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Human Gut Microbiome
 
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Video was part of 2014 Summer Scholarship Project with CSIRO called "The Hungry Microbiome" For more visit: http://www.csiro.au/hungrymicrobiome/ https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Support me: http://www.patreon.com/armando Instagram: http://instagram.com/armandohasudungan Twitter: https://twitter.com/Armando71021105
Views: 38073 Armando Hasudungan
Introducing the Human Gut Microbiota
 
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In this presentation for health care professionals, Dr. Karen Madsen discusses how gut microbes may potentially influence human health and the different ways in which microbes and the host interact with each other.
Views: 8701 CDHFtube
How Bacteria Rule Over Your Body – The Microbiome
 
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What happens when microbes talk to your brain? Kurzgesagt Newsletter: http://eepurl.com/cRUQxz Support us on Patreon so we can make more videos (and get cool stuff in return): https://www.patreon.com/Kurzgesagt?ty=h Kurzgesagt merch: http://bit.ly/1P1hQIH The MUSIC of the video: Soundcloud: http://bit.ly/2kqh1a8 Bandcamp: http://bit.ly/2y2YLbW Facebook: http://bit.ly/2qW6bY4 THANKS A LOT TO OUR LOVELY PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: Brittany Mackinnon, Frank Ziems, Rami Rahal, Dinler Amaral Antunes, Janet Rothers, David Metzger, Luke Zehrung, Malcolm Bruce, Sebastián Schiavinato, MikeSkowron, Justin Benavides, Jayant Sahewal, Marty Otzenberger, Lor (aka FigmentForms on Tumblr), Nicu Farmache, Stan Mertens, Haakon T Nordli, Jacob, Shpend A. Mustafa, John Clendenin, Issam Rachidi, Rafael Pereira, carey armstrong, marscmd, Alexander Edlin, Andrew Walker, Jeffrey Pugh, Daniel Cecil, Ayur Pulle, Floyd T Pollard, Wesley De Cocq van Delwijnen, Georgios Zacharopoulos, thylakoide, AG HAbraken, Marc Bartscht, Tarald Sponnich, Nicole Matthews, Adam Simons, Nicole Hobday, Jack Macqueen, Maximilian Fink, Henoch Argaw, Joshua Phoenix, Peter Fintl, Hoang Viet, Richard Emerson, Nick Hofmeister, Zotin, Heron Cortizo, Hannah Beth, John, Aleksa Bjelogrlic, Fabio Palamedi, Jessica­Kim Danh, James Vilcek, Igor Vaisman, ilia, Flatag, Alex Leighton, Rebecca Percz, Fatima Chairez, James Buchanan, Sarah Spath, Hugo James Ludlow Brooks,Bulbul A Rajon Help us caption & translate this video! http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UCsXVk37bltHxD1rDPwtNM8Q&tab=2 How Bacteria Rule Over Your Body – The Microbiome
The Gut Microbiome in Health and Disease | Susan Tuddenham, M.D., M.P.H.
 
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Susan Tuddenham discusses the role of the intestinal microbiome in human health and disease. To learn more about this event and to access slides for this presentation please visit: http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/institute_basic_biomedical_sciences/news_events/2017_The_Frenemy_Within.html
Introducing The Human Gut Microbiome
 
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Your body plays host to trillions of miroscopic visitors that make up your unique microbiome fingerprint. A troup of bacterial superheroes living in your gut works very hard to help keep you healthy, strong and resilient. Watch the first segment of our 4-part series on the human gut microbiome and learn more about the superheros that live within you.
Views: 8046 CDHFtube
Gut Microbiota and Ageing | Simin Nikbin Meydani
 
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http://www.weforum.org/ Is the secret to health in later life hidden in our gut? Simin Nikbin Meydani from Tufts University, USA, says disease is not an inevitable part of ageing, and bacteria in our gut may play a key role in how we age.
Views: 1205 World Economic Forum
Our Microbes, Ourselves: Gut Bacteria's Key Role in Immunity Is Tuned to the Host Species
 
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A new study suggests that the superabundant microbes lining our digestive tract are ultimately our evolutionary partners, shedding light on the hygiene hypothesis. According to this idea, living in increasingly hyper-hygienic environments might contribute to recent spikes in childhood allergies, as these beneficial host-specific microbes are hindered by the plethora of antibacterial home products and cleaning chemicals. Learn more at http://hms.harvard.edu/content/our-microbes-ourselves Like Harvard Medical School on Facebook: https://goo.gl/4dwXyZ Follow on Twitter: https://goo.gl/GbrmQM Follow on Instagram: https://goo.gl/s1w4up Follow on LinkedIn: https://goo.gl/04vRgY Website: https://hms.harvard.edu
Views: 19027 Harvard Medical School
The Invisible Universe Of The Human Microbiome
 
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The next time you look in a mirror, think about this: In many ways you're more microbe than human. There are 10 times more cells from microorganisms like bacteria and fungi in and on our bodies than there are human cells. But these tiny compatriots are invisible to the naked eye. So we asked artist Ben Arthur to give us a guided tour of the rich universe of the human microbiome.
Views: 506415 NPR
Do Gut Microbes Predict or Cause Diseases like Parkinson's? | Martha Carlin | TEDxBoulder
 
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A Citizen Scientist takes a systems approach to looking at Parkinson's disease and finds the answers to PD and many chronic diseases may be in our poop. When doctors said her husband’s Parkinson’s would eventually kill him, Martha Carlin said, No It Won’t. She stepped out of a successful career as a systems expert and into the new role of Citizen Scientist. After years of re-learning the sciences, pouring over research (and commissioning work at the University of Chicago), Martha is now a leading source of deep data on the human biome to unlock preventions and cures for many of our most complex health conditions. Her company, The BioCollective, links personal health history, metagenomics and microbiome analysis to uncover previously unknown links between chronic disease and diet, stress, and environment. She lives with her (thriving) husband John in Lone Tree, Colorado. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 195711 TEDx Talks
The Gut-Brain Connection
 
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Duke University researcher Diego Bohorquez and colleagues have identified the neural circuitry that connects the gut with the brain. This pathway is spanned by a single synapse, capable of relaying a signal from gut to brain in 100 milliseconds. This newly discovered pathway is probably exploited by pathogens, and will almost certainly lead to new therapies.
Views: 39583 Duke University
The microbiome: how might gut bacteria help treat cancer? | Cancer Research UK (2019)
 
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Our bodies are home to microbes that far outnumber our own cells. The bacteria, fungi and viruses that live inside us are collectively called our microbiome, and they play an important role in our health. But scientists also think that the bacteria in our guts might help some cancers develop and change how these cancers respond to treatment. Researchers around the world, including those now funded by Cancer Research UK’s Grand Challenge, are trying to find out more and look for ways to turn these bacteria in to new ways to treat cancer. You can find out more about the latest Cancer Research UK Grand Challenge teams on our blog: http://po.st/wLfB6o
Views: 3016 Cancer Research UK
Claire Fraser - The Human Gut Microbiome in Health and Disease
 
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This lecture is part of the IHMC Evening Lecture series. https://www.ihmc.us/life/evening_lectures/ Human beings are colonized with a diverse collection of microorganisms that inhabit every surface and cavity of the body. This collection of microbes, known as the human microbiome, is made up of nearly one thousand different bacterial species and exists in a mutualistic relationship with us as its host. Indeed, we could not survive without our microbial partners. Claire M. Fraser, Ph.D. is Director of the Institute for Genome Sciences at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore, MD. She has joint faculty appointments at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in the department of Medicine and Microbiology/Immunology. She helped launch the new field of microbial genomics and revolutionized the way microbiology has been studied. Until 2007, she was President and Director of The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR) in Rockville, MD, and led the teams that sequenced the genomes of several microbial organisms, including important human and animal pathogens. Her current research is focused on characterization of the human gut microbiome in health and disease. Her work on the Amerithrax investigation led to the identification of four genetic mutations in the anthrax spores that allowed the FBI to trace the material back to its original source. She is one of the world’s experts in microbial forensics and the growing concern about dual uses – research that can provide knowledge and technologies that could be misapplied. Dr. Fraser has authored more than 300 publications, edited three books, and served on the editorial boards of nine scientific journals. Between 1997 and 2008, she was the most highly cited investigator in the field of microbiology and has been recognized for numerous awards. She has served on many advisory panels for all of the major Federal funding agencies, the National Research Council, the Department of Defense, and the intelligence community. In addition, she has contributed her time as a Board member for universities, research institutes, and other non-profit groups because of her commitment to the education of our next generation of scientists.
Views: 41518 TheIHMC
Gut reactions: host microbiome interactions in the intestine in health and disease
 
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Gut reactions: host microbiome interactions in the intestine in health and disease Air date: Wednesday, March 14, 2018, 3:00:00 PM Category: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon Lectures Runtime: 01:00:44 Description: NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series The gastrointestinal tract is home to a large number and vast array of bacteria that play an important role in nutrition, immune-system development, and host defense. In inflammatory bowel disease there is a breakdown in this mutualistic relationship resulting in aberrant inflammatory responses to intestinal bacteria. Studies in model systems indicate that intestinal homeostasis is an active process involving a delicate balance between effector and immune suppressive pathways. For her presentation, Dr. Powrie will discuss bacterial pathways that promote intestinal homeostasis and host defense, and how these may be harnessed therapeutically. For more information go to https://oir.nih.gov/wals/2017-2018/ Author: Fiona Powrie, D. Phil., Professor; Director, Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, University of Oxford Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?23754
Views: 1980 nihvcast
How The Gut Microbiota Affects Our Health with Dr. Erica & Dr. Justin Sonnenburg
 
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Dr. Justin Sonnenburg is an associate professor of microbiology and immunology at Stanford and Dr. Erica Sonnenburg is a senior research scientist in the Sonnenburg lab where they the research many aspects the interaction between diet with the 100 trillion or so bacteria in the gut (specifically the colon) and how this impacts the health of the host (which in this case is a laboratory research mouse). In this episode we discuss the pivotal role fiber plays in fueling good bacteria in the gut to produce compounds that regulate the immune system including increasing the number of T regulatory cells, which are specialized types of immune cells that keep the immune system in check and prevent autoimmune responses, and how these compounds also increase other types of blood cells in the body in a process known as hematopoiesis. We also talk about how the lack of fiber in the typical American diet actually starves these good bacteria of their food. This has an effect not only on the immune system and autoimmune diseases but also results in the breakdown of the gut barrier, which leads to widespread inflammation and inflammatory diseases. Lastly, in this podcast, Dr. Erica Sonnenburg talks about how C-sections, have a negative effect on the infant’s gut due to the lack of exposure to bacteria present in the mother’s vaginal canal, and how the use of formula deprives the infant not only from the good bacteria present in Mom’s gut but also from special carbohydrates in breast milk that are good for the infant gut flora known as HMOs or human milk oligosaccharides. ▶︎ Get the show notes! https://www.foundmyfitness.com/episodes/the-sonnenburgs Links related to the Sonnenburgs: ▶︎ http://sonnenburglab.stanford.edu/ ▶︎ http://www.facebook.com/thegoodgut ▶︎http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1594206287/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1594206287&linkCode=as2&tag=foun06-20&linkId=IOKAGDTRCL47XQN6 Links related to FoundMyFitness: ▶︎ Join my weekly newsletter: http://www.foundmyfitness.com/?sendme=nutrigenomics ▶︎ Crowdfund more videos: http://www.patreon.com/foundmyfitness ▶︎ Subscribe on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=foundmyfitness ▶︎ Subscribe to the podcast: http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/foundmyfitness/id818198322 ▶︎ Twitter: http://twitter.com/foundmyfitness ▶︎ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/foundmyfitness ▶︎ Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/foundmyfitness
Views: 122074 FoundMyFitness
The microbiota as instructor and arbiter of immune responses in health and disease
 
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The microbiota as instructor and arbiter of immune responses in health and disease Air date: Wednesday, February 22, 2017, 3:00:00 PM Category: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon Lectures Runtime: 01:07:59 Description: NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series The vertebrate intestinal tract is colonized by hundreds of species of bacteria that outnumber the total cells in the host, yet must be compartmentalized and tolerated to prevent invasive growth and harmful inflammatory responses. A key function of commensal microbes is to contribute to the adaptive immune repertoire and to diverse lymphocyte effector functions. T cell responses against non-invasive commensals contribute to shaping the repertoire of effector/memory and regulatory T cells. How T cells elicited by commensal bacteria can influence autoimmunity is a central question that remains unsolved. The Littman Lab studies the antigenic specificity of microbiota-induced T cells and the mechanisms by which their functions are acquired upon interaction with distinct commensal species. His lab finds that Th17 cells, which are central to mucosal barrier defense but also participate in autoimmune disease, are induced by specific constituents of the microbiota, and acquire effector function only after additional exposure to endogenous adjuvants, such as the serum amyloid A proteins. The lab's studies in mice are not only relevant for human autoimmune diseases, many of which have Th17 cell involvement, but may also provide insights into how commensal microbe-specific T cell responses could be harnessed for mucosal vaccination and cancer immunotherapy. For more information go to https://oir.nih.gov/wals/2016-2017 Author: Dan R. Littman, M.D., Ph.D., Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; Kimmel Professor of Molecular Immunology at New York University School of Medicine Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?22148
Views: 5716 nihvcast
02 ENG - Structure and Functions of the Human Gut Microbiota
 
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Moderator: Pr Jaime RAMIREZ-MAYANS (Mexico) Speaker: Pr Francisco GUARNER (Spain) Q&A
Life in the Lab: Working with human gut microbiota
 
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Hilary Browne is a PhD student, working in the infection genomics group at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. In this film he describes how to work safely in the lab with bacteria from the human gut including culturing them on agar plates and extracting the DNA for genome sequencing. The infection genomics programme uses a variety of different research approaches to study the biology and evolution of disease-causing organisms such as viruses, bacteria and parasites and understand how they cause disease in humans and other animals. This is one of a series of Life in the lab films providing a more in-depth insight to some of the laboratory processes used by different teams at the Wellcome Sanger Institute. The film has been developed to help support the OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 in laboratory skills.
Views: 1039 yourgenome
A Gut Feeling: Our Microbiome and the Brain
 
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Recent research has revealed a potential connection between the brain and the trillions of microorganisms colonizing the body. This video was produced for the 2017 Brain Awareness Video Contest. Learn more here: http://www.brainfacts.org/bavc
Views: 2172 BrainFacts.org
Why Is Healthy Gut Flora So Important for Weight Loss?
 
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Gut bacteria have an immense impact on our weight and body composition. But, despite their importance, we keep starving them out by eating highly processed food, and killing them with overuse of antibiotics. Visit Bites of Reason on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bitesofreason Twitter: https://twitter.com/BitesOfReason ____________________ Created by Krunoslav Vinicki Research / Writing / Editing/Animation Lea Kralj Jager (http://smallfox.net/) Art Danko Bundalo (Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/dbundalo) Narration / Script / Sound ____________________ References: 1. Gill H.S., Guarner, F. (2004). Probiotics and human health: a clinical perspective. Postgraduate Medical Journal, 80:516-526. http://pmj.bmj.com/content/80/947/516 2. Fujimura, K. E. et al., “Role of the gut microbiota in defining human health,” Expert Review of Anti-infective Therapy 8, no. 4 (April 2010): 435–54, http://pmid.us/20377338. 3. Turnbaugh, P. J., Hamady, M., Yatsunenko, T., Cantarel, B. L., Duncan, A., Ley, R. E., Gordon, J. I. (2009). A core gut microbiome in obese and lean twins. Nature, 457(7228), 480–484. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19043404 4. Blustein, J., Attina, T., Liu, M., Ryan, M., Cox, L. M., Blaser, M. J., Trasande, L. (2013). Association of caesarean delivery with child adiposity from age 6 weeks to 15 years. International Journal of Obesity, 37, 900–906. http://www.nature.com/ijo/journal/v37/n7/abs/ijo201349a.html 5. Hyde, M.J., Modi, N. (2012). The long-term effects of birth by caesarean section: the case for a randomised controlled trial. Early Human Development, 88(12), 943-9. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23036493 6. Trasande, L., Blustein, J., Liu, M., Corwin, E., Cox, L., & Blaser, M. (2013). Infant antibiotic exposures and early-life body mass. International Journal of Obesity, 37(1), 16–23. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22907693 7. Vanessa K. Ridaura, V. K. et al. (2013), Gut microbiota from twins discordant for obesity modulate metabolism in mice. Science, 341 (6150). http://science.sciencemag.org/content/341/6150/1241214.article-info 8. OECD, Obesity and the Economics of Prevention: Fit not Fat - Korea Key Facts http://www.oecd.org/els/health-systems/obesityandtheeconomicsofpreventionfitnotfat-koreakeyfacts.htm 9. Kim, E. K., An, S.Y., Lee, M. S., Kim, T. H., Lee, H. K., Hwang, W. S., Choe, S. J., Kim, T. Y., Han, S. J., Kim, H. J., Kim, D. J., Lee, K.W. (2011). Fermented kimchi reduces body weight and improves metabolic parameters in overweight and obese patients. Nutrition Research, 31(6), 436-43. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21745625
Views: 4185 Bites of Reason
Is yogurt good for your microbiota?
 
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This video investigates the claim that eating yogurt boosts gut microbiota and repairs damaged microbiota. It explains what a microbiota is, the relationship between host and microbiota and the role of yogurt in the health of microbiota health. Information is provided about how the consumption of yogurt can affect the composition, structure and function of the gastrointestinal tract. The video concludes that yogurt itself does not contain the wide range of microorganisms that are required to repair a damaged microbiota and that those microorganisms in yougurt are often unable to colonize the human intestine. Therefore, the effects of yogurt consumption are often temporary. On the other hand, yogurt can be useful in speeding up the recovery of acute gastrointestinal problems. This video was made by Demystifying Medicine students Angela Gupta, Ingrid Kao, Kate Kim and Kaaran Gupta Copyright McMaster University 2018 Reference list: Adolfsson, O., Meydani, S. N., & Russell, R. M. (2004). Yogurt and gut function. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 80(2), 245-256. Bisanz, J., & Reid, G. (2011). Unraveling How Probiotic Yogurt Works. Science Translational Medicine, 3(106), 106ps41-106ps41. http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/scitranslmed.3003291 Canadian Dairy Comission. (2017). Yogurt. Retrieved from http://www.milkingredients.ca/index-eng.php?id=197 John, T. (2017). What Is the Function of Folic Acid?. Retrieved from: https://www.livestrong.com/article/426140-what-is-the-function-of-folic-acid/ Shreiner, A., Kao, J., & Young, V. (2015). The gut microbiome in health and in disease. Current Opinion In Gastroenterology, 31(1), 69-75. http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/mog.0000000000000139 He, T., Priebe, M.G., Zhong, Y., Huang, C., Harmsen, H.J., Raangs, G.C., Antoine, J.M., Welling, G.W., & Vonk, R.J. (2008). Effects of yogurt and bifidobacteria supplementation on the colonic microbiota in lactose-intolerant subjects. Journal of Applied Microbiology, 104(2), 595-604. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2672.2007.03579.x Quigley, E.M. (2015). Probiotics in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: The Science and the Evidence. Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, 49(1), S60-4. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000000348 Jafarnejad, S., Shab-Bidar, S., Speakman, J.R., Parastui, K., Daneshi-Maskooni, M., & Djafarian, K. (2016). Probiotics Reduce the Risk of Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea in Adults (18-64 Years) but Not the Elderly (over 65 Years): A Meta-Analysis. Nutrition in Clinical Practice, 31(4), 502-13. doi: 10.1177/0884533616639399. Wen, L., & Duffy, A. (2017). Factors Influencing the Gut Microbiota, Inflammation, and Type 2 Diabetes. The Journal Of Nutrition, 147(7), 1468S-1475S. http://dx.doi.org/10.3945/jn.116.240754
Microbiome Diet - Animation Shows How To Feed Your Gut Bacteria
 
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https://microbefiber.com We know that many plant foods benefit our health. Scientists now believe one reason for this lies with the gut Microbiome - the, bacteria in your intestines. Your microbiome is nourished by meals like this, rich in soluble fiber also referred to as resistant starch. Soluble fiber can't be digested by your body, but instead becomes food for your gut bacteria. Most starch is easily digested. Starch is dissolved in the small intestine and then absorbed by your body, providing you with energy and nutrients. The remaining, non-digestible portion is called resistant starch, or soluble fiber. The soluble fiber continues its journey through your gut and arrives at the large Intestine. We see that the soluble fiber has become exposed to the healthy bacteria of the gut microbiome. This species of bacteria specialize in breaking down soluble fiber. This breakdown process provides the bacteria with the fuel they need to survive. As they use the soluble fiber for energy, they release small carbohydrate molecules. The neighbouring bacteria feed on these carbohydrates. As the bacteria feed, they excrete even smaller molecules as waste. One of the final waste products is called butyrate, an energy source for your body. As the butyrate builds up, it is absorbed by the large intestine. The presence of butyrate encourages blood to flow into the vessels of the large intestine, keeping the tissue healthy. If your diet includes enough soluble fiber, these cells will use butyrate as their main source of energy. Here, we can see the molecular surface of one of the intestinal cells. The surface is covered in special proteins that actively pump butyrate molecules into the cell. Once inside, they can be harvested for energy. In addition, butyrate has other benefits. Intestinal cells are sensitive to DNA damage, caused by toxic foods and artificial ingredients. This cell's DNA has been damaged, resulting in a mutation. More damage could accumulate over time as the cell divides, which could lead to colon cancer. But, a steady supply of butyrate allows the damage to be more easily detected, and, the cell can activate a suicide program in response. Because the damaged cell destroys itself, it can't progress to form a cancer. A starved microbiome is unable to protect you from cancer. By eating foods rich in soluble fiber resistant starch, you can nourish your microbiome and improve your health! Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NI3KtR3LoqM Audio track remade for use in the USA with minor language edits from Australian english to USA English.
Views: 25316 MicrobeFiber
Gut bacteria and mind control: to fix your brain, fix your gut!
 
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Prof. Simon Carding, Leader of the Gut Health and Food Safety Research Programme, Institute of Food Research and Norwich Medical School at the University of East Anglia, describes our current understanding of the human gut and its relationship with its human host and introduce the provocative proposal that gut microbes influence when, what and how often we eat and whether we stay healthy or succumb to disease.
Views: 441366 Quadram Institute
Our Gut Bacteria say "Go Vegan or Else!"
 
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This video touches on the science showing that our intestinal flora do best when eating a vegan diet. The less animal products, the better our litter critters do. Gut bacteria manipulate our cravings: (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/bies.201400071/epdf) And highjack our vagus nerve to play with our emotions lower our stress levels. (http://www.pnas.org/content/108/38/16050.full.pdf) 2014 Nature study: (http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2013/12/10/250007042/chowing-down-on-meat-and-dairy-alters-gut-bacteria-a-lot-and-quickly) The benefits of propionate from Fiber: (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195666311000328) Vegan Diet study review: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4245565/pdf/nutrients-06-04822.pdf Science article on the Hadza: http://humanfoodproject.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Science_NewsFocus_Leach.pdf Hadza eat 80% plants (Yale): http://karlan.yale.edu/fieldexperiments/papers/00190.pdf Carnitine and Choline to TRimethylamine study: (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3650111/pdf/nihms-450760.pdf) Trimethylamine podcast: (http://thedianerehmshow.org/shows/2013-04-09/new-research-red-meat-and-heart-disease/transcript) Trimethylamine increases chance of death from Prostate Cancer: (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3441112/pdf/ajcn964855.pdf)
Views: 56813 Mic the Vegan
Your Microbiome and Your Brain
 
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We've talked about the trillions of microbes inside you before, but we're learning that these little creatures may have more influence than you thought! Meet your Microbiome: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ybk7E7SLbWw Hosted by: Olivia Gordon ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters—we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shoutout to Kevin Bealer, Mark Terrio-Cameron, KatieMarie Magnone, Patrick Merrithew, Charles Southerland, Fatima Iqbal, Sultan Alkhulaifi, Tim Curwick, Scott Satovsky Jr, Philippe von Bergen, Bella Nash, Chris Peters, Patrick D. Ashmore, Piya Shedden, Charles George ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4228144/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC414848/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3039072/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4367209/ https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-1-4939-0897-4_3 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3564958/ http://www.nature.com/news/the-tantalizing-links-between-gut-microbes-and-the-brain-1.18557 http://www.nature.com/news/gut-brain-link-grabs-neuroscientists-1.16316 http://www.gastrojournal.org/article/S0016-5085(11)00607-X/abstract?referrer=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nature.com%2Fnews%2Fthe-tantalizing-links-between-gut-microbes-and-the-brain-1.18557 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1664925/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4362231/ Images https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Gray848.png https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Serotonin-Spartan-HF-based-on-xtal-3D-balls-web.png
Views: 288330 SciShow
Gut microbiota (gut bacteria) - Introduction
 
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In this video Dr Mike introduces the first lecture of a series exploring the gut micobiota. He outlines the different types of bacteria on and within our body, including their abundance and composition by location. He also discusses their role in maintaining health, and introduces their involvement in disease.
Modulating the Gut Microbiome – the Role of Probiotics and Prebiotics
 
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The human intestinal microbiota functions as an organ and is critical for immune and gastrointestinal system maturation, colonization resistance, modulation of immune responses, and nutritional needs. A balanced, diverse microbiota is essential for health. There are disorders in which the beneficial use of probiotics is documented including antibiotic-associated diarrhea, C. difficile-associated diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel disease, dysbiosis, urinary tract infections, allergies, atopic dermatitis, eczema, and lactose intolerance. As a complementary therapy, prebiotics increase the numbers and/or activities of healthful gut microbiota and support populations of healthful genera that are not available as probiotics. This presentation will provide the knowledge and tools needed to effectively use prebiotics and probiotics to enhance health. Learning objectives: 1. Understand the beneficial effects of the gastrointestinal microbiota on the development and function of the immune, gastrointestinal, and other organ systems, as well as the adverse effects that can occur secondary to microbiome disruption 2. Appreciate the mechanisms by which probiotics may confer benefit and the health conditions for which evidence exists to support their use 3. Learn the safety profile and potential risks of probiotic preparations and how to effectively select and dose probiotic formulas ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by Stephen Olmstead, MDAviva Romm, MD Stephen Olmstead, MD, graduated from the University of New Mexico with distinction in biology and chemistry. He attended the University of New Mexico School of Medicine. He trained in internal medicine at Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Olmstead completed a cardiology fellowship at the University of Washington. He is board certified in both internal medicine and cardiovascular diseases. His academic honors include Phi Beta Kappa and Alpha Omega Alpha. Dr. Olmstead served in the US Public Health Service Commissioned Corps in the Indian Health Service. For many years Dr. Olmstead was Clinical Assistant Professor in Medicine at the University of Washington Medical School in Seattle. He served as advisor to the King County Natural Medicine Clinic during its inception and consultant to the Office of Alternative Medicine after it was first established at the National Institutes of Health. He has long been an advocate of rigorous scientific research on complementary medical therapies. He has more than 30 years of experience in clinical trials, registries and basic research. In 2005, Dr. Olmstead joined ProThera Inc. as its Chief Science Officer. Dr. Olmstead provides scientific support to both technical services and marketing at ProThera. He is responsible for the company newsletters, educational programs, and technical materials. designs and directs clinical trials of ProThera products including probiotics. Dr. Olmstead's current interests are in the development of innovative probiotic and prebiotic formulations and the use of nutriceuticals to disrupt dysbiotic biofilms. ------------------------------------------------------------- Genova Diagnostics offers webinar sessions that are designed to answer your most pressing questions about test profiles and popular topics in functional medicine. Learn more at http://www.gdx.net
Views: 17090 Genova Diagnostics
Human Gut Microbiome
 
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Presenter: Lisa Sardinia, PhD, JD Most of the tens of trillions of cells that make up the human body are actually microbes. The gut microbiota make vitamins for us, help us digest food, battle disease-causing microbes, and may influence our behavior.
What is the Microbiome Program?
 
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The Microbiome Program explores the genetic code of the body's microorganisms, using the latest techniques to profile an individual's microbiome to detect, prevent and diagnose infections and other diseases. To learn more, visit http://mayocl.in/2lj8hmL
Views: 12276 Mayo Clinic
What’s Your Gut Microbiome Enterotype?
 
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There appear to be just two types of people in the world: those who have mostly Bacteroides type bacteria in their gut, and those whose colons are overwhelmingly home to Prevotella species instead. Subscribe to Dr. Greger’s free nutrition newsletter and get the Evidence-Based Eating Guide: A Healthy Living Resource from Dr. Greger and NutritionFacts.org. Sign up at https://www.nutritionfacts.org/healthkit. If whatever gut flora enterotype we are could play an important role in our risk of developing chronic diet-associated diseases, the next question is can we alter our gut microbome by altering our diet? And the answer is -- diet can rapidly and reproducibly alter the bacteria in our gut, the subject of my next video, How to Change Your Enterotype (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/how to-change-your-enterotype). These are part of a new expanded series on the microbiome that I’ll be unfolding in the coming months. Make sure you catch the first four in this series: • How to Reduce Carcinogenic Bile Acid Production (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-to-reduce-carcinogenic-bile-acid-production/) • Putrefying Protein and “Toxifying” Enzymes (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/putrefying-protein-and-toxifying-enzymes/) • Microbiome: The Inside Story (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/microbiome-the-inside-story) • Prebiotics: Tending Our Inner Garden (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/prebiotics-tending-our-inner-garden) Who we have living in our gut may also play a role in autoimmune diseases. See Why Do Plant-Based Diets Help Rheumatoid Arthritis? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/why-do-plant-based-diets-help-rheumatoid-arthritis) Have a question for Dr. Greger about this video? Leave it in the comment section at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/whats-your-gut-microbiome-enterotype and he'll try to answer it! http://www.NutritionFacts.org • Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NutritionFacts.org • Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/nutrition_facts • Podcast: http://nutritionfacts.org/audio/ • Subscribe: http://http://nutritionfacts.org/subscribe/ • Donate: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/donate
Views: 107138 NutritionFacts.org
Meet Your Microbiome!
 
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What you don't know about your microbiome may kill you!!! ...or just give you diarrhea. Hosted by: Hank Green ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters—we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Kevin Bealer, Mark Terrio-Cameron, KatieMarie Magnone, Patrick Merrithew, Charles Southerland, Fatima Iqbal, Benny, Kyle Anderson, Tim Curwick, Scott Satovsky Jr, Philippe von Bergen, Bella Nash, Bryce Daifuku, Chris Peters, Patrick D. Ashmore, Charles George, Bader AlGhamdi ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: http://www.nature.com/news/scientists-bust-myth-that-our-bodies-have-more-bacteria-than-human-cells-1.19136 https://lhncbc.nlm.nih.gov/files/archive/pub2001047.pdf http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/microbiome/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3426293/ http://jb.asm.org/content/192/19/5002.full https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23201354 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4290017/ http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/c-difficile/home/ovc-20202264 http://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/clostridium-difficile-an-intestinal-infection-on-the-rise https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26104013 http://gut.bmj.com/content/early/2016/03/14/gutjnl-2015-311339.abstract https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/gut-fungus-suspected-in-crohn-s-disease/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4831151/ http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2013/11/08/243929866/can-we-eat-our-way-to-a-healthier-microbiome-its-complicated http://www.nature.com/news/bacteria-found-in-healthy-placentas-1.15274 http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/29/science/human-microbiome-may-be-seeded-before-birth.html Images: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:EscherichiaColi_NIAID.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Microbiome_Sites_(27058471125).jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:MYA3404_Ctropicalis_WT.png https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:ClostridiumDifficile.jpg
Views: 213361 SciShow
How the food you eat affects your gut - Shilpa Ravella
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-the-food-you-eat-affects-your-gut-shilpa-ravella The bacteria in our guts can break down food the body can’t digest, produce important nutrients, regulate the immune system, and protect against harmful germs. And while we can’t control all the factors that go into maintaining a healthy gut microbiome, we can manipulate the balance of our microbes by paying attention to what we eat. Shilpa Ravella shares the best foods for a healthy gut. Lesson by Shilpa Ravella, animation by Andrew Foerster.
Views: 1530621 TED-Ed
How the Gut Microbiome affects the Brain and Mind
 
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Get 10% off any purchase here: http://squarespace.com/WIL ▲Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/WILearned ▲Twitter: https://twitter.com/jeverettlearned The gut microbiota is a huge topic and has some very significant implications for health and nutrition. Here I've explained just a tiny bit of the research. A pdf with a transcript for the video and links to sources can be found here: https://www.patreon.com/posts/17115405 ________ Books: "The Good Gut" by Justin and Erica Sonnenburg - http://amzn.to/2ETThV2 "Missing Microbes" By Martin Blaser - http://amzn.to/2Hu43jh "Brain Maker" By David Perlmutter - http://amzn.to/2sF5EiO (Not mentioned in the video, but another good book on the subject) Will have the transcript with links up soon Featured Music: Broke for Free - Meiei Chris Zabriskie - Mario Bava Sleeps in a Little Later than he expected to Broke for Free - Breakfast with Tiffany Chris Zabriskie - Divider Kevin MacLeod - Rollin at 5 For Business inquiries: [email protected]
Views: 535589 What I've Learned
Gut microbiota and type 2 diabetes
 
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Fredrik Bäckhed, Wallenberg Laboratory, Sahlgrenska Centre for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. Chair: Nathalie Delzenne, Louvain Drug Research Institute Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium. From: Gut microbiota in health and disease – from concept to evidence, 2016-03-17. Watch the other lectures from the symposium at www.kvatv.se
Views: 2016 Vetenskapsakademien
4 Surprising Things That Are Bad for Your Gut Bacteria
 
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The human gut is home to over 100 trillion bacteria, known as the "gut flora." or gut microbiome. Having a healthy gut flora is incredibly important for your overall health. Interestingly, there are many surpising things that are bad for your gut bacteria, which is what i want to look at in this video. Further reading: http://www.healthline.com/nutrition/8-things-that-harm-gut-bacteria Follow Authority Nutrition: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AuthorityNutrition/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/AuthNutrition Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/+Authoritynutrition/posts Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/authynutrition/ ---- Don't forget to subscribe on YouTube here: https://www.youtube.com/user/AuthorityNutrition?sub_confirmation=1 Studies mentioned: STUDY 1: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27110483 STUDY 2: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3362077/ STUDY 3: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22552027 STUDY 4: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5123208/ STUDY 5: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301051107001597
A Gut Feeling: How Microbes Impact Human Health
 
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The one-pathogen-one-disease paradigm – the focus of infectious disease research for more than a century – has been complicated by the discovery of the human microbiome (i.e. the bacterial communities that reside in and on our bodies). The gut microbiome is intimately tied to the development of our immune system, our physiology, and even our psychology. A breakdown in the ecological structure of our gut has been associated with inflammatory disorders, metabolic syndromes, and cancer. In this talk, Dr. Sean Gibbons will discuss how disturbances of the gut ecosystem can make us sick and how restoration of the microbiome back to a healthy state can potentially alleviate many complex diseases. WGBH Forum Network ~ Free online lectures: Explore a world of ideas Like us: http://facebook.com/wgbhforum Tweet with us: http://twitter.com/ForumNetwork See our complete archive here: http://forum-network.org
Views: 1001 WGBHForum
Non-Antibiotic Drugs Affect our Gut Bacteria
 
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The gut microbiome plays a vital role in metabolism, physiology, nutrition and immune response. Previous studies have shown that some non-antibiotic drugs can lead to changes in composition of the gut microbiome, but the extent of this is not understood. Scientists at EMBL have now screened the effects of 1,200 marketed drugs on the growth of 38 representative bacterial strains found in the human gut. This e-learning video showcases the story, methodology and findings from this breakthrough Nature publication, published on the 19th March 2018. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature25979 Find out more and take our quiz and interactive exercises by visiting our e-learning website https://www.embl.de/training/e-learning/drug_microbiome/index.html
The gut flora: You and your 100 trillion friends: Jeroen Raes at TEDxBrussels
 
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Jeroen Raes is a bionaut, he researches the human microbiome. What he's discovered in his lab at the Flanders Institute of Biology could herald a major breakthrough not just in gastro-intestinal medicine, but in our fundamental knowledge of the human biology. It turns out that there are only three different types of gut bacteria and, just like blood groups, the three types are totally independent of race, sex, age or diet. Such a baffling finding leads to more research of course and Raes is currently testing his idea on a larger group . The implications for Crohn's Disease or obesity could be dramatic. http://www.tedxbrussels.eu In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 168899 TEDx Talks
Gut Microbes - Importance in Health and Disease
 
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On May 29 patients and healthcare professionals around the world celebrate World Digestive Health Day to raise awareness of the millions of patients who suffer from a digestive or liver disease. This year, special attention is given to gut microbes and their strong relation with diseases in and outside the digestive system. This video was produced by UEG & ESNM, with the backing of the WGO, medical associations, patient organisations and the charity foundation 'Core'.
Type 2 diabetes may be caused by gut bacteria
 
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Studying gut bacteria can reveal a range of human illness. Now, new research shows that the composition of a person's intestinal bacteria could play an important role in the development of type 2 diabetes. These results, from a joint European and Chinese research team, have just been published in the journal Nature.Production: Lasse Foghsgaard Mathias NielsenPhotography: Mathias NielsenSpeak: Carl Hagman Read the official University of Copenhagen press release: http://news.ku.dk/all_news/2012/2012.9/gut-bacteria-could-cause-diabetes/ Read the scientific article in the journal Nature: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v490/n7418/full/nature11450.html
The human microbiome and what we do to it
 
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Did you know that you and I are only 1% human — we've 90 trillion cells which don't belong to us. Yes we are more bacteria than human. Have you ever wondered what it means to be human? It turns out that only a tiny percentage of what you and I are made of is actually human — and we need our non-human bits to survive. This part of us now has a name — it's called our microbiome. But we're doing dreadful things to this hidden majority and it's damaging our health as a result. From the Tonic series produced with the assistance of NPS. For more information visit: http://www.nps.org.au
Views: 86655 NPS MedicineWise
Your Gut Microbes Are Controlling Your Mind, Here’s What You’ll Do For Them
 
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Microbes in your body can control how you feel and what you want to eat, here's how. Super Bacteria Has a New Enemy: The CRISPR Pill - https://youtu.be/zWzQf2xzJek Read More: Is Your Gut Making You Depressed or Anxious? https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/is-your-gut-making-you-depressed-or-anxious/ “If you had to guess the organ that has undue influence on your emotions, your mood, even your choices, what would you guess? The brain? Sure, but what else? The heart—that mythological seat of the soul? Not quite.” How Many Cells Are in the Human Body—And How Many Microbes? https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/01/160111-microbiome-estimate-count “Your body is a microbial melting pot, home to trillions of bacteria that help keep you healthy and regular. And for decades, scientists have shown their importance with this alluring factoid: The microbes in your body outnumber your own cells ten to one.” Your Gut Bacteria Want You to Eat a Cupcake https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/08/your-gut-bacteria-want-you-to-eat “Humans’ gastrointestinal tracts are home to 10,000 species of bacteria, which get energy from our half-digested lunches. (Another estimate puts the number of species as high as 36,000.) In exchange, they help us break down food and keep harmful bacteria out, and have also been shown to help regulate fat storage and provide vitamins.” ____________________ Seeker explains every aspect of our world through a lens of science, inspiring a new generation of curious minds who want to know how today’s discoveries in science, math, engineering and technology are impacting our lives, and shaping our future. Our stories parse meaning from the noise in a world of rapidly changing information. Visit the Seeker website https://www.seeker.com/videos Elements on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/SeekerElements/ Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel Seeker on Twitter http://twitter.com/seeker Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez Seeker on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SeekerMedia/ Seeker http://www.seeker.com/ Special thanks to Maren Hunsberger for hosting and writing this episode of Seeker! Check Maren out on Twitter: https://twitter.com/marenbeatrice
Views: 111651 Seeker
Know Your Gut: uBiome Sequences Human Bacteria
 
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What kinds of bacteria live in and on us? And how much bacteria do we share with the people and pets we live with? A San Francisco-based company called uBiome is trying to find the answers. Anthony takes a tour of their lab and talks to the scientists working to sequence the human microbiome to learn how it affects our health and our daily lives. Read More: Order a uBiome kit here! http://ubiome.com/ uBiome on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/uBiome uBiome on Twitter https://twitter.com/uBiome Citizen Scientist: uBiome http://www.scientificamerican.com/citizen-science/project.cfm?id=ubiome-human-microbiome "uBiome has launched a citizen science effort to map the human microbiome, the microorganisms that inhabit every inch of our skin as well as our ears, mouth, sinuses, genitals and gut." Watch More: Bacteria Affects Personality https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lKKZQfwzWAM TestTube Wild Card http://testtube.com/dnews/dnews-341-smart-guitar-makes-anyone-a-musician?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=DNews&utm_campaign=DNWC Antibiotics Don't Help! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tQZnhjJnD5E ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Anthony Carboni on Twitter http://twitter.com/acarboni Laci Green on Twitter http://twitter.com/gogreen18 Trace Dominguez on Twitter http://twitter.com/trace501 DNews on Facebook http://facebook.com/dnews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com
Views: 93789 Seeker
Mind-altering microbes: how the microbiome affects brain and behavior: Elaine Hsiao at TEDxCaltech
 
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Elaine Hsiao is a postdoctoral fellow in chemistry and biology at Caltech. She received her undergraduate degree in microbiology, immunology and molecular genetics from UCLA and her doctoral degree in neurobiology from Caltech with Professor Paul Patterson. She studied neuroimmune mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders and uncovered a role for the commensal microbiota in regulating autism-related behaviors, metabolism, and intestinal physiology. Elaine has received several honors, including predoctoral fellowships from the National Institute of Health, Autism Speaks and the Caltech Innovation Program. She is currently studying the mechanisms by which microbes modulate host production of neuroactive molecules and aims to better understand how the human microbiota influences health and disease. In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations) On January 18, 2013, Caltech hosted TEDxCaltech: The Brain, a forward-looking celebration of humankind's quest to understand the brain, by exploring the past, present and future of neuroscience. Visit TEDxCaltech.com for more details.
Views: 232032 TEDx Talks
5 tips to keep your gut microbiome healthy | UCLA Health Newsroom
 
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Kirsten Tillisch, M.D., an associate professor of medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, explains how the microbiome in the gut takes care of us – and how we can take care of it. Tillisch is a pioneer in the study of microbe-gut-brain interactions, and is currently focusing on the role of mind-body interventions such as hypnotherapy, acupuncture, and mindfulness-based stress reduction for gastrointestinal disorders. Learn more at https://uclahealth.org
Views: 33936 UCLA Health
Gut Microbiome: Impact of Diet & Intermittent Fasting || Research Roundup
 
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Our Research Lead, Dr. Brianna Stubbs, tends to read a lot of scientific literature...a lot. In this episode of Research Roundup, Dr. Stubbs dives into three papers studying the effects of diet (plant-based, animal-based, & ketogenic) & intermittent fasting on the gut microbiome. 1. Diet rapidly and reproducibly alters the human gut microbiome 2. The Gut Microbiota Mediates the Anti-Seizure Effects of the Ketogenic Diet 3. Intermittent Fasting Promotes White Adipose Browning and Decreases Obesity by Shaping the Gut Microbiota Full Transcript: https://hvmn.com/podcast/gut-microbiome-research-roundup ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Don't miss out on our EXCLUSIVE OFFER for podcast listeners: https://www.hvmn.com/pod Take a short survey that will help us improve the podcast and be entered in a HVMN Ketone giveaway: https://go.hvmn.com/podcastsurvey We also want to hear from our listeners/viewers! Contact [email protected] with any feedback, questions, and guest suggestions! Write a review for us on iTunes, let us know via email, and we'll send you $15 worth of HVMN Store Credit.
Views: 4694 HVMN
Eat yourself healthy -your microbiome and you | Sheena Cruickshank | TEDxManchester
 
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We are never alone with around 38 trillion bacteria co-habiting our body. These bacteria along with a whole host of other organisms make up our microbiome. Our microbiome has co-evolved with us and has many vital roles for our health. Bacteria also have an amazing ability to change and enable their host to do things they couldn’t normally do. However, changes in our microbiome are also linked to a whole host of diseases and conditions including obesity. The big question is whether we change our microbiome to exploit its beneficial functions. Find out how our microbiome is so important for our wellbeing, the extreme measures some people are taking to manipulate it and what you can do to eat yourself healthy. Professor Sheena Cruickshank is an immunologist in the University of Manchester. Our immune system is crucial to recognise infections but also has to cooperate with helpful microbes like the ones that live in our gut and her research focuses on the way the body’s immune system interacts with a host of microbes from bacteria to parasites. She also regularly discusses infection and her research in the media (TV, radio and press). This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx
Views: 29221 TEDx Talks
The Gut Microbiome's Impact on The Immune System
 
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Microbiome: How Your Gut Bacteria is Controlling Your Health R3 Summit 2016 (Austin, TX)
Views: 2710 Prevention Magazine
Gut Responses: Microbes, Inflammation, and Cancer
 
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Cancer Research Institute postdoctoral fellows Noah Palm, April Price, and Joshua Ziel discuss their work on the intestinal "microbiome"—our personalized collection of gut microbes—and what it tells us about cancer and cancer treatment. The Cancer Research Institute (CRI), established in 1953, is the world's only nonprofit organization dedicated exclusively to transforming cancer patient care by advancing scientific efforts to develop new and effective immune system-based strategies to prevent, diagnose, treat, and eventually cure all cancers. Guided by a world-renowned Scientific Advisory Council that includes three Nobel laureates and 26 members of the National Academy of Sciences, CRI has invested $263 million in support of research conducted by immunologists and tumor immunologists at the world's leading medical centers and universities, and has contributed to many of the key scientific advances that demonstrate the potential for immunotherapy to change the face of cancer treatment. To learn more, go to www.cancerresearch.org.
Gut Bacteria and Mental Health: How Inflammation Affects Us:  Thomas DeLauer
 
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Please Subscribe for 3-4x Videos Per Week! http://www.ThomasDeLauer.com Gut Bacteria and Mental Health: How Inflammation Affects Us: Thomas DeLauer Microbiomes are communities of microorganisms that are a combination of both beneficial and potentially harmful bacteria Lifestyle factors such as exercise and managing stress appear to dramatically affect the diversity and quantity of healthy microbiome in the intestines The human gut harbors over 100 trillion microorganisms - approximately 10 times the number of cells in the human body Microbes begin residing within human intestines shortly after birth. These microbiomes are vital to the development of the immune system and various neural functions – known as the gut-brain axis *The gut-brain axis is the biochemical signaling that takes place between the gastrointestinal tract and the central nervous system* An increasing body of research results confirms the importance of the "gut-brain axis" for neurology and indicates that the triggers for a number of neurological diseases, specifically anxiety and depression, may be located in the digestive tract How the Gut Interacts with the Brain The gut is connected to the brain via the vagus nerve, the enteric nervous system, and the gut-brain axis. Vagus Nerve The vagus nerve extends from the brainstem down into the neck, thorax, and abdomen. The nerve exits the brainstem through rootlets in the medulla that are caudal to the rootlets for the ninth cranial nerve The vagus nerve supplies motor parasympathetic fibers to all organs except adrenal glands, all the way from the neck down to the second segment of the transverse colon. It helps regulate heart rate, speech, sweating, and various gastrointestinal functions. Enteric Nervous System The enteric nervous system connects with the central nervous system. It contains 200-600 million neurons Local and centrally projecting sensory neurons in the gut wall monitor mechanical conditions in the gut wall. Local circuit neurons, on the other hand, integrate this information. This enables motor neurons to influence the activity of the smooth muscles in the gut wall and glandular secretions such as digestive enzymes, mucus, stomach acid, and bile The enteric nervous system has been referred to as a “second brain” because of its ability to operate autonomously and communicate with the central nervous system through the parasympathetic (i.e., via the vagus nerve) and sympathetic nervous systems. Gut-Brain Axis Finally, the gut-brain axis consists of bidirectional communication between the central and the enteric nervous system, linking emotional and cognitive centers of the brain with peripheral intestinal functions. There is strong evidence from animal studies that gut microorganisms can activate the vagus nerve and play a critical role in mediating effects on the brain and behavior. (1) Connections between the gut and the brain/Anxiety and Depression Recent studies on laboratory animals that grow up without any microorganisms (germ-free) show that microorganisms in the gut are capable of influencing mood Maintaining a Healthy Gut No one knows the exact ingredients for a healthy microbial gut; however, having a diet rich in probiotic foods to maintain a healthy gut seems like the way to go Probiotics seemingly boost mood in two important ways: They generate a particular neurotransmitter called gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and also enhance the brain receptors for GABA as well. GABA is calming amino acid, known to calm areas of the brain that are over active in anxiety and panic and in some forms of anxious depression. References 1) Surprising Link Between Depression, Anxiety, and Gut Health. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.globalhealingcenter.com/natural-health/link-between-depression-anxiety-and-gut-health/ 2) Link Found Between Gut Bacteria And Depression | IFLScience. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/link-found-between-gut-bacteria-and-depression/ 3) How Your Gut Affects Your Mood | FiveThirtyEight. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/gut-week-gut-brain-axis-can-fixing-my-stomach-fix-me/ 4) The Gut Microbiome, Anxiety and Depression. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/inner-source/201411/the-gut-microbiome-anxiety-and-depression-6-steps-take
Views: 76946 Thomas DeLauer
Does Drinking Alcohol Kill Your Gut Bacteria?
 
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Alcohols are used to disinfect things all the time, which makes drinking them sound bad for the helpful critters in your gut. But, turns out, drinking in moderation could actually be good for your microbiome. Host: Michael Aranda We're conducting a survey of our viewers! If you have time, please give us feedback: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/SciShowSurvey2017 Hosted by: ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters: KSam Lutfi, Kevin Knupp, Nicholas Smith, Inerri, D.A. Noe, alexander wadsworth, سلطان الخليفي, Piya Shedden, KatieMarie Magnone, Scott Satovsky Jr, Bella Nash, Charles Southerland, Bader AlGhamdi, James Harshaw, Patrick Merrithew, Patrick D. Ashmore, Candy, Tim Curwick, charles george, Saul, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Viraansh Bhanushali, Kevin Bealer, Philippe von Bergen, Chris Peters, Fatima Iqbal, Justin Lentz ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev.pharmtox.39.1.127?journalCode=pharmtox https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2539099/ http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2621.2004.tb09938.x/full http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0956713514004411 https://www.foodsafety.gov/poisoning/causes/bacteriaviruses/index.html http://www.eurosurveillance.org/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleId=2195 https://www.jstor.org/stable/3702740 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK7670/ https://academic.oup.com/nutritionreviews/article-abstract/71/7/483/1807403/Ethanol-metabolism-and-its-effects-on-the http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/95/6/1323.long ; http://www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/22/1/99/htm http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0924224410001068 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07315724.2014.904763 http://pubs.rsc.org/-/content/articlelanding/2016/fo/c5fo00886g/unauth#!divAbstract https://link.springer.com/article/10.2478/s11536-007-0048-9 http://pubs.rsc.org/-/content/articlehtml/2016/fo/c6fo00218h http://journals.lww.com/epidem/Abstract/2001/03000/Alcohol_as_a_Gastric_Disinfectant__The_Complex.13.aspx https://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/90168 http://pmj.bmj.com/content/77/905/172.short http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1521691803000349 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4590619/ http://www.mdpi.com/2218-273X/5/4/2573/htm https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1374273/ https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-30361-1_12 ---------- Images: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Galenus.jpg http://remf.dartmouth.edu/images/bacteriaSEM/source/1.html https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Clostridium_perfringens.jpg
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