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The City of Goslar in Germany | euromaxx
 
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Goslar, despite having just over 40,000 residents attracts some five million day trippers a year.That's because the town in Lower Saxony is on the edge of the Harz mountians and is home to two UNESCO World Heritage sites: the old town center and the ore mine Rammelsberg. It's the only one of its kind that has been in operation for more than 1,000 years.
Views: 3067 DW News
Adolf Eichmann Biography: The Architect of the Holocaust
 
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Adolf Eichmann was a thin little man with bow legs and a hook nose. In the civilian world he had been viewed as of no account, a socially awkward loser with little to redeem himself. Having joined the Nazi party, however, his unquestioning commitment to orders coupled with his need for ruthless efficiency allowed him to carve out a career that see him go down as one of the greatest mass murderers in all of human history. In this week’s Biographics, we trace the life, crimes and death of Adolf Eichmann. →Subscribe for new videos every Monday and Thursday! https://www.youtube.com/c/biographics?sub_confirmation=1 Visit our companion website for more: http://biographics.org Credits: Host - Simon Whistler Author - Steve Theunissen Producer - Jack Cole Executive Producer - Shell Harris Business inquiries to [email protected] Other Biographics Videos: Joseph Stalin: The Red Terror https://youtu.be/KqfcpNrcGb0?list=PLy3kHTZWA8Oj9TlyNb3Kb3roh9AWM_nwv Winston Churchill Biography: In the Darkest Hour https://youtu.be/PrqkhCsLwDA?list=PLy3kHTZWA8Oj9TlyNb3Kb3roh9AWM_nwv
Views: 317581 Biographics
Lower Saxony | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Lower Saxony 00:03:09 1 Geography 00:03:18 1.1 Location 00:05:26 1.2 Regions 00:05:34 1.2.1 General 00:06:08 1.2.2 List of regions 00:06:48 1.3 Climate 00:08:04 2 Administration 00:09:18 3 History 00:09:27 3.1 Regional history prior to foundation of Lower Saxony 00:10:03 3.1.1 Period to the Congress of Vienna (1814/1815) 00:13:03 3.1.2 To the end of the Second World War 00:16:41 3.1.3 Post–Second World War 00:21:30 3.2 History of Lower Saxony as a state 00:26:00 3.2.1 Administrative subdivisions 00:27:21 4 Demographics 00:27:44 4.1 Vital statistics 00:28:03 4.2 Religion 00:28:25 5 Economy 00:28:47 6 Politics 00:28:52 6.1 Constitution 00:30:53 6.2 Minister-President of Lower Saxony 00:34:12 7 Coat of arms 00:35:41 8 See also 00:38:10 9 References 00:38:38 10 External links 00:39:15 undefined Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Lower Saxony (German: Niedersachsen [ˈniːdɐzaksn̩]; Low German: Neddersassen; Dutch: Nedersaksen) is a German state (Land) situated in northwestern Germany. It is the second-largest state by land area, with 47,624 km2 (18,388 sq mi), and fourth-largest in population (7.9 million) among the 16 Länder federated as the Federal Republic of Germany. In rural areas, Northern Low Saxon (a dialect of Low German) and Saterland Frisian (a variety of the Frisian language) are still spoken, but the number of speakers is declining. Lower Saxony borders on (from north and clockwise) the North Sea, the states of Schleswig-Holstein, Hamburg, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Brandenburg, Saxony-Anhalt, Thuringia, Hesse and North Rhine-Westphalia, and the Netherlands. Furthermore, the state of Bremen forms two enclaves within Lower Saxony, one being the city of Bremen, the other, its seaport city of Bremerhaven. In fact, Lower Saxony borders more neighbours than any other single Bundesland. The state's principal cities include the state capital Hanover, Braunschweig (Brunswick), Lüneburg, Osnabrück, Oldenburg, Hildesheim, Wolfenbüttel, Wolfsburg, and Göttingen. The northwestern area of Lower Saxony, which lies on the coast of the North Sea, is called East Frisia and the seven East Frisian Islands offshore are popular with tourists. In the extreme west of Lower Saxony is the Emsland, a traditionally poor and sparsely populated area, once dominated by inaccessible swamps. The northern half of Lower Saxony, also known as the North German Plains, is almost invariably flat except for the gentle hills around the Bremen geestland. Towards the south and southwest lie the northern parts of the German Central Uplands: the Weser Uplands and the Harz mountains. Between these two lie the Lower Saxon Hills, a range of low ridges. Thus, Lower Saxony is the only Bundesland that encompasses both maritime and mountainous areas. Lower Saxony's major cities and economic centres are mainly situated in its central and southern parts, namely Hanover, Braunschweig, Osnabrück, Wolfsburg, Salzgitter, Hildesheim, and Göttingen. Oldenburg, near the northwestern coastline, is another economic centre. The region in the northeast is called the Lüneburg Heath (Lüneburger Heide), the largest heathland area of Germany and in medieval times wealthy due to salt mining and salt trade, as well as to a lesser degree the exploitation of its peat bogs until about the 1960s. To the north, the Elbe River separates Lower Saxony from Hamburg, Schleswig-Holstein, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, and Brandenburg. The banks just south of the Elbe are known as Altes Land (Old Country). Due to its gentle local climate and fertile soil, it is the state's largest area of fruit farming, its chief produce being apples. Most of the state's territory was part of the historic Kingdom of Hanover; the state of Lower Saxony has adopted the coat of arms and other symbols of the former kingdom. It was created by the merger of the State of Hanover with three smaller states on 1 November 1946.
Views: 2 wikipedia tts
[Cities Skylines] Vedastein #16b - Oldtown Recap
 
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Hey Guys! - Titan here This is the (second?!) sixteenth episode of my Cities Skylines series Vedastein in which we will build an authentic German city. Many custom made assets will make sure that the city will be a real eye-catcher. Excuse my bad english - I'm still working on fluency. :) You like the project? That's good! Like and comment the video, subscribe to my channel - show me your support. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ► Follow me to stay updated: ↪Twitter: https://twitter.com/TitanGameDesign ↪Steam: http://steamcommunity.com/id/TitanGameDesign ► You like my work? Consider a small monthly donation via patreon for early access and other rewards ↪ https://www.patreon.com/TitanGameDesign ► Download the Map: ↪ http://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=1311013890 ► Mods, assets and everything else I use: ↪ http://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=1325462380 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ► Used music in order of appearance: ↪ Bensound.com - Energy ↪ purple-planet.com - Time Of Your Life ↪ purple-planet.com - Transmission ↪ purple-planet.com - Swaying Daisies ↪ purple-planet.com - Morning Routine ↪ Bensound.com - Summer ↪ Bensound.com - Funky Element ↪ Bensound.com - Memories all Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org.licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 1210 Titan
Excursion to Rammelsberger Bergbaumuseum Goslar, Germany (Dec 2013)
 
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Excursion to Rammelsberger Bergbaumuseum Goslar, Germany (Dec 2013). The Rammelsberg is a mountain, 635 m high, on the northern edge of the Harz, south of the town of Goslar in the north German state of Lower Saxony. The mountain is the location of an important mine, the only mine which had been working continuously for over 1,000 years when it finally closed in 1988. Since 1992, the visitors' mine of Rammelsberg has become a UNESCO World heritage site. (wiki.en)
Views: 1588 rezkoenig
Freiberg-Germany
 
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Views: 66 Beautiful World
Rob Judge | Get Girls Not Headaches | Full Length HD
 
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Subscribe on Youtube: http://t21c.com/12YTr3X Subscribe by e-mail: http://www.the21convention.com Follow on Twitter: http://twitter.com/beachmuscles I spent the better part of my early adult life dating 1 girl, which gave me plenty of time to spend my lonely nights nerding it up. When that relationship ended, I found myself with a B.S. in Biology, a Master's degree in Creative Writing, and a remedial (retarded?) understanding of attraction and dating. So I moved to New York City, ignored my pride and better judgement, and started hitting on women shamelessly. Naturally, I got lots of rejections, amassed a canon of funny stories, and wound up at websites for the dating advice industry. Eventually it also led me to my wingman and partner-in-crime, Mr. Zack Bauer. Together, Zack and I started to piece together the truth about picking up women. It may have involved some embarrassing nights and not-so-happy ladies (sorry ladies), but after approaching enough women, we actually started to figure things out and find success. I began writing my insights in magazines, blogs, and various dating niche outlets, such as TSB Magazine. The fast-paced and sophisticated life of New York City influences my style in both writing and dating. These days I split my time between nerd activities like writing, reading, and jogging and awesome activities like aggressive dating, aggressive teaching, and aggressive aggressiveness. On a rainy day, you can find me sipping coffee while writing dating articles or bizarre fiction at a Starbucks near you. My interests include playing the guitar, graphic art, French, candlelit dinners, and anyone who can fix my flatscreen t.v. I believe every man deserves to date his dream girl IF he's willing to forget his pride to learn how to do it. I've coached close to a hundred men on live programs where I watched them transform (sometimes overnight) into the awesome men they were all along--they just needed someone to get them in touch with their inner cool guy. I love waking up each morning to emails from men around the world who tell me about their success stories or about meeting their dream girl or finding the motivation to express themselves. I want you to find an amazing woman and live an awesome life. Visit Rob at http://www.robjudge.net/ Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/BxJw/
Views: 48920 21 Studios
Germany Goslar 2012
 
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Views: 12671 Wolfgang Gegusch
Famous Christmas Market of Goslar
 
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Free video about City of Goslar. This free video was created for you by http://epsos.de and can be used for free under the creative commons license with the attribution of epSos.de as the original author of this City of Goslar video. Thank you for supporting the creative commons movement !! Christmas Market City of Goslar is a town in Lower Saxony in Germany. It is the capital of the district of Christmas Market City of Goslar and is in the northwest of the Harz. Its population was estimated at 42,792 inhabitants in 2006. It is registered since 1992 in conjunction with the Rammelsberg mines on the World Heritage List. Christmas Market City of Goslar is a popular tourist town of Lower Saxony, the gateway to western sector of the massif of Harz. The city was founded in the x th century after the discovery of silver in the mines near the Rammelsberg. The city became particularly prosperous, which attracted the attention of German emperors. The Kaiserpfalz (Imperial Palace) was built in Christmas Market City of Goslar xi th century - from 1005 to 1015 - and became a residence for the emperors, especially Henry III who visited his favorite palace near twenty times. The heart of Henry III is located in St. Ulrich chapel. Abandoned for centuries, the palace was renovated by William I st of Germany in eleven years. The painter who renovated the murals began eighteen years to restore everything. The collegiate St. Simon and St. Jude in Christmas Market City of Goslar is as old as the palace, but only the porch is original. The church itself was demolished in 1820. Christmas Market City of Goslar was not bombed during the Second World War. Other sights include the town hall ( xv th century ) and the mines, which have become one of the largest museums of mines in Germany. Christmas Market City of Goslar is located in the northwestern foothills of the Harz mountains, at the foot of the Rammelsberg, about 50 km south of Braunschweig. The city runs the Gose, a tributary of the Oker. The Gose is mentioned in Christmas Market City of Goslar Abzucht (drain) because the water from the Mines of Rammelsberg is drained surface flows for the downtown in Gose. Christmas Market City of Goslar in 922 founded by Henry the Fowler, King of East Francia. Because the ore from the mines of Rammelsberg contained silver, in addition to copper, lead and zinc, built King Henry II from 1005 to 1015 a palace in Christmas Market City of Goslar. Between 1040 and 1050 the current is imperial palace built by Emperor Henry III. Christmas Market City of Goslar in 1075 for the first time called civitas (city). In the 12th century the city reached the size of the current Old Town. Under Emperor Frederick II was the last Reichstag held in Christmas Market City of Goslar Christmas Market City of Goslar in 1253 was last used as a royal palace. When these issues are resolved after almost 100 years, beginning around 1460 a new economic boom for Christmas Market City of Goslar. The Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel wants to late 15th century, the property subject to the silver mines repay Christmas Market City of Goslar and assert their claims in the mines. Christmas Market City of Goslar know to stop this several times. The Duchy however pays the property funds back in 1527, after which there followed decades of strife. Here it does not help that the reformation in 1528 in Christmas Market City of Goslar is entered while the duchy Roman Catholic remains. Eventually Christmas Market City of Goslar looks to occur in 1552 forced away all rights to the Rammelsberg and the power of the city is gradually decreasing. Christmas Market City of Goslar are about 2,250 companies including many retailers. They include working in the chemical industry, services, suppliers to the auto industry, craft businesses, tourism and convention being. The city lies near the Harz mountains at the external border of Salzgitter-Höhenzug, and through the city across the river Gose. The nearest towns are: Bad Harzburg (10 miles east) and Wernigerode (27 miles east). To the south is Osterode nearly 30 km away. North to almost 16 km the city of Salzgitter, a 10 km west is the city of Christmas Market City of Goslar. Christmas Market City of Goslar Forest: Between the facades of the Old Town, 70 dealers, craftsmen, confectioners, mulled wine and restaurant hosts annually a romantic Vorweihnachtserlebnis. The real attraction is the Christmas forest, which is festively illuminated specifically on the Schuhhof from numerous six to nine meters tall pines built. Thank you for supporting the creative commons movement !!
Views: 445 epSos.de
History of Germany Documentary
 
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#History #Germany Please order ebook/audiobook of this video to support our channel https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/678402, https://www.amazon.co.uk/History-of-Germany/dp/B01LFTN06K/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1538744910&sr=1-1&keywords=History+of+Germany+introbooks or https://www.audible.com/pd/History-of-Germany-Audiobook/B01LFTNE7U?qid=1538744917&sr=sr_1_1&ref=a_search_c3_lProduct_1_1&pf_rd_p=e81b7c27-6880-467a-b5a7-13cef5d729fe&pf_rd_r=T3FH5Z2T989043BBWVAX& Germany is a great power today, and has the world’s 4th largest economy. It is a global leader in various technological and industrial sectors along with being the world’s 3rd largest importer and exporter of goods. Watch this video to learn the fundamentals of the German History.
Views: 66700 Education Channel
Lower Saxony
 
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Lower Saxony (German: Niedersachsen [ˈniːdɐzaksən], Low German: Neddersassen) is a German state (Bundesland) situated in northwestern Germany and is second in area, with 47,624 square kilometres (18,388 sq mi), and fourth in population (8 million) among the sixteen Länder of Germany. In rural areas Northern Low Saxon, a dialect of Low German, and Saterland Frisian, a variety of East Frisian, are still spoken, but the number of speakers is declining. Lower Saxony borders on (from north and clockwise) the North Sea, the states of Schleswig-Holstein, Hamburg, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Brandenburg, Saxony-Anhalt, Thuringia, Hesse and North Rhine-Westphalia, and the Netherlands. Furthermore, the Free Hanseatic City of Bremen forms two enclaves within Lower Saxony, one being the city of Bremen, the other, its seaport city of Bremerhaven. In fact, Lower Saxony borders more neighbours than any other single Bundesland. The state's principal cities include the state capital Hanover, Brunswick, Lüneburg, Osnabrück, Oldenburg, Hildesheim, Wolfenbüttel, Wolfsburg and Göttingen. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 417 Audiopedia
Mapping the world’s most precious resource | Alan Belward | TEDxVarese
 
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Water is the most precious resource on our planet. All the same, the Earth’s water maps are wrong, sometimes partially, sometimes completely. As Alan Belward, an earth observation scientist at the Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy, explains, this is because water is a resource that changes and human activity affects this change, with the construction of dams, but also with climate change. Thanks to the Copernicus Programme, the European Commission, in collaboration with Google, has mapped surface water since 1984, creating a database of open source data, with the aim of providing the necessary tools for making policy choices that are not only based on facts. L’acqua è la risorsa più preziosa del nostro pianeta. Tuttavia, le mappe dell’acqua della Terra sono sbagliate talvolta parzialmente, talvolta completamente. Perché, come spiega Alan Belward, earth observation scientist del Joint Research Centre di Ispra, l’acqua è una risorsa che muta e l’azione umana ha un ruolo in questo aspetto, con la costruzione di dighe ma anche con il cambiamento climatico. Grazie al programma Copernicus, la Commissione Europea ha mappato in collaborazione con Google le acque di superficie dal 1984 a oggi creando un database di dati open source con l’obiettivo di fornire gli strumenti necessari a compiere scelte di policy e non solo basate sui fatti. Ha fatto parte di numerosi gruppi scientifici internazionali tra cui il Global Climate Observing System che fa parte dalla Convenzione quadro delle Nazioni Unite sui cambiamenti climatici del Landsat Science Team della NASA/USGS.Ha una laurea in Biologia vegetale,un dottorato di ricerca in telerilevamento satellitare della Terra ed è un membro della Royal Society of Biology del Regno Unito. Lavora nel Centro comune di ricerca della Commissione Europea in Italia, dove è responsabile dell’unità per la gestione della conoscenza della Direzione per le risorse sostenibili. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx
Views: 1954 TEDx Talks
Recovering Resources: Recycling | Tomorrow Today
 
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Many raw materials for industrial applications, such as certain metals and rare earth elements, are growing scarcer or more expensive. Efficient recycling methods could provide a solution. A research center in Saxony is exploring new recycling technologies. Find out more: www.dw.de/dw/episode/9798/0,,15989035,00.html
Views: 525 DW News
Let's Play Banished - Part 20: New Settlement
 
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Let's Play Banished, a new city-builder strategy game. I'm not good at these types of games but I love them, so I hope you guys will enjoy this as much as myself! What is Banished? Welcome to the world of Banished! In this city-building strategy game, you control a group of exiled travelers who decide to restart their lives in a new land. They have only the clothes on their backs and a cart filled with supplies from their homeland. The objective of the game is to keep the population alive and grow it into a successful culture. Options for feeding the people include hunting and gathering, agriculture, trade, and fishing. However, sustainable practices must be considered to survive in the long term. Survival Surviving the winters will be among your greatest challenges. Your tailors can make clothing, your people can build houses and burn firewood. But necessities have a price—Cutting down forests reduces the deer population you can hunt. Although your foresters can plant new trees, the cures for many diseases can only be found in forests that have existed for decades. Farming for many seasons in one place will ruin the soil. Taking fish and game faster than they reproduce will lead to extinction, and your starvation. Wandering nomads can join your town to grow the population quickly, but allowing them in increases the chance of illnesses from far off lands! Gameplay The townspeople of Banished are your primary resource. They are born, grow older, work, have children of their own, and eventually die. Keeping them healthy, happy, and well-fed are essential to making your town grow. Building new homes is not enough—there must be enough people to move in and have families of their own. Banished has no skill trees. Any structure can be built at any time, provided that your people have collected the resources to do so. There is no money. Instead, your hard-earned resources can be bartered away with the arrival of trade vessels. These merchants are the key to adding livestock and annual crops to the townspeople's diet; however, their lengthy trade route comes with the risk of bringing illnesses from abroad. There are twenty different occupations that the people in the city can perform from farming, hunting, and blacksmithing, to mining, teaching, and healing. No single strategy will succeed for every town. Some resources may be more scarce from one map to the next. The player can choose to replant forests, mine for iron, and quarry for rock, but all these choices require setting aside space into which you cannot expand. The success or failure of a town depends on the appropriate management of risks and resources. Banished will be available for purchase on February 18, 2014.
Views: 1397 LinusPlays
NE China coal mine flood
 
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16 people are still trapped after a coal mine flooded in northeast China’s Heilongjiang Province. Rescue operations are underway.
Views: 100 CGTN
ContiTech @ Hannover Messe
 
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We serve our customers with our broad off-highway portfolio that holds solutions for mining operations as well as for agricultural applications. At Hanover Fair our experts will tell you everything about it. Get to know them at booth E18 in hall 5, April 23-27 – or right here in this video.
Views: 1846 ContiTech
History of Western civilization | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: History of Western civilization Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Western civilization traces its roots back to Europe and the Mediterranean. It is linked to the Roman Empire and with Medieval Western Christendom which emerged from the Middle Ages to experience such transformative episodes as the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, scientific revolution, and the development of liberal democracy. The civilizations of Classical Greece and Ancient Rome are considered seminal periods in Western history; a few cultural contributions also emerged from the pagan peoples of pre-Christian Europe, such as the Celts and Germans, as well as some significant religious contributions derived from Judaism and Hellenistic Judaism stemming back to Second Temple Judea, Galilee, and the early Jewish diaspora; and some other Middle Eastern influences. Christianity and Roman Catholicism has played a prominent role in the shaping of Western civilization, which throughout most of its history, has been nearly equivalent to Christian culture. (There were Christians outside of the West, such as China, India, Russia, Byzantium and the Middle East). Western civilization has spread to produce the dominant cultures of modern Americas and Oceania, and has had immense global influence in recent centuries in many ways. Following the 5th century Fall of Rome, Western Europe entered the Middle Ages, during which period the Catholic Church filled the power vacuum left in the West by the fall of the Western Roman Empire, while the Eastern Roman Empire (or Byzantine Empire) endured in the East for centuries, becoming a Hellenic Eastern contrast to the Latin West. By the 12th century, Western Europe was experiencing a flowering of art and learning, propelled by the construction of cathedrals and the establishment of medieval universities. Christian unity was shattered by the Reformation from the 16th century. A merchant class grew out of city states, initially in the Italian peninsula (see Italian city-states), and Europe experienced the Renaissance from the 14th to the 17th century, heralding an age of technological and artistic advance and ushering in the Age of Discovery which saw the rise of such global European Empires as those of Spain and Portugal. The Industrial Revolution began in Britain in the 18th century. Under the influence of the Enlightenment, the Age of Revolution emerged from the United States and France as part of the transformation of the West into its industrialised, democratised modern form. The lands of North and South America, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand became first part of European Empires and then home to new Western nations, while Africa and Asia were largely carved up between Western powers. Laboratories of Western democracy were founded in Britain's colonies in Australasia from the mid-19th centuries, while South America largely created new autocracies. In the 20th century, absolute monarchy disappeared from Europe, and despite episodes of Fascism and Communism, by the close of the century, virtually all of Europe was electing its leaders democratically. Most Western nations were heavily involved in the First and Second World Wars and protracted Cold War. World War II saw Fascism defeated in Europe, and the emergence of the United States and Soviet Union as rival global powers and a new "East-West" political contrast. Other than in Russia, the European Empires disintegrated after World War II and civil rights movements and widescale multi-ethnic, multi-faith migrations to Europe, the Americas and Oceania lowered the earlier predominance of ethnic Europeans in Western culture. European nations moved towards greater economic and political co-operation through the European Union. The Cold War ended around 1990 with the collapse of Soviet imposed Communism in Central and Eastern Europe. In the 21st century, the Western World retains significant global economic power and influ ...
Views: 70 wikipedia tts
Barbarossa's Town, Goslar - Germany
 
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impressions with a handycam
Views: 5214 waltwide
Iron Harvest - Pre-Alpha Gameplay with annotations
 
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Iron Harvest Kickstarter: http://www.iron-harvest.com/kickstarter This is a very early pre-Alpha demo of the upcoming real-time strategy game Iron Harvest. The game is currently in development for Windows, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. Trailer, screenshots and info: http://www.iron-harvest.com
Views: 66539 KINGArtGames
#DailyDrone: Imperial Palace of Goslar
 
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At the foot of Rammelsberg Hill in the Harz Mountains stands the imperial palace, the destination of today’s #DailyDrone. http://www.facebook.com/dw.reise http://twitter.com/TravelDW http://www.instagram.com/dw_euromaxx #DailyDrone is our daily bird's-eye view of Germany. Every day a different exciting location in the viewfinder of our drone camera. Famous sights in Berlin, Cologne, Hamburg or Munich, castles and fortresses from across the country, loading containers in a major port, bringing in the harvest, a day at the regatta. #DailyDrone takes you on unique journeys to destinations all over Germany, in all weathers and seasons, 365 days a year.
Views: 555 DW News
Black Gold - Turning Waste into a Resource | Made in Germany
 
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What remains as waste from large oil refineries is "black gold" for Nils Hansen. He can extract 800 different chemicals from the black sticky goo that remains after oil is refined. Oil is too valuable to waste, he says, so he is investing 150 million euros in a so-called "green refinery" in Hamburg.
Views: 1091 DW News
Omaha, Nebraska | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Omaha, Nebraska 00:05:23 1 History 00:07:22 1.1 Pioneer Omaha 00:09:34 1.2 19th century 00:13:22 1.3 20th century 00:20:48 1.4 21st century 00:23:36 2 Geography 00:26:46 2.1 Neighborhoods 00:28:34 2.2 Landmark preservation 00:30:06 2.3 Climate 00:31:49 3 Demographics 00:31:58 3.1 2010 census 00:34:21 3.2 2000 census 00:36:08 3.3 People 00:43:07 3.4 Latinos in Omaha 00:43:17 4 Economy 00:44:58 4.1 Top employers 00:45:12 4.2 Tourism 00:46:37 5 Culture 00:48:05 5.1 Henry Doorly Zoo 00:48:41 5.2 Old Market 00:50:16 5.3 Music 00:53:18 5.4 Popular culture 00:55:56 6 Sports and recreation 00:59:09 6.1 Recreation 01:00:32 7 Government and politics 01:03:20 7.1 Crime 01:05:37 8 Education 01:08:21 9 Media 01:09:48 10 Infrastructure 01:11:42 10.1 Transportation 01:15:55 11 Notable people 01:16:04 12 Sister cities 01:16:33 13 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Omaha ( OH-mə-hah) is the largest city in the state of Nebraska and the county seat of Douglas County. Omaha is located in the Midwestern United States on the Missouri River, about 10 miles (15 km) north of the mouth of the Platte River. Omaha is the anchor of the Omaha-Council Bluffs metropolitan area, which includes Council Bluffs, Iowa, across the Missouri River from Omaha. According to the 2010 census, Omaha's population was 408,958, having increased to 466,893 as of the 2017 estimate. This makes Omaha the nation's 40th-largest city. Including its suburbs, Omaha formed the 60th-largest metropolitan area in the United States in 2013, with an estimated population of 895,151 residing in eight counties. The Omaha-Council Bluffs-Fremont, Nebraska-IA Combined Statistical Area is 931,667, according to the U.S. Census Bureau's 2013 estimate. Nearly 1.3 million people reside within the Greater Omaha area, comprising a 50 miles (80 kilometers) radius of Downtown Omaha, the city's center. Omaha's pioneer period began in 1854, when the city was founded by speculators from neighboring Council Bluffs, Iowa. The city was founded along the Missouri River, and a crossing called Lone Tree Ferry earned the city its nickname, the "Gateway to the West". Omaha introduced this new West to the world in 1898, when it played host to the World's Fair, dubbed the Trans-Mississippi Exposition. During the 19th century, Omaha's central location in the United States spurred the city to become an important national transportation hub. Throughout the rest of the 19th century, the transportation and jobbing sectors were important in the city, along with its railroads and breweries. In the 20th century, the Omaha Stockyards, once the world's largest, and its meatpacking plants gained international prominence. Today, Omaha is the home to the headquarters of four Fortune 500 companies: mega-conglomerate Berkshire Hathaway; one of the world's largest construction companies, Kiewit Corporation; insurance and financial firm Mutual of Omaha; and the United States' largest railroad operator, Union Pacific Corporation. Berkshire Hathaway is headed by local investor Warren Buffett, one of the richest people in the world, according to a decade's worth of Forbes Magazine rankings, some of which have ranked him as high as No. 1. Omaha is also the home to five Fortune 1000 headquarters: Green Plains Renewable Energy, TD Ameritrade, Valmont Industries, Werner Enterprises, and West Corporation. Also headquartered in Omaha are First National Bank of Omaha, the largest privately held bank in the United States; three of the nation's largest 10 architecture/engineering firms: DLR Group, HDR, Inc., and Leo A Daly; the Gallup Organization, of Gallup Poll fame; and its riverfront Gallup University. Enron began in Omaha as Northern Natural Gas in 1930, before taking over a smaller Houston company in 1985 to form InterNorth, which Kenneth Lay moved permanently to Houston, in 1987. First Data, another Fortune 500 company, was founded in Omaha in 1971 and headquartered there until the late 90's. ConAgra Brand ...
Views: 9 wikipedia tts
Yelawolf - Punk ft. Travis Barker, Juicy J
 
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Yelawolf “PUNK” feat. Juicy J & Travis Barker is Out Now! http://smarturl.it/PunkYelawolf Follow Yelawolf: http://www.yelawolf.com https://www.instagram.com/yelawolf https://www.facebook.com/yelawolf Music video by Yelawolf performing Punk. (C) 2017 Interscope Records http://vevo.ly/0FA6l9
Views: 2247209 YelawolfVEVO
THE LOOTING SKILL PAYS OFF | Mount and Blade #18
 
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Hello! This is Mount&Blade Warband, an Adventure RPG set in the land of Calradia. Watch as I, GuruGamer, conquer the land for Swadia! THANK YOU BASED BORCHA -- Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheGuru1020 Twitter: https://twitter.com/Theguru1020 Subreddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/TheGuru1020/
Views: 1200 Crusticus
HISTORY 👍 LA ALTA EDAD MEDIA,HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES HISTORIA,THE HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES
 
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HISTORY 👍 LA ALTA EDAD MEDIA,HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES HISTORIA,THE HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES 👅 SUSCRÍBETE https://goo.gl/PpDqDx A DOCUMENTARIES👍 😜 👆 HISTORY 👍 LA ALTA EDAD MEDIA,HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES HISTORIA,THE HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES 👍 DALE PULGAR HACIA ARRIBA SI TE GUSTO EL DOCUMENTAL 👍ツ HISTORY 👍 LA ALTA EDAD MEDIA,HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES HISTORIA,THE HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES 🗣 DEJEN SUS COMENTARIOS BEST DOCUMENTARIES 💭 HISTORY 👍 LA ALTA EDAD MEDIA,HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES HISTORIA,THE HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES HISTORY 👍 LA ALTA EDAD MEDIA,HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES HISTORIA,THE HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES HISTORY 👍 LA ALTA EDAD MEDIA,HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES HISTORIA,THE HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES LA EDAD MEDIA,EDAD MEDIA,LA ALTA EDAD MEDIA,EDAD MEDIA DOCUMENTAL+,como,cómo,cuando,curiosidades,hist,histo,historia,history,history channel,history com,porque,search history,the history channel,world history,DOCUMENTALES HISTORIA,DOCUMENTALES DE HISTORIA,best documentaries,best documentaries on netflix,best documentaries on youtube,docu,document,documentales,documentales online,documentaries,documentaries 2017,documentary,documentary film,documentry,top documentaries,youtube documentaries LA EDAD MEDIA,EDAD MEDIA,LA ALTA EDAD MEDIA,EDAD MEDIA DOCUMENTAL+,como,cómo,cuando,curiosidades,hist,histo,historia,history,history channel,history com,porque,search history,the history channel,world history,DOCUMENTALES HISTORIA,DOCUMENTALES DE HISTORIA,best documentaries,best documentaries on netflix,best documentaries on youtube,docu,document,documentales,documentales online,documentaries,documentaries 2017,documentary,documentary film,documentry,top documentaries,youtube documentaries LA EDAD MEDIA,EDAD MEDIA,LA ALTA EDAD MEDIA,EDAD MEDIA DOCUMENTAL+,como,cómo,cuando,curiosidades,hist,histo,historia,history,history channel,history com,porque,search history,the history channel,world history,DOCUMENTALES HISTORIA,DOCUMENTALES DE HISTORIA,best documentaries,best documentaries on netflix,best documentaries on youtube,docu,document,documentales,documentales online,documentaries,documentaries 2017,documentary,documentary film,documentry,top documentaries,youtube documentaries LA EDAD MEDIA,EDAD MEDIA,LA ALTA EDAD MEDIA,EDAD MEDIA DOCUMENTAL+,como,cómo,cuando,curiosidades,hist,histo,historia,history,history channel,history com,porque,search history,the history channel,world history,DOCUMENTALES HISTORIA,DOCUMENTALES DE HISTORIA,best documentaries,best documentaries on netflix,best documentaries on youtube,docu,document,documentales,documentales online,documentaries,documentaries 2017,documentary,documentary film,documentry,top documentaries,youtube documentaries LA EDAD MEDIA,EDAD MEDIA,LA ALTA EDAD MEDIA,EDAD MEDIA DOCUMENTAL+,como,cómo,cuando,curiosidades,hist,histo,historia,history,history channel,history com,porque,search history,the history channel,world history,DOCUMENTALES HISTORIA,DOCUMENTALES DE HISTORIA,best documentaries,best documentaries on netflix,best documentaries on youtube,docu,document,documentales,documentales online,documentaries,documentaries 2017,documentary,documentary film,documentry,top documentaries,youtube documentaries #Documental#Documentales#MejoresDocumentales#DocumentalesEnEspañol#Documentales CompletosEnEspañol#DocumentalesInteresantes#Video#Videos -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "BATALLAS EPICAS DE LA HISTORIA,MIOSÉS,DOCUMENTALES GUERRA,DOCUMENTALES DOCUMENTAL,BIBLIA DOCUMENTAL" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AtzkQ0H-tJU -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
ACDH Lecture 3.2 – Gregory Crane – Greek, Latin, Classics and the need for a global philology
 
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This talk describes the results of planning work in Germany that aims to support a global philology. While a European Classical Philology may focus on Greek and Latin, Classical Philology must by default embrace every major Classical tradition including varying canonical forms of Arabic, Chinese, Sanskrit, Sumerian, Akkadian, and Egyptian. Opening by Claudia Resch 00:27 Welcome by Tara L. Andrews 01:59 Introduction by Gregory Crane 04:29 Greek, Latin and the 19 other languages 05:20 Why are the Humanities in Germany and the United States so different? 09:58 The role of Greek and Latin – Europe as a general idea 12:42 Challenges in Europe: The Big Five and other national languages 13:50 The goal of the digital humanities 18:30 Global philology and German(y) 19:26 Professorships and chairs in Germany 20:49 How and why engage with historic languages? 21:12 What is philology? 24:53 Why do we need a global philology? 27:57 1. Social / political / economic reasons 28:46 2. Intellectual reasons 36:58 3. Pragmatic reasons 39:33 Core topics of philology 45:43 Typical categories of development: writing code for philological data 48:52 The Austrian perspective: a long tradition of multilingualism & language research? 51:36 Date: 31. October 2017 Link: https://www.oeaw.ac.at/de/acdh/about/news-archive/news-detail/article/acdh-lecture-32/ Place: Austrian Academy of Sciences, Sonnenfelsgasse 19, 1010 Vienna Speaker: Gregory Crane University of Leipzig, Germany & Tufts University, MA, USA. welcome by Tara L. Andrews produced by ACDH Core Unit1 Networks, Knowledge Transfer and Outreach Claudia Resch Sandra Lehecka Daniela Fasching Tanja Wissik Daniel Schopper Vanessa Hannesschläger realized by Basem Saifo
Views: 208 ACDH OeAW
museumsinsel muenden HD
 
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http://kunstunterricht3d.blogspot.de/p/projekt-museumsinsel.html http://www.denkmalkunst-kunstdenkmal.de/pages/kunst/m-bis-r/museumsinsel-muenden.php Das Video zeigt eine virtuelle Ausstellung der Werke von sieben Künstlerinnen und Künstlern, präsentiert in realer Umgebung (Oktober 2013). Architektur und Skulpturen wurden größtenteils geschaffen von Schülerinnen und Schülern der Jahrgangsstufe 11. The Video is showing a virtual exhibition of artwork by seven artists, presented in real world (October 2013). Most parts of the architecture and sculptures were created by my students (Steampunk factory: Garry Beaumont). Software: http://newworldstudio.net/en/downloads/
Views: 1621 Beacara Boa
Goslar🏰🕍Niedersachsen-historische Kaiserstadt am Harz * Rammelsberg * Gose
 
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#Goslar #Harz #Niedersachsen Goslar (Niedersachsen)- historische Kaiserstadt am Harz. #Goslar war eine sehr wichtige Kaiserpfalz und durch den Erzbergbau, im Rammelsberg, auch sehr wohlhandend. Das ehemal. Bergwerk am Rammelsberg, ist heute UNESCO-Weltkulturerbe. An den bedeutenden Gebäuden lässt sich dies noch heute sehr gut sehen. Die wichtigsten Sehenswürdigkeiten sind das Haus Kaiserworth, das Kaiserringhaus m. dem Glockenspiel und die Kaiserpfalz. Goslar ist eine Stadt in Niedersachsen. Sie hat den Status einer großen selbständigen Stadt und ist Kreisstadt des Landkreises Goslar. Die Stadt bietet eine sehr grosse Auswahl an Hotels, Pensionen oder Ferienwohnungen und ist ein guter Ausgangspunkt für Ausflüge in den Oberharz, oder auch Unterharz. Goslar wird von der Gose durchflossen, aus welcher das bekannte Bier Gose gebraut wird, eine besondere Biersorte welche es neben Goslar noch in Leipzig gibt. Goslar war viele Jahre bevorzugte Kaiserpfalz deutscher Kaiser ( Friedrich 1.) und ist auch durch Adelige wie Heinrich dem Löwen bekannt. Die Altstadt von Goslar sowie das am südlichen Stadtrand liegende ehemalige Erzbergwerk Rammelsberg zählen zu den Weltkulturerbestätten der UNESCO. Wichtige Sehenswürdigkeiten von Goslar sind die Kaiserpfalz, das gotische Rathaus, das Kaiserringhaus und das Haus Kaiserworth, sowie das gewaltige Stadttor. Rathaus Stadtverwaltung 8.8.18 ===== Immobilien Zaspel * 997 34 Nordhausen * http://www.immocentrum.de * Tel: 036 31-900 518 * Smart Media Ulf ZASPEL
Views: 3611 immocentrum
WTVH Channel 5 News - 7/25/89 - Syracuse, NY
 
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http://www.syracusenostalgia.com - WTVH Channel 5 News complete broadcast, including commercials. Featuring Ron Curtis and Liz Ayers. Mohawk Reservation raid and blockade by police, B52 explosion in Texas, Burnet Park Zoo
Views: 2644 syracusenostalgia
Napoleon III
 
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Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte was the first President of the French Second Republic and, as Napoleon III, the Emperor of the Second French Empire. He was the nephew and heir of Napoleon I. He was the first President of France to be elected by a direct popular vote. However, when he was blocked by the Constitution and Parliament from running for a second term, he organized a coup d'état in 1851, and then took the throne as Napoleon III on 2 December 1852, the forty-eighth anniversary of Napoleon I's coronation. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 16300 encyclopediacc
2014 Archives Fair: Afternoon Session
 
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The DC Caucus of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Archives Conference and the National Archives Assembly hosted the 2014 Archives Fair in the National Archives McGowan Theater in Washington, DC on April 3, 2014. The afternoon session included: Discussion Panel: "Monuments Men Archives" National Archival Authorities Cooperative (NAAC) Donations Partnership Database *Note there is a 15 minute break starting at 1:26.
Luther's Geburtshaus in Eisleben / Luthergedenkstätten Wittenberg
 
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Dieses Video ist Teil der Web-Ausstellung der Konferenz Nationaler Kultureinrichtungen. Besuchen Sie uns unter: http://info.knk-webausstellung.de
Views: 449 KNK-Webausstellung
Wealth and Power in America: Social Class, Income Distribution, Finance and the American Dream
 
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Wealth in the United States is commonly measured in terms of net worth, which is the sum of all assets, including home equity, minus all liabilities. More on the topic: https://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ie=UTF8&tag=tra0c7-20&linkCode=ur2&linkId=ff2efe1946d5c4d43e435783f57e86dc&camp=1789&creative=9325&index=books&keywords=wealth%20america For example, a household in possession of an $800,000 house, $5,000 in mutual funds, $30,000 in cars, $20,000 worth of stock in their own company, and a $45,000 IRA would have assets totaling $900,000. Assuming that this household would have a $250,000 mortgage, $40,000 in car loans, and $10,000 in credit card debt, its debts would total $300,000. Subtracting the debts from the worth of this household's assets (900,000 - $300,000 = $600,000), this household would have a net worth of $600,000. Net worth can vary with fluctuations in value of the underlying assets. The wealth—more specifically, the median net worth—of households in the United States is varied with relation to race, education, geographic location and gender. As one would expect, households with greater income feature the highest net worths, though high income cannot be taken as an always accurate indicator of net worth. Overall the number of wealthier households is on the rise, with baby boomers hitting the highs of their careers. In addition, wealth is unevenly distributed, with the wealthiest 25% of US households owning 87% of the wealth in the United States, which was $54.2 trillion in 2009. When observing the changes in the wealth among American households, one can note an increase in wealthier individuals and a decrease in the number of poor households, while net worth increased most substantially in semi-wealthy and wealthy households. Overall the percentage of households with a negative net worth (more debt than assets) declined from 9.5% in 1989 to 4.1% in 2001. The percentage of net worths ranging from $500,000 to one million doubled while the percentage of millionaires tripled. From 1995 to 2004, there was tremendous growth among household wealth, as it nearly doubled from $21.9 trillion to $43.6 trillion, but the wealthiest quartile of the economic distribution made up 89% of this growth. During this time frame, wealth became increasingly unequal, and the wealthiest 25% became even wealthier. According to US Census Bureau statistics this "Upward shift" is most likely the result of a booming housing market which caused homeowners to experience tremendous increases in home equity. Life-cycles have also attributed to the rising wealth among Americans. With more and more baby-boomers reaching the climax of their careers and the middle aged population making up a larger segment of the population now than ever before, more and more households have achieved comfortable levels of wealth. Zhu Xiao Di (2004) notes that household wealth usually peaks around families headed by people in their 50s, and as a result, the baby boomer generation reached this age range at the time of the analysis. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wealth_in_the_United_States
Views: 212539 The Film Archives
Russian Empire
 
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The Russian Empire (Pre-reform Russian orthography: Россійская Имперія, Modern Russian: Российская империя, translit: Rossiyskaya Imperiya) was a state that existed from 1721 until overthrown by the short-lived liberal February Revolution in 1917. One of the largest empires in world history, stretching over three continents, the Russian Empire was surpassed in landmass only by the British and Mongol empires. It played a major role in 1812–14 in defeating Napoleon's ambitions to control Europe, and expanded to the west and south. It was often in conflict with the Ottoman Empire (which in turn was usually protected by the British). At the beginning of the 19th century, it extended from the Arctic Ocean in the north to the Black Sea on the south, from the Baltic Sea on the west to the Pacific Ocean, and (until 1867) into Alaska in North America on the east. With 125.6 million subjects registered by the 1897 census, it had the third largest population in the world at the time, after Qing China and the British Empire. Like all empires, it included a large disparity in terms of economics, ethnicity, and religion. There were numerous dissident elements, who launched numerous rebellions and assassination attempts; they were closely watched by the secret police, with thousands exiled to Siberia. Economically it was heavily rural with low productivity on large estates worked by serfs, until they were freed in 1861. The economy slowly industrialized with the help of foreign investments in railways and factories. The land was ruled by a nobility called Boyars from the 10th through the 17th centuries, and then was ruled by an emperor called the "Tsar". Tsar Ivan III (1462 – 1505) laid the groundwork for the empire that later emerged. He tripled the territory of his state, ended the dominance of the Golden Horde, renovated the Moscow Kremlin, and laid the foundations of the Russian state. Tsar Peter the Great (1682 - 1725) fought numerous wars and built a huge empire that became a major European power. He moved the capital from Moscow to the new model city of St. Petersburg, and led a cultural revolution that replaced some of the traditionalist and medieval social and political system with a modern, scientific, Europe-oriented, and rationalist system. Catherine the Great (1761 - 1796) presided over a golden age. She expanded the nation rapidly by conquest, colonization and diplomacy. She continued Peter the Great's policy of modernisation along West European lines. Tsar Alexander II (1855 - 1881) promoted numerous reforms, most dramatically the emancipation of all 23 million serfs in 1861. His policy in Eastern Europe was to protect the Orthodox Christians under the rule of the Ottoman Empire. That involvement by 1914 led to Russia's entry into the First World War on the side of Serbia and the Allies, and against the German, Austrian and Ottoman empires. Russia was an absolute monarchy until the Revolution of 1905 and then became a constitutional monarchy. The empire collapsed during the February Revolution of 1917, the result of massive failures in its participation in the First World War. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 756 Audiopedia
Weimar Republic
 
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The Weimar Republic (German: Weimarer Republik [ˈvaɪmaʁɐ ʁepuˈbliːk] ( )) is the name given by historians to the federal republic and semi-presidential representative democracy established in 1919 in Germany to replace the imperial form of government. It is named after Weimar, the city where the constitutional assembly took place. During this period, and well into the succeeding Nazi era, the official name of the state was German Reich (Deutsches Reich), which continued on from the pre-1918 Imperial period. Following World War I, the republic emerged from the German Revolution in November 1918. In 1919, a national assembly was convened in Weimar, where a new constitution for the German Reich was written, then adopted on 11 August of that same year. In its fourteen years, the Weimar Republic faced numerous problems, including hyperinflation, political extremists (with paramilitaries – both left and right wing) and continuing contentious relationships with the victors of World War I. However, the Weimar Republic successfully reformed the currency, unified tax policies and the railway system and it did eliminate most of the requirements of the Treaty of Versailles, in that Germany never completely met the disarmament requirements, and eventually only paid a small portion of the total reparations required by the treaty, which were reduced twice by restructuring Germany's debt through the Dawes Plan and the Young Plan. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 2218 Audiopedia
History of Europe | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: History of Europe Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The history of Europe covers the peoples inhabiting Europe from prehistory to the present. During the Neolithic era and the time of the Indo-European migrations Europe saw migrations from east and southeast and the following important cultural and material exchange. The period known as classical antiquity began with the emergence of the city-states of ancient Greece. Later, the Roman Empire came to dominate the entire Mediterranean basin. The fall of the Roman Empire in AD 476 traditionally marks the start of the Middle Ages. Beginning in the 14th century a Renaissance of knowledge challenged traditional doctrines in science and theology. Simultaneously, the Protestant Reformation set up Protestant churches primarily in Germany, Scandinavia and England. After 1800, the Industrial Revolution brought prosperity to Britain and Western Europe. The main powers set up colonies in most of the Americas and Africa, and parts of Asia. In the 20th century, World War I and World War II resulted in massive numbers of deaths. The Cold War dominated European geo-politics from 1947 to 1989. Unification into a European Union moved forward after 1950, with some setbacks. Today, most countries west of Russia belong to the NATO military alliance, along with the United States and Canada.
Views: 25 wikipedia tts
German Empire
 
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The German Empire (German: Deutsches Reich or Deutsches Kaiserreich) was the historical German nation state that existed from the unification of Germany in 1871 to the defeat in World War I in 1918, when Germany became a federal republic. The state was the predecessor of today's Germany. The Empire is sometimes called the German Reich (literally: "German Realm"). The German Empire consisted of 27 constituent territories (most of them ruled by royal families). While the Kingdom of Prussia contained most of the population and most of the territory of the Reich, the Prussian leadership became supplanted by German leaders and Prussia itself played a lesser role. As Dwyer (2005) points out, Prussia's "political and cultural influence had diminished considerably" by the 1890s. Its three largest neighbours were rivals: first the Imperial Russia to the east, secondly France to the west and thirdly ally Austria-Hungary to the south. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1517 Audiopedia
Economy of Germany
 
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Germany is the largest national economy in Europe, the fourth-largest by nominal GDP in the world, and fifth by GDP (PPP). Since the age of industrialisation and beyond, the country has been a driver, innovator, and beneficiary of an ever more globalised economy. Germany's economic policy is based on the concept of the social market economy. The country is a founding member of the European Union and the Eurozone. Germany is the third largest exporter in the world with $1.516 trillion exported in 2012. Exports account for more than one-third of national output. In 2013, Germany recorded the highest trade surplus in the world worth $270 billion, making it the biggest capital exporter globally. Germany is the largest producer of lignite in the world. Germany is also rich in timber, iron ore, potash, salt, uranium, nickel, copper and natural gas. Energy in Germany is sourced predominantly by fossil fuels, followed by nuclear power, and by renewable energy like biomass (wood and biofuels), wind, hydro and solar. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1171 Audiopedia
German Empire
 
01:07:17
The German Empire was the historical German nation state that existed from the unification of Germany in 1871 to the defeat in World War 1 in 1918, when Germany became a federal republic. The state was the predecessor of today's Germany. The Empire is sometimes called the German Reich . This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 4810 encyclopediacc
German Empire | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: German Empire Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= The German Empire (German: Deutsches Kaiserreich, officially Deutsches Reich), also known as Imperial Germany, was the German nation state that existed from the Unification of Germany in 1871 until the abdication of Kaiser Wilhelm II in 1918. It was founded in 1871 when south German states, except for Austria, joined the North German Confederation. On 1 January 1871, the new constitution came into force that changed the name of the federal state and introduced the title of emperor for Wilhelm I, King of Prussia from the Hohenzollern dynasty. Berlin remained its capital. Otto von Bismarck remained Chancellor, the head of government. As these events occurred, the Prussian-led North German Confederation and its southern German allies were still engaged in the Franco-Prussian War. The German Empire consisted of 26 states, most of them ruled by noble families. They included four kingdoms, six grand duchies, five duchies (six before 1876), seven principalities, three free Hanseatic cities, and one imperial territory. Although Prussia was one of several kingdoms in the realm, it contained about two thirds of Germany's population and territory. Prussian dominance was also established constitutionally. After 1850, the states of Germany had rapidly become industrialized, with particular strengths in coal, iron (and later steel), chemicals, and railways. In 1871, Germany had a population of 41 million people; by 1913, this had increased to 68 million. A heavily rural collection of states in 1815, the now united Germany became predominantly urban. During its 47 years of existence, the German Empire was an industrial, technological, and scientific giant, gaining more Nobel Prizes in science than any other country. By 1900, Germany was the largest economy in Europe, surpassing the United Kingdom, as well as the second-largest in the world, behind only the United States.From 1867 to 1878/9, Otto von Bismarck's tenure as the first and to this day longest reigning Chancellor was marked by relative liberalism, but it became more conservative afterwards. Broad reforms and the Kulturkampf marked his period in the office. Late in Bismarck's chancellorship and in spite of his personal opposition, Germany became involved in colonialism. Claiming much of the leftover territory that was yet unclaimed in the Scramble for Africa, it managed to build the third-largest colonial empire after the British and the French ones. As a colonial state, it sometimes clashed with other European powers, especially the British Empire. Germany became a great power, boasting a rapidly developing rail network, the world's strongest army, and a fast-growing industrial base. In less than a decade, its navy became second only to Britain's Royal Navy. After the removal of Otto von Bismarck by Wilhelm II in 1890, the Empire embarked on Weltpolitik – a bellicose new course that ultimately contributed to the outbreak of World War I. In addition, Bismarck's successors were incapable of maintaining their predecessor's complex, shifting, and overlapping alliances which had kept Germany from being diplomatically isolated. This period was marked by various factors influencing the Emperor's decisions, which were often perceived as contradictory or unpredictable by the public. In 1879, the German Empire consolidated the Dual Alliance with Austria-Hungary, followed by the Triple Alliance with Italy in 1882. It also retained strong diplomatic ties to the Ottoman Empire. When the great crisis of 1914 arrived, Italy left the alliance and the Ottoman Empire formally allied with Germany. In the First World War, German plans to capture Paris quickly in the autumn of 1914 failed. The war on the Western Front became a stalemate. The Allied naval blockade caused severe shortages of food. However, Imperial Germany had success on the Eastern Front; it occupied a large amount of territory to its east following the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk. The German declaration of unrestri ...
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Erich Ludendorff | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Erich Ludendorff 00:01:41 1 Early life 00:03:29 2 Pre-war military career 00:07:00 3 Liège 00:08:13 4 Command in the East 00:13:18 5 Military duumvirate with Hindenburg 00:15:58 6 The Home Front 00:18:49 7 In government 00:21:07 8 "Peace Offensive" in the West 00:29:53 9 Downfall 00:31:39 10 After the Great War 00:33:19 11 Political career in the Republic 00:38:23 12 Retirement and death 00:40:35 13 In popular culture 00:41:54 14 Decorations and awards 00:42:47 15 Writings 00:42:56 15.1 Books (selection) 00:43:40 15.2 Smaller publications 00:45:01 15.3 As publisher 00:45:18 16 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Erich Friedrich Wilhelm Ludendorff (9 April 1865 – 20 December 1937) was a German general, the victor of the Battle of Liège and the Battle of Tannenberg. From August 1916, his appointment as Quartermaster general (German: Erster Generalquartiermeister) made him the leader (along with Paul von Hindenburg) of the German war efforts during World War I. The failure of Germany's great Spring Offensive in 1918 in quest of total victory was his great strategic failure and he was forced out in October 1918.After the war, Ludendorff became a prominent nationalist leader, and a promoter of the Stab-in-the-back myth, which posited that the German loss in World War I was caused by the betrayal of the German Army by Marxists, Bolsheviks, and Jews who were furthermore responsible for the disadvantageous settlement negotiated for Germany in the Treaty of Versailles. He took part in the failed Kapp Putsch (coup d’état) with Wolfgang Kapp in 1920 and the Beer Hall Putsch of Adolf Hitler in 1923, and in 1925, he ran unsuccessfully for the office of President of Germany against his former superior Hindenburg. From 1924 to 1928, he represented the German Völkisch Freedom Party in the Reichstag (legislature). Consistently pursuing a purely military line of thought after the war, Ludendorff developed the theory of "Total War", which he published as Der totale Krieg (The Total War) in 1935. In this work, he argued that the entire physical and moral forces of the nation should be mobilized, because peace was merely an interval between wars. Ludendorff was a recipient of the Grand Cross of the Iron Cross and the Pour le Mérite.
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Weimar Republic | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Weimar Republic Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Weimar Republic (German: Weimarer Republik [ˈvaɪmaʁɐ ʁepuˈbliːk] (listen)) is an unofficial historical designation for the German state from 1918 to 1933. The name derives from the city of Weimar, where its constitutional assembly first took place. The official name of the state remained Deutsches Reich unchanged from 1871. Although commonly translated as "German Empire", the word Reich here better translates as "realm", in that the term does not in itself have monarchical connotations per se. In English, the country was usually known simply as Germany. Germany became a de facto republic on 9 November 1918 when Kaiser Wilhelm II abdicated the German and Prussian thrones with no agreement made on a succession by his son Crown Prince Wilhelm, and became a de jure republic in February 1919 when the position of President of Germany was created. A national assembly was convened in Weimar, where a new constitution for Germany was written and adopted on 11 August 1919. In its fourteen years, the Weimar Republic faced numerous problems, including hyperinflation, political extremism (with paramilitaries—both left- and right-wing) as well as contentious relationships with the victors of the First World War. Resentment in Germany towards the Treaty of Versailles was strong especially on the political right where there was great anger towards those who had signed the Treaty and submitted to fulfill the terms of it. The Weimar Republic fulfilled most of the requirements of the Treaty of Versailles although it never completely met its disarmament requirements and eventually paid only a small portion of the war reparations (by twice restructuring its debt through the Dawes Plan and the Young Plan). Under the Locarno Treaties, Germany accepted the western borders of the country by abandoning irredentist claims on France and Belgium, but continued to dispute the eastern borders and sought to persuade German-speaking Austria to join Germany as one of Germany's states. From 1930 onwards President Hindenburg used emergency powers to back Chancellors Heinrich Brüning, Franz von Papen and General Kurt von Schleicher. The Great Depression, exacerbated by Brüning's policy of deflation, led to a surge in unemployment. In 1933, Hindenburg appointed Adolf Hitler as Chancellor with the Nazi Party being part of a coalition government. The Nazis held two out of the remaining ten cabinet seats. Von Papen as Vice Chancellor was intended to be the "éminence grise" who would keep Hitler under control, using his close personal connection to Hindenburg. Within months, the Reichstag Fire Decree and the Enabling Act of 1933 had brought about a state of emergency: it wiped out constitutional governance and civil liberties. Hitler's seizure of power (Machtergreifung) was permissive of government by decree without legislative participation. These events brought the republic to an end — as democracy collapsed, the founding of a single-party state began the Nazi era.
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The Vietnam War: Reasons for Failure - Why the U.S. Lost
 
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In the post-war era, Americans struggled to absorb the lessons of the military intervention. About the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0871137992/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0871137992&linkCode=as2&tag=tra0c7-20&linkId=d1bb53399f448906b40e7c954de052ac As General Maxwell Taylor, one of the principal architects of the war, noted, "First, we didn't know ourselves. We thought that we were going into another Korean War, but this was a different country. Secondly, we didn't know our South Vietnamese allies... And we knew less about North Vietnam. Who was Ho Chi Minh? Nobody really knew. So, until we know the enemy and know our allies and know ourselves, we'd better keep out of this kind of dirty business. It's very dangerous." Some have suggested that "the responsibility for the ultimate failure of this policy [America's withdrawal from Vietnam] lies not with the men who fought, but with those in Congress..." Alternatively, the official history of the United States Army noted that "tactics have often seemed to exist apart from larger issues, strategies, and objectives. Yet in Vietnam the Army experienced tactical success and strategic failure... The...Vietnam War...legacy may be the lesson that unique historical, political, cultural, and social factors always impinge on the military...Success rests not only on military progress but on correctly analyzing the nature of the particular conflict, understanding the enemy's strategy, and assessing the strengths and weaknesses of allies. A new humility and a new sophistication may form the best parts of a complex heritage left to the Army by the long, bitter war in Vietnam." U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger wrote in a secret memo to President Gerald Ford that "in terms of military tactics, we cannot help draw the conclusion that our armed forces are not suited to this kind of war. Even the Special Forces who had been designed for it could not prevail." Even Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara concluded that "the achievement of a military victory by U.S. forces in Vietnam was indeed a dangerous illusion." Doubts surfaced as to the effectiveness of large-scale, sustained bombing. As Army Chief of Staff Harold Keith Johnson noted, "if anything came out of Vietnam, it was that air power couldn't do the job." Even General William Westmoreland admitted that the bombing had been ineffective. As he remarked, "I still doubt that the North Vietnamese would have relented." The inability to bomb Hanoi to the bargaining table also illustrated another U.S. miscalculation. The North's leadership was composed of hardened communists who had been fighting for independence for thirty years. They had defeated the French, and their tenacity as both nationalists and communists was formidable. Ho Chi Minh is quoted as saying, "You can kill ten of my men for every one I kill of yours...But even at these odds you will lose and I will win." The Vietnam War called into question the U.S. Army doctrine. Marine Corps General Victor H. Krulak heavily criticised Westmoreland's attrition strategy, calling it "wasteful of American lives... with small likelihood of a successful outcome." In addition, doubts surfaced about the ability of the military to train foreign forces. Between 1965 and 1975, the United States spent $111 billion on the war ($686 billion in FY2008 dollars). This resulted in a large federal budget deficit. More than 3 million Americans served in the Vietnam War, some 1.5 million of whom actually saw combat in Vietnam. James E. Westheider wrote that "At the height of American involvement in 1968, for example, there were 543,000 American military personnel in Vietnam, but only 80,000 were considered combat troops." Conscription in the United States had been controlled by the President since World War II, but ended in 1973." By war's end, 58,220 American soldiers had been killed, more than 150,000 had been wounded, and at least 21,000 had been permanently disabled. According to Dale Kueter, "Sixty-one percent of those killed were age 21 or younger. Of those killed in combat, 86.3 percent were white, 12.5 percent were black and the remainder from other races." The youngest American KIA in the war was PFC Dan Bullock, who had falsified his birth certificate and enlisted in the US Marines at age 14 and who was killed in combat at age 15. Approximately 830,000 Vietnam veterans suffered symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. An estimated 125,000 Americans fled to Canada to avoid the Vietnam draft, and approximately 50,000 American servicemen deserted. In 1977, United States President Jimmy Carter granted a full, complete and unconditional pardon to all Vietnam-era draft dodgers. The Vietnam War POW/MIA issue, concerning the fate of U.S. service personnel listed as missing in action, persisted for many years after the war's conclusion. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vietnam_War
Views: 3960618 The Film Archives
England | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: England Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Scotland to the north and Wales to the west. The Irish Sea lies northwest of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight. The area now called England was first inhabited by modern humans during the Upper Palaeolithic period, but takes its name from the Angles, a Germanic tribe deriving its name from the Anglia peninsula, who settled during the 5th and 6th centuries. England became a unified state in the 10th century, and since the Age of Discovery, which began during the 15th century, has had a significant cultural and legal impact on the wider world. The English language, the Anglican Church, and English law – the basis for the common law legal systems of many other countries around the world – developed in England, and the country's parliamentary system of government has been widely adopted by other nations. The Industrial Revolution began in 18th-century England, transforming its society into the world's first industrialised nation.England's terrain is chiefly low hills and plains, especially in central and southern England. However, there is upland and mountainous terrain in the north (for example, the Lake District and Pennines) and in the west (for example, Dartmoor and the Shropshire Hills). The capital is London, which has the largest metropolitan area in both the United Kingdom and the European Union. England's population of over 55 million comprises 84% of the population of the United Kingdom, largely concentrated around London, the South East, and conurbations in the Midlands, the North West, the North East, and Yorkshire, which each developed as major industrial regions during the 19th century.The Kingdom of England – which after 1535 included Wales – ceased being a separate sovereign state on 1 May 1707, when the Acts of Union put into effect the terms agreed in the Treaty of Union the previous year, resulting in a political union with the Kingdom of Scotland to create the Kingdom of Great Britain. In 1801, Great Britain was united with the Kingdom of Ireland (through another Act of Union) to become the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. In 1922 the Irish Free State seceded from the United Kingdom, leading to the latter being renamed the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
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Forestry
 
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Forestry is the science, art, and craft of creating, managing, using, conserving, and repairing forests and associated resources, in a sustainable manner, to meet desired goals, needs, and values for human benefit. Forestry is practiced in plantations and natural stands.The challenge of forestry is to create systems that are socially accepted while sustaining the resource and any other resources that might be affected. The forest science has elements that belong to the biological, physical, social, political and managerial sciences. Modern forestry generally embraces a broad range of concerns, in what is known as multiple-use management, including the provision of timber, fuel wood, wildlife habitat, natural water quality management, recreation, landscape and community protection, employment, aesthetically appealing landscapes, biodiversity management, watershed management, erosion control, and preserving forests as 'sinks' for atmospheric carbon dioxide. A practitioner of forestry is known as a forester. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
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Leipzig | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Leipzig Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Leipzig (; German: [ˈlaɪptsɪç]) is the most populous city in the federal state of Saxony, Germany. With a population of 591,686 inhabitants as of 30 June 2018, (1.1 million residents in the larger urban zone) it is Germany's tenth most populous city. Leipzig is located about 160 kilometres (99 mi) southwest of Berlin at the confluence of the White Elster, Pleiße and Parthe rivers at the southern end of the North German Plain. Leipzig has been a trade city since at least the time of the Holy Roman Empire. The city sits at the intersection of the Via Regia and the Via Imperii, two important medieval trade routes. Leipzig was once one of the major European centres of learning and culture in fields such as music and publishing. Leipzig became a major urban centre within the German Democratic Republic (East Germany) after the Second World War, but its cultural and economic importance declined.Events in Leipzig in 1989 played a significant role in precipitating the fall of communism in Central and Eastern Europe, mainly through demonstrations starting from St. Nicholas Church. Since the reunification of Germany, Leipzig has undergone significant change with the restoration of some historical buildings, the demolition of others, and the development of a modern transport infrastructure. Leipzig today is an economic centre, the most livable city in Germany, according to the GfK marketing research institution and has the second-best future prospects of all cities in Germany, according to HWWI and Berenberg Bank. Leipzig Zoo is one of the most modern zoos in Europe and ranks first in Germany and second in Europe according to Anthony Sheridan. Since the opening of the Leipzig City Tunnel in 2013, Leipzig forms the centrepiece of the S-Bahn Mitteldeutschland public transit system. Leipzig is currently listed as a Gamma World City, Germany's "Boomtown" and as the European City of the Year 2019.Oper Leipzig has become one of the most prominent opera houses in Germany. It was founded in 1693, making it the third oldest opera venue in Europe after La Fenice (Venice, Italy) and the Hamburg State Opera (Hamburg, Germany). Leipzig is also home to the University of Music and Theatre "Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy". It was during a stay in this city that Friedrich Schiller wrote his poem "Ode to Joy". The Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, established in 1743, is one of the oldest symphony orchestras in the world.
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Forestry | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Forestry Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Forestry is the science and craft of creating, managing, using, conserving, and repairing forests, woodlands, and associated resources for human and environmental benefits. Forestry is practiced in plantations and natural stands. The science of forestry has elements that belong to the biological, physical, social, political and managerial sciences.Modern forestry generally embraces a broad range of concerns, in what is known as multiple-use management, including the provision of timber, fuel wood, wildlife habitat, natural water quality management, recreation, landscape and community protection, employment, aesthetically appealing landscapes, biodiversity management, watershed management, erosion control, and preserving forests as "sinks" for atmospheric carbon dioxide. A practitioner of forestry is known as a forester. Other common terms are: a verderer, or a silviculturalist. Silviculture is narrower than forestry, being concerned only with forest plants, but is often used synonymously with forestry. Forest ecosystems have come to be seen as the most important component of the biosphere, and forestry has emerged as a vital applied science, craft, and technology. Forestry is an important economic segment in various industrial countries. For example, in Germany, forests cover nearly a third of the land area, wood is the most important renewable resource, and forestry supports more than a million jobs and about €181 billion of value to the German economy each year.
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Russian Empire | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Russian Empire Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Russian Empire (Russian: Российская Империя, tr. Rossiyskaya Imperiya) also known as Imperial Russia or simply Russia (Russian: Россия, tr. Rossiya) was an empire that existed across Eurasia and North America from 1721, following the end of the Great Northern War, until the Republic was proclaimed by the Provisional Government that took power after the February Revolution of 1917.The third largest empire in world history, stretching over a massive three continents, the Russian Empire was surpassed in landmass only by the British and Mongol empires. The rise of the Russian Empire happened in association with the decline of neighboring rival powers: the Swedish Empire, the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, Persia and the Ottoman Empire. It played a major role in 1812–1814 in defeating Napoleon's ambitions to control Europe and expanded to the west and south. The House of Romanov ruled the Russian Empire from 1721 until 1762, and its German-descended cadet branch, the House of Holstein-Gottorp-Romanov, ruled from 1762. At the beginning of the 19th century, the Russian Empire extended from the Arctic Ocean in the north to the Black Sea in the south, from the Baltic Sea on the west to the Pacific Ocean, into Alaska and Northern California in America on the east. With 125.6 million subjects registered by the 1897 census, it had the third-largest population in the world at the time, after Qing China and India. Like all empires, it included a large disparity in terms of economics, ethnicity, and religion. There were numerous dissident elements, who launched numerous rebellions and assassination attempts; they were closely watched by the secret police, with thousands exiled to Siberia. Economically, the empire had a predominantly agricultural base, with low productivity on large estates worked by serfs, Russian peasants (until they were freed in 1861). The economy slowly industrialized with the help of foreign investments in railways and factories. The land was ruled by a nobility (the boyars) from the 10th through the 17th centuries, and subsequently by an emperor. Tsar Ivan III (1462–1505) laid the groundwork for the empire that later emerged. He tripled the territory of his state, ended the dominance of the Golden Horde, renovated the Moscow Kremlin, and laid the foundations of the Russian state. Emperor Peter the Great (1682–1725) fought numerous wars and expanded an already huge empire into a major European power. He moved the capital from Moscow to the new model city of St. Petersburg, and led a cultural revolution that replaced some of the traditionalist and medieval social and political mores with a modern, scientific, Europe-oriented, and rationalist system. Empress Catherine the Great (reigned 1762–1796) presided over a golden age; she expanded the state by conquest, colonization and diplomacy, continuing Peter the Great's policy of modernization along West European lines. Emperor Alexander II (1855–1881) promoted numerous reforms, most dramatically the emancipation of all 23 million serfs in 1861. His policy in Eastern Europe involved protecting the Orthodox Christians under the rule of the Ottoman Empire. That connection by 1914 led to Russia's entry into the First World War on the side of France, the United Kingdom, and Serbia, against the German, Austrian, and Ottoman empires. The Russian Empire functioned as an absolute monarchy until the Revolution of 1905 and then became a de jure constitutional monarchy. The empire collapsed during the February Revolution of 1917, largely as a result of massive failures in its participation in the First World War.
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Imperial Russia | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Imperial Russia 00:03:52 1 History 00:04:31 1.1 Population 00:05:08 1.2 Foreign relations 00:05:17 1.3 Eighteenth century 00:05:26 1.3.1 Peter the Great (1672–1725) 00:09:04 1.3.2 Catherine the Great (1762–1796) 00:12:09 1.3.3 State budget 00:13:14 1.4 First half of the nineteenth century 00:18:47 1.5 Second half of the nineteenth century 00:23:31 1.5.1 Alexander III 00:25:02 1.6 Early twentieth century 00:27:59 1.7 War, revolution, collapse 00:30:59 2 Territory 00:31:08 2.1 Boundaries 00:33:14 2.2 Geography 00:33:52 2.3 Territorial development 00:37:34 2.4 Imperial territories 00:39:52 3 Government and administration 00:41:42 3.1 Emperor 00:43:17 3.2 Imperial Council 00:44:31 3.3 State Duma and the electoral system 00:46:42 3.4 Council of Ministers 00:47:48 3.5 Most Holy Synod 00:48:17 3.6 Senate 00:49:15 3.7 Administrative divisions 00:50:37 4 Judicial system 00:52:26 5 Local administration 00:52:54 5.1 Municipal dumas 00:53:57 5.2 Baltic provinces 00:55:08 6 Economy 00:55:17 6.1 Mining and Heavy Industry 00:55:26 7 Infrastructure 00:55:35 7.1 Railways 00:56:44 7.2 Seaports 00:56:53 8 Religion 00:58:30 9 Military 00:59:03 10 Society 01:00:06 10.1 Estates 01:01:23 10.2 Serfdom 01:02:42 10.3 Peasants 01:05:00 10.4 Landowners 01:07:37 10.5 Media 01:08:15 11 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Russian Empire (Russian: Российская Империя, tr. Rossiyskaya Imperiya) also known as Imperial Russia or simply Russia (Russian: Россия, tr. Rossiya) was an empire that existed across Eurasia and North America from 1721, following the end of the Great Northern War, until the Republic was proclaimed by the Provisional Government that took power after the February Revolution of 1917.The third largest empire in world history, stretching over a massive three continents, the Russian Empire was surpassed in landmass only by the British and Mongol empires. The rise of the Russian Empire happened in association with the decline of neighboring rival powers: the Swedish Empire, the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, Persia and the Ottoman Empire. It played a major role in 1812–1814 in defeating Napoleon's ambitions to control Europe and expanded to the west and south. The House of Romanov ruled the Russian Empire from 1721 until 1762, and its German-descended cadet branch, the House of Holstein-Gottorp-Romanov, ruled from 1762. At the beginning of the 19th century, the Russian Empire extended from the Arctic Ocean in the north to the Black Sea in the south, from the Baltic Sea on the west to the Pacific Ocean, into Alaska and Northern California in America on the east. With 125.6 million subjects registered by the 1897 census, it had the third-largest population in the world at the time, after Qing China and India. Like all empires, it included a large disparity in terms of economics, ethnicity, and religion. There were numerous dissident elements, who launched numerous rebellions and assassination attempts; they were closely watched by the secret police, with thousands exiled to Siberia. Economically, the empire had a predominantly agricultural base, with low productivity on large estates worked by serfs, Russian peasants (until they were freed in 1861). The economy slowly industrialized with the help of foreign investments in railways and factories. The land was ruled by a nobility (the boyars) from the 10th through the 17th centuries, and subsequently by an emperor. Tsar Ivan III (1462–1505) laid the groundwork for the empire that later emerged. He tripled the territory of his state, ended the dominance of the Golden Horde, renovated the Moscow Kremlin, and laid the foundations of the Russian state. Emperor Peter the Great (1682–1725) fought numerous wars and expanded an already huge empire into a major European power. He moved the capital from Moscow to the new model city of St. Petersburg, and led a cultural revolution that replaced some of the traditionalist and medieval social a ...
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Poland | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Poland Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= Poland (Polish: Polska [ˈpɔlska] ( listen)), officially the Republic of Poland (Polish: Rzeczpospolita Polska [ʐɛt͡ʂpɔˈspɔlita ˈpɔlska] ( listen)), is a country located in Central Europe. It is divided into 16 administrative subdivisions, covering an area of 312,696 square kilometres (120,733 sq mi), and has a largely temperate seasonal climate. With a population of approximately 38.5 million people, Poland is the sixth most populous member state of the European Union. Poland's capital and largest metropolis is Warsaw. Other major cities include Kraków, Łódź, Wrocław, Poznań, Gdańsk and Szczecin. The establishment of the Polish state can be traced back to A.D. 966, when Mieszko I, ruler of the realm coextensive with the territory of present-day Poland, converted to Christianity. The Kingdom of Poland was founded in 1025, and in 1569 it cemented its longstanding political association with the Grand Duchy of Lithuania by signing the Union of Lublin. This union formed the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, one of the largest (about 1 million km2) and most populous countries of 16th- and 17th-century Europe, with a uniquely liberal political system which adopted Europe's first written national constitution, the Constitution of 3 May 1791. More than a century after the Partitions of Poland at the end of the 18th century, Poland regained its independence in 1918 with the Treaty of Versailles. In September 1939, World War II started with the invasion of Poland by Germany, followed by the Soviet Union invading Poland in accordance with the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact. More than six million Polish citizens perished in the war. In 1947, the Polish People's Republic was established as a satellite state under Soviet influence. In the aftermath of the Revolutions of 1989, most notably through the emergence of the Solidarity movement, the sovereign state of Poland reestablished itself as a presidential democratic republic. Poland is a developed market and regional power. It has the eighth largest and one of the most dynamic economies in the European Union, simultaneously achieving a very high rank on the Human Development Index. Additionally, the Polish Stock Exchange in Warsaw is the largest and most important in Central Europe. Poland is a developed country, which maintains a high-income economy along with very high standards of living, life quality, safety, education and economic freedom. Poland has a developed school educational system. The country provides free university education, state-funded social security and a universal health care system for all citizens. Poland has 15 UNESCO World Heritage Sites, 14 of which are cultural. Poland is a member state of the European Union, the Schengen Area, the United Nations, NATO, the OECD, the Three Seas Initiative, and the Visegrád Group.
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