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RELATION BETWEEN VELOCITY, FREQUENCY AND WAVELENGTH
 
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RELATION BETWEEN VELOCITY, FREQUENCY AND WAVELENGTH Visit our website http://itinfohouse.com/ Like on FaceBook: https://www.facebook.com/itinfourdu Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MShaheen193 Join My Utube Adventurer Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/838543996274006/
Wave Period and Frequency
 
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104 - Wave Period and Frequency In this video Paul Andersen explains how the period is the time between wave and the frequency is the number of waves per second. Period is measured in seconds and frequency is measured in Hertz. Wave period and wave frequency are reciprocals of one another. After watching this video you will be able to determine the period (and therefore the frequency) using a position vs. time graph of a wave. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: igjav, Ignacio javier. English: A Simple Red Lamp, Modern Look, July 27, 2011. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bombilla_roja_-_red_Edison_lamp.svg. ———. Italiano: Icona Di Una Lampadina Spenta Realizzata in Svg, June 2, 2012. File:Bombilla amarilla - yellow Edison lamp.svg. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Gray_Edison_lamp.svg. “Wave on a String.” PhET. Accessed April 13, 2015. http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/wave-on-a-string.
Views: 220958 Bozeman Science
Wave motion | Waves | Physics | FuseSchool
 
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All waves can transfer energy from one place to another without transferring any matter. This is done by a series of disturbances or vibrations that carry the energy. Just like the people in their seats, only moving up and down when it’s their turn. Waves can transfer energy through solids, liquids, gases and empty spaces – otherwise known as vacuums. There are two types of waves – which we will look at in more detail in another video, but the basic features are the same. The frequency of a wave is the number of complete waves passing a fixed point in a given amount of time. This time period is usually one second. Frequency is given the symbol f and is measured in units called Hertz. Hertz measure how many complete cycles per second; so how many people in our Mexican wave stand up every second. The frequency and period are often confused. The frequency refers to how often something happens, whereas the period refers to the time it takes to happen. The period of a wave is the time for one complete cycle. So the time taken for one person to stand up, wave and sit down. This would be measured in seconds. When something happens repeatedly we say that the event is periodic and refer to the time for the event to repeat itself. The period of the earth to orbit the sun is 365 days, the period of a day is 24 hours, the period of a typical class at school is 45 minutes. Now for the wavelength… the wavelength is the distance between a point on one wave and the same point on the next wave, for example two peaks or two troughs. Wavelength is given the symbol Lambda from the Greek letter, and is usually measured in metres. Wavelengths can vary hugely in size, x-rays are very short, visible light is here and FM radiowaves are much longer. So we’ve looked at the frequency, period and wavelength so far. Let’s finish with amplitude. As waves travel, they create disturbance. The amplitude of a wave is the distance from the maximum disturbance to its undisturbed position. Think of a very flat sea… and then an incoming wave. The amplitude is the height of the top of the wave from the flat sea. In another video we’ll be looking at the wave speed equation, and connecting wavelengths and frequencies: Wave Equation For now you just need to know what these 4 keys words mean. Frequency, period, wavelength, amplitude SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Traveling Waves: Crash Course Physics #17
 
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Get Your Crash Course Physics Mug here: https://store.dftba.com/products/crashcourse-physics-mug Waves are cool. The more we learn about waves, the more we learn about a lot of things in physics. Everything from earthquakes to music! Ropes can tell us a lot about how traveling waves work so, in this episode of Crash Course Physics, Shini uses ropes (and animated ropes) to talk about how waves carry energy and how different kinds of waves transmit energy differently. -- Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 790257 CrashCourse
10th Class Physics, Ch 11, Ultrasound in Physics - Class 10th Physics
 
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In this online lecture, Ms Vaneeza Abbas explains 10th class Physics Chapter 11 Sound.The topic being discussed is Topic 11.7 Ultrasound in Physics. In this video following sub topics have been taught: - Uses of ultrasound punjab text book board/Sindh text book board/KPK text book board 10th Class book 2 lecture is conducted in Urdu/hindi/English. This lecture for 10th class Physics chapter 11 is created for all students who want to prepare this topic in detail. For more videos of Vaneeza Abbas visit https://www.ilmkidunya.com/study/10th-class-physics/simple-harmonic-motion-and-waves.aspx If you have any questions about this lecture on 10th Class Physics ch 11, you can go to https://www.instutor.com/10th-class/physics/sound
Views: 11109 ilmkidunya
The Wave Equation - why speed = frequency x wavelength
 
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This short video defines frequency, time period, wavelength and wave speed, and explains why wave speed = frequency multiplied by wavelength, and gives a few example calculations.
Views: 18197 Ben Ryder
What is The Schrödinger Equation, Exactly?
 
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Sign up to brilliant.org to receive a 20% discount with this link! https://brilliant.org/upandatom/ *My Quantum Physics Essay* https://drive.google.com/file/d/1w2gICWIBEOKBEHx_LvYDVQPp6o2ODAR-/view?usp=sharing Hi! I'm Jade. Subscribe to Up and Atom for new physics, math and computer science videos every two weeks! *SUBSCRIBE TO UP AND ATOM* https://www.youtube.com/c/upandatom *Follow me: @upndatom TWITTER: https://twitter.com/upndatom?lang=en INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/upndatom/ Check out this PlayList for more quantum physics! https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1lNrW4e0G8WmWpW846oE_m92nw3rlOpz A big thank you to my AMAZING PATRONS! Alan McNea, Daniel Tan-Holmes, Simon Mackenzie, Yoseph, Andrew Pann, Dave, Anne Tan, Todd Loreman, David, Susan Jones, Marc Watkins, Stephen Veitch, Renato Pereira, Simon Dargaville, Dean Madden, Noah McCann, Robert Frieske, Magesh. If you'd like to consider supporting Up and Atom, head over to my Patreon page :) https://www.patreon.com/upandatom For a one time donation, head over to my PayPal :) https://www.paypal.me/upandatom Other videos you might like: What is a Singularity, Exactly? https://youtu.be/NLQNBfI97Ck Y CN U R34D DIS? https://youtu.be/_PG-jJKB_do *Music* https://www.epidemicsound.com/
Views: 533011 Up and Atom
How to Relation between frequency and speed
 
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Let speed is N rpm (rotation per minutes) n=N/60 rps ( rotation per second) rps= rotation per second which is nothing but frequency frequency= N/60 (for one pole pair) For P pole, pole pair will be P/2 Hence for p pole pair frequency is given by, f= (p/2)×(N/60) f=PN/120
Waves
 
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Mr. Andersen introduces the concept of waves. Both transverse and logitudinal waves are described. The relationship between wave speed, wave frequency and wavelength is also included. Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License
Views: 129929 Bozeman Science
10th Class Physics, Ch 10,Waves as Carriers of Energy - Class 10th Physics
 
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In this online lecture, Ms Vaneeza Abbas explains 10th class Physics Chapter 10 Simple harmonic Motion and Waves.The topic being discussed is Topic 10.4 Types of Mechanical Waves. In this video following sub topics have been taught: - Waves as Carriesrs of Energy - Relation Betwwen Velocity,Frequency,& Wavelength punjab text book board/Sindh text book board/KPK text book board 10th Class book 2 lecture is conducted in Urdu/hindi/English. This lecture for 9th class Physics chapter 10 is created for all students who want to prepare this topic in detail. For more videos of Vaneeza Abbas visit https://www.ilmkidunya.com/study/10th-class-physics/simple-harmonic-motion-and-waves.aspx If you have any questions about this lecture on 9th Class Physics ch 10, you can go to https://www.instutor.com/10th-class/physics/simple-harmonic-motion-and-waves
Views: 14538 ilmkidunya
Interference, Reflection, and Diffraction
 
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Light and sound waves do all kinds of cool stuff, because they can be in the same place at the same time, unlike matter. This creates patterns that are important to understand! Let's take a look. Wave simulator: https://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/wave-on-a-string To support this channel and keep up on STEM news at the same time, click on the link below and subscribe to this FREE newsletter: http://www.jdoqocy.com/click-9021241-13591026 Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveSubscribe [email protected] http://patreon.com/ProfessorDaveExplains http://professordaveexplains.com http://facebook.com/ProfessorDaveExpl... http://twitter.com/DaveExplains Classical Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics1 Modern Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics2 Mathematics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveMaths General Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveGenChem Organic Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveOrgChem Biochemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBiochem Biology Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBio American History Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveAmericanHistory
Views: 131985 Professor Dave Explains
10th Class Physics, Ch 10, Reflection of Ripple Tank - Class 10th Physics
 
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In this online lecture, Ms Vaneeza Abbas explains 10th class Physics Chapter 10 Simple harmonic Motion and Waves.The topic being discussed is Topic 10.5 Ripple Tank. In this video following sub topics have been taught: - Reflection punjab text book board/Sindh text book board/KPK text book board 10th Class book 2 lecture is conducted in Urdu/hindi/English. This lecture for 9th class Physics chapter 10 is created for all students who want to prepare this topic in detail. For more videos of Vaneeza Abbas visit https://www.ilmkidunya.com/study/10th-class-physics/simple-harmonic-motion-and-waves.aspx If you have any questions about this lecture on 10th Class Physics ch 10, you can go to https://www.instutor.com/10th-class/physics/simple-harmonic-motion-and-waves
Views: 22317 ilmkidunya
10th Class Physics, Ch 11,Sound Intensity Level - Class 10th Physics
 
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In this online lecture, Ms Vaneeza Abbas explains 10th class Physics Chapter 11 Sound.The topic being discussed is Topic 11.2 Characteristics of Sound. In this video following sub topics have been taught: - Quality - Intensity - Sound Intensity Level punjab text book board/Sindh text book board/KPK text book board 10th Class book 2 lecture is conducted in Urdu/hindi/English. This lecture for 10th class Physics chapter 11 is created for all students who want to prepare this topic in detail. For more videos of Vaneeza Abbas visit https://www.ilmkidunya.com/study/10th-class-physics/simple-harmonic-motion-and-waves.aspx If you have any questions about this lecture on 10th Class Physics ch 11, you can go to https://www.instutor.com/10th-class/physics/sound
Views: 41478 ilmkidunya
Light Is Waves: Crash Course Physics #39
 
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The way light behaves can seem very counter intuitive, and many physicists would agree with that, but once you figure out light waves it all starts to make more sense! In this episode of Crash Course Physics, Shini shows us how we know that light exists as a wave and why that's really cool! Want more Crash Course in person? We'll be at NerdCon: Nerdfighteria in Boston on February 25th and 26th! For more information, go to http://www.nerdconnerdfighteria.com/ *** Get your own Crash Course Physics mug from DFTBA: http://store.dftba.com/products/crash... The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... -- Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 508067 CrashCourse
GCSE Science Physics (9-1) Properties of Waves
 
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Find my revision workbooks here: https://www.freesciencelessons.co.uk/workbooks/shop/ In this video, we explore several key properties of waves. These include amplitude, wavelength, frequency and period. Deliberate Thought by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/?keywords=deliberate+thought Artist: http://incompetech.com/
Views: 139816 Freesciencelessons
Sound: Crash Course Physics #18
 
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Get Your Crash Course Physics Mug here: https://store.dftba.com/products/crashcourse-physics-mug We learn a lot about our surroundings thanks to sound. But... what is it exactly? Sound, that is. What is sound? And how does it travel? And what is this Doppler Effect that we've heard so much about? In this episode of Crash Course Physics, Shini goes over some of the basics (and some of the not so basics) of the Physics of Sound. -- Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 703626 CrashCourse
Doppler Effect - GCSE IGCSE 9-1 Physics - Science - Succeed In your GCSE and IGCSE
 
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A secondary education revision video to help you succeed in your Science GCSE. Let Mr Thornton simplify how The Doppler Effect works - it's easy when you know how! No unnecessary information, just the stuff you need to know for GCSE Science revision, in a short, sweet video, to help you Succeed In your GCSE and IGCSE! See the video on Red Shift here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ldEzn1Dh2A Use the ripple tank simulator here: http://www.falstad.com/ripple/fullscreen.html Try the Snapquiz: http://www.snapquiz.co.uk Get the app at: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.coraxlabs.snapquiz Download a revision guide for Kindle at http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B01BBTP986 Check out my 2nd chanel at http://www.youtube.com/notschool Check my tumblr at http://getthatsci.tumblr.com for cool science news, and my twitter at http://twitter.com/mrthorntonuk for regular updates. Please note that this video relates specifically to British GCSE specifications, though it is likely to be useful for other courses too. DISCLAIMER: These videos are a revision guide designed to help students understand the requirements of the GCSE Science course, specifically the course specification(s) mentioned above. Although I say I can "help" students succeed, this should in no way be interpreted as a binding promise that they will definitely achieve any particular final grade. I offer expert guidance to try to improve a student's chances, but as there are so many factors beyond my control, I am unable to make any guarantee about the content of any exams or controlled assessments beyond any restatements of the relevant section or sections of the course specification(s). In my experience, a student's final grade is mainly dependent upon the quantity and quality of preparation he or she puts in. All I can do is try to optimise this preparation. In short, no-one can guarantee a grade; I'm just here to help.
Views: 3667 Christopher Thornton
10th Class Physics, Ch 10, Ripple Tank - Class 10th Physics
 
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In this online lecture, Ms Vaneeza Abbas explains 10th class Physics Chapter 10 Simple harmonic Motion and Waves.The topic being discussed is Topic 10.5 Ripple Tank. punjab text book board/Sindh text book board/KPK text book board 10th Class book 2 lecture is conducted in Urdu/hindi/English. This lecture for 9th class Physics chapter 10 is created for all students who want to prepare this topic in detail. For more videos of Vaneeza Abbas visit https://www.ilmkidunya.com/study/10th-class-physics/simple-harmonic-motion-and-waves.aspx If you have any questions about this lecture on 9th Class Physics ch 10, you can go to https://www.instutor.com/10th-class/physics/simple-harmonic-motion-and-waves
Views: 33825 ilmkidunya
Waves as Carriers of Energy
 
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Physics_p-9-10-shm-15.mp4
Views: 2696 Sabaq. Pk
Refraction and Snell's law | Geometric optics | Physics | Khan Academy
 
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Refraction and Snell's Law. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/physics/geometric-optics/reflection-refraction/v/refraction-in-water?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=physics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/physics/geometric-optics/reflection-refraction/v/specular-and-diffuse-reflection-2?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=physics Physics on Khan Academy: Physics is the study of the basic principles that govern the physical world around us. We'll start by looking at motion itself. Then, we'll learn about forces, momentum, energy, and other concepts in lots of different physical situations. To get the most out of physics, you'll need a solid understanding of algebra and a basic understanding of trigonometry. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Physics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0oGarQW2lE5PxhGoQAKV7Q?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 710921 Khan Academy
10th Class Physics, Ch 11, Audible Frequency Range - Class 10th Physics
 
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In this online lecture, Ms Vaneeza Abbas explains 10th class Physics Chapter 11 Sound.The topic being discussed is Topic 11.6 Audible Frequency Range. punjab text book board/Sindh text book board/KPK text book board 10th Class book 2 lecture is conducted in Urdu/hindi/English. This lecture for 10th class Physics chapter 11 is created for all students who want to prepare this topic in detail. For more videos of Vaneeza Abbas visit https://www.ilmkidunya.com/study/10th-class-physics/simple-harmonic-motion-and-waves.aspx If you have any questions about this lecture on 10th Class Physics ch 11, you can go to https://www.instutor.com/10th-class/physics/sound
Views: 5831 ilmkidunya
Interference of Waves | Superposition and Interference in light and water waves | Physics
 
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Interference of Waves | Interference and superposition explained in light and water waves with animation | Interference of waves in two dimensions | Physics The phenomena of the light which undergoes refraction and reflection by be explained by the 2 theories of light. They are corpuscular and wave theory of light. But some of the other phenomena such as interference and diffraction can only be explained by wave theory of light. We know that 2 or more wave, motions travel in space at the same time. Sometimes these 2 wave motions combine to and some physical effects take place. Inference is once such physical effect. When 2 or more waves cross each other in the same medium, they both interfere and accident takes. This accident is known as interference of waves. Interference is the combine effect of the disturbance caused by the each individual wave at the same place and at same time. This effect can be understood from the principle of superposition of waves. Principle Of superposition of waves: To understand this concept of the superposition, let's understand some of the examples. When we drop a pin in a tank, we see some circular waves. When other another pin is dropped, we see some more waves. These waves travel in the same tank and some or the other time these superimpose on each other. The resultant wave would have amplitude which is the sum of the displacement due to the individual waves. " The principle of superposition of waves states that when two or more waves travel through the same medium simultaneously, the resultant displacement at any point is the vector sum if the displacement due to the individual waves." In our case the pin is dropped in a ripple tank with 2 pins. If Y1 is the displacement caused at a point due to the first source and Y2 is the displace cause by the 2nd source, then the over displacement R at the point of interference would given by R=Y1+Y2 When both the sources have the same amplitude which then Y1,Y 2 would be equal to Y. When Y1 is due the crest or trough and Y2 is also due a crest or trough the resultant would be the maximum and when Y1 is due to a crest and Y2 is due to a trough or vice versa, the displacement would be minimum. When maximum displacement takes place it's called constructive superposition and when minimum displacement takes place it's called the destructive superposition. In constructive displacement, a maximum displacement curve is produced. Thus, when constructive displacement occurs then the phase difference between the waves would be ZERO or a multiple of 2π. When minimum displacement occurs, wave super impose destructively, the phase difference of the waves would be π or an odd integral multiple of the π. Interference of waves: When superposition of waves occurs, they could be constructive or destructive. This physical effort observed as a result of the superposition of waves is called interference. "The physical effect of the superposition of waves from the sources vibrating with the same frequency and amplitude is called the interference of waves. The physical effect is in the form of vibrations in the amplitude of resultant wave in a given potion of the medium" Interference is a special case of superposition of waves which originate from different sources but have the same amplitude, same frequency.
Views: 344626 Elearnin
Prof. Troy Carter: Fundamental Processes in Plasma Physics
 
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If you toss a stone onto a pond, waves ripple from the splash. You hear sounds because of tiny pressure waves that reach your ear. Waves are periodic changes in density or energy or temperature that move across space carrying information about their environment. Plasmas – ionized gases, composed of a mixture of positive ions, negative electrons and neutral particles – also have waves. These waves are often the “sloshing” of negative charges in the electric field of positive charges, and can be made very intricate by applying magnetic fields. Plasma waves dominate much of the behavior of the tenuous plasma in the magnetic field surrounding the earth and in interstellar space. In this video, Prof. Troy Carter of the University of California at Los Angeles describes his research into uncovering the intricacies of plasma waves.
1 - Class 12 - Physics - Wave Optics - Wave front and Huygens’s principle
 
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Explanation about formation of wave front and Huygens’s principle in which, each point in a wave is a source of secondary waves of the same frequency and wavelength and these secondary waves form a new wave front that advances through the medium. To view other chapter videos please purchase from our site https://www.scholarswing.in
Views: 17697 Scholarswing
Zero Point Energy (हिन्दी मे) || अन्तत ऊर्जा का श्रोत जो मिनटो मे ले जाएगा सोर मंडल से बाहर (1080p )
 
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Quantum mechanics predicts the existence of what are usually called ''zero-point'' energies for the strong, the weak and the electromagnetic interactions, where ''zero-point'' refers to the energy of the system at temperature T=0, or the lowest quantized energy level of a quantum mechanical system. Although the term ''zero-point energy'' applies to all three of these interactions in nature, customarily (and hereafter in this article) it is used in reference only to the electromagnetic case. In conventional quantum physics, the origin of zero-point energy is the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, which states that, for a moving particle such as an electron, the more precisely one measures the position, the less exact the best possible measurement of its momentum (mass times velocity), and vice versa. The least possible uncertainty of position times momentum is specified by Planck's constant, h. A parallel uncertainty exists between measurements involving time and energy (and other so-called conjugate variables in quantum mechanics). This minimum uncertainty is not due to any correctable flaws in measurement, but rather reflects an intrinsic quantum fuzziness in the very nature of energy and matter springing from the wave nature of the various quantum fields. This leads to the concept of zero-point energy. Zero-point energy is the energy that remains when all other energy is removed from a system. This behaviour is demonstrated by, for example, liquid helium. As the temperature is lowered to absolute zero, helium remains a liquid, rather than freezing to a solid, owing to the irremovable zero-point energy of its atomic motions. (Increasing the pressure to 25 atmospheres will cause helium to freeze.) A harmonic oscillator is a useful conceptual tool in physics. Classically a harmonic oscillator, such as a mass on a spring, can always be brought to rest. However a quantum harmonic oscillator does not permit this. A residual motion will always remain due to the requirements of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, resulting in a zero-point energy, equal to 1/2 hf, where f is the oscillation frequency. Electromagnetic radiation can be pictured as waves flowing through space at the speed of light. The waves are not waves of anything substantive, but are ripples in a state of a theoretically defined field. However these waves do carry energy (and momentum), and each wave has a specific direction, frequency and polarization state. Each wave represents a ''propagating mode of the electromagnetic field.'' Each mode is equivalent to a harmonic oscillator and is thus subject to the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. From this analogy, every mode of the field must have 1/2 hf as its average minimum energy. That is a tiny amount of energy in each mode, but the number of modes is enormous, and indeed increases per unit frequency interval as the square of the frequency. The spectral energy density is determined by the density of modes times the energy per mode and thus increases as the cube of the frequency per unit frequency per unit volume. The product of the tiny energy per mode times the huge spatial density of modes yields a very high theoretical zero-point energy density per cubic centimeter. From this line of reasoning, quantum physics predicts that all of space must be filled with electromagnetic zero-point fluctuations (also called the zero-point field) creating a universal sea of zero-point energy. The density of this energy depends critically on where in frequency the zero-point fluctuations cease. Since space itself is thought to break up into a kind of quantum foam at a tiny distance scale called the Planck scale (10-33 cm), it is argued that the zero point fluctuations must cease at a corresponding Planck frequency (1043 Hz). If that is the case, the zero-point energy density would be 110 orders of magnitude greater than the radiant energy at the center of the Sun. How could such an enormous energy not be wildly evident? There is one major difference between zero-point electromagnetic radiation and ordinary electromagnetic radiation. Turning again to the Heisenberg uncertainty principle one finds that the lifetime of a given zero-point photon, viewed as a wave, corresponds to an average distance traveled of only a fraction of its wavelength. Such a wave ''fragment'' is somewhat different than an ordinary plane wave and it is difficult to know how to interpret this. On the other hand, zero-point energy appears to have been directly measured as current noise in a resistively shunted Josephson junction by Koch, van Harlingen and Clarke up to a frequency of about 0.6 Tz. ✳️Follow me on 👇👇 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Beyond-Sci-F... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/?hl=en Twitter: https://mobile.twitter.com/PrashantBa...
Views: 117 Beyond Sci Fact
What is CAPILLARY WAVE? What does CAPILLARY WAVE mean? CAPILLARY WAVE meaning & explanation
 
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What is CAPILLARY WAVE? What does CAPILLARY WAVE mean? CAPILLARY WAVE meaning - CAPILLARY WAVE definition - CAPILLARY WAVE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ A capillary wave is a wave traveling along the phase boundary of a fluid, whose dynamics and phase velocity are dominated by the effects of surface tension. Capillary waves are common in nature, and are often referred to as ripples. The wavelength of capillary waves in water is typically less than a few centimeters, with a phase speed in excess of 0.2 meter/second. A higher wavelength on a fluid interface will result in gravity–capillary waves which are influenced by both the effects of surface tension and gravity, as well as by fluid inertia. Ordinary gravity waves have a still higher wavelength. When generated by light wind in open water, a nautical name for them is cat's paw waves, since they may resemble paw prints. Light breezes which stir up such small ripples are also sometimes referred to as cat's paws. On the open ocean, much larger ocean surface waves (seas and swells) may result from coalescence of smaller wind-caused ripple-waves.
Views: 537 The Audiopedia
Zero Point Energy || A key for the TIME TRAVEL and source of infinite energy(1080p)
 
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Quantum mechanics predicts the existence of what are usually called ''zero-point'' energies for the strong, the weak and the electromagnetic interactions, where ''zero-point'' refers to the energy of the system at temperature T=0, or the lowest quantized energy level of a quantum mechanical system. Although the term ''zero-point energy'' applies to all three of these interactions in nature, customarily (and hereafter in this article) it is used in reference only to the electromagnetic case. In conventional quantum physics, the origin of zero-point energy is the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, which states that, for a moving particle such as an electron, the more precisely one measures the position, the less exact the best possible measurement of its momentum (mass times velocity), and vice versa. The least possible uncertainty of position times momentum is specified by Planck's constant, h. A parallel uncertainty exists between measurements involving time and energy (and other so-called conjugate variables in quantum mechanics). This minimum uncertainty is not due to any correctable flaws in measurement, but rather reflects an intrinsic quantum fuzziness in the very nature of energy and matter springing from the wave nature of the various quantum fields. This leads to the concept of zero-point energy. Zero-point energy is the energy that remains when all other energy is removed from a system. This behaviour is demonstrated by, for example, liquid helium. As the temperature is lowered to absolute zero, helium remains a liquid, rather than freezing to a solid, owing to the irremovable zero-point energy of its atomic motions. (Increasing the pressure to 25 atmospheres will cause helium to freeze.) A harmonic oscillator is a useful conceptual tool in physics. Classically a harmonic oscillator, such as a mass on a spring, can always be brought to rest. However a quantum harmonic oscillator does not permit this. A residual motion will always remain due to the requirements of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, resulting in a zero-point energy, equal to 1/2 hf, where f is the oscillation frequency. Electromagnetic radiation can be pictured as waves flowing through space at the speed of light. The waves are not waves of anything substantive, but are ripples in a state of a theoretically defined field. However these waves do carry energy (and momentum), and each wave has a specific direction, frequency and polarization state. Each wave represents a ''propagating mode of the electromagnetic field.'' Each mode is equivalent to a harmonic oscillator and is thus subject to the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. From this analogy, every mode of the field must have 1/2 hf as its average minimum energy. That is a tiny amount of energy in each mode, but the number of modes is enormous, and indeed increases per unit frequency interval as the square of the frequency. The spectral energy density is determined by the density of modes times the energy per mode and thus increases as the cube of the frequency per unit frequency per unit volume. The product of the tiny energy per mode times the huge spatial density of modes yields a very high theoretical zero-point energy density per cubic centimeter. From this line of reasoning, quantum physics predicts that all of space must be filled with electromagnetic zero-point fluctuations (also called the zero-point field) creating a universal sea of zero-point energy. The density of this energy depends critically on where in frequency the zero-point fluctuations cease. Since space itself is thought to break up into a kind of quantum foam at a tiny distance scale called the Planck scale (10-33 cm), it is argued that the zero point fluctuations must cease at a corresponding Planck frequency (1043 Hz). If that is the case, the zero-point energy density would be 110 orders of magnitude greater than the radiant energy at the center of the Sun. How could such an enormous energy not be wildly evident? There is one major difference between zero-point electromagnetic radiation and ordinary electromagnetic radiation. Turning again to the Heisenberg uncertainty principle one finds that the lifetime of a given zero-point photon, viewed as a wave, corresponds to an average distance traveled of only a fraction of its wavelength. Such a wave ''fragment'' is somewhat different than an ordinary plane wave and it is difficult to know how to interpret this. On the other hand, zero-point energy appears to have been directly measured as current noise in a resistively shunted Josephson junction by Koch, van Harlingen and Clarke up to a frequency of about 0.6 Tz. Edited by: Prashant Banerjee Voice by: Prashant Banerjee ✳️Follow me on 👇👇 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Beyond-Sci-F... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/?hl=en Twitter: https://mobile.twitter.com/PrashantBa... #ZeroPointEnergy #TimeTravel #InfiniteEnergy
Views: 156 Beyond Sci Fact
Physics Lab Demo 14: Ripple Tank
 
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A physics lab demo of the ripple tank.
Views: 185097 CarletonPhysics
The Doppler Effect: what does motion do to waves?
 
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A visual explanation of the Doppler effect. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/1NtFJuf Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Alt-Shift-X/300119650155615 Twitter: https://twitter.com/AltShiftX Tumblr: http://altshiftx.tumblr.com/ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/AltShiftX Created with Toon Boom Studio 6. Car sound: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Speeding-car-horn_doppler_effect_sample.ogg Night sky image: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Vermont_night_sky_stargazing.JPG Video from The Big Bang Theory is the property of its creators, used here under fair use.
Views: 1358783 Alt Shift X
The Quantum Experiment that Broke Reality | Space Time | PBS Digital Studios
 
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The double slit experiment radically changed the way we understand reality. To check out any of the lectures available from The Great Courses Plus go to http://ow.ly/QVaz302duhX and get ready to learn about everything from cooking to calculus. Get your own Space Time t­shirt at http://bit.ly/1QlzoBi Tweet at us! @pbsspacetime Facebook: facebook.com/pbsspacetime Email us! pbsspacetime [at] gmail [dot] com Comment on Reddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/pbsspacetime Support us on Patreon! http://www.patreon.com/pbsspacetime Help translate our videos! http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?tab=2&c=UC7_gcs09iThXybpVgjHZ_7g The double slit experiment radically changed the way we understand reality. Find out what the ramifications of this experiment were and how we can use it to better comprehend our universe. Written and hosted by Matt O’Dowd Made by Kornhaber Brown (www.kornhaberbrown.com) Previous Episode https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJ2RNBAFLj0 The Planck Length and the Origin of Quantum Mechanics https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tQSbms5MDvY Veritasium and the Double Slit Experiment https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GzbKb59my3U Is Quantum Tunneling Faster than Light? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-IfmgyXs7z8 Comments by: Jason Blank https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_NqbRcwWwPw&lc=z13mhf0rcurtybftb23nf3yalruqvx2dm Deisisase https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_NqbRcwWwPw&lc=z13uifuzxlr3xvc1022ly1jo4uijfjhgj04 Bike Jake https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_NqbRcwWwPw&lc=z13mcnhbglncgpbc122wgxsabw31xdvqw04 An Imposter https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_NqbRcwWwPw&lc=z12hyl5z4lvsjdihn04cgbhbsnnivhbgdqw0k
Views: 3606364 PBS Space Time
WAVE PARAMETERS
 
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PHYSICS - WAVES LECTURE BY SANJIV SIR RGT CLASSES, SAMPLE LECTURE
Views: 705 EDU MANTRA
Characteristics of Wave
 
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Physics_p-9-10-shm-11.mp4
Views: 3017 Sabaq. Pk
Ripple Tank and Its working Class 10th Physics Tutorials
 
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Ripple Tank and Its working Class 10th Physics Tutorials This is a simulation of a ripple tank. It demonstrates waves in two dimensions, including such wave phenomena as interference, diffraction (single slit, double slit, ... Visit out web site http://itinfohouse.com/ Like on FaceBook: https://www.facebook.com/itinfourdu Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MShaheen193 Join My Utube Adventurer Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/838543996274006/
Measuring Waves | GCSE  Science | Physics
 
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This video is all about frequency, wavelength, amplitude, period, and wave speed. You will learn all the necessary definitions and the wave speed equation. Make sure you've watched the first video: "What is a wave?".
Views: 545 GetToKnowScience
High-frequency capillary waves excited by oscillating microbubbles
 
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This fluid dynamics video shows high-frequency capillary waves excited by the volumetric oscillations of microbubbles near a free surface. The frequency of the capillary waves is controlled by the oscillation frequency of the microbubbles, which are driven by an ultrasound field. Radial capillary waves produced by single bubbles and interference patterns generated by the superposition of capillary waves from multiple bubbles are shown. The video is an entry for the 2013 APS-DFD Gallery of Fluid Motion. Article available at http://arxiv.org/abs/1310.3501
Views: 1079 garbin lab
10th Class Physics, Ch 10, Define Wave Motion - Class 10th Physics
 
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In this online lecture, Ms Vaneeza Abbas explains 10th class Physics Chapter 10 Simple harmonic Motion and Waves.The topic being discussed is Topic 10.3 Wave Motion. In this video following sub topics have been taught: - Mechanical waves - Electromagnetic Waves punjab text book board/Sindh text book board/KPK text book board 10th Class book 2 lecture is conducted in Urdu/hindi/English. This lecture for 9th class Physics chapter 10 is created for all students who want to prepare this topic in detail. For more videos of Vaneeza Abbas visit https://www.ilmkidunya.com/study/10th-class-physics/simple-harmonic-motion-and-waves.aspx If you have any questions about this lecture on 9th Class Physics ch 10, you can go to https://www.instutor.com/10th-class/physics/simple-harmonic-motion-and-waves
Views: 36610 ilmkidunya
Longitudinal & Transverse Waves
 
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www.deltastep.com
Views: 192140 DeltaStep
10th Class Physics, Ch 11, Importance of Acoustics - Class 10th Physics
 
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In this online lecture, Ms Vaneeza Abbas explains 10th class Physics Chapter 11 Sound.The topic being discussed is Topic 11.5 Noise Pollution. In this video following sub topics have been taught: - Importance of Acoustics punjab text book board/Sindh text book board/KPK text book board 10th Class book 2 lecture is conducted in Urdu/hindi/English. This lecture for 9th class Physics chapter 11 is created for all students who want to prepare this topic in detail. For more videos of Vaneeza Abbas visit https://www.ilmkidunya.com/study/10th-class-physics/simple-harmonic-motion-and-waves.aspx If you have any questions about this lecture on 10th Class Physics ch 11, you can go to https://www.instutor.com/10th-class/physics/sound
Views: 10806 ilmkidunya
Simple Harmonic Motion: Crash Course Physics #16
 
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Get Your Crash Course Physics Mug here: https://store.dftba.com/products/crashcourse-physics-mug Bridges... bridges, bridges, bridges. We talk a lot about bridges in Physics. Why? Because there is A LOT of practical physics that can be learned from the planning and construction of them. In this episode of Crash Course Physics, Shini talks to us about a particular mistake made in engineering the Millennium Bridge which allows us to talk about simple harmonic motion. -- Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 709285 CrashCourse
Phase Opposition | Physics | Chegg Tutors
 
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When two sine waves having identical frequency begin exactly 1/2 cycle (180°) apart, we say that they’re in phase opposition or that they have opposing phase. Figure 8-14 illustrates an example. If two sine waves have the same peak-to-peak amplitude and opposing phase, and if neither of them has a DC component, they completely cancel each other out, because they have equal and opposite instantaneous amplitudes at every moment in time. In that case, we get a resultant wave equivalent to no voltage or current at all. In a situation such as that shown in Fig. 8-14, where two sine waves have the same frequency, different amplitudes, and opposing phase, the resultant constitutes a sine wave whose peak-to-peak value equals to the difference between the peak-to-peak values of the two composite waves. The phase of the resultant wave corresponds to the phase of the stronger of the two composite waves. The frequency of the resultant wave equals the frequency of the two composite waves. ---------- Physics tutoring on Chegg Tutors Learn about Physics terms like Phase Opposition on Chegg Tutors. Work with live, online Physics tutors like Zach J. who can help you at any moment, whether at 2pm or 2am. Liked the video tutorial? Schedule lessons on-demand or schedule weekly tutoring in advance with tutors like Zach J. Visit https://www.chegg.com/tutors/Physics-online-tutoring/?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=video&utm_content=managed&utm_campaign=videotutorials ---------- About Zach J., Physics tutor on Chegg Tutors: The Ohio State University, Class of 2015 Biochemistry/Biology Major Subjects tutored: Physics, Calculus, Geometry, Biology, Basic Science, Pre-Algebra, Pre-Calculus, Algebra, Chemistry, Basic Math, Biochemistry, Statistics, Spanish, and Medicine TEACHING EXPERIENCE While attending The Ohio State Univerisity as an undergraduate, I was a teaching assistant for an introductory physiology class for seven semesters. Informally, I have assisted my peers in learning anything from organic chemistry to anatomy. EXTRACURRICULAR INTERESTS I am currently enrolled as a first year medical student, and I am hoping to one day pursue a career in surgery. I have always enjoyed teaching and sharing my knowledge with others! Outside of academics, I am a self-taught guitar player, political junkie, and stock market enthusiast. Want to book a private lesson with Zach J.? Message Zach J. at https://www.chegg.com/tutors/online-tutors/Zach-J-2458491/?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=video&utm_content=managed&utm_campaign=videotutorials ---------- Like what you see? Subscribe to Chegg's Youtube Channel: http://bit.ly/1PwMn3k ---------- Visit Chegg.com for purchasing or renting textbooks, getting homework help, finding an online tutor, applying for scholarships and internships, discovering colleges, and more! https://chegg.com ---------- Want more from Chegg? Follow Chegg on social media: http://instagram.com/chegg http://facebook.com/chegg http://twitter.com/chegg
Views: 442 Chegg
Properties of Waves
 
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Views: 563 Hchs Physics
Laser + mirror + sound
 
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I'm using this video as my channel trainer because It's a good example of the the sort of videos I make! Thanks to Brian Mackenwells for showing me this (@mackenwells). A laser shining on a mirror driven by a speaker creates cool patterns. Here's the code for making sounds in your browser with keyboard shortcuts: https://gist.github.com/steventhebrave/7c16a72fb940b05b5e5218390418b5bf Follow me on twitter here: http://twitter.com/moulds Buy nerdy maths things here: http://mathsgear.co.uk
Views: 1235930 Steve Mould
Capillary waves
 
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Capillary waves are very short waves dominated by surface tension effects. Licence: CC-BY-NC http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/
Views: 2385 EdUniPhysicsAstro
PhysicsProblems -- Adding Wave Pulses
 
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Example of adding two wavepulses together to get the new shape.
Views: 236 sciencejedi
Waves as Carriers of Energy
 
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1 Waves as Carriers of Energy contents: 10.1: Oscillation 1. Working of simple pendulum 10.2: Simple Harmonic Motion 1. Introduction to Simple Harmonic Motion 2. Working of Simple Harmonic Motion 3. Problem 1-Working of Simple Harmonic Motion 4. Basic terms in SHM 5. Problem 1-Mass Attached to Spring 6. Energies Interconversion in spring-mass system 7. Problem-Ball and Bowl as SHM 8. Problem 1-Basic Terms in SHM 9. Problem-Energies Interconversion in Spring-Mass System 10.3: Simple Pendulum 1. Introduction to simple Pendulum 2. Problem-Introduction to Simple Pendulum 3. Working of simple pendulum 4. Problem-Working of Simple Pendulum 10.4: Wave Motion 1. Introductoin to Wave Motion 2. Problem 2-Characteristics of Wave 10.5: Waves as Mean of Energy Transfer 1. Waves as Carriers of Energy 2. Problem-Waves as Carriers of Energy 10.6: Types of Waves 1. Mechanical and Electromagnetic Waves 2. Problem 1-Mechanical and Electromagnetic waves 3. Introduction to Transverse and longitudnal waves 4. Problem 1-Introduction to Transverse and Longitudinal waves 5. Problem 1-Stationary waves 10.7: Characteristic Wave Parameters 1. Basic terms in SHM 2. Problem 2-Characteristics of Wave 3. Derivation of Wave Equation 4. Problem 1-Derivation of Wave Equation 10.8: Properties of Waves 1. Introducing Ripple Tank 2. Reflection in Water by Ripple Tank 3. Problem 1-Introduction to Reflection 4. Refraction in Water by Ripple Tank 5. Diffraction in Water by Ripple Tank 6. Problem 1-Introduction to Refraction 7. Interference in Water by Ripple Tank -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Donate ( Feel Free to help me out with my work ) : ✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦ BTC: 1LrcMaefjnCz4nf8ViKR6EwHqySPAvCCEY DASH: XpVNfgAnYvLU79k5xuKc4r24md936ckPHu ETH: 0x56c9a1BC8E1BF2dD83ba512A3F9C22eff33beEF3 BNK : 0x56c9a1BC8E1BF2dD83ba512A3F9C22eff33beEF3 LTC: Levu8eJ6j9fsJe5tX8esGecLzCjvEirEC2 BCH : qqva7j6c353vkvcfky99ccxz5jjsd50mzv8dvyzyhu ----------------------------------------------- If you want to receive XEM to your account, you MUST provide sender with your Address and the unique Message below XEM:NBRA5SR2S47YFIXPQAFU2FZ5BYFDMJELO3XWLV2Q MESSAGE:yadB37sQ ------------------------------------------------ ✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦ -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 1138 Tigerzplace
What is ESR METER? What does ESR METER mean? ESR METER meaning, definition & explanation
 
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What is ESR METER? What does ESR METER mean? ESR METER meaning - ESR METER definition - ESR METER explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. An ESR meter is a two-terminal electronic measuring instrument designed and used primarily to measure the equivalent series resistance (ESR) of real capacitors; usually without the need to disconnect the capacitor from the circuit it is connected to. Other types of meter used for routine servicing, including normal capacitance meters, cannot be used to measure a capacitor's ESR, although a few combined meters are available which measure both ESR and out-of-circuit capacitance. A standard (DC) milliohmmeter or multimeter cannot be used to measure ESR, because a steady direct current cannot be passed through the capacitor. Most ESR meters can also be used to measure non-inductive low-value resistances, whether or not associated with a capacitor; this leads to a number of additional applications described later. Aluminium electrolytic capacitors have a relatively high ESR that increases with age, heat, and ripple current; this can cause the equipment using them to malfunction. In older equipment, this tended to cause hum and degraded operation; modern equipment, in particular switch-mode power supplies, is very sensitive to ESR, and a capacitor with high ESR can cause equipment to malfunction or cause permanent damage requiring repair, typically by causing power supply voltages to become excessively high. Electrolytic capacitors are, nevertheless, very often used because they are inexpensive and have a very high capacitance per unit volume or weight; typically, these capacitors have capacitance from about one microfarad to tens of thousands of microfarads. Capacitors with faults leading to high ESR often overheat and thereafter bulge and leak as the electrolyte chemicals decompose into gases, making them somewhat easy to identify visually; however, capacitors that appear visually perfect may still have high ESR, detectable only by measurement. Precise measurement of ESR is rarely necessary, and any usable meter is adequate for troubleshooting. When precision is required, measurements must be taken under appropriately specified conditions, because ESR varies with frequency, applied voltage, and temperature. A general-purpose ESR meter operating with a fixed frequency and waveform will usually be unsuitable for precise laboratory measurements. Measuring ESR can be done by applying an alternating voltage at a frequency at which the capacitor's reactance is negligible, in a voltage divider configuration. It is easy to check ESR well enough for troubleshooting by using an improvised ESR meter comprising a simple square-wave generator and oscilloscope, or a sinewave generator of a few tens of kilohertz and a AC voltmeter, using a known good capacitor for comparison, or by using a little mathematics. A professional ESR meter is more convenient for checking multiple capacitors in rapid succession. A standard measurement bridge, and many LCR and Q meters, can also measure ESR accurately, in addition to many other circuit parameters. The dedicated ESR meter is a relatively inexpensive special-purpose instrument of modest accuracy, used mainly to identify capacitors with unacceptably large ESR and sometimes to measure other low resistances; measurements of other parameters cannot be made. Most ESR meters work by discharging a real electrolytic capacitor (more or less equivalent to an ideal capacitor in series with an unwanted resistance, the ESR) and passing an electric current through it for a short time, too short for it to charge appreciably. This will produce a voltage across the device equal to the product of the current and the ESR plus a negligible contribution from a small charge in the capacitor; this voltage is measured and its value divided by the current (i.e., the ESR) shown in ohms or milliohms on a digital display or by the position of a pointer on a scale. The process is repeated tens or hundreds of thousands of times a second. Alternatively an alternating current at a frequency high enough that the capacitor's reactance is much less than the ESR can be used. Circuit parameters are usually chosen to give meaningful results for capacitance from about one microfarad up, a range that covers typical aluminium capacitors whose ESR tends to become unacceptably high.
Views: 4325 The Audiopedia
Strobe Ripple Tank
 
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The Strobe Ripple Tank (XWV 590 011) provides an elegant method of demonstrating the wave phenomena of reflection, diffraction, refraction and interference with none of the setting-up problems usually associated with ripple tanks.
Views: 4330 SciChemScience
Introduction to waves
 
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Introduction to waves. Include definition of amplitude and wavelength of a wave. Explains features of wave such as Wave transfer energy but not matter. Also shows the difference between transverse and longitudinal waves.
Views: 170 Thio Cher Kuan
HAARP-tastic skies
 
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http://StopSprayingUs.com - The skies over Chiloquin, OR, were filled with uniform ripples as radio frequencies were pulsed through the atmosphere.
Views: 138 Patrick Roddie