative of what happens inside a real QA device and how physical intuition may guide us to devise “Quantum Inspired” algorithms which may outperform existing ones. To this end we study how QMC simulations mimic quantum tunneling in both spin and continuous space models and how the tunneling scales with the size of the system and the shapes of the energy barriers. Presented at the Adiabatic Quantum Computing Conference, June 26-29, 2016, at Google's Los Angeles office.
Views: 1141 GoogleTechTalks
MIT 3.60 | Lec 26: Symmetry, Structure, Tensor Properties of Materials
 
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4th Rank Tensor Properties View the complete course at: http://ocw.mit.edu/3-60F05 License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 2800 MIT OpenCourseWare
AQC 2016 - Testing Adiabatic Quantum Computers Using Simple Quantum Simulation
 
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A Google TechTalk, June 29, 2016, presented by Peter Love (Tufts University) ABSTRACT: Validation of Adiabatic Quantum computers is a significant problem. One of the advantages of the Adiabatic model is that it does not require the rapid pulsed controls necessary in the gate model of quantum computation. However, eschewing this level of control also makes state and process tomography impossible in purely adiabatic hardware, and hence the quantum nature (if any) of such devices has to be established by indirect evidence. In this talk I will describe how to use Adiabatic quantum computers based on the transverse-field Ising model to simulate elementary one-dimensional quantum systems, and discuss the quantum properties of the machines that can be exhibited by such simulations. I will also discuss how to detect the presence of one type of beyond-transverse-Ising coupling, namely the XX couplings of interest for non-stoquastic Adiabatic machines. Presented at the Adiabatic Quantum Computing Conference, June 26-29, 2016, at Google's Los Angeles office.
Views: 1952 GoogleTechTalks
JMAG Express -- An Quick and Easy Method to Design Motors
 
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Benefits - Learn about standardizing motor analysis by using JMAG-Express. - Gain familiarity with the setting up models in JMAG-Express. Target audience - Anyone who would like to standardize their motor analysis operations More information about the software https://powersys-solutions.com/software/jmag/ Try JMAG: https://powersys-solutions.com/contact-us/?service=Trial%20version&software=JMAG Contact us: https://powersys-solutions.com/contact-us/?software=JMAG
Views: 4683 POWERSYS
2018 Stillwell Memorial Lecture: Dr. Robert D. Braun
 
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Dr. Robert "Bobby" D. Braun is the Smead Professor of Space Technology and Dean of the College of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Colorado in Boulder. His talk is entitled "Entry, Descent and Landing Technology Investments to Enable a New Era of Mars Exploration." The 2018 Stillwell Memorial Lecture took place on Monday, Sept. 24 in the auditorium of the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois. The lecture is sponsored by the Department of Aerospace Engineering.
DEF CON 21 - Balint Seeber - All Your RFz Are Belong to Me
 
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All Your RFz Are Belong to Me - Hacking the Wireless World with Software Defined Radio BALINT SEEBER SPENCH.NET Ever wondered what traffic is flowing through the many satellites in orbit above you? Have you wanted to intercept RADAR signals from air traffic control and visualise your local airspace in real-time on a 3D map? While youíre at it, check how many faults have been reported by the next plane youíll be travelling on (e.g. do the toilets work?). How about tracking down the source of a clandestine radio transmission that is interfering with your favourite channel, or probing the signals on your cable modem connection? If you have ever wanted to reverse engineer such systems, this is for you! I will show how to analyse and hack RF communications systems using open source software and cheap radio hardware. The focus will be on how to use Software Defined Radio to create: a digital satellite demodulator for blind signal analysis, a souped-up Mode S aviation transponder/ACARS receiver with an Internet-enabled smooth-streaming Google Earth front-end, and a Radio Direction Finder. Balint Seeber (@spenchdotnet) A software engineer by training, Balint is a perpetual hacker, and the guy behind spench.net. His passion is extracting interesting information from lesser-known data sources and visualising them in novel ways. Lately, he has become obsessed with Software Defined Radio and all that can be decoded from the ether. When not receiving electromagnetic radiation, he likes to develop interactive web apps for presenting spatial data. Originally from Australia, he moved to the United States in 2012 to pursue his love of SDR. http://spench.net/ Materials: https://www.defcon.org/images/defcon-21/dc-21-presentations/Seeber/DEFCON-21-Balint-Seeber-All-Your-RFz-Are-Belong-to-Me.pdf
Views: 10623 DEFCONConference
Benoit B. Mandelbrot, MIT 2001 - Fractals in Science, Engineering and Finance (Roughness and Beauty)
 
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Please Subscribe! http://www.youtube.com/c/MITVideoProductions?sub_confirmation=1
UK TechDays Online is back!
 
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Event description: This summer, we're setting up studio at the Microsoft Reactor in London and broadcasting through London Tech Week, bringing you a mix of deep technical content and thoughtful future vision keynotes. Running from June 12th to 14th, there's 4 technical tracks across the 3 days for you to indulge in. Agenda: Thursday June 14th Quantum Computing - 10:00 - 13:30 - a chance to delve into Microsoft Q# development environment after a keynote session from Microsoft Director of Quantum Computing, Julie Love.
Views: 1524 Microsoft Developer
Photon | Wikipedia audio article | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Photon | Wikipedia audio article Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The photon is a type of elementary particle, the quantum of the electromagnetic field including electromagnetic radiation such as light, and the force carrier for the electromagnetic force (even when static via virtual particles). The photon has zero rest mass and always moves at the speed of light within a vacuum. Like all elementary particles, photons are currently best explained by quantum mechanics and exhibit wave–particle duality, exhibiting properties of both waves and particles. For example, a single photon may be refracted by a lens and exhibit wave interference with itself, and it can behave as a particle with definite and finite measurable position or momentum, though not both at the same time. The photon's wave and quantum qualities are two observable aspects of a single phenomenon – they cannot be described by any mechanical model; a representation of this dual property of light that assumes certain points on the wavefront to be the seat of the energy is not possible. The quanta in a light wave are not spatially localized. The modern concept of the photon was developed gradually by Albert Einstein in the early 20th century to explain experimental observations that did not fit the classical wave model of light. The benefit of the photon model is that it accounts for the frequency dependence of light's energy, and explains the ability of matter and electromagnetic radiation to be in thermal equilibrium. The photon model accounts for anomalous observations, including the properties of black-body radiation, that others (notably Max Planck) had tried to explain using semiclassical models. In that model, light is described by Maxwell's equations, but material objects emit and absorb light in quantized amounts (i.e., they change energy only by certain particular discrete amounts). Although these semiclassical models contributed to the development of quantum mechanics, many further experiments beginning with the phenomenon of Compton scattering of single photons by electrons, validated Einstein's hypothesis that light itself is quantized. In 1926 the optical physicist Frithiof Wolfers and the chemist Gilbert N. Lewis coined the name "photon" for these particles. After Arthur H. Compton won the Nobel Prize in 1927 for his scattering studies, most scientists accepted that light quanta have an independent existence, and the term "photon" was accepted. In the Standard Model of particle physics, photons and other elementary particles are described as a necessary consequence of physical laws having a certain symmetry at every point in spacetime. The intrinsic properties of particles, such as charge, mass, and spin, are determined by this gauge symmetry. The photon concept has led to momentous advances in experimental and theoretical physics, including lasers, Bose–Einstein condensation, quantum field theory, and the probabilistic interpretation of quantum mechanics. It has been applied to photochemistry, high-resolution microscopy, and measurements of molecular distances. Recently, photons have been studied as elements of quantum computers, and for applications in optical imaging and optical communication such as quantum cryptography.
Views: 5 wikipedia tts
Mod-04 Lec-38 Monte Carlo method
 
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Radiation Heat Transfer by Prof. J. Srinivasan, Department of Atmospheric Science, IISc Bangalore. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in
Views: 5160 nptelhrd
Mod-08 Lec-08 Estimation of Daily/Monthly Average daily Tilt Factor Under Terrestrial Conditions
 
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Solar Energy Technology by Prof. V.V. Satyamurty, Department of Mechanical Engineering, IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 1881 nptelhrd
Lecture - 28 MEMS for Space Application
 
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Lecture Series on MEMS & Microsystems by Prof. Santiram Kal, Department of Electronics & Electrical Communication Engineering, IIT Kharagpur. For more Courses visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 4307 nptelhrd
Lecture - 1 Advanced Finite Elements Analysis
 
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Lecture Series on Advanced Finite Elements Analysis by Prof. R.KrishnaKumar, Department of Mechanical Engineering, IIT Madras. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 150065 nptelhrd
SANDstorm, Math-Fun, & Asteroid Relocation
 
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Google Tech Talk July 24, 2009 ABSTRACT Presented by Rich Schroeppel. Rich Schroeppel works on SANDstorm, the Sandia entry in the NIST contest for a new cryptographic hash function. He'll also present some math fun: Post's Tag Problem, and Polyhypercubes. Then there's a proposal for moving asteroids to useful orbits, and to close, the Fish-Pond Theory for the origin of life. Bio: Rich Schroeppel has an Erdos number of 2, coauthored MIT's famous 1972 HAKMEM, and factored Mersenne numbers M137 & M149.
Views: 3266 GoogleTechTalks
Mod-01 Lec-23 Solution of Systems of Linear Algebraic Equations: Elimination Methods (Contd.)
 
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Computational Fluid Dynamics by Dr. Suman Chakraborty, Department of Mechanical & Engineering, IIT Kharagpur For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 6057 nptelhrd
Lecture 03_2-D Lattice
 
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Defects in materials by Prof. Sundararaman M, Department of Metallurgical & Materials Engineering IIT Madras. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in
Mod-01 Lec-01 Mathematics for Chemistry
 
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Mathematics for Chemistry by Dr. Madhav Ranganathan & Dr. P.P. Thankachan,Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry,IIT Kanpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in
Views: 25504 nptelhrd
Numerical Solutions to Thermal Field and Fluid Flow in Welding - Part 2
 
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This video is part 2 of the lesson on numerical solutions to thermal field and fluid flow in welding as part of the MOOC on Analysis and Modelling of Welding offered by NPTEL, IIT Madras.
Scientific Visualization with ParaView
 
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Scientific Visualization Workshop at Indiana University. Hosted by Bill Sherman and the Advanced Visualization Lab, University Information Technology Services Research Technologies. Filmed Sep 05, 2018. For more information about visualization and data services, visit https://rt.iu.edu
Views: 90 IU_PTI
AQC 2016 - Max-k-SAT, Multi-Body Frustration, & Multi-Body Sampling on a Two Local Ising System
 
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A Google TechTalk, June 29, 2016, presented by Nicholas Chancellor (Durham University) ABSTRACT: For some time it has been known how to encode satisfiability (SAT) problems and the physics analogue of finding the ground state of a frustrated spin system onto a two local Ising spin model. These previous constructions however do not necessarily yield the statement which satisfies the maximum number of clauses as the ground state (max-SAT), in the language of physics, they did not support frustration of the multi-body terms. Furthermore, the inability to accurately describe frustration means that these methods cannot be used for thermal sampling. We propose a new method of encoding problems which does support max-SAT, frustration, and sampling. I will describe this method in detail, and show how a recent coupling proposal by a different group for unfrustrated Ising couplings is also compatible with frustration and can be made compatible with sampling applications. I will than discuss applications of our method including, direct embedding of max-SAT problems on a chimera graph, optimization with non-linear constraints, and particle simulation. Stefan Zohren, Oxford University, Paul Warburton, UCL, Simon Benjamin, Oxford University, Stephen Roberts, Oxford University Presented at the Adiabatic Quantum Computing Conference, June 26-29, 2016, at Google's Los Angeles office.
Views: 536 GoogleTechTalks
Lecture - 25 Analysis of Resistive Networks Computer Aided
 
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Lecture series on Networks,Signals and Systems by Prof. T.K.Basu, Dept.of Electrical Engineering, I.I.T.,Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 9362 nptelhrd
Anton: A Special-Purpose Machine That Achieves a Hundred-Fold Speedup in Biomolecular Simulations
 
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SPEAKER & AFFILIATION: David Shaw, D. E. Shaw Research DESCRIPTION & LINK: This lecture has been videocast from the Computer Science Department at UNC. The abstract of this lecture and a brief speaker biography is available at http://research.csc.ncsu.edu/colloquia/seminar-post.php?id=428 For a complete transcript of this lecture, go to http://www.ncsu.edu/youtube/transcript/shaw-transcript.rtf
Views: 6819 NCState
What is in Common Between Quantum Computer and Solar System?
 
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A Google TechTalk, 10/21/16, presented by Boris Altshuler. ABSTRACT: Quantum Computers (QC) consist of a large number of interacting quantum bits. Solutions of computational problems are encoded in bit-strings which result from problem-specific manipulations. In contrast with Classical Computers, the state of a QC is characterized by a quantum superposition of the bit-strings (a wave function) rather than by a particular bit-string representing a computational basis. Instead of usual focus on quantum algorithms, here we will discuss QC using concepts from many-body physics as quantum dynamical systems. Recent progress in understanding the dynamics of quantum systems with large number of degrees of freedom is based on the concept of Many-Body Localization: the eigenstates can be localized in the Hilbert space in a way similar to the conventional real space Anderson Localization of a single quantum particle by a quenched disorder. Depending on the temperature (total energy) or other tunable parameters the system can find itself either in the localized or in the many-body extended phase. In the former case, the system of interacting quantum particles/spins cannot be described in terms of conventional Statistical Mechanics: the notion of the thermal equilibrium loses its meaning. Moreover the violation of the conventional thermodynamics does not disappear with the Anderson transition to an extended state. In a finite range of the tunable parameters we expect the non-ergodic extended phase: the many-body wave-functions being extended are multifractal in the Hilbert space making thermal equilibrium unreachable in any reasonable time scale. It means the system by itself keeps some memory of its original quantum state. This property can be extremely useful for quantum computation, which cannot be implemented without connection between the remote parts of the Hilbert space, i.e. states localized in the computational basis are useless. The ergodic states should also be avoided: in the Hilbert space of high dimension they easily lose the quantum information. We will discuss evidences for the existence of delocalized non-ergodic systems and speculate about their properties by comparing them with non-integrable classical dynamical systems such as Solar Systems. Speaker Info: Boris Altshuler works in the field of Condensed Matter theory. He made substantial contributions to the understanding of the effects of disorder, quantum interference and interactions between electrons on the properties of bulk, low-dimensional, and mesoscopic conductors. Boris was educated in Russia. He graduated from the Leningrad (now St. Petersburg) State University and joined Leningrad Institute for Nuclear Physics first as a graduate student and later as a member of the research stuff. His PhD thesis advisor was Arkadii Aronov. After moving to USA Boris was on faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and later of the Princeton University. He was also a Fellow of NEC laboratories America (Princeton, NJ). Now he is a professor of Physics at Columbia University. Boris Altshuler is a recipient of a number of scientific awards - the most significant are 1993 Hewlett-Packard Europhysics Prize (Agilent Prize) and 2003 Oliver Buckley Prize of American Physical Society. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is also a foreign member of The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters and of the Academy of Romanian Scientists.
Views: 3821 GoogleTechTalks
AQC 2016 - Scaling Analysis & Instantons for Thermally-Assisted Tunneling and Quantum MC Simulations
 
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A Google TechTalk, June 28, 2016, presented by Zhang Jiang (NASA) ABSTRACT: We develop an instantonic calculus to derive an analytical expression for the thermally-assisted tunneling decay rate of a metastable state in a fully connected quantum spin model. The tunneling decay problem can be mapped onto the Kramers escape problem of a classical random dynamical field. This dynamical field is simulated efficiently by path integral Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC). We show analytically that the exponential scaling with the number of spins of the thermally-assisted quantum tunneling rate and the escape rate of the QMC process with periodic boundary conditions are identical. We relate this effect to the existence of a dominant instantonic tunneling path. The instanton trajectory is described by nonlinear dynamical mean-field theory equations for a single site magnetization vector, which we solve exactly. Finally, we derive scaling relations for the spiky barrier shape when the spin tunneling and QMC rates scale polynomially with the number of spins N while a purely classical over-the-barrier activation rate scales exponentially with N. Vadim N. Smelyanskiy, Google, Sergei V. Isakov, Google, Sergio Boixo, Google, Guglielmo Mazzola, ETH Zurich, Matthias Troyer, ETH Zurich, Hartmut Neven, Google Presented at the Adiabatic Quantum Computing Conference, June 26-29, 2016, at Google's Los Angeles office.
Views: 298 GoogleTechTalks
Verification [ Module 04 -- Lecture 01 ]: Introduction to formal methods for design verification
 
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Course: VLSI Design, Verification and Test Instructor: Prof. Jatindra Kumar Deka Department of Computer Science and Engineering, IIT Guwahati.
Estimating Elastic Deformation
 
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Tribology by Dr. Harish Hirani, Department of Mechanical Engineering, IIT Delhi. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 1385 nptelhrd
AQC 2016 - Inhomogeneous Quasi-adiabatic Driving of Quantum Critical Dynamics
 
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A Google TechTalk, June 27, 2016, presented by Masoud Mohseni (Google) ABSTRACT: We introduce an inhomogeneous protocol to drive a weakly disordered quantum spin chain quasi-adiabatically across a quantum phase transition and minimize the residual energy of the final state. The number of spins that simultaneously reach the critical point is controlled by the length scale of the inhomogeneity in which the magnetic field is modulated, introducing an effective size that favors adiabatic dynamics. The dependence of the residual energy on this length scale and the velocity at which the magnetic field sweeps out the chain is shown to be non-monotonic. We determine the conditions for an optimal suppression of the residual energy of the final state and show that inhomogeneous driving can outperform conventional adiabatic schemes based on homogeneous control fields by several orders of magnitude. Presented at the Adiabatic Quantum Computing Conference, June 26-29, 2016, at Google's Los Angeles office.
Views: 407 GoogleTechTalks
Google I/O'17: Channel 1
 
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Technical sessions and deep dives into Google's latest developer products and platforms.
Views: 33982 Google Developers
Lecture 34 - Partial Differential Equations
 
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Numerical Methods and Programing by P.B.Sunil Kumar, Dept of physics, IIT Madras
Views: 190674 nptelhrd
Butler Hine: "Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) Mission" | Talks at Google
 
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The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) is a Lunar orbiter mission launched in September 2013 to study the pristine state of the Lunar exosphere and dust environment prior to significant human activities. LADEE operated for 8 months, and successfully investigated the composition of the lunar atmosphere and the processes that control its distribution and variability, including sources, sinks, and surface interactions. LADEE also characterized dust in the lunar environment, and revealed processes that contribute to its sources and variability. LADEE employed a science instrument payload including a neutral mass spectrometer, ultraviolet spectrometer, and dust sensor. In addition to the science payloads, LADEE carried a laser communications system technology demonstration which proved high-bandwidth long-haul capability, providing a critical building block for future space communications architectures. The LADEE spacecraft bus was the result of a focused skunk-works effort around an innovative new spacecraft design. In addition to its primary science mission, LADEE demonstrated the effectiveness of a low-cost, parallel development program, utilizing a modular bus design. LADEE also launched on the new Minotaur V launch vehicle, demonstrating its capability for deep space missions. These capabilities could enable future Lunar missions in a highly cost constrained environment. This talk will describe the LADEE objectives, mission design, technical approach, operations, and results. Dr. Hine is currently the Project Manager for the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission, a Lunar science orbiter which launched Sept.6, 2013. LADEE is designed to measure Lunar dust and examine the Lunar atmosphere prior to significant human activity on the Moon. LADEE is also testing an optical communications payload from the Moon, which could be important technology enabling high-bandwidth communications links for future planetary missions. Prior to LADEE, Dr. Hine managed the Small Spacecraft Division at NASA Ames Research Center, which developed ways to build low-cost, high-performance spacecraft to enable future NASA missions. He has also managed various NASA programs, such as the Robotic Lunar Exploration Program, the Computing, Information, and Communications Technology Program, and the Intelligent Systems Program. His NASA career includes directing the Intelligent Mechanisms Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center, which pioneered the use of telepresence and virtual reality to control remote science exploration systems. Outside of NASA, Dr. Hine was President and CEO of a software start-up company which developed advanced visualization tools for managing large corporate networks. Butler Hine received his Bachelor of Science degree in Physics and Mathematics, summa cum laude, from the University of Alabama in 1981, and Masters and Doctorate degrees in Astronomy from the University of Texas in Austin in 1985 and 1988, respectively.
Views: 1773 Talks at Google
2011 Frontiers of Engineering: The Shape of Things to Come: Frontiers of Additive Manufacturing
 
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National Academy of Engineering 2011 U.S. Frontiers of Engineering Symposium September 19-21, 2011 Google, Inc. Mountain View, California The Shape of Things to Come: Frontiers of Additive Manufacturing September 19, 2011 Presented by Dr. Hod Lipson. ABSTRACT: Google hosted 100 attendees of the 2011 Nat'l Academy of Engineering's U.S. Frontiers of Engineering symposium (FOE) at our Mountain View office and Dinah's Garden Hotel in Palo Alto. The symposium is an annual three-day meeting that brings together 100 of the nation's outstanding young engineers (ages 30-45) from industry, academia, and government to discuss pioneering technical and leading-edge research in various engineering fields and industry sectors. About the speaker: Dr. Hod Lipson is an Associate Professor of the School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Cornell University in New York.
Views: 3267 GoogleTechTalks
Mod-01 Lec-19 ION Implantation
 
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Fabrication of Silicon VLSI Circuits using the MOS technology by Prof. A.N. Chandorkar, Department of Electrical Engineering, IIT Bombay. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in
Views: 289 nptelhrd

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