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RSA Algorithm with solved example using extended euclidean algorithm | CSS series #7
 
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#rsa #deffiehellman #cryptographylectures #lastmomenttuitions Take the Full Course of Cryptography and Network Security What we Provide 1) 20 Videos (Index is given down) + More Update will be Coming Before final exams 2)Hand made Notes with problems for your to practice 3)Strategy to Score Good Marks in Cryptography and Network Scurity To buy the course click https://goo.gl/mpbaK3 if you have any query email us at [email protected] Sample Notes : https://goo.gl/Ze1FpX or Fill the form we will contact you https://goo.gl/forms/2SO5NAhqFnjOiWvi2 Cryptography and System Security Index Lecture 1 Introduction to Cryptography and Security System Lecture 2 Security Goals and Mechanism Lecture 3 Symmetric Cipher Lecture 4 Substitution Cipher Lecture 5 Transposition Cipher Lecture 6 Stream and Block Cipher Lecture 7 Mono Alphabetic Cipher Lecture 8 Poly Alphabetic Cipher Lecture 9 Diffie Hellman Lecture 10 RSA Algorithm with Solved Example Lecture 11 IDEA Algorithm Full Working Lecture 12 SHA-1 Algorithm Full Working Lecture 13 Blowfish Algorithm Full working Lecture 14 DES Algorithm Full Working Lecture 15 Confusion and Diffusion Lecture 16 AES Algorithm Full working Lecture 17 Kerberos Lecture 18 Malicious Software ( Virus and worms ) Lecture 19 DOS and DDOS Attack Lecture 20 Digital Signature Full working Explained More videos Coming Soon.
Views: 280058 Last moment tuitions
Public Key Cryptography - Computerphile
 
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Spies used to meet in the park to exchange code words, now things have moved on - Robert Miles explains the principle of Public/Private Key Cryptography note1: Yes, it should have been 'Obi Wan' not 'Obi One' :) note2: The string of 'garbage' text in the two examples should have been different to illustrate more clearly that there are two different systems in use. http://www.facebook.com/computerphile https://twitter.com/computer_phile This video was filmed and edited by Sean Riley. Computer Science at the University of Nottingham: http://bit.ly/nottscomputer Computerphile is a sister project to Brady Haran's Numberphile. See the full list of Brady's video projects at: http://bit.ly/bradychannels
Views: 428393 Computerphile
Cryptography  -  ElGamal Variants With Better Security (Public key encryption from Diffie Hellman)
 
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Cryptography - ElGamal Variants With Better Security (Public key encryption from Diffie Hellman) To get certificate subscribe: https://www.coursera.org/learn/crypto ======================== Playlist URL: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2jykFOD1AWYosqucluZghEVjUkopdD1e ======================== About this course: Cryptography is an indispensable tool for protecting information in computer systems. In this course you will learn the inner workings of cryptographic systems and how to correctly use them in real-world applications. The course begins with a detailed discussion of how two parties who have a shared secret key can communicate securely when a powerful adversary eavesdrops and tampers with traffic. We will examine many deployed protocols and analyze mistakes in existing systems. The second half of the course discusses public-key techniques that let two parties generate a shared secret key.
Views: 129 intrigano
Cryptography 12.1| The ElGamal Public key System 23 min
 
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Introduction to Cryptography - I ===================== Materials (video, slides, english subtitles) from / Stanford Introduction to Cryptography Slides & Subtitle Link: http://www.mediafire.com/file/rr8pnxag9kpe3g7/Crypto-I.rar/file About this Course: Cryptography is an indispensable tool for protecting information in computer systems. In this course you will learn the inner workings of cryptographic systems and how to correctly use them in real-world applications. The course begins with a detailed discussion of how two parties who have a shared secret key can communicate securely when a powerful adversary eavesdrops and tampers with traffic. We will examine many deployed protocols and analyze mistakes in existing systems. The second half of the course discusses public-key techniques that let two parties generate a shared secret key. Throughout the course participants will be exposed to many exciting open problems in the field and work on fun (optional) programming projects. In a second course (Crypto II) we will cover more advanced cryptographic tasks such as zero-knowledge, privacy mechanisms, and other forms of encryption. SKILLS YOU WILL GAIN During the 66 Video in this Course: 1 - Cryptography, 2 - Cryptographic Attacks, 3 - Public-Key Cryptography, 4 - Symmetric-Key Algorithm,
Views: 54 TO Courses
Recover RSA private key from public keys - rhme2 Key Server (crypto 200)
 
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Using the greatest common divisor (GCD) to factorize the public modulo into the secret primes, so we can forge a RSA signature. Source for the rhme2 challenges: https://github.com/Riscure/Rhme-2016 -=[ 🔴 Stuff I use ]=- → Microphone:* https://amzn.to/2LW6ldx → Graphics tablet:* https://amzn.to/2C8djYj → Camera#1 for streaming:* https://amzn.to/2SJ66VM → Lens for streaming:* https://amzn.to/2CdG31I → Connect Camera#1 to PC:* https://amzn.to/2VDRhWj → Camera#2 for electronics:* https://amzn.to/2LWxehv → Lens for macro shots:* https://amzn.to/2C5tXrw → Keyboard:* https://amzn.to/2LZgCFD → Headphones:* https://amzn.to/2M2KhxW -=[ ❤️ Support ]=- → per Video: https://www.patreon.com/join/liveoverflow → per Month: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClcE-kVhqyiHCcjYwcpfj9w/join -=[ 🐕 Social ]=- → Twitter: https://twitter.com/LiveOverflow/ → Website: https://liveoverflow.com/ → Subreddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/LiveOverflow/ → Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LiveOverflow/ -=[ 📄 P.S. ]=- All links with "*" are affiliate links. LiveOverflow / Security Flag GmbH is part of the Amazon Affiliate Partner Programm. #CTF #Cryptography
Views: 42219 LiveOverflow
The RSA Cryptosystem
 
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Cryptography and Network Security by Prof. D. Mukhopadhyay, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 11743 nptelhrd
Public Key Cryptosystems: Stronger Security from General Assumptions
 
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Public key encryption (PKE) allows parties that had never met in advance to communicate over an unsafe channel. The notion was conceived in the 1970s, followed by the discovery that one could provide formal definitions of security for this and other cryptographic problems, and that such definitions were achievable by assuming the hardness of some computational problem (e.g., factoring large numbers). For PKE, the most basic security definition -- semantic security -- guarantees privacy, namely that it is infeasible to learn anything about the plaintext from its encryption. However, as cryptographic applications grew more sophisticated, this level of security is often not sufficient, since it does not protect against active attacks arising in networked environments. In this talk I will review some of my work aimed at achieving stronger security notions for public key encryption, including protections against adaptive corruptions, man-in-the-middle attacks (non-malleability), chosen ciphertext security, and, if time allows, tampering attacks. The emphasis of this line of work is on achieving the stronger notion from as general an assumption as possible (e.g., directly from semantically secure PKE), as well as achieving a black box construction, namely using the underlying scheme as a subroutine, without assuming it has any special structure or algebraic properties. This allows for more efficient cryptosystems that can be instantiated with a larger set of assumptions. Based on several joint works with different coauthors. The main part of the talk will be based on joint works with Seung Geol Choi, Dana Dachman-Soled, and Hoeteck Wee.
Views: 87 Microsoft Research
cryptography - Discrete Log Based Public Key Encryption
 
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Cryptography To get certificate subscribe: https://www.coursera.org/learn/cryptography ======================== Playlist URL: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2jykFOD1AWb07OLBdFI2QIHvPo3aTTeu ============================ Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/intrigano ============================ https://scsa.ge/en/online-courses/ https://www.facebook.com/cyberassociation/
Views: 579 intrigano
What is HYBRID CRYPTOSYSTEM? What does HYBRID CRYPTOSYSTEM mean? HYBRID CRYPTOSYSTEM meaning
 
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What is HYBRID CRYPTOSYSTEM? What does HYBRID CRYPTOSYSTEM mean? HYBRID CRYPTOSYSTEM meaning - HYBRID CRYPTOSYSTEM definition - HYBRID CRYPTOSYSTEM explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ In cryptography, a hybrid cryptosystem is one which combines the convenience of a public-key cryptosystem with the efficiency of a symmetric-key cryptosystem. Public-key cryptosystems are convenient in that they do not require the sender and receiver to share a common secret in order to communicate securely (among other useful properties). However, they often rely on complicated mathematical computations and are thus generally much more inefficient than comparable symmetric-key cryptosystems. In many applications, the high cost of encrypting long messages in a public-key cryptosystem can be prohibitive. This is addressed by hybrid systems by using a combination of both. A hybrid cryptosystem can be constructed using any two separate cryptosystems: a key encapsulation scheme, which is a public-key cryptosystem, and a data encapsulation scheme, which is a symmetric-key cryptosystem. The hybrid cryptosystem is itself a public-key system, whose public and private keys are the same as in the key encapsulation scheme. Note that for very long messages the bulk of the work in encryption/decryption is done by the more efficient symmetric-key scheme, while the inefficient public-key scheme is used only to encrypt/decrypt a short key value. All practical implementations of public key cryptography today employ the use of a hybrid system. Examples include the TLS protocol which uses a public-key mechanism for key exchange (such as Diffie-Hellman) and a symmetric-key mechanism for data encapsulation (such as AES). The OpenPGP (RFC 4880) file format and the PKCS #7 (RFC 2315) file format are other examples. Example: To encrypt a message addressed to Alice in a hybrid cryptosystem, Bob does the following: 1. Obtains Alice's public key. 2. Generates a fresh symmetric key for the data encapsulation scheme. 3. Encrypts the message under the data encapsulation scheme, using the symmetric key just generated. 4. Encrypt the symmetric key under the key encapsulation scheme, using Alice's public key. 5. Send both of these encryptions to Alice. To decrypt this hybrid ciphertext, Alice does the following: Uses her private key to decrypt the symmetric key contained in the key encapsulation segment. Uses this symmetric key to decrypt the message contained in the data encapsulation segment. If both the key encapsulation and data encapsulation schemes are secure against adaptive chosen ciphertext attacks, then the hybrid scheme inherits that property as well. However, it is possible to construct a hybrid scheme secure against adaptive chosen ciphertext attack even if the key encapsulation has a slightly weakened security definition (though the security of the data encapsulation must be slightly stronger).
Views: 1289 The Audiopedia
Pycon UK 2016: Euler's Key to Cryptography
 
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Timothy John Weaving Cryptography lies at the heart of the modern era; online transactions, authentication and secure network communications all rely on the encryption and decryption of data. This talk begins with a short introduction to RSA Public Key Cryptography and subsequently explores its mathematical foundations; touching upon Euler's totient function, the Extended Euclidean Algorithm and Modular Exponentiation.
Views: 283 PyCon UK
RSA Algorithm using extended euclidian method
 
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In this video I explained how to find encryption and decryption value using extended euclidian method. Notes link : https://drive.google.com/file/d/16hcllzEqSvvtG64G9891xYIt_fvozXUC/view?usp=drivesdk It's Free of Cost. If you have any doubts then you can connect me via G-mail: [email protected] Contact: 7030994979
Views: 485 Exam Partner
The Diffie-Hellman Problem and Security of ElGamal Systems
 
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Cryptography and Network Security by Prof. D. Mukhopadhyay, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 7841 nptelhrd
Provably Secure Key-Aggregate Cryptosystems with Broadcast Aggregate Keys for Online Data Sharing
 
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Provably Secure Key-Aggregate Cryptosystems with Broadcast Aggregate Keys for Online Data Sharing on the Cloud Abstract: Online data sharing for increased productivity and efficiency is one of the primary requirements today for any organization. The advent of cloud computing has pushed the limits of sharing across geographical boundaries, and has enabled a multitude of users to contribute and collaborate on shared data. However, protecting online data is critical to the success of the cloud, which leads to the requirement of efficient and secure cryptographic schemes for the same. Data owners would ideally want to store their data/files online in an encrypted manner, and delegate decryption rights for some of these to users, while retaining the power to revoke access at any point of time. An efficient solution in this regard would be one that allows users to decrypt multiple classes of data using a single key of constant size that can be efficiently broadcast to multiple users. Chu et al. proposed a key aggregate cryptosystem (KAC) in 2014 to address this problem, albeit without formal proofs of security. In this paper, we propose CPA and CCA secure KAC constructions that are efficiently implementable using elliptic curves and are suitable for implementation on cloud based data sharing environments. We lay special focus on how the standalone KAC scheme can be efficiently combined with broadcast encryption to cater to m data users and m' data owners while reducing the reducing the secure channel requirement from O(mm') in the standalone case to O(m + m').
Views: 286 1 Crore Projects
Extended Euclidean Algorithm and Inverse Modulo Tutorial
 
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Using EA and EEA to solve inverse mod.
Views: 394534 Emily Jane
Key Management.
 
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Views: 4143 Internetwork Security
symmetric key cryptography
 
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https://8gwifi.org/CipherFunctions.jsp Reference book: http://leanpub.com/crypto Cryptographic Algorithms generally fall into one of two different categories, or are a combination of both. Symmetric Fast Only provide confidentiality Examples: DES, AES, Blowfish, RC4, RC5 Asymmetric Large mathematical operations make it slower than symmetric algorithms No need for out of band key distribution (public keys are public!) Scales better since only a single key pair needed per individual Can provide authentication and nonrepudiation Examples: RSA, El Gamal, ECC, Diffie-Hellman problem with symmetric key cryptography DES (Data Encryption Standard) 64 bit key that is effectively 56 bits in strength Actual algorithm is called DEA (Data Encryption Algorithm) DES Modes Electronic Code Book Cipher Block Chaining (most commonly used for general purpose encryption) Cipher Feedback Output Feedback Counter Mode (used in IPSec) 3DES 112-bit effective key length Uses either 2 or 3 different smaller keys in one of several modes Modes EEE2/3 EDE2/3 AES NIST replaced DES in 1997 with this Uses the Rijndael algorithm Supports key/block sizes of 128, 192, and 256 bits Uses 10/12/14 rounds as block size increases IDEA (International Data Encryption Algorithm) Operates on 64 bit blocks in 8 rounds with 128 bit key Considered stronger than DES and is used in PGP Blowfish 64 bit block cipher with up to 448 bit key and 16 rounds Designed by Bruce Schneier RC4 Stream cipher with variable key size created by Ron Rivest RC5 Another Rivest cipher Block cipher with 32/64/128 bit blocks and keys up to 2048 bits RC6 Beefier version of RC5 submitted as AES candidate CAST 64 bit block cipher with keys between 40-128 bits with 12-16 rounds depending on key length CAST-256 used 128-bit blocks and keys from 128-256 bits using 48 rounds SAFER (Secure and Fast Encryption Routine) Set of patent-free algorithms in 64 and 128 bit block variants Variation used in Bluetooth Twofish Adapted version of Blowfish with 128 bit blocks, 128-256 bit keys and 16 rounds AES Finalist Kryptografie mit symmetrischem Schlüssel symmetric key cryptography symmetric key cryptography tutorial symmetric key cryptography example symmetric key cryptography vs asymmetric key cryptography symmetric and asymmetric key cryptography symmetric key cryptography Kryptografie mit symmetrischem Schlüssel Kryptographie mit symmetrischem Schlüssel Kryptographie mit symmetrischem Schlüssel Kryptografie mit symmetrischem Schlüssel und asymmetrische Schlüsselkryptographie symmetrische und asymmetrische Schlüsselkryptographie Kryptografie mit symmetrischem Schlüssel
Views: 41444 Zariga Tongy
Diffie Hellman Algorithm with solved example
 
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In this video I explained Diffie Hellman Algorithm with solved Numerical problem. Video is about how two persons can exchange their secret key. Notes link : https://drive.google.com/file/d/1_T5PVcl5NfR_S9p9MEwD42cS2YqN97FJ/view?usp=drivesdk If you have any doubts then you can connect me via: Email : [email protected] Contact : 7030994979
Views: 5125 Exam Partner
Lecture 7: Introduction to Galois Fields for the AES by Christof Paar
 
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For slides, a problem set and more on learning cryptography, visit www.crypto-textbook.com
Public Key Encryption Examples - The advantages of Public Key Encryption
 
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Learn more advanced front-end and full-stack development at: https://www.fullstackacademy.com Public Key Encryption is a cryptographic system that uses pairs of keys: public keys which may be known widely, and private keys known only to the message's recipient. In a public key encryption system, the public key is used to encrypt messages and only the corresponding private key can be used to decrypt them. In this video, we discuss the advantages of this system by giving public key encryption examples. Watch this video to learn: - The basics of cryptography - Common problems in symmetric key encryption - How public key encryption solves some of those problems
Views: 417 Fullstack Academy
Fully Homomorphic Encryption; Bi-Deniable Encryption; We Have The Technology, Now Where Next?
 
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Fully Homomorphic Encryption over the Integers Vinod Vaikuntanathan, Microsoft Research We construct a simple fully homomorphic encryption scheme, using only elementary modular arithmetic. The security of our scheme relies on the hardness of the approximate integer greatest common divisors (gcd) problem -- namely, given a list of integers that are 'near-multiples' of a hidden integer, output that hidden integer. Joint work with Marten van Dijk, Craig Gentry, and Shai Halevi. Bi-Deniable Encryption Chris Peikert, Georgia Tech A *deniable* encryption scheme allows a sender and/or receiver, having already performed some encrypted communication, to produce `fake' but legitimate-looking encryption coins and/or decryption keys that make the ciphertext appear as an encryption of some message other than the `true' one. Deniability is a powerful notion for both theory and practice: apart from its inherent utility for resisting coercion, a deniable scheme is also *noncommitting* (an important property for constructing adaptively secure protocols), and secure under selective-opening attacks. To date, however, known constructions have achieved only limited forms of deniability, requiring at least one party to remain uncoerced, and in some cases using an interactive protocol. Our main result is a *bideniable* public-key cryptosystem, i.e., one in which both the sender and receiver can simultaneously equivocate; we stress that the scheme is noninteractive and involves no external parties. The construction is based on the (worst-case) hardness of lattice problems. This is joint work with Adam O'Neill at Georgia Tech. We Have The Technology, Now Where Next? David Molnar, MSR What will it take to convince people that cryptography makes the cloud safe? How might our favourite cryptographic constructions work together with systems moving to the cloud? I will describe examples where existing policies blocked movement of data or computation to the cloud. I will then discuss trends in cloud audit approaches and in document labeling that may be complementary to the use of cloud cryptography. Finally I will talk about what is required today for storing highly sensitive data on premises in a large company.
Views: 614 Microsoft Research
What is QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY? What does QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY mean?
 
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What is QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY? What does QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY mean? QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY meaning - QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY definition - QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Quantum cryptography is the science of exploiting quantum mechanical properties to perform cryptographic tasks. The best known example of quantum cryptography is quantum key distribution which offers an information-theoretically secure solution to the key exchange problem. Currently used popular public-key encryption and signature schemes (e.g., RSA and ElGamal) can be broken by quantum adversaries. The advantage of quantum cryptography lies in the fact that it allows the completion of various cryptographic tasks that are proven or conjectured to be impossible using only classical (i.e. non-quantum) communication (see below for examples). For example, it is impossible to copy data encoded in a quantum state and the very act of reading data encoded in a quantum state changes the state. This is used to detect eavesdropping in quantum key distribution. History: Quantum cryptography uses Heisenberg's uncertainty principle formulated in 1927, and the No-cloning theorem first articulated by Wootters and Zurek and Dieks in 1982. Werner Heisenberg discovered one of the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics: "At the instant at which the position of the electron is known, its momentum therefore can be known only up to magnitudes which correspond to that discontinuous change; thus, the more precisely the position is determined, the less precisely the momentum is known, and conversely” (Heisenberg, 1927: 174–5). This simply means that observation of quanta changes its behavior. By measuring the velocity of quanta we would affect it, and thereby change its position; if we want to find a quant's position, we are forced to change its velocity. Therefore, we cannot measure a quantum system's characteristics without changing it (Clark, n.d.) and we cannot record all characteristics of a quantum system before those characteristics are measured. The No-cloning theorem demonstrates that it is impossible to create a copy of an arbitrary unknown quantum state. This makes unobserved eavesdropping impossible because it will be quickly detected, thus greatly improving assurance that the communicated data remains private. Quantum cryptography was proposed first by Stephen Wiesner, then at Columbia University in New York, who, in the early 1970s, introduced the concept of quantum conjugate coding. His seminal paper titled "Conjugate Coding" was rejected by IEEE Information Theory Society, but was eventually published in 1983 in SIGACT News (15:1 pp. 78–88, 1983). In this paper he showed how to store or transmit two messages by encoding them in two "conjugate observables", such as linear and circular polarization of light, so that either, but not both, of which may be received and decoded. He illustrated his idea with a design of unforgeable bank notes. In 1984, building upon this work, Charles H. Bennett, of the IBM's Thomas J. Watson Research Center, and Gilles Brassard, of the Université de Montréal, proposed a method for secure communication based on Wiesner's "conjugate observables", which is now called BB84. In 1991 Artur Ekert developed a different approach to quantum key distribution based on peculiar quantum correlations known as quantum entanglement. Random rotations of the polarization by both parties (usually called Alice and Bob) have been proposed in Kak's three-stage quantum cryptography protocol. In principle, this method can be used for continuous, unbreakable encryption of data if single photons are used. The basic polarization rotation scheme has been implemented. The BB84 method is at the basis of quantum key distribution methods. Companies that manufacture quantum cryptography systems include MagiQ Technologies, Inc. (Boston, Massachusetts, United States), ID Quantique (Geneva, Switzerland), QuintessenceLabs (Canberra, Australia) and SeQureNet (Paris, France).
Views: 1526 The Audiopedia
Cryptography active attacks on CPA secure encryption (authenticated encryption)
 
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Cryptography active attacks on CPA secure encryption To get certificate subscribe: https://www.coursera.org/learn/crypto ======================== Playlist URL: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2jykFOD1AWYosqucluZghEVjUkopdD1e ======================== About this course: Cryptography is an indispensable tool for protecting information in computer systems. In this course you will learn the inner workings of cryptographic systems and how to correctly use them in real-world applications. The course begins with a detailed discussion of how two parties who have a shared secret key can communicate securely when a powerful adversary eavesdrops and tampers with traffic. We will examine many deployed protocols and analyze mistakes in existing systems. The second half of the course discusses public-key techniques that let two parties generate a shared secret key.
Views: 181 intrigano
Affine Cipher Encryption
 
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gcd: https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=WA4nP-iPYKE Decryption: http://youtu.be/XFxFPBKFVe8
Views: 26355 Theoretically
Some Comments on the Security of RSA
 
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Cryptography and Network Security by Prof. D. Mukhopadhyay, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 3971 nptelhrd
Application of Elliptic Curves to Cryptography
 
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Cryptography and Network Security by Prof. D. Mukhopadhyay, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 10470 nptelhrd
Encrypted Key Exchange - Applied Cryptography
 
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This video is part of an online course, Applied Cryptography. Check out the course here: https://www.udacity.com/course/cs387.
Views: 3655 Udacity
Attacks : Types of attacks in Network Security | Cryptography | Security Goals in Cryptography
 
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Attacks : Types of attacks in Cryptography | Security Goals in Cryptography Visit Our Channel :- https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxikHwpro-DB02ix-NovvtQ In this lecture we have taught about what are the Types Of Attacks In Cryptography and What are Security Goals In Cryptography. Follow Smit Kadvani on :- Facebook :- https://www.facebook.com/smit.kadvani Instagram :- https://www.instagram.com/the_smit0507 Follow Dhruvan Tanna on :- Facebook :- https://www.facebook.com/dhruvan.tanna1 Instagram :- https://www.instagram.com/dhru1_tanna Follow Keyur Thakkar on :- Facebook :- https://www.facebook.com/keyur.thakka... Instagram :- https://www.instagram.com/keyur_1982 Snapchat :- keyur1610 Follow Ankit Soni on:- Facebook :- https://www.facebook.com/ankitsoni.1511 Instagram :- https://www.instagram.com/ankit_soni1511
Views: 14733 Quick Trixx
Random Oracle Reducibility (Crypto 2011)
 
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Paul Baecher and Marc Fischlin Darmstadt University of Technology, Germany Abstract. We discuss a reduction notion relating the random oracles in two cryptographic schemes A and B. Basically, the random oracle of scheme B reduces to the one of scheme A if any hash function instantiation of the random oracle (possibly still oracle based) which makes A secure also makes B secure. In a sense, instantiating the random oracle in scheme B is thus not more demanding than the one for scheme A. If, in addition, the standard cryptographic assumptions for scheme B are implied by the ones for scheme A, we can conclude that scheme B actually relies on weaker assumptions. Technically, such a conclusion cannot be made given only individual proofs in the random oracle model for each scheme. The notion of random oracle reducibility immediately allows to transfer an uninstantiability result from an uninstantiable scheme B to a scheme A to which the random oracle reduces. We are nonetheless mainly interested in the other direction as a mean to establish hierarchically ordered random-oracle based schemes in terms of security assumptions. As a positive example, we consider the twin Diffie-Hellman (DH) encryption scheme of Cash et al.~(Journal of Cryptology, 2009), which has been shown to be secure under the DH assumption in the random oracle scheme. It thus appears to improve over the related hashed ElGamal encryption scheme which relies on the random oracle model and the strong DH assumption where the adversary also gets access to a decisional DH oracle. As explained above, we complement this believe by showing that the random oracle in the twin DH scheme actually reduces to the one of the hashed ElGamal encryption scheme. We finally discuss further random oracle reductions between common signature schemes like GQ, PSS, and FDH.
Views: 1258 TheIACR
What Is Digital Signature In Cryptography?
 
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In the united states and certain other countries. Digital signature initiative links on law, cryptography and electronic communications 10 dec 2012 these types of cryptographic primitive can be distinguished by the security goals they fulfill (in simple protocol 'appending to a message') entrust is registered trademark entrust, inc. Bitcoin digital signatures (video) microsoft docs. Origin of cryptography, modern cryptosystems, attacks on 19 nov 2014 digital signatures are based public key also known as asymmetric cryptography. Cryptography digital signatures wikibooks, open books for an introduction to signature how do they work? Cgi. How do digital signatures work? Youtube. What is digital signature? Definition from whatis what a are the differences between signature, mac and an introduction to cryptography signatures v2. Entrust is a registered trademark of entrust limited in canada elements applied cryptographydigital signatures with appendix. Digital signatures based cryptographic goals; Message authentication codes (macs)rsa digital signaturecomparison of ecdsa as 2014, installing apps is probably the most common way people use. Digital signatures are one of the most important inventions modern cryptography. Using a public key algorithm such as rsa, digital signature is mathematical scheme for demonstrating the authenticity of signatures are standard element most cryptographic protocol suites, and commonly used software distribution, financial transactions, make sure documents you send electronically authentic. This coupling is established using public key cryptography and 3 oct 2016 over the years, digital signatures have become more secure by adding information to key, different types of cryptography, chapter 9. The problem is how can a user sign What digital signature? Definition from whatis what are the differences between signature, mac and an introduction to cryptography signatures v2. Keys are used to encrypt information. Encrypting information 1 oct 2005 digital signatures are coupled to the electronic document which they apply. Both android and ios require an app to be digitally signed before it 20symmetric key cryptography is a mechanism by which the same used for both this characteristic implement encryption digital signature 130 mar 2017 cryptographic signatures use public algorithms provide data integrity. What is a digital signature? . Chapter 09 digital signatures fi muni. Digital signatures with message recovery. Understanding digital certificates technet microsoft. Learn about digital signatures and other authentication methods. Cryptography digital signatures learn cryptography in simple and easy steps. Crash c
Views: 46 Hadassah Hartman
Bugs in Crypto Implementations
 
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Whether it’s by email, text, or social media platform, the average person will send over 60 messages per day—that's 22,000 messages per year. With billions of messages sent around the world each day, how can you be sure that your messages are safe and secure? Join professor Dan Boneh, one of the world’s leading experts of applied cryptography and network security, in this breakdown of vulnerabilities in WEP and iMessage. This presentation is brought to you by the Stanford Computer Forum and the Stanford Advanced Computer Security Program. If you would like information on how to join the forum and attend the next meeting, see our website: http://forum.stanford.edu/about/howtojoin.php.
Views: 1713 stanfordonline
DES (Contd.).
 
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Views: 7611 Internetwork Security
A Secure Key Predistribution Scheme for WSN Using ECC and HCC
 
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Security in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) is an upcoming research field which is quite different from traditional network security mechanisms.Many applications are dependent on the secure operation of a WSN,and have serious effects if the network is disrupted. Therefore,it is necessary to protect communication between sensor nodes.Key management plays an essential role in achieving security in WSNs.To achieve security, various key predistribution schemes have been proposed in the literature. A secure key management technique in WSN is a real challenging task.In this project, a novel approach to the above problem by making use of Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) and Hyperelliptic Curve Cryptosystem(HECC) is presented.In the proposed scheme, a seed key, which is a distinct point in an elliptic curve, is assigned to each sensor node prior to its deployment. The private key ring for each sensor node is generated using the point doubling mathematical operation over the seed key. When two nodes share a common private key, then a link is established between these two nodes. By suitably choosing the value of the prime field and key ring size, the probability of two nodes sharing the same private key could be increased. The performance is evaluated in terms of connectivity and resilience against node capture. The results show that the performance comaprsion for the proposed scheme ECC and HECC with polynomial genus 2.
Views: 196 VERILOG COURSE TEAM
Stream Cipher.
 
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Views: 8427 Internetwork Security
RSA Conference 2009 Mathematics Award: Victor Miller
 
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Victor S. Miller, IDA Center for Communications Research, Princeton; In 1985, Professor Neal Koblitz, a faculty member in mathematics at the University of Washington, and Dr. Victor Miller, then a scientist at IBM, independently proposed a new approach to public-key cryptography based on elliptic curves. Thanks to its mathematical elegance and efficiency, Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) has achieved far-reaching importance in both academic research and commercial cryptographic systems.
Views: 1595 rsaconf2009
Chosen-ciphertext attack
 
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If you find our videos helpful you can support us by buying something from amazon. https://www.amazon.com/?tag=wiki-audio-20 Chosen-ciphertext attack A chosen-ciphertext attack (CCA) is an attack model for cryptanalysis in which the cryptanalyst gathers information, at least in part, by choosing a ciphertext and obtaining its decryption under an unknown key.In the attack, an adversary has a chance to enter one or more known ciphertexts into the system and obtain the resulting plaintexts. -Video is targeted to blind users Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA image source in video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-7GKQskiDKA
Views: 1321 WikiAudio
Man in the Middle Attack on Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange and Solution using Public-Key Certificates
 
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This video describes the man-in-the-middle attack on Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange with an Example and how to prevent it using public-key certificate
Views: 13642 Natarajan Meghanathan
Lecture 21 (update): SHA-3 Hash Function by Christof Paar
 
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For slides, a problem set and more on learning cryptography, visit www.crypto-textbook.com
Public Key Cryptography w/ JAVA  (tutorial 03) - DHKE w/ Encryption
 
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Public Key Cryptography w/ JAVA (tutorial 03) - DHKE w/ Encryption | Website + download source code @ http://www.zaneacademy.com
Views: 322 zaneacademy
Secret Sharing - Applied Cryptography
 
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This video is part of an online course, Applied Cryptography. Check out the course here: https://www.udacity.com/course/cs387.
Views: 7504 Udacity
Lecture 1: Introduction to Cryptography by Christof Paar
 
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For slides, a problem set and more on learning cryptography, visit www.crypto-textbook.com. The book chapter "Introduction" for this video is also available for free at the website (click "Sample Chapter").
Public-key cryptography
 
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Public-key cryptography, also known as asymmetric cryptography, is a class of cryptographic algorithms which require two separate keys, one of which is secret (or private) and one of which is public. Although different, the two parts of this key pair are mathematically linked. The public key is used to encrypt plaintext or to verify a digital signature; whereas the private key is used to decrypt ciphertext or to create a digital signature. The term "asymmetric" stems from the use of different keys to perform these opposite functions, each the inverse of the other -- as contrasted with conventional ("symmetric") cryptography which relies on the same key to perform both. Public-key algorithms are based on mathematical problems which currently admit no efficient solution that are inherent in certain integer factorization, discrete logarithm, and elliptic curve relationships. It is computationally easy for a user to generate their own public and private key-pair and to use them for encryption and decryption. The strength lies in the fact that it is "impossible" (computationally infeasible) for a properly generated private key to be determined from its corresponding public key. Thus the public key may be published without compromising security, whereas the private key must not be revealed to anyone not authorized to read messages or perform digital signatures. Public key algorithms, unlike symmetric key algorithms, do not require a secure initial exchange of one (or more) secret keys between the parties. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 765 Audiopedia
System Security
 
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Cryptography and Network Security by Prof. D. Mukhopadhyay, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 7329 nptelhrd
Overview on Modern Cryptography
 
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Cryptography and Network Security by Prof. D. Mukhopadhyay, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 35917 nptelhrd