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The amazing ways plants defend themselves - Valentin Hammoudi
 
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Check out our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/teded View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-amazing-ways-plants-defend-themselves-valentin-hammoudi Plants are constantly under attack. They face threats ranging from microscopic fungi to small herbivores like caterpillars, up to large herbivores like elephants. But plants are ready, with a whole series of internal and external defenses that make them a less appealing meal — or even a deadly one. Valentin Hammoudi explains some of the fascinating ways that plants defend themselves. Lesson by Valentin Hammoudi, directed by Juan M. Urbina Studios.
Views: 1411272 TED-Ed
Vascular Plants = Winning! - Crash Course Biology #37
 
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Hank introduces us to one of the most diverse and important families in the tree of life - the vascular plants. These plants have found tremendous success and the their secret is also their defining trait: conductive tissues that can take food and water from one part of a plant to another part. Though it sounds simple, the ability to move nutrients and water from one part of an organism to another was a evolutionary breakthrough for vascular plants, allowing them to grow exponentially larger, store food for lean times, and develop features that allowed them to spread farther and faster. Plants dominated the earth long before animals even showed up, and even today hold the world records for the largest, most massive, and oldest organisms on the planet. Crash Course Biology is now available on DVD! http://dft.ba/-8bCC Like CrashCourse @ http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Follow CrashCourse @ http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Table of Contents 1) 3 Tissue Types 02:37 2) Primary Growth 03:04 3) Secondary Growth 03:28 4) Dermal Tissue 04:47 a) Epidermis 04:54 5) Parenchyma Cells 05:39 6) Vascular Tissue 05:58 7) Xylem 05:58 8) Collenchyma 07:10 9) Sclerenchyma 07:35 10) Ground Tissue 08:25 a) Mesophyll 08:17 b) Photosynthesis 08:47 11) Phloem 09:54 References http://www.uic.edu/classes/bios/bios100/lecturesf04am/lect17.htm http://www.deseretnews.com/article/700071982/Central-Utahs-Pando-worlds-largest-living-thing-is-threatened-scientists-say.html?pg=all http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2012-02/200000-year-old-patch-seagrass-worlds-oldest-living-organism crashcourse, biology, vascular plant, plant, successful, diversity, diverse, conductive tissue, evolution, growth, largest, most massive, oldest, dermal tissue, vascular tissue, ground tissue, photosynthesis, sprout, germination, primary growth, herbaceous, secondary growth, woody tissue, organ, root, stem, meristem, leaf, epidermis, cuticle, trichomes, root hairs, parenchyma, cortex, xylem, evapotranspiration, collenchyma, sclerenchyma, lignin, mesophyll, chloroplasts, stomata, phloem, sieve cells, sieve-tube elements, internal pressure, diffusion Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 980597 CrashCourse
Andrew Murray (Harvard) Part 1: Yeast Sex: An Introduction
 
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https://www.ibiology.org/cell-biology/yeast-life-cycle/ Murray begins his talk by explaining why he studies sex in yeast not humans. He describes the yeast life cycle including the decision to bud in the absence of a mate, or to shmoo and mate in the presence of yeast of the correct mating type. In either case, the cells must switch from uniform to non-uniform or polarized growth. Mating cells must also recognize a chemical signal and move towards a target cell. Murray explains the molecular details known to underlie the response to the chemical signal. In Part 2, Murray describes experiments done in his lab to learn more about mating in yeast. These experiments provide an example of how models are proposed, how experiments are designed to discriminate between the models and how further experiments may be needed to address questions raised by the models.
Views: 30994 iBiology
Syphilis - causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, pathology
 
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What is Syphilis? Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease that affects the skin and mucous membrane of the external genitalia, and also sometimes the mouth. It is caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Hundreds of thousands of current & future clinicians learn by Osmosis. We have unparalleled tools and materials to prepare you to succeed in school, on board exams, and as a future clinician. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways, and more when you follow us on social media: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Our Vision: Everyone who cares for someone will learn by Osmosis. Our Mission: To empower the world’s clinicians and caregivers with the best learning experience possible. Learn more here: http://osms.it/mission Medical disclaimer: Knowledge Diffusion Inc (DBA Osmosis) does not provide medical advice. Osmosis and the content available on Osmosis's properties (Osmosis.org, YouTube, and other channels) do not provide a diagnosis or other recommendation for treatment and are not a substitute for the professional judgment of a healthcare professional in diagnosis and treatment of any person or animal. The determination of the need for medical services and the types of healthcare to be provided to a patient are decisions that should be made only by a physician or other licensed health care provider. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you have regarding a medical condition.
Views: 309076 Osmosis
See What Happens When A Plane Violates Presidential Airspace | TODAY
 
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Each time President Trump spends a weekend away from the White House, there’s a massive military effort to protect him from threats… including from above. TODAY national investigative correspondent Jeff Rossen was given rare access to present a dramatic demonstration of how the Air National Guard keeps presidential airspace safe. » Subscribe to TODAY: http://on.today.com/SubscribeToTODAY » Watch the latest from TODAY: http://bit.ly/LatestTODAY About: TODAY brings you the latest headlines and expert tips on money, health and parenting. We wake up every morning to give you and your family all you need to start your day. If it matters to you, it matters to us. We are in the people business. Subscribe to our channel for exclusive TODAY archival footage & our original web series. Connect with TODAY Online! Visit TODAY's Website: http://on.today.com/ReadTODAY Find TODAY on Facebook: http://on.today.com/LikeTODAY Follow TODAY on Twitter: http://on.today.com/FollowTODAY Follow TODAY on Google+: http://on.today.com/PlusTODAY Follow TODAY on Instagram: http://on.today.com/InstaTODAY Follow TODAY on Pinterest: http://on.today.com/PinTODAY See What Happens When A Plane Violates Presidential Airspace | TODAY
Views: 22527105 TODAY
HOW TO ANALYZE PEOPLE ON SIGHT - FULL AudioBook - Human Analysis, Psychology, Body Language
 
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How To Analyze People On Sight | GreatestAudioBooks 🎅 Give the gift of audiobooks! 🎄 Click here: http://affiliates.audiobooks.com/tracking/scripts/click.php?a_aid=5b8c26085f4b8&a_bid=ec49a209 🌟SPECIAL OFFERS: ► Free 30 day Audible Trial & Get 2 Free Audiobooks: https://amzn.to/2Iu08SE ...OR: 🌟 try Audiobooks.com 🎧for FREE! : http://affiliates.audiobooks.com/tracking/scripts/click.php?a_aid=5b8c26085f4b8 ► Shop for books & gifts: https://www.amazon.com/shop/GreatestAudioBooks How To Analyze People On Sight | GreatestAudioBooks by Elsie Lincoln Benedict & Ralph Pain Benedict - Human Analysis, Psychology, Body Language - In this popular American book from the 1920s, "self-help" author Elsie Lincoln Benedict makes pseudo-scientific claims of Human Analysis, proposing that all humans fit into specific five sub-types. Supposedly based on evolutionary theory, it is claimed that distinctive traits can be foretold through analysis of outward appearance. While not considered to be a serious work by the scientific community, "How To Analyze People On Sight" makes for an entertaining read. . ► Follow Us On TWITTER: https://www.twitter.com/GAudioBooks ► Friend Us On FACEBOOK: http://www.Facebook.com/GreatestAudioBooks ► For FREE SPECIAL AUDIOBOOK OFFERS & MORE: http://www.GreatestAudioBooks.com ► SUBSCRIBE to Greatest Audio Books: http://www.youtube.com/GreatestAudioBooks ► BUY T-SHIRTS & MORE: http://bit.ly/1akteBP ► Visit our WEBSITE: http://www.GreatestAudioBooks.com READ along by clicking (CC) for Caption Transcript LISTEN to the entire book for free! Chapter and Chapter & START TIMES: 01 - Front matter -- - 00:00 02 - Human Analysis - 04:24 03 - Chapter 1, part 1 The Alimentive Type - 46:00 04 - Chapter 1, part 2 The Alimentive Type - 1:08:20 05 - Chapter 2, part 1 The Thoracic Type - 1:38:44 06 - Chapter 2, part 2 The Thoracic Type - 2:10:52 07 - Chapter 3, part 1 The Muscular type - 2:39:24 08 - Chapter 3, part 2 The Muscular type - 3:00:01 09 - Chapter 4, part 1 The Osseous Type - 3:22:01 10 - Chapter 4, part 2 The Osseous Type - 3:43:50 11 - Chapter 5, part 1 The Cerebral Type - 4:06:11 12 - Chapter 5, part 2 The Cerebral Type - 4:27:09 13 - Chapter 6, part 1 Types That Should and Should Not Marry Each Other - 4:53:15 14 - Chapter 6, part 2 Types That Should and Should Not Marry Each Other - 5:17:29 15 - Chapter 7, part 1 Vocations For Each Type - 5:48:43 16 - Chapter 7, part 2 Vocations For Each Type - 6:15:29 #audiobook #audiobooks #freeaudiobooks #greatestaudiobooks #book #books #free #top #best #psychology This video: Copyright 2012. Greatest Audio Books. All Rights Reserved. Audio content is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more information or to volunteer visit librivox.org. Disclaimer: As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases. Your purchases through Amazon affiliate links generate revenue for this channel. Thank you for your support.
Views: 2117747 Greatest AudioBooks
Female Bear Shows Young Male How Mating Season is Done in the Rockies
 
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A female with two young cubs gently nudges an inexperienced — and slightly reluctant — male into action. When Wild Canadian Year director Jeff Turner and a pilot from Hinton, Alberta set out to look for grizzly bears in the Rocky Mountain wilderness, they knew that the odds were not in their favour. "The landscape we were flying over was incredibly vast," says Turner, "the bears are just emerging from the den and are very spaced out." They traveled to a very remote valley, far from any roads or human habitation with a Cineflex camera bolted to the helipcopter's frame and controlled from inside. Adult grizzly bears are usually solitary creatures, so Turner was amazed to capture four of them together. "It was like winning the lottery!" From a vantage point in the sky, the crew was able to capture a rare springtime mating ritual. "This family drama was unfolding before our eyes," recalled Turner, "the male bear couldn't believe his luck at finding this female who was interested in him, but seemed kind of shy and confused. He doesn't seem to know what to do." Visit The Wild Canadian Year for more stories: http://www.cbc.ca/wildcanadianyear/ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/CBCSubscribe From the creators of the acclaimed series WILD CANADA, comes a year full of stories which will view Canada’s extraordinary wildlife through the lens of its four distinct seasons. Series coming to CBC-TV in September 2017. About CBC: Welcome to the official YouTube channel for CBC, Canada’s public broadcaster. CBC is dedicated to creating content with original voices that inspire and entertain. Watch sneak peeks and trailers, behind the scenes footage, original web series, digital-exclusives and more. Connect with CBC Online: Twitter: http://bit.ly/CBCTwitter Facebook: http://bit.ly/CBCFacebook Instagram: http://bit.ly/CBCInstagram Female Bear Shows Young Male How Mating Season is Done in the Rockies http://youtube.com/user/cbctv
Views: 574155 CBC
Plant Breeding
 
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Title: Plant Breeding / IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY Description: Plant breeding is the art and science of improving the heredity of plants for human benefit. Covers the basic principles and understanding of plant inheritance, Mendelian genetics, and traditional and modern plant breeding methods used to improve crop varieties. No Closed Captioning. Publisher: IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY Related Titles: Series: Agronomy Principles & Practice (Agronomy 114, Aka Crop Scien 8 Creation Date: 1994 Format: 1 videocassette (54 min.) : sd., col.; 1/2 in.. Language: English
6. Behavioral Genetics I
 
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(April 12, 2010) Robert Sapolsky introduces a two-part series exploring the controversial scientific practice of inferring behavior to genetics. He covers classical techniques in behavior genetics and flaws, the significance of environmental factors, non genetic inheritance of traits, and multigenerational effects and relationship to epigenetic differences. Stanford University http://www.stanford.edu Stanford Department of Biology http://biology.stanford.edu/ Stanford University Channel on YouTube http://www.youtube.com/stanford
Views: 338030 Stanford
Chromosomal Theory of Inheritance | Principle of Inheritance and Variation | Class 11 Biology
 
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Download the Avanti Gurukul App from the google store now and get all the videos by India's top teachers on your phone. Click here to download: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=in.avanti.gurukul.learning.cbse.ncert.iit.video.test.doubt&referrer=utm_source%3DYouTube%26utm_medium%3DYouTube%2520Description%26utm_campaign%3DAll-YT-Description Class 12 Biology – Principle of Inheritance and Variation Ever wondered why people say that you look somewhat like your mother or your father? Why some features give away your identity? This ‘inheritance’ which you get from your parents or grandparents, is related to your genes. Your genes contain certain information which came along to you from your forefathers. We’ll learn about this in detail in this chapter. We’ll learn 1. What is inheritance and variation? 2. Experimental approach by Mendel. 3. Inheritance of one gene. 4. Punnett Square. 5. Laws of Inheritance. 6. Inheritance of 2 genes. 7. Chromosomal Theory of Inheritance. 8. Linkage. 9. Sex Determination. 10. Mutations. 11. Pedigree Analysis. 12. Sex linked Disorders. 13. Chromosomal Disorders. AvantiEd- Learn more about us at http://www.avanti.in Like us on Facebook @ https://www.facebook.com/avantilearningcentres/?fref=ts Follow us on Twitter @ https://twitter.com/AvantiLC For more information, please visit www.avanti.in For more information, please visit www.avanti.in
Views: 125866 Avanti Gurukul
Raw Food Diet Documentary - part 1 of 2
 
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Raw food diet and healthy lifestyle! Vegan 2017 VEGAN 2018 - The Film Raw Food Diet Documentary (english subtitles) Raw Food Diet Documentary (spanish subtitles) Raw Food Diet Documentary (italian subtitles) Raw Food Diet Documentary (swedish subtitles) Raw Food Diet Documentary (german subtitles) La Dieta De Alimentos Crudos (subtitulos en español) Documentario De Dieta Alimentare Cruda (sottotitoli in italiano) Rå matdiet (svenska undertexter) rohkost diät Dokumentarfilm (Deutsche Untertitel)
Views: 2020905 Health and Raw food
2017 Maps of Meaning 03: Marionettes and Individuals (Part 2)
 
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In this lecture, I continue with the analysis of the Disney film Pinocchio to illustrate the manner in which great mythological or archetypal themes inform and permeate both the creation and the understanding of narratives. --- SUPPORT THIS CHANNEL --- Direct Support: https://www.jordanbpeterson.com/donate Merchandise: https://teespring.com/stores/jordanbpeterson --- BOOKS --- 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos: https://jordanbpeterson.com/12-rules-for-life/ Maps of Meaning: The Architecture of Belief: https://jordanbpeterson.com/maps-of-meaning/ --- LINKS --- Website: https://jordanbpeterson.com/ 12 Rules for Life Tour: https://jordanbpeterson.com/events/ Blog: https://jordanbpeterson.com/blog/ Podcast: https://jordanbpeterson.com/podcast/ Reading List: https://jordanbpeterson.com/great-books/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/jordanbpeterson Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jordan.b.peterson/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drjordanpeterson --- PRODUCTS --- Self Authoring Suite: https://selfauthoring.com/ Understand Myself personality test: https://understandmyself.com/ Merchandise: https://teespring.com/stores/jordanbpeterson
Views: 578790 Jordan B Peterson
Sugar: The Bitter Truth
 
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Watch "The Skinny on Obesity" with Dr. Lustig: http://www.uctv.tv/skinny-on-obesity Robert H. Lustig, MD, UCSF Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Endocrinology, explores the damage caused by sugary foods. He argues that fructose (too much) and fiber (not enough) appear to be cornerstones of the obesity epidemic through their effects on insulin. Series: UCSF Mini Medical School for the Public [7/2009] [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 16717] More UCTV videos about sugar: http://www.uctv.tv/sugar Dr. Lustig's book (comes out Dec 27, 2012), "Fat Chance: Beating the Odds Against Sugar, Processed Food, Obesity, and Disease": http://www.amazon.com/Fat-Chance-Beating-Against-Processed/dp/159463100X Thank you to Centar dr Gifing for providing the Serbian subtitles for Sugar the Bitter Truth. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8cXfUiAey9wzYg3K_eR_zg
97% Owned - Economic Truth documentary - How is Money Created
 
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If you like 97% Owned support our future documentaries on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/independentdocumentary or Liberapay https://liberapay.com/IndependentPOV Watch our newest documentary The Spider's Web: Britain's Second Empire: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=np_ylvc8Zj8 97% owned present serious research and verifiable evidence on our economic and financial system. This is the first documentary to tackle this issue from a UK-perspective and explains the inner workings of Central Banks and the Money creation process. When money drives almost all activity on the planet, it's essential that we understand it. Yet simple questions often get overlooked, questions like; where does money come from? Who creates it? Who decides how it gets used? And what does this mean for the millions of ordinary people who suffer when the monetary, and financial system, breaks down? A film by Michael Oswald, Produced by Mike Horwath, featuring Ben Dyson of Positive Money, Josh Ryan-Collins of The New Economics Foundation, Ann Pettifor, the "HBOS Whistleblower" Paul Moore, Simon Dixon of Bank to the Future and Nick Dearden from the Jubliee Debt Campaign. Help us translate this video: http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_video?ref=share&v=XcGh1Dex4Yo or contact us on [email protected] Brought to you by: http://hushhushvideo.com/ and http://queuepolitely.com/
Views: 2700334 Independent POV
Impacts of climate change on plant communities
 
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Janneke Hille Ris Lambers (Univ. of Washington, Seattle) gave a talk entitled "Impacts of climate change on plant communities," at the Current Issues in Statistical Ecology Education & Outreach Workshop, held at NIMBioS April 15-17, 2015. To read more about the workshop, click the following link: http://www.nimbios.org/education/WS_gradconf2015
Views: 234 NIMBioS
Nathan D. B. Connolly on White Supremacy and the American City
 
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“'Blood and Soil!’: White Supremacy and the American City” - a talk by Nathan D.B. Connolly, Herbert Baxter Adams Associate Professor of History at Johns Hopkins University. This presentation is part of a series titled “Segregated: Structural Racism and the Shaping of American Cities,” which examines how space and race have intersected in American cities for generations to produce dramatic inequality in wealth, opportunity, and safety. Presented by the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America, the Department of History, and the Department of American Studies at Brown University. Brown University Thursday, February 28, 2019
Views: 260 Brown University
The World That Couldn't Be by Clifford D. Simak
 
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The planet where his new plantation was established was very strange, with a complete lack of sex; all of his workers and all the animals and plants had no sex at all; they were all 'its'. But like every farmer on every planet, Duncan had to hunt down anything that damaged his crops—and whatever animal ate his vua plants was going to die. Of course he had no idea what this one looked like or what it was like, but whatever it was, he would track it and his rifle would bring it down. Chapter 1 - 00:00 Chapter 2 - 13:18 Chapter 3 - 31:21 Chapter 4 - 47:01 Chapter 5 - 53:58 Chapter 6 - 1:39:13
Views: 9432 Audiobooks Unleashed
The Origin of Life: Evolution vs. Design [Full Debate]
 
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Michael Ruse and Fuz Rana square off to debate the question "Are natural processes sufficient to explain the origin and the complexity of the cell?" Moderated by Craig Hazen, and recorded live at the University of California, Riverside. Sponsored by Biola University's Christian Apologetics Program, The Well Christian Club at UCR, and Come Reason Ministries.
Views: 123993 BiolaUniversity
Dean Ornish: "Transforming Lives and Healthcare" | Talks at Google
 
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For over 35 years, Dr. Dean Ornish’s series of scientific research studies have been empowering the way millions of people think about the simple lifestyle choices they make each day in dynamic relation to their health & wellbeing. From being a revolutionary thought leader, a powerful professor, a beloved author and respected advisor to some of the worlds most powerful leaders, Dr. Dean Ornish is resoundingly recognized as a leader in health, healthcare and medicine. Get the book here: https://goo.gl/FsFAUU Moderated by Jack Hidary.
Views: 11125 Talks at Google
Sadhguru at IIT Bombay – Youth and Truth [Full talk]
 
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On Sep 20, Sadhguru was at IIT Bombay as part of the Youth and Truth movement. Watch the vibrant QnA session that followed as Sadhguru answered students’ questions on a wide range of topics 5:53 - When we are at crossroads, how to choose the best option ? 8:37 - How much should we care about other's opinions ? 18:12 - Should I go to Canada and send dollars to India or work at grassroots level in India ? 30:10 - Will the technological advancements ultimately cause mankind's doom ? 39:07 - Can inanimate objects(stones, rings, etc.) control/influence our lives ? 52:39 - Why are we studying/working so hard when illiterate politicians are ruling the country ? 1:03:20 - What is the big deal in using bad words when we just use them casually ? 1:10:50 - Is unconditional love truly possible ? 1:18:15 - Why do we knowingly procrastinate things ? 1:22:31 - When both parents work, kids sometimes feel insecure. What can we do to avoid this ? 1:25:01 - How we do we know whether we are overdoing masturbation ? 1:31:26 - I play guitar and also I have to study engg. How to focus on one thing without losing the other ? 1:43:56 - What is logic ? How to express myself ? 1:47:50 - All humans and animals should live happily. But none is happy. Why ? Ask & Vote Your Questions Here: http://UnplugwithSadhguru.org #UnplugWithSadhguru Download Sadhguru App 📲 http://onelink.to/sadhguru__app Yogi, mystic and visionary, Sadhguru is a spiritual master with a difference. An arresting blend of profundity and pragmatism, his life and work serves as a reminder that yoga is a contemporary science, vitally relevant to our times. Subscribe to Sadhguru YouTube Channel Here: https://www.youtube.com/user/sadhguru?sub_confirmation=1 Official Sadhguru Website http://www.isha.sadhguru.org Official Social Profiles of Sadhguru https://facebook.com/sadhguru https://instagram.com/sadhguru https://twitter.com/SadhguruJV Free Online Guided Yoga & Meditation by Sadhguru http://isha.sadhguru.org/5-min-practices http://isha.sadhguru.org/IshaKriya
Views: 346089 Sadhguru
What is SEASONAL BREEDER? What does SEASONAL BREEDER mean? SEASONAL BREEDER meaning & explanation
 
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What is SEASONAL BREEDER? What does SEASONAL BREEDER mean? SEASONAL BREEDER meaning - SEASONAL BREEDER definition - SEASONAL BREEDER explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Seasonal breeders are animal species that successfully mate only during certain times of the year. These times of year allow for the optimization of survival of young due to factors such as ambient temperature, food and water availability, and changes in the predation behaviors of other species. Related sexual interest and behaviors are expressed and accepted only during this period. Female seasonal breeders will have one or more estrus cycles only when she is "in season" or fertile and receptive to mating. At other times of the year, they will be anestrus, or have a dearth of their sexual cycle. Unlike reproductive cyclicity, seasonality is described in both males and females. Male seasonal breeders may exhibit changes in testosterone levels, testes weight, and fertility depending on the time of year. Seasonal breeders are distinct from opportunistic breeders, that mate whenever the conditions of their environment become favorable, and continuous breeders, like humans, that mate year-round. The breeding season is the most suitable season, usually with favorable conditions and abundant food and water for breeding. Abiotic factors such as the timing of seasonal rains and winds can also play an important role in breeding onset and success. Many species breed in colonies or large communities, known as communal breeding. It is common to see large congregations of these species in particularly favorable locations during their breeding seasons. These breeding colonies and their locations are generally protected by wildlife conservation laws to keep the species from going extinct. Some species have evolved for communal breeding in large breeding colonies and cannot breed in smaller numbers or pairs alone. These species can be threatened by imminent extinction if they are hunted on their breeding grounds or if their breeding colonies are destroyed. The passenger pigeon is a famous example of probably the most numerous land bird on the American continent which had evolved for communal breeding. Due to large scale hunting in its communal breeding grounds during the breeding season and its inability to breed in smaller numbers, the passenger pigeon went extinct. The hypothalamus is considered to be the central control for reproduction due to its role in hormone regulation. Hence, factors that determine when a seasonal breeder will be ready for mating affect this tissue. This is achieved specifically through changes in the production of the hormone GnRH. GnRH in turn transits to the pituitary where it promotes the secretion of the gonadotropins LH and FSH, both pituitary hormones critical for reproductive function and behavior, into the bloodstream. Changes in gonadotropin secretion initiate the end of anestrus in females. Seasonal breeding readiness is strongly regulated by length of day (photoperiod) and thus season. Photoperiod likely affects the seasonal breeder through changes in melatonin secretion by the pineal gland that ultimately alter GnRH release by the hypothalamus. Hence, seasonal breeders can be divided into groups based on fertility period. "Long day" breeders cycle when days get longer (spring) and are in anestrus in fall and winter. Some animals that are long day breeders include; ring-tailed lemurs, horses, hamsters, groundhogs, and mink. "Short day" breeders cycle when the length of daylight shortens (fall) and are in anestrus in spring and summer. The decreased light during the fall decreases the firing of the retinal nerves, in turn decreasing the excitation of the superior cervical ganglion, which then decreases the inhibition of the pineal gland, finally resulting in an increase in melatonin. This increase in melatonin results in an increase in GnRH and subsequently an increase in the hormones LH and FSH, which stimulate cyclicity. Some animals that are short day breeders include; sheep, goats, foxes, red deer, elk, moose, and mice. ....
Views: 1572 The Audiopedia
THE MIRACLE OF SEED 02/05
 
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THE MIRACLE OF SEED In this film we have examined a miracle that perhaps most people are not aware of—seeds and pollen. We have seen: The storage of thousands of pages of information in a tiny seed.... Flowers that guide insects... Orchids that offer perfume to bees, use booby traps or imitate bees.... Plants that use special machine guns to spread their spores... Plants that use parachutes... Seeds with the most flawless wing design in the world... Plants that attach helicopter wings to their seeds... Seeds that use explosions... Seeds that travel thousands of kilometers in water or resist fire... Methods used by plants to have other living things transport their seeds... And flowers that plant their own seeds. And we have witnessed that God's creative artistry encompasses every thing and every where in the world. God has created everything in the heaven and on the earth. And His knowledge encompasses all things; God, there is no deity except Him, the Living, the Self-Sustaining. He is not subject to drowsiness or sleep. Everything in the heavens and the earth belongs to Him. Who can intercede with Him except by His permission? He knows what is before them and what is behind them but they cannot grasp any of His knowledge save what He wills. His Footstool encompasses the heavens and the earth and their preservation does not tire Him. He is the Most High, the Magnificent. (Qur'an, 2: 255) The keys of the Unseen are in His possession. No one knows them but Him. He knows everything in the land and sea. No leaf falls without His knowing it. There is no seed in the darkness of the earth, and nothing moist or dry which is not in a Clear Book. (Qur'an, 6: 59) Everyone in the heavens and earth belongs to Him. All are submissive to Him. (Qur'an, 30: 26) Have you thought about what you cultivate? Is it you who make it germinate or are We the Germinator? If We wished We could have made it broken stubble. You would then be left devoid of crops, distraught. (Qur'an: 56, 63-65) Your god is God alone, there is no god but Him. He encompasses all things in His knowledge. (Qur'an, 20: 98) It is He Who sends down water from the sky from which We bring forth growth of every kind, and from that We bring forth the green shoots and from them We bring forth close-packed seeds, and from the spathes of the date palm date clusters hanging down, and gardens of grapes and olives and pomegranates, both similar and dissimilar. Look at their fruits as they bear fruit and ripen. There are Signs in that for people who believe. (Qur'an, 6: 99) The Miracle In The Seed Everyone knows what seeds look like, and know that all plants germinate from seeds. But few stop to wonder how it is that such a variety of plants, many very different from one another, can come from something that resembles a smooth chunk of wood or how seeds can contain all the information relating to these plants' characteristics and how this information is individually coded. How can fruits, with their unique tastes and aromas and just the right degree of sweetness, come from something that's small and dry? Does the seed produce the tree and adorn it with fruit? Does the seed determine the shape and color of fruits and flowers? Does the seed pack all the information on the tree into the embryo it contains? This book will answer all these questions and more, will explain how the seed is evidence of the infinite power of God and the magnificence of His creation. THE MIRACLE IN THE SEED: http://www.harunyahya.com/books/science/seed/seedintro.php
Views: 666 Kamui915
BSA cor.wmv
 
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BSA is method developed for rapid identification of molecular markers linked to specific trait or genomic region. This video is about BSA for drought tolerance in rice. Using RILs developed by crossing IR 64, a drought susceptible HYV and Nootripathu, a drought tolerant land race RM 212 was found to be linked to leaf rolling and leaf drying drought associated traits.
Views: 33 ravindra kale
Vermicomposting: How worms can reduce our waste - Matthew Ross
 
04:30
View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/vermicomposting-how-worms-can-reduce-our-waste-matthew-ross Nearly one third of our food ends up in the trash can. There is hope, however, in the form of worms, which naturally convert organic waste into fertilizer. Matthew Ross details the steps we can all take to vermicompost at home -- and why it makes good business sense to do so. Lesson by Matthew Ross, animation by Cinematic Sweden.
Views: 498218 TED-Ed
The Science of Cats
 
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TWEET IT - http://clicktotweet.com/cMb3K CATS!!!! Written and created by Mitchell Moffit (twitter @mitchellmoffit) and Gregory Brown (twitter @whalewatchmeplz). TWITTER: http://www.twitter.com/AsapSCIENCE FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/AsapSCIENCE Mitchell Moffit http://www.mitchellmoffit.com http://www.twitter.com/mitchellmoffit http://www.facebook.com/mitchellmoffit Gregory Brown http://www.gregorybrownart.tumblr.com http://www.twitter.com/whalewatchmeplz
Views: 4457887 AsapSCIENCE
Fruit Development
 
00:42
A fruit consists of seeds enclosed in a mature ovary of a flowering plant. The wall of the ovary in an apple hardened and the supporting stem become fleshy and grows up and around the ovary.
Views: 233259 kosasihiskandarsjah
The science of milk - Jonathan J. O'Sullivan
 
05:24
View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-science-of-milk-jonathan-j-o-sullivan The milk industry produces in excess of 840 million tons of products each year. Why do humans drink so much milk? And given that all mammals lactate, why do we favor certain types of milk over others? Jonathan J. O’Sullivan describes how milk is made. Lesson by Jonathan J. O'Sullivan, animation by TED-Ed.
Views: 865619 TED-Ed
Plant sciences | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:05:17
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Botany 00:03:36 1 History 00:03:45 1.1 Early botany 00:08:24 1.2 Early modern botany 00:11:44 1.3 Late modern botany 00:17:03 2 Scope and importance 00:21:28 2.1 Human nutrition 00:23:22 3 Plant biochemistry 00:28:07 3.1 Medicine and materials 00:31:34 4 Plant ecology 00:33:58 4.1 Plants, climate and environmental change 00:35:16 5 Genetics 00:39:35 5.1 Molecular genetics 00:42:13 5.2 Epigenetics 00:44:51 6 Plant evolution 00:47:58 7 Plant physiology 00:50:17 7.1 Plant hormones 00:54:17 8 Plant anatomy and morphology 00:58:44 9 Systematic botany 01:05:03 10 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8976965530674565 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Botany, also called plant science(s), plant biology or phytology, is the science of plant life and a branch of biology. A botanist, plant scientist or phytologist is a scientist who specialises in this field. The term "botany" comes from the Ancient Greek word βοτάνη (botanē) meaning "pasture", "grass", or "fodder"; βοτάνη is in turn derived from βόσκειν (boskein), "to feed" or "to graze". Traditionally, botany has also included the study of fungi and algae by mycologists and phycologists respectively, with the study of these three groups of organisms remaining within the sphere of interest of the International Botanical Congress. Nowadays, botanists (in the strict sense) study approximately 410,000 species of land plants of which some 391,000 species are vascular plants (including ca 369,000 species of flowering plants), and ca 20,000 are bryophytes.Botany originated in prehistory as herbalism with the efforts of early humans to identify – and later cultivate – edible, medicinal and poisonous plants, making it one of the oldest branches of science. Medieval physic gardens, often attached to monasteries, contained plants of medical importance. They were forerunners of the first botanical gardens attached to universities, founded from the 1540s onwards. One of the earliest was the Padua botanical garden. These gardens facilitated the academic study of plants. Efforts to catalogue and describe their collections were the beginnings of plant taxonomy, and led in 1753 to the binomial system of Carl Linnaeus that remains in use to this day. In the 19th and 20th centuries, new techniques were developed for the study of plants, including methods of optical microscopy and live cell imaging, electron microscopy, analysis of chromosome number, plant chemistry and the structure and function of enzymes and other proteins. In the last two decades of the 20th century, botanists exploited the techniques of molecular genetic analysis, including genomics and proteomics and DNA sequences to classify plants more accurately. Modern botany is a broad, multidisciplinary subject with inputs from most other areas of science and technology. Research topics include the study of plant structure, growth and differentiation, reproduction, biochemistry and primary metabolism, chemical products, development, diseases, evolutionary relationships, systematics, and plant taxonomy. Dominant themes in 21st century plant science are molecular genetics and epigenetics, which are the mechanisms and control of gene expression during differentiation of plant cells and tissues. Botanical research has diverse applications in providing staple foods, materials such as timber, oil, rubber, fibre and drugs, in modern horticulture, agriculture and forestry, plant propagation, breeding and genetic modification, in the synthesis of chemicals and raw materials for construction and energy production, in environmental management, and the maintenance of biodiversity.
Views: 26 wikipedia tts
Martha Nussbaum, "Creating Capabilities: The Human Development Approach"
 
01:02:44
International agencies used to measure the quality of life in a nation simply by looking at GDP per capita. Recently that approach has been challenged by an approach that focuses on people's "capabilities": what they are actually able to do and be, their substantial freedoms, in some central areas of life. As one of the architects of that approach, Nussbaum will discuss its origins and structure, and the arguments for and against it. Martha Nussbaum is Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics at the University of Chicago Law School. This talk was recorded March 2, 2010 as part of the Chicago's Best Ideas series.
The Evidence For Evolution Made Easy
 
44:53
Evolution is one of the most well-evidenced conclusions in all of science. In this video, I present six independent lines of evidence that prove evolution is fact. Creationists deny conclusive evidence exists, but they are either ignorant of the facts, or willfully dishonest about it. All facts presented are backed by extensive scientific research. Don't take my word for it, research it yourself. Here are some additional references you can read or watch. Jerry Coyne's lecture, "Why Evolution is True" is a great overview of the evidence, based on his book of the same name. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CW9G2YVtBYc Fossil record and transitional fossils: http://chem.tufts.edu/science/Stear-NoAiG/no-AiG/fossil_record.htm Transitional fossils, and how they confirm the predictions of evolution youtu.be/kfTbrHg8KGQ The process of evolution, natural selection. http://evolution.berkeley.edu/evolibrary/article/0_0_0/evo_14 The fusion of human chromosome #2, the Genome Research Center site, a peer-reviewed journal: http://genome.cshlp.org/content/22/6/1036.long This article explains how science studies the past, by checking evidence against expectations. http://undsci.berkeley.edu/article/0_0_0/coreofscience_03 If you liked this video please like and subscribe. And feel free to drop me a line on Twitter at https://twitter.com/VoysovReason
Views: 125971 VoysovReason
Human Evolution: Crash Course Big History #6
 
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In which John Green and Hank Green teach you about how human primates moved out of Africa and turned Earth into a real-life Planet of the Apes. And the apes are people! John and Hank teach you about how humans evolved, and the sort of tricks they picked up along the way like complex tool use, big brains, and fighting. Our ancestors adapted to the grasslands of Africa, and went through several iterations including Australopithecus, Homo Habilis, and Homo Ergaster/Erectus. Our ancestors tamed fire, made pressure flake tools, and eventually smartphones. Learn more: http://www.bighistoryproject.com
Views: 2113522 CrashCourse
Uprooting the Leading Causes of Death
 
55:50
Subscribe to Dr. Greger’s free nutrition newsletter and get the Evidence-Based Eating Guide: A Healthy Living Resource from Dr. Greger and NutritionFacts.org. Sign up at https://www.nutritionfacts.org/healthkit. DESCRIPTION: This Dr. Greger's 2012 live presentation. Death in America is largely a foodborne illness. Focusing on studies published just over the last year in peer-reviewed scientific medical journals, Michael Greger, M.D., offers practical advice on how best to feed ourselves and our families to prevent, treat, and even reverse many of the top 15 killers in the United States. Dr. Greger uploads a new video every weekday to NutritionFacts.org, the first non-commercial, science-based website to provide free daily updates on the latest discoveries in clinical nutrition. Subscribe for free at http://nutritionfacts.org/subscribe/. More information about this presentation in particular can be found at http://nutritionfacts.org/2012/07/09/uprooting-dvd-now-available-proceeds-to-charity/ http://www.NutritionFacts.org • Subscribe: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/subscribe • Donate: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/donate • HOW NOT TO DIE: http://nutritionfacts.org/book • Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NutritionFacts.org • Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/nutrition_facts • Instagram: http://instagram.com/nutrition_facts_org/ • Google+: https://plus.google.com/+NutritionfactsOrgMD • Podcast: http://nutritionfacts.org/audio/
Views: 1735698 NutritionFacts.org
Evolutionary history of plants | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:37:06
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evolutionary_history_of_plants 00:02:27 1 Colonization of land 00:08:42 2 Evolution of life cycles 00:14:06 3 Evolution of plant anatomy 00:14:16 3.1 Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis 00:16:32 3.2 Xylem 00:26:39 4 Evolution of plant morphology 00:26:49 4.1 Leaves 00:36:47 4.1.1 Factors influencing leaf architectures 00:40:37 4.2 Roots 00:45:48 4.3 Tree form 00:50:04 4.4 Seeds 00:56:39 4.5 Flowers 01:02:38 4.5.1 Origins of the flower 01:04:26 4.5.2 Evolution of the MADS-box family 01:06:29 4.6 Factors influencing floral diversity 01:08:52 4.6.1 Flowering time 01:10:41 4.6.2 Theories of flower evolution 01:12:03 4.7 Mechanisms and players in evolution of plant morphology 01:16:14 5 Evolution of photosynthetic pathways 01:17:21 5.1 Concentrating carbon 01:19:07 5.2 Evolutionary record 01:22:26 5.3 When is Csub4/sub an advantage? 01:25:11 6 Evolution of transcriptional regulation 01:25:49 7 Evolution of secondary metabolism 01:29:01 8 Coevolution of plants and fungal parasites 01:36:27 9 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8704377278997828 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The evolution of plants has resulted in a wide range of complexity, from the earliest algal mats, through multicellular marine and freshwater green algae, terrestrial bryophytes, lycopods and ferns, to the complex gymnosperms and angiosperms of today. While many of the earliest groups continue to thrive, as exemplified by red and green algae in marine environments, more recently derived groups have displaced previously ecologically dominant ones, e.g. the ascendance of flowering plants over gymnosperms in terrestrial environments.There is evidence that cyanobacteria and multicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes lived in freshwater communities on land as early as 1 billion years ago, and that communities of complex, multicellular photosynthesizing organisms existed on land in the late Precambrian, around 850 million years ago.Evidence of the emergence of embryophyte land plants first occurs in the mid-Ordovician (~470 million years ago), and by the middle of the Devonian (~390 million years ago), many of the features recognised in land plants today were present, including roots and leaves. Late Devonian (~370 million years ago) free-sporing plants such as Archaeopteris had secondary vascular tissue that produced wood and had formed forests of tall trees. Also by late Devonian, Elkinsia, an early seed fern, had evolved seeds. Evolutionary innovation continued into the Carboniferous and still continues today. Most plant groups were relatively unscathed by the Permo-Triassic extinction event, although the structures of communities changed. This may have set the scene for the appearance of the flowering plants in the Triassic (~200 million years ago), and their later diversification in the Cretaceous and Paleogene. The latest major group of plants to evolve were the grasses, which became important in the mid-Paleogene, from around 40 million years ago. The grasses, as well as many other groups, evolved new mechanisms of metabolism to survive the low CO2 and warm, dry conditions of the tropics over the last 10 million years.
Views: 22 wikipedia tts
World of Dinosaurs - National Geographic Documentary HD
 
01:30:34
Most people think of dinosaurs as big, ferocious and extinct reptiles. That's largely true, but there are some misconceptions. Dinosaurs came in all shapes and sizes. Dinosaurs were the largest land animals of all time, but a great number of dinosaurs were smaller than a turkey. Dinosaurs first appeared between 247 and 240 million years ago. They ruled the Earth for about 175 million years until an extinction event 65.5 million years ago wiped out all of them, except for the avian dinosaurs. Scientists don't agree entirely on what happened, but the extinction likely was a double or triple whammy involving an asteroid impact, choking chemicals from erupting volcanoes, climate change and possibly other factors. Flying on Only the big, classic dinosaurs are extinct. Birds are living dinosaurs, most experts believe. Think of that next time a pigeon strafes you. Fossils show that some of the more advanced dinosaurs had feathers or feather-like body covering, but many of them didn't fly and probably didn't even glide. Archaeopteryx, which was for a long time considered to be the first bird (although this status is not certain), could likely launch itself from the ground, but probably couldn't fly far, according to unpublished research presented at the 2016 Society of Vertebrate Paleontology meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah. Instead, feathers, likely helped these bird-like dinosaurs stay warm as juveniles or send signals to other individuals. Many people think extinct flying reptiles called pterosaurs were dinosaurs. They were dinosaurs' closest relatives, but technically not dinosaurs. Pterosaurs had hollow bones, relatively large brains and eyes, and, of course, the flaps of skin extending along their arms, which were attached to the digits on their front hands. The family includes Pterodactyls, with elaborate, bony head crests and lack of teeth. Pterosaurs survived up until the mass die-off 65 million years ago, when they were going the way of the dodo along with marine reptiles and other nonavian dinosaurs. Hip check Dinosaur fossils were first recognized in the 19th century. In 1842, paleontologist Richard Owen coined the term dinosaur, derived from the Greek deinos, meaning "terrible" or "fearfully great," and sauros, meaning "lizard" or reptile." Scientists classify dinosaurs into two orders — Saurischians and Ornithischians— based on the structure of the bones in their hips. (This saurischian and ornithischian grouping is now disputed. See the "Family tree update" section below to learn more.) Most of the well-known dinosaurs — including Tyrannosaurus rex, Deinonychus and Velociraptor — fall into the order known as Saurischian dinosaurs (pronounced sor-ISK-ee-en). These "reptile-hipped" dinosaurs have a pelvis that points forward, similar to more primitive animals. They are often long-necked, have large and sharp teeth, long second fingers, and a first finger that points strongly away from the rest of the fingers. Saurischians are divided into two groups – four legged herbivores called sauropods and two-legged carnivores called theropods (living birds are in the theropod lineage). Theropods walked on two legs and were carnivorous. "Theropod" means "beast-footed" and they are some of the fearsome and most recognizable dinosaurs — including Allosaurus and T. rex. Scientists have wondered whether large theropods — such as Giganotosaurus and Spinosaurus — actively hunted their prey, or simply scavenged carcasses. The evidence points to the animals working together as opportunistic hunters: they would bring down prey, but also eat animals that were lying around. When fossil-hunters found bones with bite marks on them, they wondered if theropods engaged in cannibalism. It appears now that the animals may have scavenged their own kind, but they didn't hunt down their own. Sauropods were herbivores with long heads, long necks, and long tails. They were among the largest land animals ever, but they likely had small brains. The gentle giants like leaf-eating Apatosaurus, Brachiosaurus and Diplodocus are part of this family. Ornithischia Ornithischian (pronounced or-neh-THISK-ee-en) dinosaurs, a group that includes horned and frilled Triceratops, spiked Stegosaurus and armored Ankylosaurus, are more mild-mannered, plant eaters. These dinosaurs were beaked herbivores. Smaller than the sauropods, the Ornithischia (meaning "bird-hipped") often lived in herds and were prey to the larger species of dinosaurs. Interestingly, the Ornithischia shifted from a two-legged to a four-legged posture at least three times in their evolutionary history and scientists think they could adopt both postures early in their evolutionary history.
Views: 477149 ADVEXON TV
The Mind After Midnight: Where Do You Go When You Go to Sleep?
 
01:25:41
We spend a third of our lives asleep. Every organism on Earth—from rats to dolphins to fruit flies to microorganisms—relies on sleep for its survival, yet science is still wrestling with a fundamental question: Why does sleep exist? During Shakespeare and Cervantes' time, sleep was likened to death, with body and mind falling into a deep stillness before resurrecting each new day. In reality, sleep is a flurry of action. Trillions of neurons light up. The endocrine system kicks into overdrive. The bloodstream is flooded with a potent cocktail of critically vital hormones. Such vibrant activity begs the question: Where do we go when we go to sleep? Based on new sleep research, there are tantalizing signposts. We delved into the one-eyed, half-brained sleep of some animals; eavesdropped on dreams to understand their cognitive significance; and investigated extreme and bizarre sleeping behaviors like “sleep sex” and “sleep violence.” The World Science Festival gathers great minds in science and the arts to produce live and digital content that allows a broad general audience to engage with scientific discoveries. Our mission is to cultivate a general public informed by science, inspired by its wonder, convinced of its value, and prepared to engage with its implications for the future. Subscribe to our YouTube Channel for all the latest from WSF. Visit our Website: http://www.worldsciencefestival.com/ Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/worldsciencefestival Follow us on twitter: https://twitter.com/WorldSciFest Original Program Date: June 3, 2011 MODERATOR: Carl Zimmer PARTICIPANTS: Carlos H. Schenck, Matthew Wilson, Niels Rattenborg Video Introduction. 00:13 Carl Zimmer's Introduction. 03:13 Participant Introductions. 04:03 Human sleep vs Animal sleep. 05:40 Sharing sleep traits with animals. 10:03 Ducks sleep with one eye open... but why? 13:22 What is the reason everything needs sleep? 18:30 Are there limits to our dreams? 19:55 Where do we currently stand with dream research? 22:06 The brain never turns off. 26:16 Is daydreaming the same as normal dreaming? 32:18 REM sleep dreams are crazy. 38:57 Dreaming through memory models. 44:41 REM sleep behavior disorder. 46:08 Mel and Norma Gabler and his dream killing 51:58 Sleep fighting footage. 54:20 Sleep state dependent sleep activation. 01:00:28 Extreme animal sleep. 01:02:35 The Curious Case of Kenneth Parks 01:12:10 What is the next step for sleep science? 01:20:38
Views: 2654034 World Science Festival
The Jumping Genome: Changing Ideas about Heredity and Evolution
 
01:16:37
Nina Fedoroff, External Professor, Santa Fe Institute September 13, 2006 Genetics traces its origins to monk Gregor Mendel's experiments on common pea plants. The 20th century witnessed the explosive growth of genetics from the naming of genes to the identification of DNA as the stuff of heredity by Nobel Laureates Watson and Crick to the sequencing of whole genomes. The second lecture explores the revolutions in ideas of genes and chromosomes from beads on a string to the jumping corn genes of Nobel Laureate Barbara McClintock to contemporary ideas of a dynamic genome.
Views: 1740 Santa Fe Institute
The Choice is Ours (2016) Official Full Version
 
01:37:20
https://www.thevenusproject.com Intro: 0:00 Part 1 6:16 Part 2 23:28 Part 3 47:03 Part 4 1:19:09 Produced/Directed by Roxanne Meadows and Joel Holt Script by Roxanne Meadows Editor Joel Holt, assisted by Roxanne Meadows & Nathanael Dinwiddie Original Score by Kat Epple This film series explores many aspects of our society. To rethink what is possible in our world, we need to consider what kind of world we want to live in. Although we refer to it as a civilization, it is anything but civilized. Visions of global unity & fellowship have long inspired humanity, yet the social arrangements up to the present have largely failed to produce a peaceful and productive world. While we appear to be technically advanced, our values and behaviors are not. The possibility of an optimistic future is in stark contrast to our current social, economic, and environmental dilemmas. The Choice Is Ours includes interviews with notable scientists, media professionals, authors, and other thinkers exploring the difficulties we face. Part I provides an introduction and overview of cultural & environmental conditions that are untenable for a sustainable world civilization. It explores the determinants of behavior to dispel the myth of “human nature” while demonstrating how environment shapes behavior. The science of behavior is an important - yet largely missing - ingredient in our culture. Part II questions the values, behaviors, and consequences of our social structures, and illustrates how our global monetary system is obsolete and increasingly insufficient to meet the needs of most people. Critical consideration of the banking, media, and criminal justice systems reveals these institutions for what they really are: tools of social control managed by the established political and economic elite. If we stay the present course, the familiar cycles of crime, economic booms & busts, war, and further environmental destruction are inevitable. Part III explains the methods and potential of science. It proposes solutions that we can apply at present to eliminate the use of non-renewable sources of energy. It depicts the vision of The Venus Project to build an entirely new world from the ground up, a “redesign of the culture”, where all enjoy a high standard of living, free of servitude and debt, while also protecting the environment. Part IV explains how it is not just architecture and a social structure that is in desperate need of change, but our values which have been handed down from centuries ago. They too need to be updated to our technological age, which has the potential to eliminate our scarcity-driven societies of today. Our problems are mostly of our own making, but we can still turn things around before the point of no return. It’s not too late for an optimistic outlook on the fantastic possibilities that lie before us. Jacque Fresco-Futurist, Industrial Designer, Social Engineer, Founder of The Venus Project Jeffrey A. Hoffman Ph.D. - Prof. Aeronautics & Astronautics MIT, Former NASA Astronaut Henry Schlinger, Ph.D., BCBA-D - Prof. Psychology CAL State University Abby Martin - Journalist & Host "The Empire Files" Karen Hudes - Economist, Lawyer, World Bank Whistleblower Erin Ade - Reporter & Host "Boom Bust" – RT Paul Wright - Founder & Director of Human Rights Defense Center, Editor of Prison Legal News, Author Dylan Ratigan - Author & TV Host "The Dylan Ratigan Show" Mark Jacobson, Ph.D. - Prof. Civil & Env. Engineering, Stanford University. www.thesolutionsproject.org Erik Brynjolfsson, Ph.D. - Prof. of Management-MIT Sloan School of Management, Dir. MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy, Author Lawrence M. Krauss, Ph.D. - Foundation Prof. School of Earth and Space Exploration, and director of Origins Project, Arizona State University. Author "A Universe from Nothing". Paul G. Hewitt - Author "Conceptual Physics" Roxanne Meadows - Co-Founder The Venus Project *special thanks also to Alexander "Obraz" ...Obraz.io who created the many 2d motion depictions (plus the sound fx!) of concepts such as the "hamburgers and fried chicken" segment and many others which are Alexander's inimitable work style and attention to details where we needed very specific illustrations of key points. The Venus Project proposes an alternative vision of what the future can be if we apply what we already know in order to achieve a sustainable new world civilization. It calls for a straightforward redesign of our culture in which the age-old inadequacies of war, poverty, hunger, debt and unnecessary human suffering are viewed not only as avoidable but as totally unacceptable. Anything less will result in a continuation of the same catalog of problems inherent in today's world. Learn more at http://www.thevenusproject.com Support/donate to the project: https://www.thevenusproject.com/donations/ Become a volunteer:https://www.thevenusproject.com/become-a-volunteer/
Views: 2112381 The Venus Project
Sex | Wikipedia audio article
 
23:14
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Sex 00:01:38 1 Overview 00:04:08 2 Evolution 00:06:38 3 Sexual reproduction 00:08:50 3.1 Animals 00:11:29 3.2 Plants 00:13:43 3.3 Fungi 00:14:53 4 Sex determination 00:16:07 4.1 Genetic 00:19:15 4.2 Nongenetic 00:20:30 5 Sexual dimorphism 00:22:59 6 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Organisms of many species are specialized into male and female varieties, each known as a sex. Sexual reproduction involves the combining and mixing of genetic traits: specialized cells known as gametes combine to form offspring that inherit traits from each parent. The gametes produced by an organism define its sex: males produce small gametes (e.g. spermatozoa, or sperm, in animals; pollen in seed plants) while females produce large gametes (ova, or egg cells). Individual organisms which produce both male and female gametes are termed hermaphroditic. Gametes can be identical in form and function (known as isogamy), but, in many cases, an asymmetry has evolved such that two different types of gametes (heterogametes) exist (known as anisogamy). Physical differences are often associated with the different sexes of an organism; these sexual dimorphisms can reflect the different reproductive pressures the sexes experience. For instance, mate choice and sexual selection can accelerate the evolution of physical differences between the sexes. Among humans and other mammals, males typically carry an X and a Y chromosome (XY), whereas females typically carry two X chromosomes (XX), which are a part of the XY sex-determination system. Other animals have different sex-determination systems, such as the ZW system in birds, the X0 system in insects, and various environmental systems, for example in crustaceans. Fungi may also have more complex allelic mating systems, with sexes not accurately described as male, female, or hermaphroditic.
Views: 67 wikipedia tts
Four Horsemen - Feature Documentary - Official Version
 
01:38:54
RenegadeInc.com brings you FOUR HORSEMEN - an award winning independent feature documentary which lifts the lid on how the world really works. As we will never return to 'business as usual' 23 international thinkers, government advisors and Wall Street money-men break their silence and explain how to establish a moral and just society. FOUR HORSEMEN is free from mainstream media propaganda -- the film doesn't bash bankers, criticise politicians or get involved in conspiracy theories. It ignites the debate about how to usher a new economic paradigm into the world which would dramatically improve the quality of life for billions. Subtitles available in English, French, Greek, Spanish and Portuguese. "It's Inside Job with bells on, and a frequently compelling thesis thanks to Ashcroft's crack team of talking heads -- economists, whistleblowers and Noam Chomsky, all talking with candour and clarity." - Total Film "Four Horsemen is a breathtakingly composed jeremiad against the folly of Neo-classical economics and the threats it represents to all we should hold dear." - Harold Crooks, The Corporation (Co-Director) Surviving Progress (Co-Director/Co-Writer) Follow us on https://www.twitter.com/Renegade_Inc on https://www.facebook.com/RenEconomist or visit our website http://www.renegadeinc.com Support us by subscribing here http://bit.ly/1db4xVQ
Views: 8349264 Renegade Inc.
14. The Germ Theory of Disease
 
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Epidemics in Western Society Since 1600 (HIST 234) Although the development of the germ theory of disease in the latter half of the nineteenth century marks a major revolution in medical science, comparable to the discoveries of Galileo in astronomy or Darwin in biology, it cannot be reduced to the heroic efforts of a single researcher or group of researchers. Rather, a number of conceptual, technological and institutional preconditions made the germ theory possible. Among these, contagionism, microscopy and hospital medicine all played a major role. The germ theory of disease facilitated a wide range of scientific advances, including the isolation of pathogens, the creation of vaccines and the introduction of antiseptics in surgery. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Germ Theory of Disease 03:33 - Chapter 2. Preconditions 14:34 - Chapter 3. Louis Pasteur 24:17 - Chapter 4. Attenuation 33:28 - Chapter 5. Robert Koch' 39:31 - Chapter 6. Therapeutic Effects Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Spring 2010.
Views: 15378 YaleCourses
ALL of Edexcel IGCSE Biology 9-1 - IGCSE Biology Revision - SCIENCE WITH HAZEL
 
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Science with Hazel's Perfect Answer Revision Guides for Edexcel IGCSE Triple Science are available at https://sciencewithhazel.co.uk/collections/edexcel-igcse-triple TOPIC TIMINGS: Cells 0:39 Cell Organisation 8:05 Biological Molecules 12:45 Enzymes 12:51 Diffusion, Active Transport & Osmosis 16:33 Photosynthesis 19:00 Leaf Structure 22:31 The Digestive System 25:43 Balanced Diet 30:47 Respiration 34:50 The Respiratory System 37:22 Transport In Plants - Xylem & Phloem 42:31 Transpiration 45:55 Transport In Humans - Blood 48:35 The Immune System 50:09 The Circulatory System 53:24 Arteries, Veins & Capillaries 1:00:33 Excretion 1:01:42 Co-ordination & Response 1:06:50 Auxins 1:07:05 The Nervous System 1:09:12 The Eye 1:13:11 Homeostasis 1:17:27 Reproduction Overview 1:21:06 Reproduction In Plants 1:22:58 Reproduction In Humans 1:28:04 Protein Synthesis 1:33:08 Punnett Squares 1:39:59 Pedigree Analysis 1:46:33 Mitosis & Meiosis 1:51:14 Evolution & Natural Selection 1:56:15 Ecology 1:58:21 Carbon Cycle 2:05:29 Nitrogen Cycle 2:06:51 Human Impact On The Environment 2:08:57 Biological Resources 2:14:23 Fish Farming 2:22:16 Selective Breeding 2:24:29 Genetic Engineering 2:25:40 Cloning 2:31:11 These videos are designed to help with your GCSE and IGCSE science revision. To keep up to date with my Science with Hazel videos and support: Visit my website: www.sciencewithhazel.co.uk Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sciencewithazel/ Add me on Snapchat: https://www.snapchat.com/add/sciencewithazel Like my Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/sciencewithazel/ Hazel completed her undergraduate degree at St John's College, the University of Cambridge. She then did a PGCE (Post-Graduate Certificate of Education) before qualifying as a science teacher. She now works full time as a professional tutor.
Views: 42614 Science with Hazel
"The Science of Obesity: Fighting Fat with Fact" presented by Dr. Susan Bagby
 
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OHSU physician/nephrologist and founding member of the Steering Committee of the OHSU Moore Institute of Nutrition & Wellness at OHSU, Dr. Susan Bagby presents the epigenetics of obesity in an informative and captivating way. She challenges viewers to consider ways that science calls upon us to prevent childhood obesity by looking at the whole food system.
Views: 848 PCC Videos
SEXUAL REPRODUCTION
 
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For more information: http://www.7activestudio.com [email protected] http://www.7activemedical.com/ [email protected] http://www.sciencetuts.com/ [email protected] Contact: +91- 9700061777, +91- 9100061777 7 Active Technology Solutions Pvt.Ltd. is an educational 3D digital content provider for K-12. We also customise the content as per your requirement for companies platform providers colleges etc . 7 Active driving force "The Joy of Happy Learning" -- is what makes difference from other digital content providers. We consider Student needs, Lecturer needs and College needs in designing the 3D & 2D Animated Video Lectures. We are carrying a huge 3D Digital Library ready to use. Sexual reproduction is a form of reproduction where two morphologically distinct types of specialized reproductive cells called gametes fuse together, involving a female's large ovum (or egg) and a male's smaller sperm. Each gamete contains half the number of chromosomes of normal cells. They are created by a specialized type of cell division, which only occurs in eukaryotic cells, known as meiosis. The two gametes fuse during fertilization to produce DNA replication and the creation of a single-celled zygote which includes genetic material from both gametes. In a process called genetic recombination, genetic material (DNA) joins up so that homologous chromosome sequences are aligned with each other, and this is followed by exchange of genetic information. Two rounds of cell division then produce four daughter cells with half the number of chromosomes from each original parent cell, and the same number of chromosomes as both parents, though self-fertilization can occur. For instance, in human reproduction each human cell contains 46 chromosomes, 23 pairs, except gamete cells, which only contain 23 chromosomes, so the child will have 23 chromosomes from each parent genetically recombined into 23 pairs. Cell division initiates the development of a new individual organism in multicellular organisms, including animals and plants, for the vast majority of whom this is the primary method of reproduction. A species is defined as a taxonomic rank. A species is often defined as the largest group of organisms where two hybrids are capable of reproducing fertile offspring, typically using sexual reproduction, although the species problem encompasses a series of difficult related questions that often come up when biologists define the word species.
Views: 269925 7activestudio
The Organism as Subject and Object of Evolution
 
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Richard Lewontin, Science Board, Santa Fe Institute November 12, 2003 This lecture will challenge directly the notion that evolution is the process of "adaptation" of organisms to problems posed by the environment. Instead, it will describe the evolution of the organism and its environment as a co-evolutionary one best described as a process of "construction."
Views: 3649 Santa Fe Institute
TEDxPhiladelphia - Unintended Consequences
 
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The moment that we recognize the impact of an unintended consequence, a new story unfolds. Ideas that arise from unintended consequences are deeply personal. An unintended consequence forces us to reassess our assumptions and challenge our narratives. Unintended Consequences is the official theme for TEDxPhiladelphia 2019. The daylong multidisciplinary conference will bring together engaging speakers, performers, and participants to share their stories and experiences of unanticipated moments, their challenges and unexpected opportunities that arose from this, and how it's shaped who they are and what they do today.
The Superorganism
 
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Edward O. Wilson, Pellegrino Research Professor Emeritus and Honorary Curator in Entomology at Harvard, presents the annual John M. Prather Lecture in Biology. The study of insect societies is today one of the fastest growing major branches of evolutionary biology. It has revealed a great deal about the general principles of the origin and evolution of advanced social behavior, and has shed light on the enormous ecological success of the social insects (with ants and termites making up over half of the insect biomass around the world). The evolution from organism to superorganism has been the major transition between levels of biological organization, easiest to penetrate and understand. Organized by the departments of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology & Molecular and Cellular Biology at Harvard.