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Search results “Staphylococcus epidermidis microbiota commensal”
Skin bacteria
 
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This bacteriology video explains the microflora and bacteria present in our skin and it also talks about the opportunistic pathogen present in skin. For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html
Views: 5729 Shomu's Biology
Early gut colonization by S. aureus linked to atopic eczema, F.L. Nowrouzian et al
 
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Author video for 'Superantigens and adhesins of infant gut commensal Staphylococcus aureus strains and association with subsequent development of atopic eczema' Full article: https://doi.org/10.1111/bjd.15138
Does Garlic Kill Good Bacteria?
 
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Garlic is known as "Nature's Antibiotic." BUT, we know that antibiotics can wipe out ALL bacteria (bad with good). So if garlic is a natural antibiotic, does it also wipe out good bacteria? Some new research has shown it does! Watch this video to get my take on this research and my overall opinion on garlic and our good gut bacteria. References: Study on prebiotic effectiveness of neutral garlic fructan in vitro- https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2213453013000311 Growth of selected probiotic bacterial strains with fructans from Nendran banana and garlic- https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0023643817302141 Garlic is a source of major lactic acid bacteria for early-stage fermentation of cabbage-kimchi- https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10068-015-0184-y Effect of garlic powder on the growth of commensal bacteria from the gastrointestinal tract- https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22480662 In vitro effects of food extracts on selected probiotic and pathogenic bacteria (Garlic significantly enhanced the growth of one strain of probiotic bacteria (L. reuteri) whilst inhibiting both pathogenic strains of E. coli)- https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19919519 The Effect of Kyolic Aged Garlic Extract on Gut Microbiota, Inflammation, and Cardiovascular Markers in Hypertensives: The GarGIC Trial (Garlic improved gut microbiota, evident by higher microbial richness and diversity with a marked increase in Lactobacillus and Clostridia species)- https://www.researchgate.net/publication/329566407_The_Effect_of_Kyolic_Aged_Garlic_Extract_on_Gut_Microbiota_Inflammation_and_Cardiovascular_Markers_in_Hypertensives_The_GarGIC_Trial Protection against Helicobacter pylori and other bacterial infections by garlic- https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11238826 Antibacterial activity of garlic extract on streptomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli solely and in synergism with streptomycin- https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3217283/
Views: 4596 Ivan B
The role of microbiome in cancer
 
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Medicine by Alexandros G. Sfakianakis,Anapafseos 5 Agios Nikolaos 72100 Crete Greece,00302841026182,00306932607174,[email protected], https://plus.google.com/communities/115462130054650919641?sqinv=VFJWaER0c2NCRl9ERzRjZWhxQmhzY09kVV84cjRn , ,https://plus.google.com/u/0/+AlexandrosGSfakianakis , https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQH21WX8Qn5YSTKrlJ3OrmQ , https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTREJHxB6yt4Gaqs4-mLzDA , https://twitter.com/g_orl?lang=el, https://www.instagram.com/alexandrossfakianakis/, The role of microbiome in cancer p. 1 RB Nerli, Shridhar C Ghagane DOI:10.4103/kleuhsj.kleuhsj_323_17 Cancer has become a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In addition to the tremendous suffering it inflicts, cancer is a reason for significant economic burden both to the sufferer and to the nation.[1] Recently, a high-impact report suggested that cancer is primarily stochastic or “bad luck” because of the accumulation of spontaneous mutations during DNA replication in tissues where stem cells undergo a relatively large number of cell divisions;[2] however, it is widely believed that the environment too significantly influences the risk of cancer.[3],[4] Numerous epidemiologic and occupational health studies support the importance of lifestyle factors and exposure to known or suspected carcinogens in the development of cancer. In fact, it is estimated that 15%–20% of cancers are driven by infectious agents; 20%–30% are largely caused by tobacco use; and 30%–35% are associated with diet, physical activity, and/or energy balance (e.g., obesity). Ultraviolet radiation from sunlight, alcohol, and many other substances (e.g., asbestos, benzene, and radon) also play a role, both alone and in combination (i.e., mixed exposures), although relative risk depends on the dose and duration of each exposure and the genetic background of each individual.[5],[6] The microbiota that inhabits our gastrointestinal tract and other anatomic sites can be considered environmental factors to which we are continuously exposed at high doses throughout life. Most of these microbes are commensal bacteria and until recently have been difficult to culture, which has limited our understanding. However, during the past decade, the advent of metagenomic sequencing approaches that combine next-generation DNA sequencing technologies with the computational analysis of targeted (16S ribosomal RNA hypervariable regions) or whole-genome shotgun sequence reads has documented the diversity and abundance of microbes at different body sites in a culture-independent manner.[7],[8] It is well known that prostatitis and prostatitis symptoms are associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer.[9],[10] It is probably that bacteria induce a chronic inflammatory state in the prostate that could result in enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Both neutrophils and macrophages release pro-inflammatory molecules such as nitric oxide that have the propensity to cause genetic damage which could pave the way for enhanced cell proliferation and cancer. This is particularly interesting in the light of the reports that low-grade inflammation does exist in cancer. Yu et al.[11] investigated the type of microbiota in the expressed prostatic secretions (EPSs) of patients with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) by the polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis method using universal bacterial primers and reported that the prostate cancer group had a significantly increased number of Bacteroidetes bacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Firmicutes bacteria, Lachnospiraceae, Propionicimonas, Sphingomonas, and Ochrobactrum and a decrease in Eubacterium and Defluviicoccus compared to the BPH group. Based on these results, they suggested that there were significant changes in the microbial population in EPS, urine, and seminal fluid of individuals with prostate cancer and BPH, indicating a possible role for these bacteria in these two conditions. Cavarretta et al.[12] recently reported on the microbiome profile of tumor, peritumor, and nontumor tissues in 16 radical prostatectomy specimens. They observed significant differences in specific microbial populations among tumor/peritumor and nontumor prostate specimens at certain taxonomic levels. Among genera, Propionibacterium spp. were the most abundant. Staphylococcus spp. were more represented in the tumor/peritumor tissues (P 0.05). The authors concluded that the prostate contained a plethora of bacteria, which set themselves within the gland with a distribution dependent on the nature of the tissue, thus suggesting a possible pathophysiological correlation between the composition of the local microbial niche and the presence of the tumor itself. Similarly, Shrestha et al.[13] profiled the urinary microbiome in men with positive versus negative biopsies for prostate cancer.
Clinical trial evaluates R. mucosa for atopic dermatitis
 
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The inflammatory skin disease atopic dermatitis is characterized by decreased epidermal barrier function, susceptibility to S. aureus infection, and immune dysfunction. Recently, the commensal bacterium Roseomonas mucosa was shown to improve atopic dermatitis-like phenotypes in murine models. In this episode, Ian Myles and colleagues evaluate safety and efficacy of topical administration of R. mucosa in a small cohort of adults and children with atopic dermatitis. Overall, R. mucosa treatment was considered safe and reduced disease severity in both children and adults. The results from this initial study supports further evaluation of topical R. mucosa for treating atopic dermatitis.
What’s In Your Expired Makeup?
 
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I’m the worst! I keep makeup FOREVER! Call me frugal, but it’s hard to part with a 6 year old lipstick when there’s still something left in the tube! I’ve always wondered if expiration dates were just a way for cosmetic companies to get us to buy more stuff or if there was really something nasty lurking inside. Instead of sitting around and wondering, I got off my duff and used science to put my makeup to the test. You won’t believe what I found out! Hungry for more science videos? Get your fill from these awesome YouTubers on Google’s Making & Science Playlist: goo.gl/weIIpv 😀Fun Facts😀 Unable to distinguish between species of bacteria, Swedish botanist Carolus Linnaeus originally classified all bacteria in the order Chaos (1763). When it comes to bacteria --you can’t see them. They’re microscopic. This makes it hard to know when your cosmetics should be thrown out and is why some cosmetic manufacturers offer expiration dates. Expiration dates are a rule of thumb and can vary depending on many factors, including how makeup is stored (sunlight can break down ingredients), handled (unwashed hands can cause makeup to expire sooner), and ingredients used (some botanical extracts, carbohydrates, and proteins act as nutrients for bacteria). In this video, we used chromogenic AKA color producing agar so we can identify what genus and species the bacteria belong to. Not all bacteria are trying to kill you! In fact, many bacteria naturally live on your skin (commensals) and many indirectly help us by crowding out more harmful bacteria (pathogens). The biggest contaminator of your cosmetics is YOU! When you dip your finger into your lipgloss, you’re also adding some of your own microbes (bacteria, fungi, yeast) In most healthy adults, a contaminated product might not yield a bad effect, but for those with compromised health there could be severe consequences. ***I learned so much making this video. If you want more fun facts or just want to share/trade knowledge leave a comment! It’s so fun to talk about this stuff with others!*** ❤️Special Thank Yous❤️ Google’s Making & Science Team - You’re totally awesome! THANK YOU for providing the resources to make THIS video possible. I had so much fun using science to explore the world around me! *Dr. Shannon Bennett of the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco, California -- I dub you Princess Of Pathogens! Thank you for all the information you shared on bacteria! *Dr. Chris Noel & Patrik D’Haeseleer of Counter Culture Labs in Oakland, California - Thank you both for co-parenting my “bacteria babies” 🔬Don’t Forget To Support These Fantastic Science Organizations🔬 California Academy of Sciences http://www.calacademy.org/ Twitter: @calacademy Instagram: calacademy Counter Culture Labs https://counterculturelabs.org/ Twitter: @CountrCultrLabs 📹 Video Credits This video was written, produced and edited by -- yours truly! Video Team *Ben Ferrer (Videographer - www.benferrer.com) *Mike Murphy (Location Audio - https://player.vimeo.com/video/87128399) *Biren Venkatraman *Isaac Guenard *Mike Root Science Check *Dr. Howard Epstein Support *Akemi Mease *Coma Niddy *Liz Anderson Stock Credits Staphylococcus Aureus https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Methicillin-resistant_Staphylococcus_aureus_10048.jpg Bacillus Cereus Copyright: http://www.123rf.com/profile_drmicrobe Staphylococcus Epidermidis Copyright: http://www.123rf.com/profile_royaltystockphoto Pantoea Agglomerans https://www.flickr.com/photos/ajc1/ Poo emoji https://www.flickr.com/photos/sometoast/4735407064 👋Hi! I'm Trina, AKA Ms. Beautyphile, and I'm addicted to science and mythbusting beauty :D Hey, there are worse things to be addicted too ;) If you want to see more of my videos, then march your tushie on over to my channel and SUBSCRIBE here - http://goo.gl/3HsVY5 And if you watched the video, subscribed, and read this entire description - THANK YOU!!!! Virtual hugs and head noogies for you :D XO Ms. Beautyphile
Views: 3531 msbeautyphile
Eczema, Immunity and the Skin Microbiome - Heidi Kong
 
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July 24-26, 2013 - Human Microbiome Science: Vision for the Future More: http://www.genome.gov/27554404
Propionibacterium acnes
 
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Propionibacterium acnes is the relatively slow-growing, typically aerotolerant anaerobic, Gram-positive bacterium (rod) linked to the skin condition acne; it can also cause chronic blepharitis and endophthalmitis, the latter particularly following intraocular surgery. The genome of the bacterium has been sequenced and a study has shown several genes can generate enzymes for degrading skin and proteins that may be immunogenic (activating the immune system). This bacterium is largely commensal and part of the skin flora present on most healthy adult humans' skin. It is usually just barely detectable on the skin of healthy preadolescents. It lives primarily on, among other things, fatty acids in sebum secreted by sebaceous glands in the follicles. It may also be found throughout the gastrointestinal tract in humans and many other animals. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 7129 Audiopedia
Human Germs and Bacteria Seen As Weapons In War Against Cancer
 
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Bay Area scientists are on the hunt to discover how a person's own germs may be the best medicine in the war against cancer. Juliette Goodrich reports. (9/20/16)
Tim Ferriss on Ketosis, Microbiome, Lyme Disease, and Biomarkers
 
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Dr. Rhonda Patrick interviews 3-time New York Times best-selling author Tim Ferriss. They discuss what Tim's leading blood biomarkers are that he focuses on optimizing, the importance of tracking glucose along with ketones to make sure you don't confuse non-nutritional ketosis with the real deal, Tim's personal experience beating lyme disease and his insights on recovery, the origin and cause of "lyme hysteria", and how some of the symptoms of what is described as "chronic lyme disease" may actually be caused by a disrupted gut microbiome from uninterrupted, long-term use of antibiotics, what the "minimum effective dose" is when it comes to working out, and a little bit about Tim's workout routine and much much more. You can check out Tim's blog here: http://www.fourhourworkweek.com/ You can get in touch with him on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram here: http://www.twitter.com/tferriss http://www.facebook.com/timferriss http://www.instagram.com/timferriss You can subscribe to his podcast by going here https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-tim-ferriss-show/id863897795?mt=2 (note: Like Tim, I am also on iTunes!) You can buy one of his many books here: http://www.amazon.com/Timothy-Ferriss/e/B001ILKBW2/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1439325281&sr=8-1&tracking_id=foun06-20 ... or his TV show here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/tv-season/the-tim-ferriss-experiment/id984734983 -------------------------------------------------------- Join my weekly newsletter (please!): http://www.foundmyfitness.com/?sendme=nutrigenomics Crowdfund more videos: http://www.patreon.com/foundmyfitness Subscribe on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=foundmyfitness Subscribe to the podcast: http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/foundmyfitness/id818198322 Twitter: http://twitter.com/foundmyfitness Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/foundmyfitness
Views: 258781 FoundMyFitness
Genomics of Microbes and Microbiomes - Julie Segre (2016)
 
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May 18, 2016 - Current Topics in Genome Analysis 2016 More: http://www.genome.gov/CTGA2016
A look at how pathogen proteins can disable human metabolism
 
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Here I describe how proteins and metabolites created by pathogens can dysregulate the activity/signaling of human pathways that control metabolism. I focus on one mechanism: many pathogens create proteins similar in size/shape to human proteins (this is called molecular mimicry). These foreign proteins can bind into human receptors and adjust how they control metabolic signaling. I use the following two studies as examples of this pathogen-induced metabolic dysfunction. Both studies found that proteins created by viral/bacterial pathogens could directly interfere with human insulin signaling: Viral insulin-like peptides activate human insulin and IGF-1 receptor signaling: A paradigm shift for host–microbe interactions: http://www.pnas.org/content/115/10/2461 The extracellular domain of Staphylococcus aureus LtaS binds insulin and induces insulin resistance during infection: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41564-018-0146-2 *A clarification: Because so many microbes/viruses persist in the human body, their collective genes outnumber those expressed by our human bodies. It follows that there are likely more microbial/viral proteins + metabolites in the body than human proteins + metabolites. However, not all these proteins/metabolites are expressed by pathogens. Many are expressed by "commensal" species, or pathobionts.
Views: 191 Amy Proal
How Many Species Of Staphylococcus Are There?
 
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When stained, it will be seen in small clusters (staphylo cluster). Mega base pairs long with approximately 2,600 open reading frames, comprising 84. There are only a few species of staphylococcus that positive for the coagulase test (see table below), and s. Wikipedia wiki staphylococcus "imx0m" url? Q webcache. Epidermidis, which is considered to be a universal colonizer and part of pan microbiota. The aerobic catalase positive gram cocci present many taxonomic problems which must be resolved before a stable system of nomenclature can 12 nov 2014 they are opportunistic pathogens lack the virulence factors associated with sthere more than 30 species cons. Several manual and automated methods based on phenotypic characteristics have been developed for the identification of staphylococci (12, 24). Aureus is the most common. Staphylococcus medical microbiology ncbi bookshelfstaphylococcus bookshelf. The term staphylococcus, generally used for all the species, refers to cells'. The boundaries of the species, whereby m sort them, are made by men. The characterization of the subdivisions is presented in a quantitative way. Distribution of staphylococcus species among human clinical identification a variety by matrix microbewiki. The coagulase negative staphylococci (cns) are now known to comprise over 30 other species. Among these there are some salient peculiarities. Biochemical characteristics of staphylococcus species human not all aureus strains are equally pathogenic distribution coagulase positive staphylococci in humans and a new silver. In fact, these different species can swap genes distribution in healthy hosts. Not only salt resistant, staphylococcus is always facultatively anaerobic. Human isolates 17 jul 2009 one of the important open questions in staphylococcal biology is whether molecular determinants for infection and colonization are shared or separate. Staphylococci colonizers and pathogens of human skin medscape. Staphylococcus list of prokaryotic names with standing in. The cns are common commensals of skin, although some species can cause infections s. Differences were observed between strains within a species from the same source and different sources. Identification of staphylococcus species, micrococcus species and an overview 22a identification biology libretexts. Staphylococcus medical microbiology ncbi bookshelf staphylococcus wikipedia en. The taxonomy of these coagulase negative staphylococci (cons) fall into clusters based on 16s rrna sequences18saprophyticus are the there at least 30 other species staphylococci, all which lack this enzyme. Unfortunately, these systems have their limitations, mostly due to phenotypic differences between strains from the same species (6, 10, 19, 21). Biochemically, a principle difference between the two 21 apr 2016 run coagulase test there is linked exercise for this. Larlettae, of arlette; Named for arlette van de kerckhove, who has studied this and related species many years. Differe
Views: 11 new sparky
The Microbiome & Skin Health
 
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We’ve heard a lot about how the microbiome can affect gut health, but what about skin? Learn more about the microbiome and hear some of the creative ways cosmetic companies are using these microscopic creatures to help benefit our skin. Thank yous: *Cosmetics & Toiletries - For providing all the awesome content *Rachel Grabenhofer - For creating the article that most of this content is based on *FISHTITCH - Those finger puppets --TOTES ADORBES, right?!?! I got them from Brandy. You can find them here: https://www.facebook.com/Fishtitch Learn more about the microbiome from the folks at COSMETICS & TOILETRIES: *http://www.cosmeticsandtoiletries.com/research/biology/Connecting-the-Dots-Between-Microbes-367821901.html *http://www.gcimagazine.com/business/rd/technology/174764911.html *http://www.cosmeticsandtoiletries.com/research/methodsprocesses/Natural-vs-Synthetic-Antimicrobials-and-HDAC-as-an-Indicator-of-Microflora-Health-300982911.html *http://www.cosmeticsandtoiletries.com/research/methodsprocesses/How-Do-Cosmetic-Formulas-Impact-Skins-Microbiome-391613731.html? *http://www.cosmeticsandtoiletries.com/formulating/function/preservatives/62592027.html 👋Hi! I'm Trina, AKA Ms. Beautyphile, and I'm addicted to cosmetic chemistry and beauty products :D Hey, there are worse things to be addicted too ;) Watch my channel to learn more about the science behind cosmetics! Subscribe here - http://goo.gl/3HsVY5 Have thoughts to share on the microbiome? I’d love to hear them! Share your thoughts in the comments sections below! And if you watched the video, SUBSCRIBED, and read this entire description, thank you so much for taking the time to do all that. Hugs and head noogies for you!!!! :P Hey, your science is showing! Come find me on Social Media! ***** Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/msbeautyphile ***** Mosh: https://www.mosh.us/ms-beautyphile/ ***** Blog: http://www.msbeautyphile.com ***** Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/msbeautyphile ***** Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/msbeautyphile Love learning about cosmetic chemistry? Read more about the industry here: http://www.cosmeticsandtoiletries.com/ https://www.linkedin.com/groups/1856030/profile
Views: 1702 msbeautyphile
Microbial Pathogenesis and Host Immune Response
 
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The research community has begun correlating the makeup of individual microbiomes with disorders and diseases such as obesity, atherosclerosis and cancer. To accomplish this, researchers must first identify and characterize these microbial communities and understand the complex immune interactions between host and pathogen. This webinar provides you with a complete overview of the microbiome, metagenomics and host-pathogen interactions. Experimental strategies, from sample to insight, which can facilitate your microbiology and immunology research, are highlighted.
Views: 589 QIAGEN
Lung microbiome | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lung_microbiota 00:02:00 1 Role of the epithelial barrier 00:07:21 2 Physiology 00:09:44 3 Clinical significance 00:11:44 4 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7394873283596325 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-E "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The lung microbiota, is the pulmonary microbial community consisting of a complex variety of microorganisms found in the lower respiratory tract particularly on the mucous layer and the epithelial surfaces. These microorganisms include bacteria, fungi, viruses and bacteriophages. The bacterial part of the microbiota has been more closely studied. It consists of a core of nine genera: Prevotella, Sphingomonas, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Fusobacterium, Megasphaera, Veillonella, Staphylococcus, and Streptococcus. They are aerobes as well as anaerobes and aerotolerant bacteria. The microbial communities are highly variable in particular individuals and compose of about 140 distinct families. The bronchial tree for instance contains a mean of 2000 bacterial genomes per cm2 surface. The harmful or potentially harmful bacteria are also detected routinely in respiratory specimens. The most significant are Moraxella catarrhalis, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. They are known to cause respiratory disorders under particular conditions namely if the human immune system is impaired. The mechanism by which they persist in the lower airways in healthy individuals is unknown. Fungal genera that are commonly found in the lung microbiota include Candida, Malassezia, Neosartorya, Saccharomyces, and Aspergillus, among others.
Views: 3 wikipedia tts
Webinar: Human Skin Microflora: DNA Sequence-Based Approach to Examining Hand Disease
 
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October 15, 2009. The skin creates a barrier between the body and the environment. Using animal models, Dr. Julie Segre's laboratory focuses on the genetic pathways involved in building and repairing this skin barrier. The Segre laboratory estimates that approximately one million bacteria reside on each square centimeter of skin and many common skin conditions are associated with both impaired skin barrier function and increased microbial colonization. Dr. Segre moderated the discussion, answered questions and addressed comments. In addition, the webinar discussed details of the Human Microbiome Project. More: http://www.genome.gov/27535715
Genomics of Microbes and Microbiomes - Julia Segre (2014)
 
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June 4, 2014 - Current Topics in Genome Analysis 2014 A lecture series covering contemporary areas in genomics and bioinformatics. More: http://www.genome.gov/COURSE2014
The NIH Common Fund's Human Microbiome Project
 
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No Longer Germ Warfare. An interview with Dr. Julie Segre, NIH Intramural Researcher, The NIH Common Fund's Human Microbiome Project.
Views: 9879 NIHOD
Should You Be Eating Your Boogers? | #AskMikeTheCaveman Part 393
 
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There is a new concept running around, that is likely as old as time itself, mucophagy, or eating of one’s boogers; only in this case, it is for your health, but is it actually a good idea? Find out here! Originally inspiration article - http://www.muscleandfitness.com/features/edge/science-says-booger-eating-and-nose-picking-healthy Scientific Literature: Brugger, S. D., Bomar, L., & Lemon, K. P. (2016). Commensal–Pathogen Interactions along the Human Nasal Passages. PLoS Pathogens, 12(7), e1005633. - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4936728/pdf/ppat.1005633.pdf Canovas, J., Baldry, M., Bojer, M. S., Andersen, P. S., Grzeskowiak, P. K., Stegger, M., … Ingmer, H. (2016). Cross-talk between Staphylococcus aureus and other Staphylococcal species via the agr quorum sensing system. Frontiers in Microbiology, 7, 1733. - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5099252/pdf/fmicb-07-01733.pdf Chen, H.-W., Liu, P.-F., Liu, Y.-T., Kuo, S., Zhang, X.-Q., Schooley, R. T., … Huang, C.-M. (2016). Nasal commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis counteracts influenza virus. Scientific Reports, 6, 27870. - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4910069/pdf/srep27870.pdf Frenkel, E. S., & Ribbeck, K. (2015). Salivary mucins protect surfaces from colonization by cariogenic bacteria. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 81(1), 332–338. - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4272720/pdf/zam332.pdf Frenkel, E. S., & Ribbeck, K. (2015). Salivary mucins in host defense and disease prevention. Journal of Oral Microbiology, 7, 10 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4689954/pdf/JOM-7-29759.pdf Habte, H. H., Mall, A. S., de Beer, C., Lotz, Z. E., & Kahn, D. (2006). The role of crude human saliva and purified salivary MUC5B and MUC7 mucins in the inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in an inhibition assay. Virology Journal, 3, 99. - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1676003/pdf/1743-422X-3-99.pdf Ubeda, C., Djukovic, A., & Isaac, S. (2017). Roles of the intestinal microbiota in pathogen protection. Clinical & Translational Immunology, 6(2), e128 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5311919/pdf/cti20172a.pdf Zipperer, A., Konnerth, M. C., Laux, C., Berscheid, A., Janek, D., Weidenmaier, C., ... & Krismer, B. (2016). Human commensals producing a novel antibiotic impair pathogen colonization. Nature, 535(7613), 511-516. - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27466123 Also, be sure to check us out at - Subscribe - http://www.mikethecaveman.com Like - http://www.facebook.com/paleoprimal.longisland Follow - http://www.instagram.com/mikethecaveman Like - http://www.twitter.com/mikethecaveman Become a Patron - http://www.patreon.com/mikethecaveman Get Your Own Official #AskMikeTheCaveman Shirt - https://teespring.com/and-the-answer-is
Views: 59 Mike The Caveman
Do Skin Probiotics Work? - CHTV 174
 
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Probiotic skin products are all the rage these days, but do they actually work? In this episode, we bring back our favorite biochemist Dr. Shayne Morris to help understand the skin microbiome, how to keep it healthy, and explain his break-through Skin Colonizer product that has been getting outstanding results with our clients. The skin microbiome affects more than how we look; it's connected to our gut, brain, and immune function as a whole; and now we have the tools and knowledge to keep it happy. Notice: Dr. Daniel Pompa is licensed by the Pastoral Medical Association (PMA). For detailed licensing & disclaimer information, visit: http://drpompa.com/pma-disclaimer Dr. Pompa has voluntarily relinquished his chiropractic license in the state of Pennsylvania in order to more effectively pursue his dream of world health.
Views: 2014 Dr. Daniel Pompa
Lecture 23
 
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This lecture introduces the succession of microbial cells to the daughter cells.
The Human Microbiome: Emerging Themes at the Horizon of the 21st Century (Day 2)
 
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The Human Microbiome: Emerging Themes at the Horizon of the 21st Century (Day 2) Air date: Thursday, August 17, 2017, 8:15:00 AM Category: Conferences Runtime: 07:32:24 Description: The 2017 NIH-wide microbiome workshop will strive to cover advances that reveal the specific ways in which the microbiota influences the physiology of the host, both in a healthy and in a diseased state and how the microbiota may be manipulated, either at the community, population, organismal or molecular level, to maintain and/or improve the health of the host. The goal will be to seek input from a trans-disciplinary group of scientists to identify 1) knowledge gaps, 2) technical hurdles, 3) new approaches and 4) research opportunities that will inform the development of novel prevention and treatment strategies based on host/microbiome interactions over the next ten years. Author: NIH Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?23423
Views: 1786 nihvcast
Human microbiota | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_microbiota 00:01:51 1 Terminology 00:02:27 2 Relative numbers 00:03:42 3 Study 00:06:26 3.1 Shotgun Sequencing 00:06:56 3.1.1 Collection of samples and DNA extraction 00:07:35 3.1.2 Preparation of the library and sequencing 00:08:04 3.1.3 Metagenome assembly 00:08:40 3.1.4 Contig binning 00:09:22 3.1.5 Analysis after the processing 00:10:13 3.2 Marker gene analysis 00:13:09 3.3 Phylogenetic Analysis 00:14:46 4 Types 00:14:55 4.1 Bacteria 00:17:23 4.2 Archaea 00:18:07 4.3 Fungi 00:18:37 4.4 Viruses 00:19:05 5 Anatomical areas 00:19:15 5.1 Skin 00:20:43 5.2 Conjunctiva 00:21:32 5.3 Gut 00:24:33 5.4 Urethra and bladder 00:25:20 5.5 Vagina 00:26:55 5.6 Placenta 00:27:16 5.7 Uterus 00:27:44 5.8 Oral cavity 00:31:11 5.9 Lung 00:32:46 5.10 Biliary tract 00:33:22 6 Disease and death 00:33:40 6.1 Cancer 00:36:25 6.2 Inflammatory bowel disease 00:36:58 6.3 Human immunodeficiency virus 00:38:08 6.4 Death 00:38:31 7 Environmental health 00:38:55 8 Migration 00:39:22 9 See also 00:39:31 10 Bibliography Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9308021918324354 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The human microbiota is the aggregate of microorganisms that resides on or within any of a number of human tissues and biofluids, including the skin, mammary glands, placenta, seminal fluid, uterus, ovarian follicles, lung, saliva, oral mucosa, conjunctiva, biliary and gastrointestinal tracts. They include bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists and viruses. Though micro-animals can also live on the human body, they are typically excluded from this definition. The human microbiome refers specifically to the collective genomes of resident microorganisms.Humans are colonized by many microorganisms; the traditional estimate is that the average human body is inhabited by ten times as many non-human cells as human cells, but more recent estimates have lowered that ratio to 3:1 or even to approximately the same number. Some microorganisms that colonize humans are commensal, meaning they co-exist without harming humans; others have a mutualistic relationship with their human hosts. Conversely, some non-pathogenic microorganisms can harm human hosts via the metabolites they produce, like trimethylamine, which the human body converts to trimethylamine N-oxide via FMO3-mediated oxidation. Certain microorganisms perform tasks that are known to be useful to the human host but the role of most of them is not well understood. Those that are expected to be present, and that under normal circumstances do not cause disease, are sometimes deemed normal flora or normal microbiota.The Human Microbiome Project took on the project of sequencing the genome of the human microbiota, focusing particularly on the microbiota that normally inhabit the skin, mouth, nose, digestive tract, and vagina. It reached a milestone in 2012 when it published its initial results.
Views: 6 wikipedia tts
Central Line-associated Bloodstream Infections (CLABSI) Case Studies
 
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This video is for everyone who is collecting or reporting NHSN CLABSI Surveillance. This course allows the user to accurately apply the NHSN definitions and criteria in case scenarios for CLABSI. Comments on this video are allowed in accordance with our comment policy: http://www.cdc.gov/SocialMedia/Tools/CommentPolicy.html This video can also be viewed at http://streaming.cdc.gov/vod.php?id=2bf56071beafd1d66338bbdd8b0063a520130305144041379
No Longer Germ Warfare - An Interview with Dr. Julie Segre
 
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NIH Intramural Researcher Dr. Julie Segre talks about the Human Microbiome Project in an interview produced by the NIH Common Fund. More: http://www.genome.gov/27541152
PACCARB 11th Public Mtg, Day 2 Pt 5: PUBLIC COMMENT & Adjourn
 
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Eleventh public meeting of the Presidential Advisory Council on Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria (PACCARB). The January 30th-31st public meeting was dedicated to hosting domestic and international stakeholders from all One Health domains, including animal, human, and environmental health, to explore priority areas that have emerged since the original National Action Plan on Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria (CARB) was launched in 2015. January 30-31, 2019 Public Meeting Page: https://www.hhs.gov/ash/advisory-committees/paccarb/meetings/upcoming-meetings/january-30-2019-public-meeting/index.html -- U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) http://www.hhs.gov We accept comments in the spirit of our comment policy: http://www.hhs.gov/web/socialmedia/po... HHS Privacy Policy http://www.hhs.gov/Privacy.html • Category o Education • License o Standard YouTube License
2014 Demystifying Medicine - Worldwide Emergence of Drug-Resistant Infections
 
01:48:41
Worldwide Emergence of Drug-Resistant Infections and What's Being Done About It Air date: Tuesday, January 07, 2014, 4:00:00 PM Runtime: 01:48:41 Description: The 2014 Demystifying Medicine Series, which is jointly sponsored by FAES and NIH, will begin January 7th and includes the presentation of patients, pathology, diagnosis and therapy in the context of major disease problems and current research. Primarily directed toward Ph.D. students, clinicians and program managers, the course is designed to help bridge the gap between advances in biology and their application to major human diseases. Each session includes clinical and basic science components presented by NIH staff and invitees. All students, fellows and staff are welcome, as well. For more information go to http://demystifyingmedicine.od.nih.gov Author: Anthony Fauci, MD (NIAID) Jeffrey Taubenberger, MD, PhD (NIAID) Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?18222 Runtime: 01:41:10 Description: The 2014 Demystifying Medicine Series, which is jointly sponsored by FAES and NIH, will begin January 7th and includes the presentation of patients, pathology, diagnosis and therapy in the context of major disease problems and current research. Primarily directed toward Ph.D. students, clinicians and program managers, the course is designed to help bridge the gap between advances in biology and their application to major human diseases. Each session includes clinical and basic science components presented by NIH staff and invitees. All students, fellows and staff are welcome, as well. For more information go to http://demystifyingmedicine.od.nih.gov Author: Mark Hoon, PhD (NIDCR) Irwin Arias, MD (NICHD/CC) Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?18231
Views: 539 nihvcast
Bactérias comensais: podem evoluir até se tornarem infecciosas?
 
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Vídeo informativo que oferece evidências da evolução de bactérias comensais a bactérias infecciosas. Para conhecer essa e outras notas sobre infectologia, acesse nossa plataforma em: www.pfizerpro.com.br Fonte da nota: Severe infections emerge from commensal bacteria by adaptive evolution. Young B, et al. eLife. Dezembro de 2017. Disponível em: https://elifesciences.org/articles/30637 Créditos musicais: Operating System (Sting) by Twin Musicom is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...) Artist: http://www.twinmusicom.org/ Você está saindo da Health Connect. Os links a todos os sites de terceiros são oferecidos como um serviço para os nossos visitantes, mas não implicam endosso, cessão ou recomendação da Health Connect. Os artigos vinculados são fornecidos com fins puramente informativos e não pretendem dar a entender nenhuma cessão do autor e/ou editor. A Health Connect não aceita qualquer responsabilidade pelo conteúdo ou pelos serviços de outros sites da internet. Recomendamos ler as políticas e condições de todos os websites que você decidir acessar. Código de Aprovação: PP-ZYV-BRA-0106
Views: 487 HealthConnectBR
Angular cheilitis
 
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Angular cheilitis, (pronounced /kaɪˈlaɪtɪs/, sometimes abbreviated to AC, and also called perlèche, cheilosis, angular cheilosis, commissural cheilitis, or angular stomatitis), is inflammation of one, or more commonly both, of the corners of the mouth. It is a type of cheilitis (inflammation of the lips). Angular cheilitis often represents an opportunistic infection of fungi and/or bacteria, with multiple local and systemic predisposing factors being involved in the initiation and persistence of the lesion. Such factors include nutritional deficiencies, overclosure of the mouth, dry mouth, a lip-licking habit, drooling, immunosuppression, and others. Treatment for angular cheilitis varies based on the exact causes of the condition in each case, but often an antifungal cream is used among other measures. It is a fairly common problem, and is more prevalent in people without any natural teeth who wear dentures, and in elderly people, although it may also occur in children. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 348 Audiopedia
Microbial symbiosis and immunity | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microbial_symbiosis_and_immunity 00:01:53 1 General principles 00:02:48 2 In the gastrointestinal tract 00:04:33 2.1 Regulation of immune responses 00:06:42 2.2 Development of isolated lymphoid tissues 00:08:36 2.3 Protection against pathogens 00:09:02 2.3.1 Immunoglobulin A 00:11:21 2.3.2 Antimicrobial peptides 00:13:54 2.3.3 Fortification fucose 00:14:49 3 On the epidermis 00:15:59 4 Role in disease 00:16:35 4.1 Cancer 00:17:39 4.2 Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) 00:20:02 4.3 Obesity Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7238050180124337 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= There are close and often long-term relationships between symbiotic microbes and their host's immune system. The immune system is a host defense system consisting of anatomical barriers, and physiological and cellular responses, which protect the host against harmful parasites while limiting inflammation by tolerating harmless symbionts. Humans are home to 1013 to 1014 bacteria. These bacteria can have almost any kind of relationship with the host, including mutually beneficial in a host's gut, or parasitic. Microbes can promote the development of the host's immune system in the gut and skin, and may help to prevent pathogens from invading. Some release anti-inflammatory products, protecting against parasitic gut microbes. Commensals promote the development of B cells that produce a protective antibody, Immunoglobulin A (IgA). This can neutralize pathogens and exotoxins, and promote the development of TH17 and FOXP3+ regulatory T cells. Microbes trigger development of isolated lymphoid follicles in the small intestine, which are sites of mucosal immune response. Microbes can prevent growth of harmful pathogens by altering pH, consuming nutrients required for pathogen survival, and secreting toxins that inhibit growth of pathogens. However, microbes have been implicated in inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, and cancer.
Views: 2 wikipedia tts
Escherichia coli | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Escherichia coli 00:01:52 1 Biology and biochemistry 00:02:02 1.1 Type and morphology 00:03:12 1.2 Metabolism 00:03:48 1.3 Culture growth 00:05:05 1.4 Cell cycle 00:05:58 1.5 Genetic adaptation 00:06:37 2 Diversity 00:08:25 2.1 Serotypes 00:09:07 2.2 Genome plasticity and evolution 00:11:12 2.3 Neotype strain 00:12:27 2.4 Phylogeny of iE. coli/i strains 00:13:58 3 Genomics 00:15:49 4 Gene nomenclature 00:16:33 5 Proteomics 00:17:05 5.1 Proteome 00:17:32 5.2 Interactome 00:17:41 6 Normal microbiota 00:19:00 6.1 Therapeutic use 00:20:11 7 Role in disease 00:21:00 7.1 Incubation period 00:21:28 7.2 Treatment 00:25:12 7.3 Prevention 00:25:49 8 Model organism in life science research 00:27:03 8.1 Model organism 00:28:52 9 History 00:31:28 10 See also 00:33:15 11 References Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Escherichia coli (), also known as E. coli (), is a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic, rod-shaped, coliform bacterium of the genus Escherichia that is commonly found in the lower intestine of warm-blooded organisms (endotherms). Most E. coli strains are harmless, but some serotypes can cause serious food poisoning in their hosts, and are occasionally responsible for product recalls due to food contamination. The harmless strains are part of the normal microbiota of the gut, and can benefit their hosts by producing vitamin K2, and preventing colonization of the intestine with pathogenic bacteria, having a symbiotic relationship. E. coli is expelled into the environment within fecal matter. The bacterium grows massively in fresh fecal matter under aerobic conditions for 3 days, but its numbers decline slowly afterwards.E. coli and other facultative anaerobes constitute about 0.9% of gut microbiota, and fecal–oral transmission is the major route through which pathogenic strains of the bacterium cause disease. Cells are able to survive outside the body for a limited amount of time, which makes them potential indicator organisms to test environmental samples for fecal contamination. A growing body of research, though, has examined environmentally persistent E. coli which can survive for extended periods outside a host.The bacterium can be grown and cultured easily and inexpensively in a laboratory setting, and has been intensively investigated for over 60 years. E. coli is a chemoheterotroph whose chemically defined medium must include a source of carbon and energy. E. coli is the most widely studied prokaryotic model organism, and an important species in the fields of biotechnology and microbiology, where it has served as the host organism for the majority of work with recombinant DNA. Under favorable conditions, it takes up to 20 minutes to reproduce.
Views: 24 wikipedia tts

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