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DIY School Supplies! 12 Weird Back to School Hacks!
 
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Diy School Supplies for Back to School! In this back to school DIY video I show how to make 12 easy DIY school supplies and school hacks for kids and teenagers that go back to school. Perfect DIY school supplies for elementary, high school or college. These school DIYs are easy to make and perfect for DIY beginners as I show them step by step. Why do expensive back to school haul and shopping when you can make cool DIY school supplies yourself. This back to school DIY video includes DIY school supplies notebooks, pencils, fidget spinner pen and more! These are not DIY edible school supplies but I can make them if you'd like! These hacks and DIYs for school will get all kids and teenagers ready for back to school. Help me translate this DIY School Supplies video: https://www.youtube.com/timedtext_video?v=U5TF2udQIlw Pencil case inspired by 2 Cats & 1 Doll: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rSC9L55_Ub8 First back to school essentials I show in this video are notebooks! I show how to make a couple of DIY school supplies notebooks. Go back to school shopping for an inexpensive notebook and turn it into amazing fruit one. I show how to make a watermelon and lemon notebooks using felt. These are so simple and easy and will make sure that your school supplies haul won't cost you a lot of money. Next DIY school supplies notebook trend is a sequin notebook, that you can draw or write on. It works like an erase board! This DIY is perfect for beginners – easy and affordable but absolutely beautiful. We'll definitely remember 2017 by the fidget spinners so there can't be a DIY school supplies 2017 video without a DIY fidget spinner, right? I'll show how to make a fidget spinner pen! It's a great idea to prank your schoolmates and teachers. You'll need some crayons, play dough and a spinner of your choice. We also need a pencil case and pencil holders when going back to school. Did you know that you can make epic DIY stress ball pencil holders out of a stress ball? They are a perfect DIY room decor and room organization piece that you will love! In this DIY school supplies video I also show how to create a candy no-sew DIY pencil case. It is perfect for beginners and turns out gorgeous! The sweetest kawaii pencil case ever that you can also use as a DIY makeup bag. You know how much I love DIY makeup so I had to include three DIY makeup school supplies ideas. First is an epic back to school hack where I show how to use coloring pencils as lipsticks! I know it sounds insane but they work amazing and think about all the different colors you can try! A very practical life hack for back to school. Another makeup school supplies is a DIY blush notepad! All you need is a blush container that you've used up and some post it notes! How about some DIY nail polish highlighters?! You don't have to be a nail polish addict to adore these. All you need is a highlighter, some rubbing alcohol and a nail polish bottle! Another must-have when going back to school are pencils. And we are making DIY rainbow pencils! These are the coolest pencils I've ever seen and all you need to make them is some clay and pencil lead. These DIY pencils are also super satisfying and fun to make. Besides the rainbow pencils we also need a magic marker, right? This back to school DIY is seriously mind blowing – it shows how to make a magic marker out of bleach and any marker of your choice. An even more insane marker DIY is a spray graffiti pen. I found a way how to make amazing blow markers out of any marker that you already have. Never before was taking notes so much fun! No need for expensive back to school shopping this school year, you can make way better DIY school supplies with these 12 school hacks yourself! Become my Friend & Enter Giveaways :) Instagram: http://instagram.com/sarabeautycorner Twitter: https://twitter.com/SaraBeautyC Google +: http://goo.gl/ci0OSI Facebook: http://goo.gl/020J6i Tumblr: http://goo.gl/Y7zYU8 Join our Nail Art G+ Community: http://goo.gl/RQ3SPC Join our DIY G+ Community: http://goo.gl/yAnZsQ Join our Comedy and Fun G+ Community: http://goo.gl/oD19bI Music from Monstercat: https://www.monstercat.com/ or http://www.youtube.com/monstercat and Epidemic Sound: https://goo.gl/5koA4i Work provided under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). #School #DIY #SaraBeautyCorner
When You Are About To Give Up - Motivational Speeches 1 Hour Long (very powerful)
 
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About to give up? Listen to this and seize the day! If you think this video can help someone, please SHARE it! I just hope this video will be helpful for somebody. Thank you! ⚠ A big part of this video was uploaded with the permission of the owners.⚠ ►►If you struggle and have a hard time, consider taking an online therapy session with our partner BetterHelp. https://tryonlinetherapy.com/dailymotivation. ►►Follow us on: Twitter https://twitter.com/dailyM_channel Facebook https://www.facebook.com/dailyMOTIVATIONchannel/ Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dailymotivation_channel/ ______________________________ ►►SPEAKERS IN ORDER: Tom Bilyeu Joe Rogan Ray Lewis Tyrese Gibson Will Smith Les Brown Jentezen Franklin Eric Thomas Tim Grove Grant Cardone Tony Robbins Steven Bartlett Jarret Adams Oprah Winfrey Wayne Dyer Arvin Lal Joe Stumpf Tom O'Bedlam (No Leaders Please by Charles Bukowski) John Assaraf Lisa Nichols Kash Shaikh Jim Cathcart Tai Lopez Will Smith Usain Bolt Arnold Schwarzenegger Terrell Owens Wesley Chapman Wyclef Jean Billionaire P.A. Tyler Perry Mel Robbins Michael Strahan Jim Carrey Bob Proctor Randy Gage Darren Hardy Special thanks to Tom Bilyeu for your great work. Subscribe to Tom's channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnYMOamNKLGVlJgRUbamveA Special thanks to Steven Bartlett for your great work. Subscribe to Steven's channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_LOoFtney1PI4La_edqz0w ______________________________ ►►BACKGROUND MUSIC by Really Slow Motion & AudioJungle https://www.youtube.com/user/reallyslowmotion Really Slow Motion - New Life (Motivational Uplifting Music) Event Horizon (Epic Emotional Modern Hybrid Drama) ______________________________ ❗If any content owners would like their images removed, please contact us by email at: [email protected] Thank you for understanding❗ ©⚠ FAIR-USE COPYRIGHT DISCLAIMER ⚠© * Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, commenting, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use. 1)This video has no negative impact on the original works (It would actually be positive for them) 2)This video is also for teaching purposes. 3)It is transformative in nature. 4)I only used bits and pieces of videos to get the point across where necessary. Daily Motivation does not own the rights to these video clips. They have, in accordance with fair use, been repurposed with the intent of educating and inspiring others. ►►Help us caption & translate this video! ◄◄ http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UCK9i-t1GwUeVVmddPCCdqCg&tab=2 #dailyMOTIVATION #MorningMotivation
Views: 3402716 daily MOTIVATION
Learn how to read TAB for Ukulele AND Guitar - IN TWO MINUTES!
 
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Here's a quick and easy lesson explaining exactly how to read tab for ukulele (and guitar! By the end you'll even be able to play your first song... though I'm not telling you what it is! AMAZON STORE: https://www.amazon.com/shop/theukuleleteacher --- Check out ukulele news & reviews and news at my website https://www.GrabYourUke.com! --- Go to http://www.UkuleleTees.com for an official GRAB YOUR UKE t-shirt! --- NEW VIDEOS EVERY MONDAY, WEDNESDAY & SATURDAY! --- If you enjoy my videos please consider supporting me on http://www.patreon.com/UkeTeacher - you won't regret it! For as little as $1 a month you get some VERY cool and exclusive rewards AND each lesson 24 hours before the rest of the world! Plus I'll follow you back on Twitter and Instagram! --- Get 10% off ANYTHING at http://www.UkeLifeCo.com with the promo code: UKETEACHER --- THE UKULELE APP: App Store: http://bit.ly/UkeAppIOS Android: http://bit.ly/UkeAppAndroid Amazon UK: http://bit.ly/UkeApp-AmazonUK Amazon US: bit.ly/UkeApp-AmazonUS --- WRITE TO ME! I'll write back! John "The Ukulele Teacher" Atkins PO Box 661657 Los Angeles CA 90066 USA --- Go to http://www.UkuleleTees.com for an official GRAB YOUR UKE t-shirt! --- LET'S BE BUDS! * Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/UkeTeacher * Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/UkeTeacher * Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/TheUkuleleTeacher * Snapchat/Periscope: @UkeTeacher --- The Ukulele Teacher provides the best free ukulele lessons anywhere on the internet! Learn how to play all your favourite songs on the ukulele with new videos every Monday, Wednesday and Saturday. Subscribe NOW!
Views: 485582 The Ukulele Teacher
PERFECT AFFORDABLE SMILE in 2 weeks at HOME! Brighter Image Lab
 
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Her smile was the only thing holding her back, and now it's perfect! Lab Direct! No Dentist Visit!! Her results were AMAZING! We did it for her, we can do it for you! Visit brighterimagelab.com _____ FAQ’s PLEASE READ BEFORE COMMENTING! We know a lot of people are going to have questions. While we appreciate the interest, we don’t actively respond to any comments or questions that can be answered easily with a visit to our website at http://brighterimagelab.com/?i=youtube_desc where we also offer live chat to assist you. Here’s a list of some of the most common questions that are all answered on our site. 1. Where can I find you? 2. How much is this going to cost? 3. Do you offer to finance? 4. If I have questions that aren’t answered here or on the website, how do I ask a live person? 5. Are you dentists? Will this fix anything relating to my teeth? 6. Can I get a refund if I’m not satisfied? 7. What else does Brighter Image Lab offer? Again, http://brighterimagelab.com/?i=youtube_desc is always the best way to reach us with questions. Instead, for this YouTube channel, we try to encourage conversation about the video itself. If you have questions NOT related to the product, we do our best to respond to those as we can. _____ Filmed on: Canon 70D: goo.gl/iyqLKU Canon 7D: goo.gl/5qaWkp Canon 5D Mark II: goo.gl/f4gUo8 _____ Lab Direct, No Dentist, Worldwide. We service clients in: USA New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Houston, Philadelphia, Phoenix, San Antonio, San Diego, Dallas, Fort Worth, San Jose, Austin, Jacksonville, Columbus, San Francisco, Charlotte, Seattle, Denver, El Paso, Washington D.C., Boston, Oklahoma City, Honolulu, Anchorage, Orlando, and any area in the U.S. CANADA Toronto, Ottawa, Mississauga, Hamilton, London, Ontario; Montreal, Quebec City, Quebec; Calgary, Edmonton, Alberta; Vancouver, Surrey, British Columbia; Halifax, Nova Scotia; Winnipeg, Manitoba; Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, and any area in Canada. AUSTRALIA: Sydney, Tweed Heads, Wollongong, New South Wales; Melbourne, Geelong, Ballarat, Victoria; Brisbane, Sunshine Coast, Gold Coast, Queensland; Perth, Adelaide, Newcastle-Maitland, Canberra- Queanbeyan, New South Wales; Hobart, Tasmania CENTRAL AND SOUTH AMERICA: Mexico City, Ecatepec, Nezahualcoyoti, Cancun, Mexico; Guadalajara, Zapopan, Jalisco; Puebla; Tijuana, Mexicali, Baja California; Juarez, Chihuahua; Leon, Guanajuato; Monterrey, Nuevo Leon; Acapulco, Guerrero; Nassau, Bahamas, Belmopan, Belize, St. John’s, Antigua and Barbuda; San Juan, Puerto Rico; Panama City, Panama; Kingston, Jamaica; Tegucigalpa, Honduras; Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago; Argentina, Buenos Aires, Bolivia, La Paz and Sucre, Brazil, Brasília, Chile, Santiago, Colombia, Bogotá, Ecuador, Quito, French Guiana, Cayenne, Guyana, Georgetown, Venezuela, Caracas, Peru, Lima, San José , Costa Rica, and most areas in Central and South America. EUROPE: Berlin, Hamburg, Munich, Frankfurt, Germany, Paris, Marseille, Lyon, France, London, Manchester, Birmingham, Liverpool, Leeds, Bristol, Nottingham, Britain United Kingdom, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Dundee, Scotland, Rome, Florence, Venice, Milan, Naples, Italy, Helsinki, Finland, Copenhagen, Denmark, Prague, Czech Republic, Sofia, Bulgaria, Brussels, Antwerp, Belgium, Lisbon, Portugal, Vienna, Austria, Athens, Greece, Stockholm, Sweden, Bratislava, Slovakia, Bucharest, Romania, Bucharest, Dublin, Cork, Galway, Limerick, Ireland, Belfast, Derry, Northern Ireland, Norway, Oslo, Netherlands, Amsterdam, Monaco, Monaco, Luxembourg City, Luxembourg, Warsaw, Poland, and any area in Europe. ASIA, JAPAN, INDONESIA, PHILLIPPINES, INDIA: Guangzhou, Shanghai, Chongqing, Beijing, Hangzhou, Tianjin, Xi’an, China; Taipei, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Tokyo, Yokohama, Osaka, Nagoya, Sapporo, Kobe, Kyoto, Fukuoka, Kawasaki, Saitama, Japan; Mumbai, Delhi, Bangalore, Hyderabad, Ahmedabad, Chennal, Kolkata, Surat, India; Jakarta, Surabaya, Bandung, Indonesia; Manila, Quezon City, Davao, Malingao, Cebu City, Taguig, Pasig City, Philippines, and most areas in Asia and the Pacific Islands. Learn more at brighterimagelab.com
Views: 441 teethwhitening
2019 Limestone Tiles Tips  - Remove Mildew Stains From Limestone Tiles
 
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"2019 Limestone Tiles Tips - Remove Mildew Stains From Limestone Tiles Watch more videos for more knowledge 2017 Limestone Tiles Tips - Remove Mildew Stains ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/dqAQSqu5rVY%26vl%3Den How to Clean Limestone Tile - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/X2AiGude11M Cleaning Limestone Tile Showers Edgewater FL ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/ZmPV81mZSAE How to clean an internal limestone floor - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/xkCXffEbP-0 How To Remove Mildew From Natural Stone Using ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/RglvwVyDBCs Limestone - Episode 16 Limestone Cleaning ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/tMZSEvVldpw How to clean Austin Limestone - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/YaK6yYzxzGo CLEANING LIMESTONE TILES - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/d-azCAbD0T0 Jerusalem Limestone Floor Cleaning - Barrington ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/n83V1VrmtoA Limestone shower restoration - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/FHB0RoXatao Removal of Marker Stain from Limestone ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/b7iRSSGHGoc Cleaning and sealing a Limestone Floor Hull - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/Ke1kBIcZzOQ How to seal Limestone flooring tiles - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/TrnIrl65-i8 Limestone Restoration - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/Tdtj7mqdyS4 Rugby Tile Cleaning - Warwickshire Tile Cleaning ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/rKLCUJnrnoc Lichen & Black Stain Removal on Natural Stone ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/B6X6c_jxMaA Travertine Tile Shower, Remove Mold with Vapor ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/jKmsrVsPG4o ITT Ceramic - Serie LimeStone - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/rGTvjUhaIzo What Is The Best Type Of Tile For A Shower? - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/KIMu_PhAOts "
Views: 2745 IS mas
NEMC yakifunga kiwanda cha kutengeneza lami cha SKOL cha Salasala Dar es Salaam.
 
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NEMC yakifunga kiwanda cha kutengeneza lami cha SKOL cha Salasala Dar es Salaam.
Views: 1185 ITV TANZANIA
Military Lessons: The U.S. Military in the Post-Vietnam Era (1999)
 
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The Vietnam War called into question the U.S. Army doctrine. Marine Corps General Victor H. Krulak heavily criticised Westmoreland's attrition strategy, calling it "wasteful of American lives... with small likelihood of a successful outcome." In addition, doubts surfaced about the ability of the military to train foreign forces. Between 1965 and 1975, the United States spent $111 billion on the war ($686 billion in FY2008 dollars). This resulted in a large federal budget deficit. More than 3 million Americans served in the Vietnam War, some 1.5 million of whom actually saw combat in Vietnam. James E. Westheider wrote that "At the height of American involvement in 1968, for example, there were 543,000 American military personnel in Vietnam, but only 80,000 were considered combat troops." Conscription in the United States had been controlled by the President since World War II, but ended in 1973." By war's end, 58,220 American soldiers had been killed, more than 150,000 had been wounded, and at least 21,000 had been permanently disabled. According to Dale Kueter, "Sixty-one percent of those killed were age 21 or younger. Of those killed in combat, 86.3 percent were white, 12.5 percent were black and the remainder from other races." The youngest American KIA in the war was PFC Dan Bullock, who had falsified his birth certificate and enlisted in the US Marines at age 14 and who was killed in combat at age 15. Approximately 830,000 Vietnam veterans suffered symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. An estimated 125,000 Americans fled to Canada to avoid the Vietnam draft, and approximately 50,000 American servicemen deserted. In 1977, United States President Jimmy Carter granted a full, complete and unconditional pardon to all Vietnam-era draft dodgers. The Vietnam War POW/MIA issue, concerning the fate of U.S. service personnel listed as missing in action, persisted for many years after the war's conclusion. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vietnam_war
Views: 131669 The Film Archives
Native American Activist and Member of the American Indian Movement: Leonard Peltier Case
 
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Leonard Peltier (born September 12, 1944) is a Native American activist and member of the American Indian Movement (AIM). More: https://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ie=UTF8&tag=tra0c7-20&linkCode=ur2&linkId=74eb5ef2b7015aca45bc45c0cadabf7f&camp=1789&creative=9325&index=books&keywords=leonard%20peltier In 1977 he was convicted and sentenced to two consecutive terms of life imprisonment for first degree murder in the shooting of two Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) agents during a 1975 conflict on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. Peltier's indictment and conviction is the subject of the 1992 documentary Incident at Oglala, a film directed by Michael Apted. Peltier has been identified as a political prisoner by certain activist groups. Amnesty International placed his case under the "Unfair Trials" category of its Annual Report: USA 2010, citing concerns with the fairness of the proceedings. His murder conviction has survived appeals in various courts over the years. In 2002 and 2003, Paul DeMain, editor of News From Indian Country, wrote that sources had told him that Peltier had said he killed the FBI agents; DeMain withdrew his support for clemency. At the trials in 2004 and 2010 of two men indicted for the murder of Anna Mae Aquash in December 1975 at the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, prosecution witnesses testified that Peltier had told them and a small group of fugitive activists, including Aquash, that he had shot the two FBI agents. Peltier issued a statement in 2004 accusing one witness of perjury for her testimony and being a sellout. The two men charged in the murder of Aquash were convicted. Peltier is incarcerated at the Coleman Federal Correctional Complex, Florida. His projected release date is October 11, 2040. His last parole hearing was in July 2009; his request for parole was denied. Peltier's next scheduled hearing will be in July 2024. In 1965, Peltier relocated to Seattle, Washington. He worked for several years and became the owner of an auto body station. In the city, Peltier became involved in a variety of causes championing Native American civil rights, and eventually joined the American Indian Movement (AIM). In the early 1970s, he learned about the factional tensions at the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota between supporters of Richard Wilson, elected tribal chairman in 1972, and traditionalist members of the tribe. Wilson had created a private militia, known as the Guardians of the Oglala Nation (GOONs), whose members were reputed to have attacked political opponents. Protests over a failed impeachment hearing of Wilson contributed to the AIM and Lakota armed takeover of Wounded Knee in February 1973, which resulted in a 71-day siege by federal forces, known as the Wounded Knee Incident. They demanded the resignation of Wilson. The takeover did not end Wilson's leadership, the actions of the GOONs or the violence; at least 50 murders were reported on Pine Ridge during the next three years. In 1975 Peltier traveled to the Pine Ridge reservation as a member of AIM to try to help reduce the continuing violence among political opponents. At the time, he was a fugitive, with a warrant issued in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. It charged him with unlawful flight to avoid prosecution for the attempted murder of an off-duty Milwaukee police officer, a crime for which he was later acquitted. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonard_Peltier
Views: 103301 The Film Archives
There are No Forests on Earth ??? Really? Full UNBELIEVABLE Documentary -Multi Language
 
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If you've studied the Illuminati, then you know how big the lies are. This video is one of the biggest lies in plain sight. This is for the TRUE Truth Seekers out there. This video is a paradigm shifter. Be fore-warned! (Here's a tip for those who want to watch a lot of videos but don't have enough time. There is a setting on the video player that allows you to double the speed. It comes in handy...) Don't forget to subscribe here: http://www.youtube.com/c/FreeTruthProductions www.freetruthproductions.com Languages: Afrikaans አማርኛ العربية Azərbaycanca / آذربايجان Boarisch Беларуская Български বাংলা བོད་ཡིག / Bod skad Bosanski Català Нохчийн Sinugboanong Binisaya ᏣᎳᎩ Corsu Nehiyaw Česky словѣньскъ / slověnĭskŭ Cymraeg Dansk Deutsch Ελληνικά Esperanto Español Eesti Euskara فارسی Suomi Võro Français Frysk Gàidhlig Galego Avañe'ẽ ગુજરાતી هَوُسَ Hawai`i עברית हिन्दी Hrvatski Krèyol ayisyen Magyar Հայերեն Bahasa Indonesia Igbo Ido Íslenska Italiano 日本語 Basa Jawa ქართული Қазақша ភាសាខ្មែរ ಕನ್ನಡ 한국어 Kurdî / كوردی Коми Kırgızca / Кыргызча Latina Lëtzebuergesch ລາວ / Pha xa lao Lazuri / ლაზური Lietuvių Latviešu Malagasy 官話/官话 Māori Македонски മലയാളം Монгол Moldovenească मराठी Bahasa Melayu bil-Malti Myanmasa नेपाली Nederlands Norsk (bokmål / riksmål) Diné bizaad Chi-Chewa ਪੰਜਾਬੀ / पंजाबी / پنجابي Norfuk Polski پښتو Português Romani / रोमानी Kirundi Română Русский संस्कृतम् Sicilianu सिनधि Srpskohrvatski / Српскохрватски සිංහල Slovenčina Slovenščina Gagana Samoa chiShona Soomaaliga Shqip Српски Sesotho Basa Sunda Svenska Kiswahili தமிழ் తెలుగు Тоҷикӣ ไทย / Phasa Thai Tagalog Lea Faka-Tonga Türkçe Reo Mā`ohi Українська اردو Ўзбек Việtnam Хальмг isiXhosa ייִדיש Yorùbá 中文 isiZulu ‪中文(台灣)‬ tokipona -note - My sub title editor doesn't translate anymore (new implements from Google) so I'm translating through an online translator and it takes a lot more time. But more videos to come... Free Truth - it's own reward! www.freetruthproductions.com
Calling All Cars: True Confessions / The Criminal Returns / One Pound Note
 
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The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
Views: 94466 Remember This
Our Miss Brooks: Magazine Articles / Cow in the Closet / Takes Over Spring Garden / Orphan Twins
 
01:51:34
Our Miss Brooks is an American situation comedy starring Eve Arden as a sardonic high school English teacher. It began as a radio show broadcast from 1948 to 1957. When the show was adapted to television (1952--56), it became one of the medium's earliest hits. In 1956, the sitcom was adapted for big screen in the film of the same name. Connie (Constance) Brooks (Eve Arden), an English teacher at fictional Madison High School. Osgood Conklin (Gale Gordon), blustery, gruff, crooked and unsympathetic Madison High principal, a near-constant pain to his faculty and students. (Conklin was played by Joseph Forte in the show's first episode; Gordon succeeded him for the rest of the series' run.) Occasionally Conklin would rig competitions at the school--such as that for prom queen--so that his daughter Harriet would win. Walter Denton (Richard Crenna, billed at the time as Dick Crenna), a Madison High student, well-intentioned and clumsy, with a nasally high, cracking voice, often driving Miss Brooks (his self-professed favorite teacher) to school in a broken-down jalopy. Miss Brooks' references to her own usually-in-the-shop car became one of the show's running gags. Philip Boynton (Jeff Chandler on radio, billed sometimes under his birth name Ira Grossel); Robert Rockwell on both radio and television), Madison High biology teacher, the shy and often clueless object of Miss Brooks' affections. Margaret Davis (Jane Morgan), Miss Brooks' absentminded landlady, whose two trademarks are a cat named Minerva, and a penchant for whipping up exotic and often inedible breakfasts. Harriet Conklin (Gloria McMillan), Madison High student and daughter of principal Conklin. A sometime love interest for Walter Denton, Harriet was honest and guileless with none of her father's malevolence and dishonesty. Stretch (Fabian) Snodgrass (Leonard Smith), dull-witted Madison High athletic star and Walter's best friend. Daisy Enright (Mary Jane Croft), Madison High English teacher, and a scheming professional and romantic rival to Miss Brooks. Jacques Monet (Gerald Mohr), a French teacher. Our Miss Brooks was a hit on radio from the outset; within eight months of its launch as a regular series, the show landed several honors, including four for Eve Arden, who won polls in four individual publications of the time. Arden had actually been the third choice to play the title role. Harry Ackerman, West Coast director of programming, wanted Shirley Booth for the part, but as he told historian Gerald Nachman many years later, he realized Booth was too focused on the underpaid downside of public school teaching at the time to have fun with the role. Lucille Ball was believed to have been the next choice, but she was already committed to My Favorite Husband and didn't audition. Chairman Bill Paley, who was friendly with Arden, persuaded her to audition for the part. With a slightly rewritten audition script--Osgood Conklin, for example, was originally written as a school board president but was now written as the incoming new Madison principal--Arden agreed to give the newly-revamped show a try. Produced by Larry Berns and written by director Al Lewis, Our Miss Brooks premiered on July 19, 1948. According to radio critic John Crosby, her lines were very "feline" in dialogue scenes with principal Conklin and would-be boyfriend Boynton, with sharp, witty comebacks. The interplay between the cast--blustery Conklin, nebbishy Denton, accommodating Harriet, absentminded Mrs. Davis, clueless Boynton, scheming Miss Enright--also received positive reviews. Arden won a radio listeners' poll by Radio Mirror magazine as the top ranking comedienne of 1948-49, receiving her award at the end of an Our Miss Brooks broadcast that March. "I'm certainly going to try in the coming months to merit the honor you've bestowed upon me, because I understand that if I win this two years in a row, I get to keep Mr. Boynton," she joked. But she was also a hit with the critics; a winter 1949 poll of newspaper and magazine radio editors taken by Motion Picture Daily named her the year's best radio comedienne. For its entire radio life, the show was sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, promoting Palmolive soap, Lustre Creme shampoo and Toni hair care products. The radio series continued until 1957, a year after its television life ended. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Miss_Brooks
Views: 71202 Remember This
Our Miss Brooks: English Test / First Aid Course / Tries to Forget / Wins a Man's Suit
 
01:47:30
Our Miss Brooks is an American situation comedy starring Eve Arden as a sardonic high school English teacher. It began as a radio show broadcast from 1948 to 1957. When the show was adapted to television (1952--56), it became one of the medium's earliest hits. In 1956, the sitcom was adapted for big screen in the film of the same name. Connie (Constance) Brooks (Eve Arden), an English teacher at fictional Madison High School. Osgood Conklin (Gale Gordon), blustery, gruff, crooked and unsympathetic Madison High principal, a near-constant pain to his faculty and students. (Conklin was played by Joseph Forte in the show's first episode; Gordon succeeded him for the rest of the series' run.) Occasionally Conklin would rig competitions at the school--such as that for prom queen--so that his daughter Harriet would win. Walter Denton (Richard Crenna, billed at the time as Dick Crenna), a Madison High student, well-intentioned and clumsy, with a nasally high, cracking voice, often driving Miss Brooks (his self-professed favorite teacher) to school in a broken-down jalopy. Miss Brooks' references to her own usually-in-the-shop car became one of the show's running gags. Philip Boynton (Jeff Chandler on radio, billed sometimes under his birth name Ira Grossel); Robert Rockwell on both radio and television), Madison High biology teacher, the shy and often clueless object of Miss Brooks' affections. Margaret Davis (Jane Morgan), Miss Brooks' absentminded landlady, whose two trademarks are a cat named Minerva, and a penchant for whipping up exotic and often inedible breakfasts. Harriet Conklin (Gloria McMillan), Madison High student and daughter of principal Conklin. A sometime love interest for Walter Denton, Harriet was honest and guileless with none of her father's malevolence and dishonesty. Stretch (Fabian) Snodgrass (Leonard Smith), dull-witted Madison High athletic star and Walter's best friend. Daisy Enright (Mary Jane Croft), Madison High English teacher, and a scheming professional and romantic rival to Miss Brooks. Jacques Monet (Gerald Mohr), a French teacher. Our Miss Brooks was a hit on radio from the outset; within eight months of its launch as a regular series, the show landed several honors, including four for Eve Arden, who won polls in four individual publications of the time. Arden had actually been the third choice to play the title role. Harry Ackerman, West Coast director of programming, wanted Shirley Booth for the part, but as he told historian Gerald Nachman many years later, he realized Booth was too focused on the underpaid downside of public school teaching at the time to have fun with the role. Lucille Ball was believed to have been the next choice, but she was already committed to My Favorite Husband and didn't audition. Chairman Bill Paley, who was friendly with Arden, persuaded her to audition for the part. With a slightly rewritten audition script--Osgood Conklin, for example, was originally written as a school board president but was now written as the incoming new Madison principal--Arden agreed to give the newly-revamped show a try. Produced by Larry Berns and written by director Al Lewis, Our Miss Brooks premiered on July 19, 1948. According to radio critic John Crosby, her lines were very "feline" in dialogue scenes with principal Conklin and would-be boyfriend Boynton, with sharp, witty comebacks. The interplay between the cast--blustery Conklin, nebbishy Denton, accommodating Harriet, absentminded Mrs. Davis, clueless Boynton, scheming Miss Enright--also received positive reviews. Arden won a radio listeners' poll by Radio Mirror magazine as the top ranking comedienne of 1948-49, receiving her award at the end of an Our Miss Brooks broadcast that March. "I'm certainly going to try in the coming months to merit the honor you've bestowed upon me, because I understand that if I win this two years in a row, I get to keep Mr. Boynton," she joked. But she was also a hit with the critics; a winter 1949 poll of newspaper and magazine radio editors taken by Motion Picture Daily named her the year's best radio comedienne. For its entire radio life, the show was sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, promoting Palmolive soap, Lustre Creme shampoo and Toni hair care products. The radio series continued until 1957, a year after its television life ended. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Miss_Brooks
Views: 75712 Remember This
Our Miss Brooks: Another Day, Dress / Induction Notice / School TV / Hats for Mother's Day
 
01:43:12
Our Miss Brooks is an American situation comedy starring Eve Arden as a sardonic high school English teacher. It began as a radio show broadcast from 1948 to 1957. When the show was adapted to television (1952--56), it became one of the medium's earliest hits. In 1956, the sitcom was adapted for big screen in the film of the same name. Connie (Constance) Brooks (Eve Arden), an English teacher at fictional Madison High School. Osgood Conklin (Gale Gordon), blustery, gruff, crooked and unsympathetic Madison High principal, a near-constant pain to his faculty and students. (Conklin was played by Joseph Forte in the show's first episode; Gordon succeeded him for the rest of the series' run.) Occasionally Conklin would rig competitions at the school--such as that for prom queen--so that his daughter Harriet would win. Walter Denton (Richard Crenna, billed at the time as Dick Crenna), a Madison High student, well-intentioned and clumsy, with a nasally high, cracking voice, often driving Miss Brooks (his self-professed favorite teacher) to school in a broken-down jalopy. Miss Brooks' references to her own usually-in-the-shop car became one of the show's running gags. Philip Boynton (Jeff Chandler on radio, billed sometimes under his birth name Ira Grossel); Robert Rockwell on both radio and television), Madison High biology teacher, the shy and often clueless object of Miss Brooks' affections. Margaret Davis (Jane Morgan), Miss Brooks' absentminded landlady, whose two trademarks are a cat named Minerva, and a penchant for whipping up exotic and often inedible breakfasts. Harriet Conklin (Gloria McMillan), Madison High student and daughter of principal Conklin. A sometime love interest for Walter Denton, Harriet was honest and guileless with none of her father's malevolence and dishonesty. Stretch (Fabian) Snodgrass (Leonard Smith), dull-witted Madison High athletic star and Walter's best friend. Daisy Enright (Mary Jane Croft), Madison High English teacher, and a scheming professional and romantic rival to Miss Brooks. Jacques Monet (Gerald Mohr), a French teacher. Our Miss Brooks was a hit on radio from the outset; within eight months of its launch as a regular series, the show landed several honors, including four for Eve Arden, who won polls in four individual publications of the time. Arden had actually been the third choice to play the title role. Harry Ackerman, West Coast director of programming, wanted Shirley Booth for the part, but as he told historian Gerald Nachman many years later, he realized Booth was too focused on the underpaid downside of public school teaching at the time to have fun with the role. Lucille Ball was believed to have been the next choice, but she was already committed to My Favorite Husband and didn't audition. Chairman Bill Paley, who was friendly with Arden, persuaded her to audition for the part. With a slightly rewritten audition script--Osgood Conklin, for example, was originally written as a school board president but was now written as the incoming new Madison principal--Arden agreed to give the newly-revamped show a try. Produced by Larry Berns and written by director Al Lewis, Our Miss Brooks premiered on July 19, 1948. According to radio critic John Crosby, her lines were very "feline" in dialogue scenes with principal Conklin and would-be boyfriend Boynton, with sharp, witty comebacks. The interplay between the cast--blustery Conklin, nebbishy Denton, accommodating Harriet, absentminded Mrs. Davis, clueless Boynton, scheming Miss Enright--also received positive reviews. Arden won a radio listeners' poll by Radio Mirror magazine as the top ranking comedienne of 1948-49, receiving her award at the end of an Our Miss Brooks broadcast that March. "I'm certainly going to try in the coming months to merit the honor you've bestowed upon me, because I understand that if I win this two years in a row, I get to keep Mr. Boynton," she joked. But she was also a hit with the critics; a winter 1949 poll of newspaper and magazine radio editors taken by Motion Picture Daily named her the year's best radio comedienne. For its entire radio life, the show was sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, promoting Palmolive soap, Lustre Creme shampoo and Toni hair care products. The radio series continued until 1957, a year after its television life ended. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Miss_Brooks
Views: 160893 Remember This
You Bet Your Life: Secret Word - Face / Sign / Chair
 
01:28:14
Julius Henry "Groucho" Marx (October 2, 1890 -- August 19, 1977) was an American comedian and film and television star. He is known as a master of quick wit and widely considered one of the best comedians of the modern era. His rapid-fire, often impromptu delivery of innuendo-laden patter earned him many admirers and imitators. He made 13 feature films with his siblings the Marx Brothers, of whom he was the third-born. He also had a successful solo career, most notably as the host of the radio and television game show You Bet Your Life. His distinctive appearance, carried over from his days in vaudeville, included quirks such as an exaggerated stooped posture, glasses, cigar, and a thick greasepaint mustache and eyebrows. These exaggerated features resulted in the creation of one of the world's most ubiquitous and recognizable novelty disguises, known as "Groucho glasses", a one-piece mask consisting of horn-rimmed glasses, large plastic nose, bushy eyebrows and mustache. Groucho Marx was, and is, the most recognizable and well-known of the Marx Brothers. Groucho-like characters and references have appeared in popular culture both during and after his life, some aimed at audiences who may never have seen a Marx Brothers movie. Groucho's trademark eye glasses, nose, mustache, and cigar have become icons of comedy—glasses with fake noses and mustaches (referred to as "Groucho glasses", "nose-glasses," and other names) are sold by novelty and costume shops around the world. Nat Perrin, close friend of Groucho Marx and writer of several Marx Brothers films, inspired John Astin's portrayal of Gomez Addams on the 1960s TV series The Addams Family with similarly thick mustache, eyebrows, sardonic remarks, backward logic, and ever-present cigar (pulled from his breast pocket already lit). Alan Alda often vamped in the manner of Groucho on M*A*S*H. In one episode, "Yankee Doodle Doctor", Hawkeye and Trapper put on a Marx Brothers act at the 4077, with Hawkeye playing Groucho and Trapper playing Harpo. In three other episodes, a character appeared who was named Captain Calvin Spalding (played by Loudon Wainwright III). Groucho's character in Animal Crackers was Captain Geoffrey T. Spaulding. On many occasions, on the 1970s television sitcom All In The Family, Michael Stivic (Rob Reiner), would briefly imitate Groucho Marx and his mannerisms. Two albums by British rock band Queen, A Night at the Opera (1975) and A Day at the Races (1976), are named after Marx Brothers films. In March 1977, Groucho invited Queen to visit him in his Los Angeles home; there they performed "'39" a capella. A long-running ad campaign for Vlasic Pickles features an animated stork that imitates Groucho's mannerisms and voice. On the famous Hollywood Sign in California, one of the "O"s is dedicated to Groucho. Alice Cooper contributed over $27,000 to remodel the sign, in memory of his friend. In 1982, Gabe Kaplan portrayed Marx in the film Groucho, in a one-man stage production. He also imitated Marx occasionally on his previous TV sitcom Welcome Back, Kotter. Actor Frank Ferrante has performed as Groucho Marx on stage for more than two decades. He continues to tour under rights granted by the Marx family in a one-man show entitled An Evening With Groucho in theaters throughout the United States and Canada with piano accompanist Jim Furmston. In the late 1980s Ferrante starred as Groucho in the off-Broadway and London show Groucho: A Life in Revue penned by Groucho's son Arthur. Ferrante portrayed the comedian from age 15 to 85. The show was later filmed for PBS in 2001. Woody Allen's 1996 musical Everyone Says I Love You, in addition to being named for one of Groucho's signature songs, ends with a Groucho-themed New Year's Eve party in Paris, which some of the stars, including Allen and Goldie Hawn, attend in full Groucho costume. The highlight of the scene is an ensemble song-and-dance performance of "Hooray for Captain Spaulding"—done entirely in French. In the last of the Tintin comics, Tintin and the Picaros, a balloon shaped like the face of Groucho could be seen in the Annual Carnival. In the Italian horror comic Dylan Dog, the protagonist's sidekick is a Groucho impersonator whose character became his permanent personality. The BBC remade the radio sitcom Flywheel, Shyster and Flywheel, with contemporary actors playing the parts of the original cast. The series was repeated on digital radio station BBC7. Scottish playwright Louise Oliver wrote a play named Waiting For Groucho about Chico and Harpo waiting for Groucho to turn up for the filming of their last project together. This was performed by Glasgow theatre company Rhymes with Purple Productions at the Edinburgh Fringe and in Glasgow and Hamilton in 2007-08. Groucho was played by Scottish actor Frodo McDaniel. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Groucho
Views: 69786 Remember This
Our Miss Brooks: House Trailer / Friendship / French Sadie Hawkins Day
 
01:34:37
Our Miss Brooks is an American situation comedy starring Eve Arden as a sardonic high school English teacher. It began as a radio show broadcast from 1948 to 1957. When the show was adapted to television (1952--56), it became one of the medium's earliest hits. In 1956, the sitcom was adapted for big screen in the film of the same name. Connie (Constance) Brooks (Eve Arden), an English teacher at fictional Madison High School. Osgood Conklin (Gale Gordon), blustery, gruff, crooked and unsympathetic Madison High principal, a near-constant pain to his faculty and students. (Conklin was played by Joseph Forte in the show's first episode; Gordon succeeded him for the rest of the series' run.) Occasionally Conklin would rig competitions at the school--such as that for prom queen--so that his daughter Harriet would win. Walter Denton (Richard Crenna, billed at the time as Dick Crenna), a Madison High student, well-intentioned and clumsy, with a nasally high, cracking voice, often driving Miss Brooks (his self-professed favorite teacher) to school in a broken-down jalopy. Miss Brooks' references to her own usually-in-the-shop car became one of the show's running gags. Philip Boynton (Jeff Chandler on radio, billed sometimes under his birth name Ira Grossel); Robert Rockwell on both radio and television), Madison High biology teacher, the shy and often clueless object of Miss Brooks' affections. Margaret Davis (Jane Morgan), Miss Brooks' absentminded landlady, whose two trademarks are a cat named Minerva, and a penchant for whipping up exotic and often inedible breakfasts. Harriet Conklin (Gloria McMillan), Madison High student and daughter of principal Conklin. A sometime love interest for Walter Denton, Harriet was honest and guileless with none of her father's malevolence and dishonesty. Stretch (Fabian) Snodgrass (Leonard Smith), dull-witted Madison High athletic star and Walter's best friend. Daisy Enright (Mary Jane Croft), Madison High English teacher, and a scheming professional and romantic rival to Miss Brooks. Jacques Monet (Gerald Mohr), a French teacher. Our Miss Brooks was a hit on radio from the outset; within eight months of its launch as a regular series, the show landed several honors, including four for Eve Arden, who won polls in four individual publications of the time. Arden had actually been the third choice to play the title role. Harry Ackerman, West Coast director of programming, wanted Shirley Booth for the part, but as he told historian Gerald Nachman many years later, he realized Booth was too focused on the underpaid downside of public school teaching at the time to have fun with the role. Lucille Ball was believed to have been the next choice, but she was already committed to My Favorite Husband and didn't audition. Chairman Bill Paley, who was friendly with Arden, persuaded her to audition for the part. With a slightly rewritten audition script--Osgood Conklin, for example, was originally written as a school board president but was now written as the incoming new Madison principal--Arden agreed to give the newly-revamped show a try. Produced by Larry Berns and written by director Al Lewis, Our Miss Brooks premiered on July 19, 1948. According to radio critic John Crosby, her lines were very "feline" in dialogue scenes with principal Conklin and would-be boyfriend Boynton, with sharp, witty comebacks. The interplay between the cast--blustery Conklin, nebbishy Denton, accommodating Harriet, absentminded Mrs. Davis, clueless Boynton, scheming Miss Enright--also received positive reviews. Arden won a radio listeners' poll by Radio Mirror magazine as the top ranking comedienne of 1948-49, receiving her award at the end of an Our Miss Brooks broadcast that March. "I'm certainly going to try in the coming months to merit the honor you've bestowed upon me, because I understand that if I win this two years in a row, I get to keep Mr. Boynton," she joked. But she was also a hit with the critics; a winter 1949 poll of newspaper and magazine radio editors taken by Motion Picture Daily named her the year's best radio comedienne. For its entire radio life, the show was sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, promoting Palmolive soap, Lustre Creme shampoo and Toni hair care products. The radio series continued until 1957, a year after its television life ended. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Miss_Brooks
Views: 61313 Remember This
Our Miss Brooks: Accused of Professionalism / Spring Garden / Taxi Fare / Marriage by Proxy
 
01:44:57
Our Miss Brooks is an American situation comedy starring Eve Arden as a sardonic high school English teacher. It began as a radio show broadcast from 1948 to 1957. When the show was adapted to television (1952--56), it became one of the medium's earliest hits. In 1956, the sitcom was adapted for big screen in the film of the same name. Connie (Constance) Brooks (Eve Arden), an English teacher at fictional Madison High School. Osgood Conklin (Gale Gordon), blustery, gruff, crooked and unsympathetic Madison High principal, a near-constant pain to his faculty and students. (Conklin was played by Joseph Forte in the show's first episode; Gordon succeeded him for the rest of the series' run.) Occasionally Conklin would rig competitions at the school--such as that for prom queen--so that his daughter Harriet would win. Walter Denton (Richard Crenna, billed at the time as Dick Crenna), a Madison High student, well-intentioned and clumsy, with a nasally high, cracking voice, often driving Miss Brooks (his self-professed favorite teacher) to school in a broken-down jalopy. Miss Brooks' references to her own usually-in-the-shop car became one of the show's running gags. Philip Boynton (Jeff Chandler on radio, billed sometimes under his birth name Ira Grossel); Robert Rockwell on both radio and television), Madison High biology teacher, the shy and often clueless object of Miss Brooks' affections. Margaret Davis (Jane Morgan), Miss Brooks' absentminded landlady, whose two trademarks are a cat named Minerva, and a penchant for whipping up exotic and often inedible breakfasts. Harriet Conklin (Gloria McMillan), Madison High student and daughter of principal Conklin. A sometime love interest for Walter Denton, Harriet was honest and guileless with none of her father's malevolence and dishonesty. Stretch (Fabian) Snodgrass (Leonard Smith), dull-witted Madison High athletic star and Walter's best friend. Daisy Enright (Mary Jane Croft), Madison High English teacher, and a scheming professional and romantic rival to Miss Brooks. Jacques Monet (Gerald Mohr), a French teacher. Our Miss Brooks was a hit on radio from the outset; within eight months of its launch as a regular series, the show landed several honors, including four for Eve Arden, who won polls in four individual publications of the time. Arden had actually been the third choice to play the title role. Harry Ackerman, West Coast director of programming, wanted Shirley Booth for the part, but as he told historian Gerald Nachman many years later, he realized Booth was too focused on the underpaid downside of public school teaching at the time to have fun with the role. Lucille Ball was believed to have been the next choice, but she was already committed to My Favorite Husband and didn't audition. Chairman Bill Paley, who was friendly with Arden, persuaded her to audition for the part. With a slightly rewritten audition script--Osgood Conklin, for example, was originally written as a school board president but was now written as the incoming new Madison principal--Arden agreed to give the newly-revamped show a try. Produced by Larry Berns and written by director Al Lewis, Our Miss Brooks premiered on July 19, 1948. According to radio critic John Crosby, her lines were very "feline" in dialogue scenes with principal Conklin and would-be boyfriend Boynton, with sharp, witty comebacks. The interplay between the cast--blustery Conklin, nebbishy Denton, accommodating Harriet, absentminded Mrs. Davis, clueless Boynton, scheming Miss Enright--also received positive reviews. Arden won a radio listeners' poll by Radio Mirror magazine as the top ranking comedienne of 1948-49, receiving her award at the end of an Our Miss Brooks broadcast that March. "I'm certainly going to try in the coming months to merit the honor you've bestowed upon me, because I understand that if I win this two years in a row, I get to keep Mr. Boynton," she joked. But she was also a hit with the critics; a winter 1949 poll of newspaper and magazine radio editors taken by Motion Picture Daily named her the year's best radio comedienne. For its entire radio life, the show was sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, promoting Palmolive soap, Lustre Creme shampoo and Toni hair care products. The radio series continued until 1957, a year after its television life ended. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Miss_Brooks
Views: 158139 Remember This
NYSTV - Nephilim Bones and Excavating the Truth w Joe Taylor - Multi - Language
 
01:57:45
Joe Taylor is an artist, musician, sculptor, paleontologist and founder creator of Mt. Blanco Fossil Museum, the largest working non-evolutionist fossil museum the world. The talk delves into forbidden archeology, the manipulation and control of the educational system, especially when it comes to paleontology, elongated skulls, giant skeletons, the knowledge of which is being suppressed. Subscribe here: http://www.youtube.com/c/FreeTruthProductions www.freetruthproductions.com Languages: Afrikaans አማርኛ العربية Azərbaycanca / آذربايجان Boarisch Беларуская Български বাংলা བོད་ཡིག / Bod skad Bosanski Català Нохчийн Sinugboanong Binisaya ᏣᎳᎩ (supposed to be Burmese but it doesn't show...) Corsu Nehiyaw Česky словѣньскъ / slověnĭskŭ Cymraeg Dansk Deutsch Ελληνικά Esperanto Español Eesti Euskara فارسی Suomi Võro Français Frysk Gàidhlig Galego Avañe'ẽ ગુજરાતી هَوُسَ Hawai`i עברית हिन्दी Hrvatski Krèyol ayisyen Magyar Հայերեն Bahasa Indonesia Igbo Ido Íslenska Italiano 日本語 Basa Jawa ქართული Қазақша ភាសាខ្មែរ ಕನ್ನಡ 한국어 Kurdî / كوردی Коми Kırgızca / Кыргызча Latina Lëtzebuergesch ລາວ / Pha xa lao Lazuri / ლაზური Lietuvių Latviešu Malagasy 官話/官话 Māori Македонски മലയാളം Монгол Moldovenească मराठी Bahasa Melayu bil-Malti Myanmasa नेपाली Nederlands Norsk (bokmål / riksmål) Diné bizaad Chi-Chewa ਪੰਜਾਬੀ / पंजाबी / پنجابي Norfuk Polski پښتو Português Romani / रोमानी Kirundi Română Русский संस्कृतम् Sicilianu सिनधि Srpskohrvatski / Српскохрватски සිංහල Slovenčina Slovenščina Gagana Samoa chiShona Soomaaliga Shqip Српски Sesotho Basa Sunda Svenska Kiswahili தமிழ் తెలుగు Тоҷикӣ ไทย / Phasa Thai Tagalog Lea Faka-Tonga Türkçe Reo Mā`ohi Українська اردو Ўзбек Việtnam Хальмг isiXhosa ייִדיש Yorùbá 中文 isiZulu ‪中文(台灣)‬ tokipona
Views: 18020 Free Truth Productions
Ambassadors, Attorneys, Accountants, Democratic and Republican Party Officials (1950s Interviews)
 
01:40:09
Interviewees: Sir Percy C. Spender, ambassador from Australia to the United States Stephen A. Mitchell, American attorney and Democratic Party official. He served as chairman of the Democratic National Committee from 1952 to 1956, and was an unsuccessful candidate for the Democratic nomination for Governor of Illinois in 1958. W. Sterling Cole, Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from New York. T. Coleman Andrews, accountant and an independent candidate for President of the United States. T. Lamar Caudle, Justice Department official Tadeusz Bór-Komorowski, Polish military leader. Komorowski was born in Lwów (now L'viv in Ukraine), in the Austrian partition of Poland. In the First World War he served as an officer in the Austro-Hungarian Army, and after the war became an officer in the Polish Army, rising to command the Grudziądz Cavalry School. Thomas Coleman Andrews (February 19, 1899 -- October 15, 1983) was an accountant and an independent candidate for President of the United States. Andrews was born in Richmond, Virginia. After high school, he worked at a meat packing company in Richmond. He then worked with a public accounting firm and he was certified as a CPA in 1921. Andrews formed his own public accounting firm in 1922. He went on leave from his firm in 1931 to become the Auditor of Public Accounts for the Commonwealth of Virginia, a position he held until 1933. He also took leave in 1938 to serve as controller and director of finance in Richmond. Andrews served in the office of the Under-Secretary of War as a fiscal director. He joined the United States Marine Corps in 1943, working as an accountant in North Africa and in the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing. Andrews retired from his firms in 1953 to become the Commissioner of Internal Revenue. He left the position in 1955 stating his opposition to the income tax. Andrews ran for President as the States' Rights Party candidate in 1956; his running mate was former Congressman Thomas H. Werdel. Andrews won 107,929 votes (0.17% of the vote) running strongest in the state of Virginia (6.16% of the vote), winning Fayette County, Tennessee and Prince Edward County, Virginia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coleman_Andrews
Views: 44913 The Film Archives
Our Miss Brooks: Cow in the Closet / Returns to School / Abolish Football / Bartering
 
01:44:49
Our Miss Brooks is an American situation comedy starring Eve Arden as a sardonic high school English teacher. It began as a radio show broadcast from 1948 to 1957. When the show was adapted to television (1952--56), it became one of the medium's earliest hits. In 1956, the sitcom was adapted for big screen in the film of the same name. Connie (Constance) Brooks (Eve Arden), an English teacher at fictional Madison High School. Osgood Conklin (Gale Gordon), blustery, gruff, crooked and unsympathetic Madison High principal, a near-constant pain to his faculty and students. (Conklin was played by Joseph Forte in the show's first episode; Gordon succeeded him for the rest of the series' run.) Occasionally Conklin would rig competitions at the school--such as that for prom queen--so that his daughter Harriet would win. Walter Denton (Richard Crenna, billed at the time as Dick Crenna), a Madison High student, well-intentioned and clumsy, with a nasally high, cracking voice, often driving Miss Brooks (his self-professed favorite teacher) to school in a broken-down jalopy. Miss Brooks' references to her own usually-in-the-shop car became one of the show's running gags. Philip Boynton (Jeff Chandler on radio, billed sometimes under his birth name Ira Grossel); Robert Rockwell on both radio and television), Madison High biology teacher, the shy and often clueless object of Miss Brooks' affections. Margaret Davis (Jane Morgan), Miss Brooks' absentminded landlady, whose two trademarks are a cat named Minerva, and a penchant for whipping up exotic and often inedible breakfasts. Harriet Conklin (Gloria McMillan), Madison High student and daughter of principal Conklin. A sometime love interest for Walter Denton, Harriet was honest and guileless with none of her father's malevolence and dishonesty. Stretch (Fabian) Snodgrass (Leonard Smith), dull-witted Madison High athletic star and Walter's best friend. Daisy Enright (Mary Jane Croft), Madison High English teacher, and a scheming professional and romantic rival to Miss Brooks. Jacques Monet (Gerald Mohr), a French teacher. Our Miss Brooks was a hit on radio from the outset; within eight months of its launch as a regular series, the show landed several honors, including four for Eve Arden, who won polls in four individual publications of the time. Arden had actually been the third choice to play the title role. Harry Ackerman, West Coast director of programming, wanted Shirley Booth for the part, but as he told historian Gerald Nachman many years later, he realized Booth was too focused on the underpaid downside of public school teaching at the time to have fun with the role. Lucille Ball was believed to have been the next choice, but she was already committed to My Favorite Husband and didn't audition. Chairman Bill Paley, who was friendly with Arden, persuaded her to audition for the part. With a slightly rewritten audition script--Osgood Conklin, for example, was originally written as a school board president but was now written as the incoming new Madison principal--Arden agreed to give the newly-revamped show a try. Produced by Larry Berns and written by director Al Lewis, Our Miss Brooks premiered on July 19, 1948. According to radio critic John Crosby, her lines were very "feline" in dialogue scenes with principal Conklin and would-be boyfriend Boynton, with sharp, witty comebacks. The interplay between the cast--blustery Conklin, nebbishy Denton, accommodating Harriet, absentminded Mrs. Davis, clueless Boynton, scheming Miss Enright--also received positive reviews. Arden won a radio listeners' poll by Radio Mirror magazine as the top ranking comedienne of 1948-49, receiving her award at the end of an Our Miss Brooks broadcast that March. "I'm certainly going to try in the coming months to merit the honor you've bestowed upon me, because I understand that if I win this two years in a row, I get to keep Mr. Boynton," she joked. But she was also a hit with the critics; a winter 1949 poll of newspaper and magazine radio editors taken by Motion Picture Daily named her the year's best radio comedienne. For its entire radio life, the show was sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, promoting Palmolive soap, Lustre Creme shampoo and Toni hair care products. The radio series continued until 1957, a year after its television life ended. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Miss_Brooks
Views: 49861 Remember This
Our Miss Brooks: Boynton's Barbecue / Boynton's Parents / Rare Black Orchid
 
01:29:56
Our Miss Brooks is an American situation comedy starring Eve Arden as a sardonic high school English teacher. It began as a radio show broadcast from 1948 to 1957. When the show was adapted to television (1952--56), it became one of the medium's earliest hits. In 1956, the sitcom was adapted for big screen in the film of the same name. Connie (Constance) Brooks (Eve Arden), an English teacher at fictional Madison High School. Osgood Conklin (Gale Gordon), blustery, gruff, crooked and unsympathetic Madison High principal, a near-constant pain to his faculty and students. (Conklin was played by Joseph Forte in the show's first episode; Gordon succeeded him for the rest of the series' run.) Occasionally Conklin would rig competitions at the school--such as that for prom queen--so that his daughter Harriet would win. Walter Denton (Richard Crenna, billed at the time as Dick Crenna), a Madison High student, well-intentioned and clumsy, with a nasally high, cracking voice, often driving Miss Brooks (his self-professed favorite teacher) to school in a broken-down jalopy. Miss Brooks' references to her own usually-in-the-shop car became one of the show's running gags. Philip Boynton (Jeff Chandler on radio, billed sometimes under his birth name Ira Grossel); Robert Rockwell on both radio and television), Madison High biology teacher, the shy and often clueless object of Miss Brooks' affections. Margaret Davis (Jane Morgan), Miss Brooks' absentminded landlady, whose two trademarks are a cat named Minerva, and a penchant for whipping up exotic and often inedible breakfasts. Harriet Conklin (Gloria McMillan), Madison High student and daughter of principal Conklin. A sometime love interest for Walter Denton, Harriet was honest and guileless with none of her father's malevolence and dishonesty. Stretch (Fabian) Snodgrass (Leonard Smith), dull-witted Madison High athletic star and Walter's best friend. Daisy Enright (Mary Jane Croft), Madison High English teacher, and a scheming professional and romantic rival to Miss Brooks. Jacques Monet (Gerald Mohr), a French teacher. Our Miss Brooks was a hit on radio from the outset; within eight months of its launch as a regular series, the show landed several honors, including four for Eve Arden, who won polls in four individual publications of the time. Arden had actually been the third choice to play the title role. Harry Ackerman, West Coast director of programming, wanted Shirley Booth for the part, but as he told historian Gerald Nachman many years later, he realized Booth was too focused on the underpaid downside of public school teaching at the time to have fun with the role. Lucille Ball was believed to have been the next choice, but she was already committed to My Favorite Husband and didn't audition. Chairman Bill Paley, who was friendly with Arden, persuaded her to audition for the part. With a slightly rewritten audition script--Osgood Conklin, for example, was originally written as a school board president but was now written as the incoming new Madison principal--Arden agreed to give the newly-revamped show a try. Produced by Larry Berns and written by director Al Lewis, Our Miss Brooks premiered on July 19, 1948. According to radio critic John Crosby, her lines were very "feline" in dialogue scenes with principal Conklin and would-be boyfriend Boynton, with sharp, witty comebacks. The interplay between the cast--blustery Conklin, nebbishy Denton, accommodating Harriet, absentminded Mrs. Davis, clueless Boynton, scheming Miss Enright--also received positive reviews. Arden won a radio listeners' poll by Radio Mirror magazine as the top ranking comedienne of 1948-49, receiving her award at the end of an Our Miss Brooks broadcast that March. "I'm certainly going to try in the coming months to merit the honor you've bestowed upon me, because I understand that if I win this two years in a row, I get to keep Mr. Boynton," she joked. But she was also a hit with the critics; a winter 1949 poll of newspaper and magazine radio editors taken by Motion Picture Daily named her the year's best radio comedienne. For its entire radio life, the show was sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, promoting Palmolive soap, Lustre Creme shampoo and Toni hair care products. The radio series continued until 1957, a year after its television life ended. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Miss_Brooks
Views: 84165 Remember This
Our Miss Brooks: First Day / Weekend at Crystal Lake / Surprise Birthday Party / Football Game
 
01:50:17
Our Miss Brooks is an American situation comedy starring Eve Arden as a sardonic high school English teacher. It began as a radio show broadcast from 1948 to 1957. When the show was adapted to television (1952--56), it became one of the medium's earliest hits. In 1956, the sitcom was adapted for big screen in the film of the same name. Connie (Constance) Brooks (Eve Arden), an English teacher at fictional Madison High School. Osgood Conklin (Gale Gordon), blustery, gruff, crooked and unsympathetic Madison High principal, a near-constant pain to his faculty and students. (Conklin was played by Joseph Forte in the show's first episode; Gordon succeeded him for the rest of the series' run.) Occasionally Conklin would rig competitions at the school--such as that for prom queen--so that his daughter Harriet would win. Walter Denton (Richard Crenna, billed at the time as Dick Crenna), a Madison High student, well-intentioned and clumsy, with a nasally high, cracking voice, often driving Miss Brooks (his self-professed favorite teacher) to school in a broken-down jalopy. Miss Brooks' references to her own usually-in-the-shop car became one of the show's running gags. Philip Boynton (Jeff Chandler on radio, billed sometimes under his birth name Ira Grossel); Robert Rockwell on both radio and television), Madison High biology teacher, the shy and often clueless object of Miss Brooks' affections. Margaret Davis (Jane Morgan), Miss Brooks' absentminded landlady, whose two trademarks are a cat named Minerva, and a penchant for whipping up exotic and often inedible breakfasts. Harriet Conklin (Gloria McMillan), Madison High student and daughter of principal Conklin. A sometime love interest for Walter Denton, Harriet was honest and guileless with none of her father's malevolence and dishonesty. Stretch (Fabian) Snodgrass (Leonard Smith), dull-witted Madison High athletic star and Walter's best friend. Daisy Enright (Mary Jane Croft), Madison High English teacher, and a scheming professional and romantic rival to Miss Brooks. Jacques Monet (Gerald Mohr), a French teacher. Our Miss Brooks was a hit on radio from the outset; within eight months of its launch as a regular series, the show landed several honors, including four for Eve Arden, who won polls in four individual publications of the time. Arden had actually been the third choice to play the title role. Harry Ackerman, West Coast director of programming, wanted Shirley Booth for the part, but as he told historian Gerald Nachman many years later, he realized Booth was too focused on the underpaid downside of public school teaching at the time to have fun with the role. Lucille Ball was believed to have been the next choice, but she was already committed to My Favorite Husband and didn't audition. Chairman Bill Paley, who was friendly with Arden, persuaded her to audition for the part. With a slightly rewritten audition script--Osgood Conklin, for example, was originally written as a school board president but was now written as the incoming new Madison principal--Arden agreed to give the newly-revamped show a try. Produced by Larry Berns and written by director Al Lewis, Our Miss Brooks premiered on July 19, 1948. According to radio critic John Crosby, her lines were very "feline" in dialogue scenes with principal Conklin and would-be boyfriend Boynton, with sharp, witty comebacks. The interplay between the cast--blustery Conklin, nebbishy Denton, accommodating Harriet, absentminded Mrs. Davis, clueless Boynton, scheming Miss Enright--also received positive reviews. Arden won a radio listeners' poll by Radio Mirror magazine as the top ranking comedienne of 1948-49, receiving her award at the end of an Our Miss Brooks broadcast that March. "I'm certainly going to try in the coming months to merit the honor you've bestowed upon me, because I understand that if I win this two years in a row, I get to keep Mr. Boynton," she joked. But she was also a hit with the critics; a winter 1949 poll of newspaper and magazine radio editors taken by Motion Picture Daily named her the year's best radio comedienne. For its entire radio life, the show was sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, promoting Palmolive soap, Lustre Creme shampoo and Toni hair care products. The radio series continued until 1957, a year after its television life ended. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Miss_Brooks
Views: 84607 Remember This
Our Miss Brooks: Exchanging Gifts / Halloween Party / Elephant Mascot / The Party Line
 
01:54:03
Our Miss Brooks is an American situation comedy starring Eve Arden as a sardonic high school English teacher. It began as a radio show broadcast from 1948 to 1957. When the show was adapted to television (1952--56), it became one of the medium's earliest hits. In 1956, the sitcom was adapted for big screen in the film of the same name. Connie (Constance) Brooks (Eve Arden), an English teacher at fictional Madison High School. Osgood Conklin (Gale Gordon), blustery, gruff, crooked and unsympathetic Madison High principal, a near-constant pain to his faculty and students. (Conklin was played by Joseph Forte in the show's first episode; Gordon succeeded him for the rest of the series' run.) Occasionally Conklin would rig competitions at the school--such as that for prom queen--so that his daughter Harriet would win. Walter Denton (Richard Crenna, billed at the time as Dick Crenna), a Madison High student, well-intentioned and clumsy, with a nasally high, cracking voice, often driving Miss Brooks (his self-professed favorite teacher) to school in a broken-down jalopy. Miss Brooks' references to her own usually-in-the-shop car became one of the show's running gags. Philip Boynton (Jeff Chandler on radio, billed sometimes under his birth name Ira Grossel); Robert Rockwell on both radio and television), Madison High biology teacher, the shy and often clueless object of Miss Brooks' affections. Margaret Davis (Jane Morgan), Miss Brooks' absentminded landlady, whose two trademarks are a cat named Minerva, and a penchant for whipping up exotic and often inedible breakfasts. Harriet Conklin (Gloria McMillan), Madison High student and daughter of principal Conklin. A sometime love interest for Walter Denton, Harriet was honest and guileless with none of her father's malevolence and dishonesty. Stretch (Fabian) Snodgrass (Leonard Smith), dull-witted Madison High athletic star and Walter's best friend. Daisy Enright (Mary Jane Croft), Madison High English teacher, and a scheming professional and romantic rival to Miss Brooks. Jacques Monet (Gerald Mohr), a French teacher. Our Miss Brooks was a hit on radio from the outset; within eight months of its launch as a regular series, the show landed several honors, including four for Eve Arden, who won polls in four individual publications of the time. Arden had actually been the third choice to play the title role. Harry Ackerman, West Coast director of programming, wanted Shirley Booth for the part, but as he told historian Gerald Nachman many years later, he realized Booth was too focused on the underpaid downside of public school teaching at the time to have fun with the role. Lucille Ball was believed to have been the next choice, but she was already committed to My Favorite Husband and didn't audition. Chairman Bill Paley, who was friendly with Arden, persuaded her to audition for the part. With a slightly rewritten audition script--Osgood Conklin, for example, was originally written as a school board president but was now written as the incoming new Madison principal--Arden agreed to give the newly-revamped show a try. Produced by Larry Berns and written by director Al Lewis, Our Miss Brooks premiered on July 19, 1948. According to radio critic John Crosby, her lines were very "feline" in dialogue scenes with principal Conklin and would-be boyfriend Boynton, with sharp, witty comebacks. The interplay between the cast--blustery Conklin, nebbishy Denton, accommodating Harriet, absentminded Mrs. Davis, clueless Boynton, scheming Miss Enright--also received positive reviews. Arden won a radio listeners' poll by Radio Mirror magazine as the top ranking comedienne of 1948-49, receiving her award at the end of an Our Miss Brooks broadcast that March. "I'm certainly going to try in the coming months to merit the honor you've bestowed upon me, because I understand that if I win this two years in a row, I get to keep Mr. Boynton," she joked. But she was also a hit with the critics; a winter 1949 poll of newspaper and magazine radio editors taken by Motion Picture Daily named her the year's best radio comedienne. For its entire radio life, the show was sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, promoting Palmolive soap, Lustre Creme shampoo and Toni hair care products. The radio series continued until 1957, a year after its television life ended. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Miss_Brooks
Views: 146935 Remember This
Behavioral Health Therapy With Mental Health Network CEO Kristin Walker
 
01:08:06
Behavioral Health Therapy With Mental Health Network CEO Kristin Walker Hamza and David explore the world of Behavioral Health and Mental Health with Mental Health Network CEO Kristin Walker . Can Behavioral Health and Mental Health be stretched to have a bigger impact on society today? What is the the big deal with regards to dealing with the latest Behavioral Health and Mental Health with experts like Mental Health Network CEO Kristin Walker anyway? We discuss experiences both pro and con on the subject from a homies' perspective... Intrinsic Motivation - A Homies Perspective https://www.intrinsicmotivation.life - Come hang out with our weekly talk as we cover everything from Law of Attraction, Personal Development and more from a homie's perspective. Stay tuned! About Mental Health Network CEO Kristin Walker http://www.mhnrnetwork.com Subscribe To Our YT channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxCy8t2zrzeXly9vC527QhQ Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Intrinsic-Motivation-A-Homies-Perspective-1840324906181321/ Google Plus: https://aboutme.google.com/b/104269580399573766056 SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/intrinsic-motivation-from-a-homies-perspective Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=158463&refid=stpr iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/intrinsic-motivation-from-a-homies-perspective/ Media Inquiries: howintrinsic AT intrinsicmotivation DOT life PlayerFM: https://player.fm/series/1766116 PodBean: https://www.podbean.com/podcast-detail/vnu24-5f9f0/Intrinsic+Motivation+From+A+Homies%27+Perspective Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/IntrinisicMotivationHomies SoundCloud Rss Feed: http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:30551638/sounds.rss
Our Miss Brooks: Easter Egg Dye / Tape Recorder / School Band
 
01:30:00
Our Miss Brooks is an American situation comedy starring Eve Arden as a sardonic high school English teacher. It began as a radio show broadcast from 1948 to 1957. When the show was adapted to television (1952--56), it became one of the medium's earliest hits. In 1956, the sitcom was adapted for big screen in the film of the same name. Connie (Constance) Brooks (Eve Arden), an English teacher at fictional Madison High School. Osgood Conklin (Gale Gordon), blustery, gruff, crooked and unsympathetic Madison High principal, a near-constant pain to his faculty and students. (Conklin was played by Joseph Forte in the show's first episode; Gordon succeeded him for the rest of the series' run.) Occasionally Conklin would rig competitions at the school--such as that for prom queen--so that his daughter Harriet would win. Walter Denton (Richard Crenna, billed at the time as Dick Crenna), a Madison High student, well-intentioned and clumsy, with a nasally high, cracking voice, often driving Miss Brooks (his self-professed favorite teacher) to school in a broken-down jalopy. Miss Brooks' references to her own usually-in-the-shop car became one of the show's running gags. Philip Boynton (Jeff Chandler on radio, billed sometimes under his birth name Ira Grossel); Robert Rockwell on both radio and television), Madison High biology teacher, the shy and often clueless object of Miss Brooks' affections. Margaret Davis (Jane Morgan), Miss Brooks' absentminded landlady, whose two trademarks are a cat named Minerva, and a penchant for whipping up exotic and often inedible breakfasts. Harriet Conklin (Gloria McMillan), Madison High student and daughter of principal Conklin. A sometime love interest for Walter Denton, Harriet was honest and guileless with none of her father's malevolence and dishonesty. Stretch (Fabian) Snodgrass (Leonard Smith), dull-witted Madison High athletic star and Walter's best friend. Daisy Enright (Mary Jane Croft), Madison High English teacher, and a scheming professional and romantic rival to Miss Brooks. Jacques Monet (Gerald Mohr), a French teacher. Our Miss Brooks was a hit on radio from the outset; within eight months of its launch as a regular series, the show landed several honors, including four for Eve Arden, who won polls in four individual publications of the time. Arden had actually been the third choice to play the title role. Harry Ackerman, West Coast director of programming, wanted Shirley Booth for the part, but as he told historian Gerald Nachman many years later, he realized Booth was too focused on the underpaid downside of public school teaching at the time to have fun with the role. Lucille Ball was believed to have been the next choice, but she was already committed to My Favorite Husband and didn't audition. Chairman Bill Paley, who was friendly with Arden, persuaded her to audition for the part. With a slightly rewritten audition script--Osgood Conklin, for example, was originally written as a school board president but was now written as the incoming new Madison principal--Arden agreed to give the newly-revamped show a try. Produced by Larry Berns and written by director Al Lewis, Our Miss Brooks premiered on July 19, 1948. According to radio critic John Crosby, her lines were very "feline" in dialogue scenes with principal Conklin and would-be boyfriend Boynton, with sharp, witty comebacks. The interplay between the cast--blustery Conklin, nebbishy Denton, accommodating Harriet, absentminded Mrs. Davis, clueless Boynton, scheming Miss Enright--also received positive reviews. Arden won a radio listeners' poll by Radio Mirror magazine as the top ranking comedienne of 1948-49, receiving her award at the end of an Our Miss Brooks broadcast that March. "I'm certainly going to try in the coming months to merit the honor you've bestowed upon me, because I understand that if I win this two years in a row, I get to keep Mr. Boynton," she joked. But she was also a hit with the critics; a winter 1949 poll of newspaper and magazine radio editors taken by Motion Picture Daily named her the year's best radio comedienne. For its entire radio life, the show was sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, promoting Palmolive soap, Lustre Creme shampoo and Toni hair care products. The radio series continued until 1957, a year after its television life ended. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Miss_Brooks
Views: 52512 Remember This
Dragnet: Eric Kelby / Sullivan Kidnapping: The Wolf / James Vickers
 
01:28:10
Dragnet is a radio and television crime drama about the cases of a dedicated Los Angeles police detective, Sergeant Joe Friday, and his partners. The show takes its name from an actual police term, a "dragnet", meaning a system of coordinated measures for apprehending criminals or suspects. Dragnet debuted inauspiciously. The first several months were bumpy, as Webb and company worked out the program's format and eventually became comfortable with their characters (Friday was originally portrayed as more brash and forceful than his later usually relaxed demeanor). Gradually, Friday's deadpan, fast-talking persona emerged, described by John Dunning as "a cop's cop, tough but not hard, conservative but caring." (Dunning, 210) Friday's first partner was Sergeant Ben Romero, portrayed by Barton Yarborough, a longtime radio actor. After Yarborough's death in 1951 (and therefore Romero's, who also died of a heart attack, as acknowledged on the December 27, 1951 episode "The Big Sorrow"), Friday was partnered with Sergeant Ed Jacobs (December 27, 1951 - April 10, 1952, subsequently transferred to the Police Academy as an instructor), played by Barney Phillips; Officer Bill Lockwood (Ben Romero's nephew, April 17, 1952 - May 8, 1952), played by Martin Milner (with Ken Peters taking the role for the June 12, 1952 episode "The Big Donation"); and finally Frank Smith, played first by Herb Ellis (1952), then Ben Alexander (September 21, 1952-1959). Raymond Burr was on board to play the Chief of Detectives. When Dragnet hit its stride, it became one of radio's top-rated shows. Webb insisted on realism in every aspect of the show. The dialogue was clipped, understated and sparse, influenced by the hardboiled school of crime fiction. Scripts were fast moving but didn't seem rushed. Every aspect of police work was chronicled, step by step: From patrols and paperwork, to crime scene investigation, lab work and questioning witnesses or suspects. The detectives' personal lives were mentioned but rarely took center stage. (Friday was a bachelor who lived with his mother; Romero, a Mexican-American from Texas, was an ever fretful husband and father.) "Underplaying is still acting", Webb told Time. "We try to make it as real as a guy pouring a cup of coffee." (Dunning, 209) Los Angeles police chiefs C.B. Horrall, William A. Worton, and (later) William H. Parker were credited as consultants, and many police officers were fans. Most of the later episodes were entitled "The Big _____", where the key word denoted a person or thing in the plot. In numerous episodes, this would the principal suspect, victim, or physical target of the crime, but in others was often a seemingly inconsequential detail eventually revealed to be key evidence in solving the crime. For example, in "The Big Streetcar" the background noise of a passing streetcar helps to establish the location of a phone booth used by the suspect. Throughout the series' radio years, one can find interesting glimpses of pre-renewal Downtown L.A., still full of working class residents and the cheap bars, cafes, hotels and boarding houses which served them. At the climax of the early episode "James Vickers", the chase leads to the Subway Terminal Building, where the robber flees into one of the tunnels only to be killed by an oncoming train. Meanwhile, by contrast, in other episodes set in outlying areas, it is clear that the locations in question are far less built up than they are today. Today, the Imperial Highway, extending 40 miles east from El Segundo to Anaheim, is a heavily used boulevard lined almost entirely with low-rise commercial development. In an early Dragnet episode scenes along the Highway, at "the road to San Pedro", clearly indicate that it still retained much the character of a country highway at that time. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dragnet_(series)
Views: 117934 Remember This
The Great Gildersleeve: Craig's Birthday Party / Peavey Goes Missing / Teacher Problems
 
01:29:31
Aiding and abetting the periodically frantic life in the Gildersleeve home was family cook and housekeeper Birdie Lee Coggins (Lillian Randolph). Although in the first season, under writer Levinson, Birdie was often portrayed as saliently less than bright, she slowly developed as the real brains and caretaker of the household under writers John Whedon, Sam Moore and Andy White. In many of the later episodes Gildersleeve has to acknowledge Birdie's commonsense approach to some of his predicaments. By the early 1950s, Birdie was heavily depended on by the rest of the family in fulfilling many of the functions of the household matriarch, whether it be giving sound advice to an adolescent Leroy or tending Marjorie's children. By the late 1940s, Marjorie slowly matures to a young woman of marrying age. During the 9th season (September 1949-June 1950) Marjorie meets and marries (May 10) Walter "Bronco" Thompson (Richard Crenna), star football player at the local college. The event was popular enough that Look devoted five pages in its May 23, 1950 issue to the wedding. After living in the same household for a few years with their twin babies Ronnie and Linda, the newlyweds move next door to keep the expanding Gildersleeve clan close together. Leroy, aged 10--11 during most of the 1940s, is the all-American boy who grudgingly practices his piano lessons, gets bad report cards, fights with his friends and cannot remember to not slam the door. Although he is loyal to his Uncle Mort, he is always the first to deflate his ego with a well-placed "Ha!!!" or "What a character!" Beginning in the Spring of 1949, he finds himself in junior high and is at last allowed to grow up, establishing relationships with the girls in the Bullard home across the street. From an awkward adolescent who hangs his head, kicks the ground and giggles whenever Brenda Knickerbocker comes near, he transforms himself overnight (November 28, 1951) into a more mature young man when Babs Winthrop (both girls played by Barbara Whiting) approaches him about studying together. From then on, he branches out with interests in driving, playing the drums and dreaming of a musical career. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Gildersleeve
Views: 53992 Remember This
Dragnet: Big Escape / Big Man Part 1 / Big Man Part 2
 
01:28:44
Dragnet is a radio and television crime drama about the cases of a dedicated Los Angeles police detective, Sergeant Joe Friday, and his partners. The show takes its name from an actual police term, a "dragnet", meaning a system of coordinated measures for apprehending criminals or suspects. Dragnet debuted inauspiciously. The first several months were bumpy, as Webb and company worked out the program's format and eventually became comfortable with their characters (Friday was originally portrayed as more brash and forceful than his later usually relaxed demeanor). Gradually, Friday's deadpan, fast-talking persona emerged, described by John Dunning as "a cop's cop, tough but not hard, conservative but caring." (Dunning, 210) Friday's first partner was Sergeant Ben Romero, portrayed by Barton Yarborough, a longtime radio actor. After Yarborough's death in 1951 (and therefore Romero's, who also died of a heart attack, as acknowledged on the December 27, 1951 episode "The Big Sorrow"), Friday was partnered with Sergeant Ed Jacobs (December 27, 1951 - April 10, 1952, subsequently transferred to the Police Academy as an instructor), played by Barney Phillips; Officer Bill Lockwood (Ben Romero's nephew, April 17, 1952 - May 8, 1952), played by Martin Milner (with Ken Peters taking the role for the June 12, 1952 episode "The Big Donation"); and finally Frank Smith, played first by Herb Ellis (1952), then Ben Alexander (September 21, 1952-1959). Raymond Burr was on board to play the Chief of Detectives. When Dragnet hit its stride, it became one of radio's top-rated shows. Webb insisted on realism in every aspect of the show. The dialogue was clipped, understated and sparse, influenced by the hardboiled school of crime fiction. Scripts were fast moving but didn't seem rushed. Every aspect of police work was chronicled, step by step: From patrols and paperwork, to crime scene investigation, lab work and questioning witnesses or suspects. The detectives' personal lives were mentioned but rarely took center stage. (Friday was a bachelor who lived with his mother; Romero, a Mexican-American from Texas, was an ever fretful husband and father.) "Underplaying is still acting", Webb told Time. "We try to make it as real as a guy pouring a cup of coffee." (Dunning, 209) Los Angeles police chiefs C.B. Horrall, William A. Worton, and (later) William H. Parker were credited as consultants, and many police officers were fans. Most of the later episodes were entitled "The Big _____", where the key word denoted a person or thing in the plot. In numerous episodes, this would the principal suspect, victim, or physical target of the crime, but in others was often a seemingly inconsequential detail eventually revealed to be key evidence in solving the crime. For example, in "The Big Streetcar" the background noise of a passing streetcar helps to establish the location of a phone booth used by the suspect. Throughout the series' radio years, one can find interesting glimpses of pre-renewal Downtown L.A., still full of working class residents and the cheap bars, cafes, hotels and boarding houses which served them. At the climax of the early episode "James Vickers", the chase leads to the Subway Terminal Building, where the robber flees into one of the tunnels only to be killed by an oncoming train. Meanwhile, by contrast, in other episodes set in outlying areas, it is clear that the locations in question are far less built up than they are today. Today, the Imperial Highway, extending 40 miles east from El Segundo to Anaheim, is a heavily used boulevard lined almost entirely with low-rise commercial development. In an early Dragnet episode scenes along the Highway, at "the road to San Pedro", clearly indicate that it still retained much the character of a country highway at that time. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dragnet_(series)
Views: 88930 Remember This