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mining investors venture capital
 
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A short video clip introduction venture and mining investors. Mineral commodities are valuable resources, mining companies undertake operations in that field. Venture capital and mining equities. Commodity prices for iron ore, metallurgical coal, manganese ore http://www.privateventurecapital.com
Views: 389 venturecapitalism
MiningMaven 7 Year Anniversary  'Elevator Pitches' from 9 AIM/ASX Mining + Exploration Companies
 
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Elevator Pitches from: Cameron Parry, CEO Kolar Gold ( LON:KGLD) Dr Kerim Sener, MD Ariana Resources (LON:AAU) Gervaise Heddle, Exec Director Greatland Gold (LON:GGP) Andrew Bell, Chairman and CEO Red Rock Resources (LON:RRR) Harry Adams Chairman Kefi Minerals (LON:KEFI) Craig Brown, CEO ECR Minerals (LON:ECR) Keith Byrne, Exploration Geologist Eurasia Mining (LON:EUA) Vassilios Carellas, CEO Ortac Resources (LON:OTC) Francis Wedin, Executive Technical Director Dakota Minerals (ASX:DKO) Event Sponsors: SI Capital http://sicapital.co.uk/ Luther Pendragon http://www.luther.co.uk/ This video is for information and educational purposes only. All opinions expressed are those of the respective presenter and should not be construed as investment advice or a recommendation to buy shares in any featured Company. Viewers are advised to do their own extensive research before buying shares which, as with all small cap exploration stocks, should be viewed as high risk. Investors should also seek the advice of a qualified investment adviser or stockbroker, as they deem appropriate. UK Investor Forums (UKIF) organises and facilitates events and seminars across the UK for Sophisticated Investors and those wishing to manage their own financial affairs, to hear from sector and industry experts, meet with companies, learn more about a wide range of investment ideas and opportunities and network with like-minded people. UKIF does not give investment advice or act as an advisor or promoter for any individual person, company or investment class. Individuals are always advised to carry out their own extensive research with regard to any investment and or consult with their advisors should they deem it appropriate. In the case of investments listed on stock markets, any information provided does not constitute any form of advice or recommendation and is not intended to be relied upon for making (or refraining to make) any specific investment or other decisions. Should individuals wish to enter into direct relationship with any company or individual presenting they do so of their own accord and UKIF will not have any responsibility or liability in this respect. Recorded at the Cote, London. Wednesday 30th November 2016. MiningMaven and UK Investor Forums (UKIF) are trading divisions of Catalyst Information Services Limited. Registered in England no. 06537074 (Registered Office Address 3rd Floor Ivy Mill, Crown Street, Manchester, M35 9BG). http://www.miningmaven.com/
Views: 561 Miningmaven
How many shares should be authorized in the certificate of incorporation?
 
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Eric Save, Partner at K&L Gates LLP explains the difference between authorized and issued shares and how much authorized shares you should have when setting up your incorporation.  Eric Save is a corporate/M&A partner in the firm’s San Francisco office and a member of the firm’s Latin America practice. He has represented clients with respect to a broad range of matters in Mexico, Brazil and other parts of Latin America, including cross-border M&A transactions, joint ventures, venture capital investments, start-up company matters, investments in energy and mining projects, secured lending transactions, and the establishment or sourcing of operations in the region. Transcript: How many shares should be authorized in the certificate of incorporation? Typically what I advise clients to do is to provide plenty of room for authorized shares, and so typically that will be a fairly high number. The sort of the standard is 10 million shares as authorized shares in the certificate of incorporation. One thing to understand is that authorized shares are not the same as issued shares, so just because it says in your certificate of incorporation that you have authorised capital of 10,000 shares, I'm sorry, 10 million shares, that doesn't mean that you've already issued those shares and you have shareholders holding 10 million shares. Typically, when you start a company, you will only issue a certain portion of those 10 million shares to the founders of the company, and when I say that you need to leave some room, what you need to leave room for, is a stock option plan and a potential future financing where, an outside investor comes into the company and is going to invest in the company. Often investors will come in and they will want preferred shares so that one that has special rights and shares that can be converted into common stock. Typically, the conversion rate will be one-to-one at least at first and so you've got to kind of plan and figure how many shares do we need for the stock option plan that we want to create, how many shares do we think we need to reserve for our first round of financing, and it's just better to allow yourself a little bit more room so that you don't have to go back and amend the certificate of incorporation later because it's a bit of a hassle to amend a certificate of incorporation. You have to get a new board and shareholder consense and then you have to make a filing with the state of Delaware or whatever state you're incorporated in to make that amendment. The only thing you want to be careful with is being aware if you're in Delaware with how the Delaware franchise tax works. Because they're sort of two methods in which they can calculate the franchise tax and if you don't do it the right way if you have a large amount of authorized stock, you could get a pretty high franchise tax bill from the state of Delaware. But fortunately there's another method of calculating the franchise tax, that isn’t just basically based on the number of the authorised shares, it’s based on the value of your growth assets and the number of issued shares, and typically for a startup company that doesn't have much in terms of assets, just getting started, they can kind of control the amount of that franchise tax won't be a significant amount going forward, but just something to keep in mind in terms of authorized shares. Typically, the tried-and-true method is to provide plenty of room for your stock option plan and for any other issues of stock that you plan to do in your early years. Learn more at http://siliconvalleyforum.com/startupedia/legal
Views: 1229 Startupedia
H2O Innovation CEO Dugré on increasing revenue through Clearlogx technology acquisition
 
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October 27, 2015 — Frédéric Dugré, CEO and Director for H2O Innovation Inc. (TSXV: HEO | OTCQX: HEOFF) in an interview with InvestorIntel Publisher Tracy Weslosky discuss their increase in revenue, which includes 60% growth from project business and 18% from the specialty production. Tracy also asks Frédéric about the acquisition of a new technology company Clearlogx® and that will both increase revenue and recurring revenues as well. Tracy Weslosky: I was reading your 2015 year ends and you're up 40% and nearly $50 million in revenue last year. Is that correct? Frédéric Dugré: That's correct. Pretty sustained growth over the year exclusively organically coming from our project business. 60% growth from our project business only and then 18% from the specialty production service group as well. Tracy Weslosky: Now you just had more good news this last week, a deal with Clearlogx®? Frédéric Dugré: That's correct. We just acquired a new technology, a new company based in the U.S., around Denver. Actually complements very nicely our project business. It's a technology that will differentiate the project business. It's a controller that allows us to measure the proper level of coagulant chemicals we need to have into a water solution to avoid premature falling of our membrane. It both complements the business, the project business, as well as expand our chemical offering. Tracy Weslosky: Now I believe I read in the Clearlogx® news release that you managed to do this with debt financing from a bank and you haven't diluted the shares. Frédéric Dugré: This is something we're pretty proud of. After 15 years of building this company and now being able to acquire and bolt-on new acquisition without diluting the shareholders. This is accomplishment because it will be extremely accretive. Obviously we're adding about $1 to $1.5 million in revenues and it's a profitable and it's a profitable business as well and with no dilution impact as you said financed through a senior debt. Tracy Weslosky: The part I heard is that this will increase revenue. Is that correct? Frédéric Dugré: That's correct and recurring revenues as well. That's what we like. Tracy Weslosky: Dr. Duchesne at InvestorIntel called your technology ‘revolutionary’, ‘groundbreaking’ -- this membrane filter system: can you give our audience a bit of an overview? Frédéric Dugré: The membrane systems or membrane technologies have been around for about 15 years now. Essentially what's different and what's new in H20 is the way we are integrating these membranes into an open source platform…to access the complete interview, click here -- https://youtu.be/C-OVtCyo2uM Disclaimer: H2O Innovation Inc. is an advertorial member of InvestorIntel.
Views: 895 InvestorIntel
How To Develop A Company Philosophy - Building an Online Business Ep. 7
 
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Do you really need to Develop a Company Philosophy? If you want to build an income with an online business, then you need to have a company philosophy. A company philosophy isn’t some strange thing that you write up and then never use. Your company philosophy answers the question of what do you believe as business owner? As entrepreneur what is your world view? How do the solutions you provide make you different form your competitors? A true company philosophy defines what you believe as a business owner, coach or consultant. When you’re helping customers, writing blog posts, and interacting on social media your company philosophy drives what you say. A great way to think of it is as a method. It’s your unique take on how to solve your ideal customer’s problems. When you have a company philosophy you’ll have a solid marketing foundation that you can keep coming back to as you grow your business. In this episode of building an online business from scratch, Jason dives into why he believes it’s so vital to have a company Philosophy and how you can use your own to create a powerful marketing machine. Links: Ideal Customer Video: https://youtu.be/rgHn9RD-DyA ACT Marketing Philosophy: Referenced Resources Optimize Press: http://bit.ly/WPOptimize2 Click Funnels: http://bit.ly/JwClickFunnels Did you get some value out of this video? If you did hit that like button and subscribe for more great business building strategies and insights. Subscribe Now: http://bit.ly/JasonSubscribe FREE WEBINAR TRAINING: Training: How to Be Instantly Recognized as an Authority in Your Industry in the Next 30 Days Without a Big Marketing Budget or Previous PR Experience Reserve Your Seat Today: http://jasonwhaling.com/authority-webinar LEARN MORE: Let's keep in touch! Website: http://jasonwhaling.com/ Facebook: http://bit.ly/JasonWFB Twitter: http://bit.ly/JasonWT FTC Disclaimer: This description may contain affiliate links!
Views: 693 Jason Whaling
How to Think Like A CEO in Your Business
 
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Do you think like a CEO in your Business? Or do you think like an Employee? If you're like most new entrepreneurs, you may not be prepared for what that means financially! When you were an employee – you paid for nothing. Heck, if you wanted to read a book related to your job, your employer may have even paid for that too! The responsibility for getting the money needed to pay for business costs and making the decisions on what to invest in, were usually up to the CEO. The CEO took care of the business, and indirectly took care of you. And so when you make the leap to entrepreneur it can be pretty darn scary and unsettling to suddenly be on the hook for everything. I get it. The fear and discomfort are very real, however it’s one thing to be afraid, it’s a whole other thing to not take action because of it. Our episode this week explores the difference between an employee and CEO mindset in your business, and why it’s crucial for you to adopt the mindset of a CEO if you want your business to succeed. I also share a really cute story about my nephew and his fridge! And please, please, please, grab our freebie – it’s a double up bonus this week to help you navigate decisions in your business like a CEO. Click this link to grab the free download - http://nafissashireen.com/31download Did you like this episode? Tweet it when you’re done giving me a “Like”, just click this link: http://bit.ly/lftv-betheceo If you’d like to see more episodes about “Smart Business Strategies” then make sure to check out our YouTube playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPKAUK3mWLQ&list=PLECO8isDBNA2ctbJ4Ty9zlBtjUymebjdp -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --- - - - Join My FREE Mastermind for Entrepreneurs (and aspiring Entrepreneurs) who are committed to creating their personal freedom: The Living Forward Community http://LivingForwardCommunity.com Become a Living Forward Insider - Don’t miss a single episode – get Living Forward TV Delivered each week directly to your Inbox (along with some personal insights that I ONLY share with my Insiders). http://JoinLivingForward.com Let’s Connect: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NafissaShireen/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nafissashireen/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/NafissaShireen Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/NafissaShireen LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/nafissashireen/
Views: 313 Nafissa Shireen
Tom Russo  & David Nadel
 
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Two money managers finding value in two different stock classes. Both have beaten the markets, with less than market risk over the long term. Noted value investor Tom Russo focuses on strong global brand name companies, while Royce and Associates David Nadel specializes in international small company stocks including gold mining shares.
Views: 2556 WealthTrack
Horror Screenwriting Tips and How Jeffrey Reddick Created A Horror Franchise [FULL INTERVIEW]
 
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In this Film Courage video interview, horror screenwriter Jeffrey Reddick (Final Destination, Final Destination 2, Final Destination 3, The Final Destination, Final Destination 5, Tamara and many more) shares his writing tips and how he created a horror franchise. MORE VIDEOS WITH JEFFREY REDDICK http://bit.ly/2gsUDve CONNECT WITH JEFFREY REDDICK http://areyoudeadawake.com http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0714695 https://www.facebook.com/JeffreyaaronReddick https://twitter.com/JeffreyaReddick https://www.instagram.com/jeffreyareddick CONNECT WITH FILM COURAGE http://www.FilmCourage.com http://twitter.com/#!/FilmCourage https://www.facebook.com/filmcourage http://filmcourage.tumblr.com http://pinterest.com/filmcourage BUSINESS INQUIRIES http://bit.ly/22M0Va2 SUBSCRIBE TO THE FILM COURAGE YOUTUBE CHANNEL http://bit.ly/18DPN37 LISTEN TO THE FILM COURAGE PODCAST https://soundcloud.com/filmcourage-com PROMOTE YOUR MOVIE, WEBSERIES, OR PRODUCT ON FILM COURAGE http://bit.ly/1nnJkgm SUPPORT FILM COURAGE http://www.patreon.com/filmcourage Stuff we use: CAMERA - This is the camera we have used to film 90+% of our interviews (over 200 interviews and counting) It continues to be our workhorse - http://amzn.to/2u66V1J LENS - Most people ask us what camera we use, no one ever asks about the lens which filmmakers always tell us is more important. This lens was a big investment for us and one we wish we could have made sooner. Started using this lens at the end of 2013 - http://amzn.to/2tbtmOq AUDIO Rode VideoMic Pro - The Rode mic helps us capture our backup audio. It also helps us sync up our audio in post http://amzn.to/2t1n2hx Audio Recorder - If we had to do it all over again, this is probably the first item we would have bought - http://amzn.to/2tbFlM9 LIGHTS - Although we like to use as much natural light as we can, we often enhance the lighting with this small portable light. We have two of them and they have saved us a number of times - http://amzn.to/2u5UnHv COMPUTER - Our favorite computer, we each have one and have used various models since 2010 - http://amzn.to/2t1M67Z EDITING - We upgraded our editing suite this year and we’re glad we did! This has improved our workflow and the quality of our work. Having new software also helps when we have a problem, it’s easy to search and find a solution - https://goo.gl/56LnpM *These are affiliate links, by using them you can help support this channel.
Views: 7033 Film Courage
Pervitin in WW2 - The miracle pill of Wehrmacht HD (gr subs)
 
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The documentary "The miracle pill of Wehrmacht" reveals one of the biggest taboos of German military history: the role of performance-enhancing drugs from the Nazi era to the present day. In the US and Japan are conducting research since the 20s of the last century in the development of amphetamines, but production is difficult. In Germany, the Berliner Temmler plants that increase their efforts in this area in the 30's. 1937 manages the Temmler chemist Fritz Hauschild breakthrough: He discovered a particularly effective Amphetamine: The methylamphetamine, which brings the company Temmler in the same year under the name of 'pervitin' in the market. Military doctors quickly pay attention to the new agent. Perform first tests with medical students. By all means promises Pervitin the largest military utility. In addition to eliminating the need sleep it also leads to an increase of self-confidence and the willingness to take risks. Soldiers become superman September 1939: In less than four weeks, the Wehrmacht overran the eastern neighbors. Pervitin has become so well known that many soldiers have private case. Krad-, tank and truck drivers, pilots, infantry, guards, all of them are equipped with pervitin. "The Germans use a miracle pill," said the British press the unpredictable rapid pace of the Wehrmacht after the Western campaign against France. With the German invention of Pervitin the soldiers seem almost to make superhuman. Human experiments on concentration camp inmates An Expert: The Blitzkrieg was amphetamine controlled! In cruel human experiments on concentration camp inmates the right dosage is tested. Fatigued child soldiers, the day the school and must consist at night at the Flak, get Pervitin on command. In the one-man torpedo the German navy, the wake-up means is definitely planned. Despite serious side effects and considerable addictive Pervitin heard after the war for the Bundeswehr and NVA. It is the story of unbroken success. For the Radio Bremen Production of filmmaker Sönke el Bitar has the far less known aspects, so one of the biggest taboos of German military history illuminated. Film von Sönke El-Bitar Google translation from German
Views: 48676 Epimenides Kritikos
time management 101, understanding time management basics and fundamentals
 
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time management 101, understanding time management basics and fundamentals. Time Management Definition “Time management” is the process of organizing and planning how to divide your time between specific activities. Good time management enables you to work smarter – not harder – so that you get more done in less time, even when time is tight and pressures are high. Failing to manage your time damages your effectiveness and causes stress. The Key to Good Time Management: Understanding The Difference Between Urgent and Important ‘Urgent’ tasks demand your immediate attention, but whether you actually give them that attention may or may not matter. 'Important' tasks matter, and not doing them may have serious consequences for you or others. For example: Answering the phone is urgent. If you don’t do it, the caller will ring off, and you won’t know why they called. It may, however, be an automated voice telling you that you may be eligible for compensation for having been mis-sold insurance. That’s not important. Going to the dentist regularly is important (or so we’re told). If you don’t, you may get gum disease, or other problems. But it’s not urgent. If you leave it too long, however, it may become urgent, because you may get toothache. Picking your children up from school is both urgent and important. If you are not there at the right time, they will be waiting in the playground or the classroom, worrying about where you are. Reading funny emails or checking Facebook is neither urgent nor important. So why is it the first thing that you do each day? See our page minimising distractions to help you recognise and avoid other things that may distract you from getting your urgent and important tasks done. This distinction between urgent and important is the key to prioritising your time and your workload, whether at work or at home.
Yelawolf - Daddy's Lambo (Official Music Video)
 
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Sign up for updates: http://smarturl.it/Yelawolf.News Music video by Yelawolf performing Daddy's Lambo. (C) 2011 DGC Records Best of Yelawolf: https://goo.gl/vy7NZQ Subscribe here: https://goo.gl/ynkVDL #Yelawolf #DaddysLambo #Vevo #HipHop #OfficialMusicVideo
Views: 51427655 YelawolfVEVO
The Saskatoon Police Service - Never the Same Day Twice
 
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The Saskatoon Police Service offers career opportunities that are worth serious consideration. The city has a rapidly growing Aboriginal population and the service must reflect this change. As protectors and peacemakers, the role police play in any community is invaluable. The police service offers careers both on the front lines and in civilian support positions. For more information visit saskatoonpoliceservice.ca. ©2014 Saskatoon Police Service
Views: 13285 SaskatoonPolice
Starting-Up in America
 
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Starting-Up in America is a documentary film by Tarik Ansari and Basil Glew-Galloway about the issues faced by international Silicon Valley Entrepreneurs with US Immigration. See more on http://startingupinamerica.com
Views: 71631 startingupinamerica
2017-05-29 Question Period
 
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Question Period: May 29, 2017
Views: 651 OntarioLegislature
Engaging Youth With Indigenous Materials in Libraries and Classrooms
 
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"Assessing and incorporating teaching and learning resources by and about First Nations, Metis and Inuit peoples is critical for librarians, educators and parents. Awareness of diverse epistemologies, notions of cultural authenticity and historical accuracy, and the influence of colonialism, are essential when considering books, films and interactive media for library and classroom collections. This panel will address challenges facing Indigenous and non-Indigenous librarians, educators and parents when drawing upon materials representing Indigenous peoples and cultures. They will offer insights about such issues as cultural appropriation, stereotypes, addressing colonialism and what to do with dated resources. This session is ideal for teacher candidates, classroom teachers, teacher-librarians, youth librarians and parents. Convener: Jo-Anne Naslund, UBC Education Library Moderator: Lisa P. Nathan, Assistant Professor and Coordinator of the First Nations Curriculum Concentration, School of Library, Archival and Information Studies Panelists: Debra Martel, Associate Director, First Nations House of Learning; Jan Hare, Associate Professor, Department of Language and Literacy Education; Allison Taylor-McBryde, Adjunct Professor, School of Library, Archival and Information Studies."
Warren Hastings by Thomas Babington Macaulay
 
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"Warren Hastings" is Chapter IV of Thomas Macaulay's Critical and Historical Essays, vol. III. It first appeared in the Edinburgh Review of October 1841 as a review of Memoirs of the Life of Warren Hastings, first Governor-General of Bengal. Compiled from Original Papers, by the Rev. G. R. Gleig, M. A. 3 vols. 8vo. London: 1841. This essay on is generally considered to be one of the finest by the great historian and great literary stylist, Thomas Babington Macalay. Macaulay himself served in India from 1834 to 1838, and as a Whig and a believer in progress in the nineteenth century sense, he urged that Indians be trained in useful knowledge -- western, that is, and particularly British learning, easily dismissing traditional Indian education as of no value. Though he is well aware of Hastings’s flaws, he nevertheless greatly admires him as one of the creators of Britain’s Asian empire. Today’s critics, of course, can easily dismiss both men as “Orientalists” (to use Edwin Said’s terminology) but they both remain essential to an understanding of nineteenth century British history and culture. Chapter 1 - 00:00 Chapter 2 - 38:17 Chapter 3 - 1:07:07 Chapter 4 - 1:38:30 Chapter 5 - 2:12:07 Chapter 6 - 2:44:18 Chapter 7 - 3:19:18 Chapter 8 - 3:55:12 Chapter 9 - 4:25:40
Views: 1052 Audiobooks Unleashed
Wealth and Power in America: Social Class, Income Distribution, Finance and the American Dream
 
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Wealth in the United States is commonly measured in terms of net worth, which is the sum of all assets, including home equity, minus all liabilities. More on the topic: https://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ie=UTF8&tag=tra0c7-20&linkCode=ur2&linkId=ff2efe1946d5c4d43e435783f57e86dc&camp=1789&creative=9325&index=books&keywords=wealth%20america For example, a household in possession of an $800,000 house, $5,000 in mutual funds, $30,000 in cars, $20,000 worth of stock in their own company, and a $45,000 IRA would have assets totaling $900,000. Assuming that this household would have a $250,000 mortgage, $40,000 in car loans, and $10,000 in credit card debt, its debts would total $300,000. Subtracting the debts from the worth of this household's assets (900,000 - $300,000 = $600,000), this household would have a net worth of $600,000. Net worth can vary with fluctuations in value of the underlying assets. The wealth—more specifically, the median net worth—of households in the United States is varied with relation to race, education, geographic location and gender. As one would expect, households with greater income feature the highest net worths, though high income cannot be taken as an always accurate indicator of net worth. Overall the number of wealthier households is on the rise, with baby boomers hitting the highs of their careers. In addition, wealth is unevenly distributed, with the wealthiest 25% of US households owning 87% of the wealth in the United States, which was $54.2 trillion in 2009. When observing the changes in the wealth among American households, one can note an increase in wealthier individuals and a decrease in the number of poor households, while net worth increased most substantially in semi-wealthy and wealthy households. Overall the percentage of households with a negative net worth (more debt than assets) declined from 9.5% in 1989 to 4.1% in 2001. The percentage of net worths ranging from $500,000 to one million doubled while the percentage of millionaires tripled. From 1995 to 2004, there was tremendous growth among household wealth, as it nearly doubled from $21.9 trillion to $43.6 trillion, but the wealthiest quartile of the economic distribution made up 89% of this growth. During this time frame, wealth became increasingly unequal, and the wealthiest 25% became even wealthier. According to US Census Bureau statistics this "Upward shift" is most likely the result of a booming housing market which caused homeowners to experience tremendous increases in home equity. Life-cycles have also attributed to the rising wealth among Americans. With more and more baby-boomers reaching the climax of their careers and the middle aged population making up a larger segment of the population now than ever before, more and more households have achieved comfortable levels of wealth. Zhu Xiao Di (2004) notes that household wealth usually peaks around families headed by people in their 50s, and as a result, the baby boomer generation reached this age range at the time of the analysis. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wealth_in_the_United_States
Views: 217417 The Film Archives
CIA Archives: Buddhism in Burma - History, Politics and Culture
 
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Buddhism in Burma (also known as Myanmar) is predominantly of the Theravada tradition, practised by 89% of the country's population. It is the most religious Buddhist country in terms of the proportion of monks in the population and proportion of income spent on religion. Adherents are most likely found among the dominant ethnic Bamar (or Burmans), Shan, Rakhine (Arakanese), Mon, Karen, and Chinese who are well integrated into Burmese society. Monks, collectively known as the Sangha, are venerated members of Burmese society. Among many ethnic groups in Myanmar, including the Bamar and Shan, Theravada Buddhism is practiced in conjunction with nat worship, which involves the placation of spirits who can intercede in worldly affairs. With regard to the Daily Routines as Buddhists in Myanmar, there are two most popular practices: merit-making and vipassana (Insight Meditation). The weizza path is the least popular (an esoteric form somewhat linked to Buddhist aspiration that involves the occult).[4] Merit-making is the most common path undertaken by Burmese Buddhists. This path involves the observance of the Five Precepts and accumulation of good merit through charity and good deeds (dana) in order to obtain a favorable rebirth. The vipassana path, which has gained ground since the early 1900s, is a form of insight meditation believed to lead to enlightenment. The weizza path, is an esoteric system of occult practices (such as recitation of spells, samatha meditation, and alchemy) and believed to lead to life as a weizza (also spelt weikza), a semi-immortal and supernatural being who awaits the appearance of the future Buddha, Maitreya (Arimeitaya).[5] This last one is frowned upon by many practicing Buddhists and almost all Monks in Myanmar nowadays. Burma (Listeni/ˈbɜrmə/ BUR-mə), also Myanmar (Listeni/ˌmjɑːnˈmɑː/ MYAHN--MAR), is a sovereign country in Southeast Asia. It is bordered by India, Bangladesh, China, Laos and Thailand. One-third of Burma's total perimeter of 1,930 kilometres (1,200 mi) forms an uninterrupted coastline along the Bay of Bengal and the Andaman Sea. At 676,578 km2 (261,227 sq mi), it is the 40th largest country in the world and the second largest country in Southeast Asia. Burma is also the 24th most populous country in the world with over 60.28 million people.[6] Burma is home to some of the early civilizations of Southeast Asia including the Pyu and the Mon.[7] In the 9th century, the Burmans of the Kingdom of Nanzhao entered the upper Irrawaddy valley and, following the establishment of the Pagan Empire in the 1050s, the Burmese language and culture slowly became dominant in the country. During this period, Theravada Buddhism gradually became the predominant religion of the country. The Pagan Empire fell due to the Mongol invasions (1277--1301), and several warring states emerged. In the second half of the 16th century, the country was reunified by the Taungoo Dynasty which for a brief period was the largest empire in the history of Southeast Asia.[8] The early 19th century Konbaung Dynasty ruled over an area that included modern Burma as well as Manipur and Assam. The country was colonized by Britain following three Anglo-Burmese Wars (1824--1885). British rule brought social, economic, cultural and administrative changes. Since independence in 1948, the country has been in one of the longest running civil wars among the country's myriad ethnic groups that remains unresolved. From 1962 to 2011, the country was under military rule. The military junta was officially dissolved in 2011 following a general election in 2010 and a nominally civilian government installed, though the military retains enormous influence. Burma is a resource-rich country. However, the Burmese economy is one of the least developed in the world. Burma's GDP stands at $42.953 billion and grows at an average rate of 2.9% annually -- the lowest rate of economic growth in the Greater Mekong Subregion.[9] Among others, the EU, United States and Canada have imposed economic sanctions on Burma.[10] Burma's health care system is one of the worst in the world: The World Health Organization ranked Burma at 190th, the worst performing of all countries. The United Nations and several other organizations have reported consistent and systematic human rights violations in the country, including child labour, human trafficking and a lack of freedom of speech. In recent years, the country and its military leadership has made large concessions to democratic activists and is slowly improving its relations with the major powers and the UN. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burma
Views: 119346 The Film Archives
International relations of the Great Powers (1814–1919) | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_relations_of_the_Great_Powers_(1814%E2%80%931919) 00:03:15 1 1814–1830: Restoration and reaction 00:05:07 1.1 Congress of Vienna: 1814–1815 00:08:15 1.2 British policies 00:09:11 1.3 Slave trade 00:10:02 1.4 Spain loses its colonies 00:12:06 1.5 Greek independence: 1821–1833 00:14:13 2 Travel, trade and communications 00:14:43 2.1 Travel 00:15:59 2.2 Transportation 00:17:56 2.3 Communications 00:18:29 3 1830–1850s 00:19:40 3.1 British policies 00:20:40 3.2 Belgian Revolution 00:21:27 3.3 Ottoman Empire 00:22:41 3.3.1 Serbian independence 00:23:39 3.3.2 Crimean War 00:26:29 3.3.3 Moldavia and Wallachia 00:27:59 4 1860–1871: Nationalism and unification 00:28:45 4.1 Great Britain 00:29:26 4.2 France 00:31:53 4.3 Italian unification 00:32:37 4.4 United States of America 00:35:06 4.5 Germany 00:35:47 4.5.1 Schleswig and Holstein 00:36:41 4.5.2 Unification 00:37:58 5 1871: the year of transition 00:38:09 5.1 Maintaining the peace 00:40:13 5.2 Major powers 00:42:02 5.3 Conscription 00:44:05 6 Imperialism 00:46:34 6.1 French Empire in Asia and Africa 00:46:44 6.1.1 France seizes Mexico 00:48:52 6.2 Takeover of Egypt, 1882 00:51:26 6.3 Great Game in Central Asia 00:52:42 6.4 Scramble for Africa 00:54:52 6.4.1 Kenya 00:58:00 6.5 Portugal 00:59:46 6.6 Italy 01:01:16 6.7 Japan becomes a power 01:02:25 6.7.1 Okinawa 01:02:50 6.7.2 War with China 01:04:09 6.7.3 Taiwan 01:06:02 6.7.4 Japan defeats Russia, 1904-1905 01:07:44 6.7.5 Korea 01:08:38 6.8 Dividing up China 01:09:20 6.9 British policies 01:09:28 6.9.1 Free trade imperialism 01:10:05 6.9.2 Splendid isolation 01:11:11 6.9.3 Policy toward Germany 01:11:53 6.9.4 Liberal Party splits on imperialism 01:12:55 7 The Eastern Question 01:13:31 7.1 Long-term goals 01:13:48 7.1.1 Ottoman Empire (Turkey) 01:14:42 7.1.2 Austro-Hungarian Empire 01:17:30 7.1.3 Russia 01:18:05 7.1.4 Serbia 01:20:00 7.1.5 Germany 01:20:23 7.2 Great Eastern Crisis of 1875-78 Turkey at war with Serbia and Russia 01:22:28 7.3 Minority rights 01:23:23 7.4 British policies 01:25:25 7.5 German policy, 1872–1890 01:27:02 7.5.1 War in Sight crisis of 1875 01:28:47 7.6 The alliance between Russia and France, 1894–1914 01:31:19 8 Balkan crises: 1908-1913 01:31:31 8.1 Bosnian crisis of 1908–09 01:32:56 8.2 Balkan Wars 01:35:12 9 Coming of World War 01:37:16 9.1 France 01:40:03 9.1.1 Franco-Russian Alliance 01:43:05 9.1.2 Anglo-German relations deteriorate: 1880-1904 01:44:58 9.1.3 Two crises in Morocco 01:48:15 9.2 British-German naval race 01:49:54 10 The Great War 01:51:55 11 Paris Peace Conference and Versailles Treaty 1919 01:53:15 12 See also 01:54:21 13 Notes 01:54:30 14 Further reading 01:54:39 14.1 Surveys 02:00:27 14.2 Maps 02:01:19 14.3 Coming of World War I 02:03:56 14.3.1 Primary sources on coming of the war 02:06:44 14.4 Wartime diplomacy 02:07:29 14.5 Imperialism 02:09:38 14.6 Britain 02:14:11 14.6.1 Primary sources for Britain 02:14:54 14.7 France 02:16:31 14.8 Germany and Austria 02:21:31 14.9 Russia and Balkans 02:23:46 14.10 United States 02:25:55 14.11 Japan and China 02:28:02 14.12 Others 02:28:36 15 Primary sources Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= This article covers worldwide diplomacy and, more generally, the international relations of the major powers from 1814 to 1919. The international relations of minor countries are covered in their own history articles. This era covers the period from the end of the Napoleonic Wars and the Congress of Vienna (1814–15), to the end of the First World War and the Paris Peace Conference. For the previous era see International relations, 1648–1814. For the 1920s and 1930s see International relations (1919–1939). Important themes include the rapid industrialization and growing power of Britain, France and Prussia/Germany, and, later in the period, the United States and Japan. This led to i ...
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My Friend Irma: Buy or Sell / Election Connection / The Big Secret
 
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My Friend Irma, created by writer-director-producer Cy Howard, is a top-rated, long-run radio situation comedy, so popular in the late 1940s that its success escalated to films, television, a comic strip and a comic book, while Howard scored with another radio comedy hit, Life with Luigi. Marie Wilson portrayed the title character, Irma Peterson, on radio, in two films and a television series. The radio series was broadcast from April 11, 1947 to August 23, 1954. Dependable, level-headed Jane Stacy (Cathy Lewis, Diana Lynn) began each weekly radio program by narrating a misadventure of her innocent, bewildered roommate, Irma, a dim-bulb stenographer from Minnesota. The two central characters were in their mid-twenties. Irma had her 25th birthday in one episode; she was born on May 5. After the two met in the first episode, they lived together in an apartment rented from their Irish landlady, Mrs. O'Reilly (Jane Morgan, Gloria Gordon). Irma's boyfriend Al (John Brown) was a deadbeat, barely on the right side of the law, who had not held a job in years. Only someone like Irma could love Al, whose nickname for Irma was "Chicken". Al had many crazy get-rich-quick schemes, which never worked. Al planned to marry Irma at some future date so she could support him. Professor Kropotkin (Hans Conried), the Russian violinist at the Princess Burlesque theater, lived upstairs. He greeted Jane and Irma with remarks like, "My two little bunnies with one being an Easter bunny and the other being Bugs Bunny." The Professor insulted Mrs. O'Reilly, complained about his room and reluctantly became O'Reilly's love interest in an effort to make her forget his back rent. Irma worked for the lawyer, Mr. Clyde (Alan Reed). She had such an odd filing system that once when Clyde fired her, he had to hire her back again because he couldn't find anything. Useless at dictation, Irma mangled whatever Clyde dictated. Asked how long she had been with Clyde, Irma said, "When I first went to work with him he had curly black hair, then it got grey, and now it's snow white. I guess I've been with him about six months." Irma became less bright as the program evolved. She also developed a tendency to whine or cry whenever something went wrong, which was at least once every show. Jane had a romantic inclination for her boss, millionaire Richard Rhinelander (Leif Erickson), but he had no real interest in her. Another actor in the show was Bea Benaderet. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/My_Friend_Irma_%28radio-TV%29 Katherine Elisabeth Wilson (August 19, 1916 -- November 23, 1972), better known by her stage name, Marie Wilson, was an American radio, film, and television actress. She may be best remembered as the title character in My Friend Irma. Born in Anaheim, California, Wilson began her career in New York City as a dancer on the Broadway stage. She gained national prominence with My Friend Irma on radio, television and film. The show made her a star but typecast her almost interminably as the quintessential dumb blonde, which she played in numerous comedies and in Ken Murray's famous Hollywood "Blackouts". During World War II, she was a volunteer performer at the Hollywood Canteen. She was also a popular wartime pin-up. Wilson's performance in Satan Met a Lady, the second film adaptation of Dashiell Hammett's detective novel The Maltese Falcon, is a virtual template for Marilyn Monroe's later onscreen persona. Wilson appeared in more than 40 films and was a guest on The Ed Sullivan Show on four occasions. She was a television performer during the 1960s, working until her untimely death. Wilson's talents have been recognized with three stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame: for radio at 6301 Hollywood Boulevard, for television at 6765 Hollywood Boulevard and for movies at 6601 Hollywood Boulevard. Wilson married four times: Nick Grinde (early 1930s), LA golf pro Bob Stevens (1938--39), Allan Nixon (1942--50) and Robert Fallon (1951--72). She died of cancer in 1972 at age 56 and was interred in the Columbarium of Remembrance at Forest Lawn Cemetery in Hollywood Hills. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie_Wilson_%28American_actress%29
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CIA Covert Action in the Cold War: Iran, Jamaica, Chile, Cuba, Afghanistan, Libya, Latin America
 
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1982 - More on this topic: https://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ie=UTF8&tag=tra0c7-20&linkCode=ur2&linkId=8ac525aa638bd100f713dadc31f67c76&camp=1789&creative=9325&index=books&keywords=cia%20covert%20action The following persons are known to have participated in covert operations, as distinct from clandestine intelligence gathering (espionage) either by their own admission or by the accounts of others: Robert Baer Jozef Gabčík and Jan Kubiš, Czechoslovak British-trained agents sent to assassinate one of the most important Nazis, Reinhard Heydrich, in 1942 as part of Operation Anthropoid. Aaron Franklin, World War II US Office of Strategic Services (OSS) officer who created a fake group of the German Army, made up of POWs, with the mission of killing Hitler. As a colonel, he was the first commander of United States Army Special Forces. Charles Beckwith, US Army colonel who was an early exchange officer with the British Special Air Service (SAS), and created the Delta Force (1st Special Forces Operational Detachment-Delta) based on the SAS. Gary Berntsen, CIA field officer and team leader during Operation Enduring Freedom Wendell Fertig, United States Army Reserve officer who organized large Filipino guerrilla forces against the Japanese in World War II Virginia Hall, American who first worked for the British Special Operations Executive, then for the American Office of Strategic Services in German-occupied France. Only U.S. woman to receive the Distinguished Service Cross. Eric Haney, one of the founding members of Delta Force. Michael Harari, Israeli Mossad officer who led assassination operations (Operation Wrath of God) against PLO members accused of the 1972 Munich Massacre. Bruce Rusty Lang, commander of a mixed United States Army Special Forces & Montagnard (Degar/Bru people) commando Recon Team (RT Oklahoma) of Command and Control North, Studies and Observations Group. Previously served on Project 404, U.S. Embassy Laos, Assistant Army Attaché ("Secret War" in Laos 1970). Edward Lansdale, United States Air Force officer (and eventually major general) seconded to the CIA, and noted for his work with Ramon Magsaysay against the Hukbalahap insurgency in Philippines during the early 1950s, and later involved in Operation Mongoose against Cuba. T. E. Lawrence, British "Lawrence of Arabia" who organized Arab forces during World War I. Alain Mafart, French DGSE officer convicted, in New Zealand, for sinking the Greenpeace ship Rainbow Warrior. Richard Meadows, United States Army Special Forces officer known for many operations, including the POW rescue attempt at Son Tay, North Vietnam, and for deep operations in support of Operation Eagle Claw. Richard Meinertzhagen, British officer who engaged in deceptive operations against Turkish forces in World War I, although falsifying later operations. Ramon Mercader, NKVD operator who assassinated Leon Trotsky under the direction of Pavel Sudoplatov. Omar Nasiri Noor Inayat Khan, Anglo-Indian Special Operations Executive radio operator in World War II Occupied France, killed in Nazi captivity with three other SOE agents, Yolande Beekman, Eliane Plewman and Madeleine Damerment. Chuck Pfarrer, former Navy SEAL. Dominique Prieur, French DGSE officer convicted, in New Zealand, for sinking the Greenpeace ship Rainbow Warrior Richard Quirin, German World War II saboteur landed by German submarine in the US, as part of Operation Pastorius. Captured and executed. ex parte Quirin was a Supreme Court case challenging the constitutionality of execution of unlawful combatants. Ali Hassan Salameh, chief of operations of Black September. Mike Spann, CIA field officer and the first Agency operative to be killed in action during Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan. Gary Schroen, CIA field officer who led the first CIA team into Afghanistan during the opening stages of Operation Enduring Freedom. Otto Skorzeny, German commando who led the rescue of Benito Mussolini, and operated in US uniform during the Battle of the Bulge. Pavel Sudoplatov, major general in Soviet state security (under many organizational names), with roles ranging from assassin to director of field operations. Jesús Villamor, Filipino Air Force officer that helped organize World War II guerilla movements. Billy Waugh, former United States Special Forces soldier who later worked as a contractor with the CIA. Covert operations have often been the subject of popular novels, films, TV series, comics, etc. The Company is a fictional covert organization featured in the American television drama/thriller series Prison Break. Also other series that deal with covert operations are Mission: Impossible, Alias, Burn Notice, The Unit, The State Within, Covert Affairs and 24. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Covert_operation
Views: 375773 The Film Archives
"Move Over, Mrs. Markham"  - September 18 (Bulldog Bites)
 
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Martell Jefferson shares with us about his character in the upcoming PAC Rats production of "Move Over, Mrs. Markham". Call the 24/7 box office voicemail line at 708-210-5741 to reserve tickets!
The Great Gildersleeve: The Manganese Mine / Testimonial Dinner for Judge / The Sneezes
 
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The Great Gildersleeve (1941--1957), initially written by Leonard Lewis Levinson, was one of broadcast history's earliest spin-off programs. Built around Throckmorton Philharmonic Gildersleeve, a character who had been a staple on the classic radio situation comedy Fibber McGee and Molly, first introduced on Oct. 3, 1939, ep. #216. The Great Gildersleeve enjoyed its greatest success in the 1940s. Actor Harold Peary played the character during its transition from the parent show into the spin-off and later in a quartet of feature films released at the height of the show's popularity. On Fibber McGee and Molly, Peary's Gildersleeve was a pompous windbag who became a consistent McGee nemesis. "You're a haa-aa-aa-aard man, McGee!" became a Gildersleeve catchphrase. The character was given several conflicting first names on Fibber McGee and Molly, and on one episode his middle name was revealed as Philharmonic. Gildy admits as much at the end of "Gildersleeve's Diary" on the Fibber McGee and Molly series (Oct. 22, 1940). Premiering on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGees' Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where Gildersleeve now oversaw his late brother-in-law's estate and took on the rearing of his orphaned niece and nephew, Marjorie (originally played by Lurene Tuttle and followed by Louise Erickson and Mary Lee Robb) and Leroy Forester (Walter Tetley). The household also included a cook named Birdie. Curiously, while Gildersleeve had occasionally spoken of his (never-present) wife in some Fibber episodes, in his own series the character was a confirmed bachelor. In a striking forerunner to such later television hits as Bachelor Father and Family Affair, both of which are centered on well-to-do uncles taking in their deceased siblings' children, Gildersleeve was a bachelor raising two children while, at first, administering a girdle manufacturing company ("If you want a better corset, of course, it's a Gildersleeve") and then for the bulk of the show's run, serving as Summerfield's water commissioner, between time with the ladies and nights with the boys. The Great Gildersleeve may have been the first broadcast show to be centered on a single parent balancing child-rearing, work, and a social life, done with taste and genuine wit, often at the expense of Gildersleeve's now slightly understated pomposity. Many of the original episodes were co-written by John Whedon, father of Tom Whedon (who wrote The Golden Girls), and grandfather of Deadwood scripter Zack Whedon and Joss Whedon (creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly and Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog). The key to the show was Peary, whose booming voice and facility with moans, groans, laughs, shudders and inflection was as close to body language and facial suggestion as a voice could get. Peary was so effective, and Gildersleeve became so familiar a character, that he was referenced and satirized periodically in other comedies and in a few cartoons. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Gildersleeve
Views: 64916 Remember This
Suspense: Beyond Good and Evil / Summer Storm / A Shroud for Sara
 
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The program's heyday was in the early 1950s, when radio actor, producer and director Elliott Lewis took over (still during the Wilcox/Autolite run). Here the material reached new levels of sophistication. The writing was taut, and the casting, which had always been a strong point of the series (featuring such film stars as Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Henry Fonda, Humphrey Bogart, Judy Garland, Ronald Colman, Marlene Dietrich, Eve McVeagh, Lena Horne, and Cary Grant), took an unexpected turn when Lewis expanded the repertory to include many of radio's famous drama and comedy stars — often playing against type — such as Jack Benny. Jim and Marian Jordan of Fibber McGee and Molly were heard in the episode, "Backseat Driver," which originally aired February 3, 1949. The highest production values enhanced Suspense, and many of the shows retain their power to grip and entertain. At the time he took over Suspense, Lewis was familiar to radio fans for playing Frankie Remley, the wastrel guitar-playing sidekick to Phil Harris in The Phil Harris-Alice Faye Show. On the May 10, 1951 Suspense, Lewis reversed the roles with "Death on My Hands": A bandleader (Harris) is horrified when an autograph-seeking fan accidentally shoots herself and dies in his hotel room, and a vocalist (Faye) tries to help him as the townfolk call for vigilante justice against him. With the rise of television and the departures of Lewis and Autolite, subsequent producers (Antony Ellis, William N. Robson and others) struggled to maintain the series despite shrinking budgets, the availability of fewer name actors, and listenership decline. To save money, the program frequently used scripts first broadcast by another noteworthy CBS anthology, Escape. In addition to these tales of exotic adventure, Suspense expanded its repertoire to include more science fiction and supernatural content. By the end of its run, the series was remaking scripts from the long-canceled program The Mysterious Traveler. A time travel tale like Robert Arthur's "The Man Who Went Back to Save Lincoln" or a thriller about a death ray-wielding mad scientist would alternate with more run-of-the-mill crime dramas. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_%28radio_drama%29
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The Savings and Loan Banking Crisis: George Bush, the CIA, and Organized Crime
 
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The savings and loan crisis of the 1980s and 1990s (commonly dubbed the S&L crisis) was the failure of about 747 out of the 3,234 savings and loan associations in the United States. About the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1561712035/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1561712035&linkCode=as2&tag=tra0c7-20&linkId=5a4bfa3c7e7e8c1104831acd81c8fd71 A savings and loan or "thrift" is a financial institution that accepts savings deposits and makes mortgage, car and other personal loans to individual members—a cooperative venture known in the United Kingdom as a Building Society. "As of December 31, 1995, RTC estimated that the total cost for resolving the 747 failed institutions was $87.9 billion." The remainder of the bailout was paid for by charges on savings and loan accounts — which contributed to the large budget deficits of the early 1990s. The concomitant slowdown in the finance industry and the real estate market may have been a contributing cause of the 1990--91 economic recession. Between 1986 and 1991, the number of new homes constructed per year dropped from 1.8 million to 1 million, which was at the time the lowest rate since World War II. The United States Congress granted all thrifts in 1980, including savings and loan associations, the power to make consumer and commercial loans and to issue transaction accounts. Designed to help the thrift industry retain its deposit base and to improve its profitability, the Depository Institutions Deregulation and Monetary Control Act (DIDMCA) of 1980 allowed thrifts to make consumer loans up to 20 percent of their assets, issue credit cards, accept negotiable order of withdrawal (NOW) accounts from individuals and nonprofit organizations, and invest up to 20 percent of their assets in commercial real estate loans. The damage to S&L operations led Congress to act, passing the Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981 (ERTA) in August 1981 and initiating the regulatory changes by the Federal Home Loan Bank Board allowing S&Ls to sell their mortgage loans and use the cash generated to seek better returns soon after enactment; the losses created by the sales were to be amortized over the life of the loan, and any losses could also be offset against taxes paid over the preceding 10 years. This all made S&Ls eager to sell their loans. The buyers—major Wall Street firms—were quick to take advantage of the S&Ls' lack of expertise, buying at 60%-90% of value and then transforming the loans by bundling them as, effectively, government-backed bonds (by virtue of Ginnie Mae, Freddie Mac, or Fannie Mae guarantees). S&Ls were one group buying these bonds, holding $150 billion by 1986, and being charged substantial fees for the transactions. In 1982, the Garn-St Germain Depository Institutions Act was passed and increased the proportion of assets that thrifts could hold in consumer and commercial real estate loans and allowed thrifts to invest 5 percent of their assets in commercial loans until January 1, 1984, when this percentage increased to 10 percent. A large number of S&L customers' defaults and bankruptcies ensued, and the S&Ls that had overextended themselves were forced into insolvency proceedings themselves. The Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation (FSLIC), a federal government agency that insured S&L accounts in the same way the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation insures commercial bank accounts, then had to repay all the depositors whose money was lost. From 1986 to 1989, FSLIC closed or otherwise resolved 296 institutions with total assets of $125 billion. An even more traumatic period followed, with the creation of the Resolution Trust Corporation in 1989 and that agency's resolution by mid-1995 of an additional 747 thrifts. A Federal Reserve Bank panel stated the resulting taxpayer bailout ended up being even larger than it would have been because moral hazard and adverse selection incentives that compounded the system's losses. There also were state-chartered S&Ls that failed. Some state insurance funds failed, requiring state taxpayer bailouts. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis
Views: 175053 The Film Archives
Executive Schedule
 
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Executive Schedule (5 U.S.C. §§ 5311–5318) refers to the system of salaries given to the highest-ranked appointed positions in the executive branch of the U.S. government. The President of the United States, an elected official, appoints incumbents to these positions, most of them with the advice and consent of the Senate. They include members of the President's Cabinet as well as other subcabinet policy makers. There are five pay rates within the Executive Schedule, usually denoted with a Roman numeral with I being the highest level and V the lowest. Congress lists the positions eligible for the Executive Schedule and the corresponding level. Congress also gives the president the ability to grant Executive Schedule IV and V status to no more than 34 employees not listed in the law. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
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Health effects of tobacco
 
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The health effects of smoking are the circumstances, mechanisms, and factors of tobacco consumption on human health. Epidemiological research has been focused primarily on cigarette tobacco smoking, which has been studied more extensively than any other form of consumption. Tobacco is the single greatest cause of preventable death globally. Tobacco use leads most commonly to diseases affecting the heart, liver and lungs, with smoking being a major risk factor for heart attacks, strokes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (including emphysema and chronic bronchitis), and cancer (particularly lung cancer, cancers of the larynx and mouth, and pancreatic cancer). It also causes peripheral vascular disease and hypertension. The effects depend on the number of years that a person smokes and on how much the person smokes. Starting smoking earlier in life and smoking cigarettes higher in tar increases the risk of these diseases. Also, environmental tobacco smoke, or secondhand smoke, has been shown to cause adverse health effects in people of all ages. Cigarettes sold in underdeveloped countries tend to have higher tar content, and are less likely to be filtered, potentially increasing vulnerability to tobacco-related disease in these regions. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1199 Audiopedia
Battle of Passchendaele
 
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The Battle of Passchendaele (or Third Battle of Ypres or "Passchendaele") was a campaign of the First World War, fought by the British and their allies against the German Empire. The battle took place on the Western Front, between July and November 1917, for control of the ridges south and east of the Belgian city of Ypres in West Flanders, as part of a strategy decided by the Allies at conferences in November 1916 and May 1917. Passchendaele lay on the last ridge east of Ypres, five miles from a railway junction at Roeselare, which was a vital part of the supply system of the German Fourth Army. The next stage of the Allied strategy was an advance to Torhout–Couckelaere, to close the German-controlled railway running through Roeselare and Torhout, which did not take place until 1918. Further operations and a British supporting attack along the Belgian coast from Nieuwpoort, combined with an amphibious landing, were to have reached Bruges and then the Dutch frontier. The resistance of the German Fourth Army, unusually wet weather, the onset of winter and the diversion of British and French resources to Italy, following the Austro-German victory at the Battle of Caporetto (24 October – 19 November) allowed the Germans to avoid a general withdrawal, which had seemed inevitable to them in October. The campaign ended in November when the Canadian Corps captured Passchendaele. In 1918 the Battle of the Lys and the Fifth Battle of Ypres, were fought before the Allies occupied the Belgian coast and reached the Dutch frontier. A campaign in Flanders was controversial in 1917 and has remained so. British Prime Minister Lloyd George opposed the offensive as did General Foch the French Chief of the General Staff. The British commander Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig did not receive approval for the Flanders operation from the War Cabinet until 25 July. Matters of dispute by the participants and writers and historians since the war have included the wisdom of pursuing an offensive strategy in the wake of the failed Nivelle Offensive, rather than waiting for the arrival of the American armies in France; the choice of Flanders over areas further south or the Italian front; the climate and weather in Flanders; Haig's selection of General Hubert Gough and the Fifth Army to conduct the offensive; debates over the nature of the opening attack between advocates of shallow and deeper objectives; the passage of time between the Battle of Messines and the opening attack of the Battles of Ypres; the extent to which the internal troubles of the French armies motivated British persistence in the offensive; the effect of mud on operations; the decision to continue the offensive in October once the weather had broken and the human cost of the campaign on the soldiers of the German and British armies. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 2696 Audiopedia
Treaty of Versailles | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Treaty of Versailles Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Treaty of Versailles (French: Traité de Versailles) was the most important of the peace treaties that brought World War I to an end. The Treaty ended the state of war between Germany and the Allied Powers. It was signed on 28 June 1919 in Versailles, exactly five years after the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand which directly led to World War I. The other Central Powers on the German side of World War I signed separate treaties. Although the armistice, signed on 11 November 1918, ended the actual fighting, it took six months of Allied negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference to conclude the peace treaty. The treaty was registered by the Secretariat of the League of Nations on 21 October 1919. Of the many provisions in the treaty, one of the most important and controversial required "Germany [to] accept the responsibility of Germany and her allies for causing all the loss and damage" during the war (the other members of the Central Powers signed treaties containing similar articles). This article, Article 231, later became known as the War Guilt clause. The treaty required Germany to disarm, make ample territorial concessions, and pay reparations to certain countries that had formed the Entente powers. In 1921 the total cost of these reparations was assessed at 132 billion marks (then $31.4 billion or £6.6 billion, roughly equivalent to US $442 billion or UK £284 billion in 2018). At the time economists, notably John Maynard Keynes (a British delegate to the Paris Peace Conference), predicted that the treaty was too harsh—a "Carthaginian peace"—and said the reparations figure was excessive and counter-productive, views that, since then, have been the subject of ongoing debate by historians and economists from several countries. On the other hand, prominent figures on the Allied side such as French Marshal Ferdinand Foch criticized the treaty for treating Germany too leniently. The result of these competing and sometimes conflicting goals among the victors was a compromise that left no one content: Germany was neither pacified nor conciliated, nor was it permanently weakened. The problems that arose from the treaty would lead to the Locarno Treaties, which improved relations between Germany and the other European powers, and the re-negotiation of the reparation system resulting in the Dawes Plan, the Young Plan, and the indefinite postponement of reparations at the Lausanne Conference of 1932. Although it is often referred to as the "Versailles Conference", only the actual signing of the treaty took place at the historic palace. Most of the negotiations were in Paris, with the "Big Four" meetings taking place generally at the Quai d'Orsay.
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Environmentalism | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Environmentalism Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Environmentalism or environmental rights is a broad philosophy, ideology, and social movement regarding concerns for environmental protection and improvement of the health of the environment, particularly as the measure for this health seeks to incorporate the impact of changes to the environment on humans, animals, plants and non-living matter. While environmentalism focuses more on the environmental and nature-related aspects of green ideology and politics, ecologism combines the ideology of social ecology and environmentalism. Ecologism is more commonly used in continental European languages while ‘environmentalism’ is more commonly used in English but the words have slightly different connotations. Environmentalism advocates the preservation, restoration and/or improvement of the natural environment, and may be referred to as a movement to control pollution or protect plant and animal diversity. For this reason, concepts such as a land ethic, environmental ethics, biodiversity, ecology, and the biophilia hypothesis figure predominantly. At its crux, environmentalism is an attempt to balance relations between humans and the various natural systems on which they depend in such a way that all the components are accorded a proper degree of sustainability. The exact measures and outcomes of this balance is controversial and there are many different ways for environmental concerns to be expressed in practice. Environmentalism and environmental concerns are often represented by the color green, but this association has been appropriated by the marketing industries for the tactic known as greenwashing. Environmentalism is opposed by anti-environmentalism, which says that the Earth is less fragile than some environmentalists maintain, and portrays environmentalism as overreacting to the human contribution to climate change or opposing human advancement.
Views: 6 wikipedia tts
Treaty of Versailles | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Treaty of Versailles Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Treaty of Versailles (French: Traité de Versailles) was the most important of the peace treaties that brought World War I to an end. The Treaty ended the state of war between Germany and the Allied Powers. It was signed on 28 June 1919 in Versailles, exactly five years after the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand which directly led to World War I. The other Central Powers on the German side of World War I signed separate treaties. Although the armistice, signed on 11 November 1918, ended the actual fighting, it took six months of Allied negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference to conclude the peace treaty. The treaty was registered by the Secretariat of the League of Nations on 21 October 1919. Of the many provisions in the treaty, one of the most important and controversial required "Germany [to] accept the responsibility of Germany and her allies for causing all the loss and damage" during the war (the other members of the Central Powers signed treaties containing similar articles). This article, Article 231, later became known as the War Guilt clause. The treaty required Germany to disarm, make ample territorial concessions, and pay reparations to certain countries that had formed the Entente powers. In 1921 the total cost of these reparations was assessed at 132 billion marks (then $31.4 billion or £6.6 billion, roughly equivalent to US $442 billion or UK £284 billion in 2018). At the time economists, notably John Maynard Keynes (a British delegate to the Paris Peace Conference), predicted that the treaty was too harsh—a "Carthaginian peace"—and said the reparations figure was excessive and counter-productive, views that, since then, have been the subject of ongoing debate by historians and economists from several countries. On the other hand, prominent figures on the Allied side such as French Marshal Ferdinand Foch criticized the treaty for treating Germany too leniently. The result of these competing and sometimes conflicting goals among the victors was a compromise that left no one content: Germany was neither pacified nor conciliated, nor was it permanently weakened. The problems that arose from the treaty would lead to the Locarno Treaties, which improved relations between Germany and the other European powers, and the re-negotiation of the reparation system resulting in the Dawes Plan, the Young Plan, and the indefinite postponement of reparations at the Lausanne Conference of 1932. Although it is often referred to as the "Versailles Conference", only the actual signing of the treaty took place at the historic palace. Most of the negotiations were in Paris, with the "Big Four" meetings taking place generally at the Quai d'Orsay.
Views: 26 wikipedia tts
2017-05-29 Période des questions
 
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Période des questions : 29 mai 2017
U.S. Economic Collapse: Henry B. Gonzalez Interview, House Committee on Banking and Currency
 
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Henry Barbosa González (born Enrique Barbosa González; May 3, 1916 -- November 28, 2000) was a Democratic politician from the state of Texas. He represented Texas's 20th congressional district from 1961 to 1999. González was born in San Antonio, Texas, the son of Mexican-born parents Genoveva (née Barbosa) and Leonides Gonzalez (from Mapimi, Durango), who had immigrated during the Mexican Revolution. He attended the University of Texas at Austin and San Antonio College, earning his undergraduate degree. Later, he received a Juris Doctor from St. Mary's University School of Law. Upon graduation, he became a probation officer, and was quickly promoted to the chief office of Bexar County, Texas. In 1950, he was Scoutmaster of Troop 90 of San Antonio, of which his son was a member. González served on the San Antonio City Council from 1953 to 1956, when he was elected to the Texas Senate, having defeated the Republican candidate, Jesse Oppenheimer. He remained in the Senate until 1961 and set the filibuster record in the chamber at the time by speaking for twenty-two straight hours against a set of bills on segregation. Most of the bills were abandoned (eight out of ten). He ran for governor in 1958, finishing second in the Democratic primary (the real contest for governor in a solidly Democratic state) to Price Daniel. In January 1961, González ran in the special election for Lyndon Johnson's Senate seat, finishing sixth. However, in September, 20th District Rep. Paul J. Kilday was appointed to the Court of Military Appeals. González ran in the special election for the San Antonio-based district in November and defeated a strong Republican candidate, John Goode. He was unopposed for a full term in 1962 and was reelected seventeen times. He never faced truly serious or well-funded opposition, having been unopposed in 1970, 1974, 1976, 1978, 1982, and 1984. In fact, the 20th was (and still is) became so heavily Democratic that González faced GOP opposition only five times and handily won each time. González became known for his liberal views. In 1963, Rep. Ed Foreman (R-Texas) called González a "communist" and a "pinko" and González confronted him. González was referred to as a "communist" in 1986 by a man at Earl Abel's restaurant, a popular San Antonio eatery. The 70 year-old representative responded by punching him in the face. González was acquitted of assault for this incident. González chaired the United States House Select Committee on Assassinations that investigated the deaths of John F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr. He introduced legislation calling for the impeachment of Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush. González also blocked hearings into Whitewater until finally agreeing to hold hearings in 1994. In 1997, González fell ill and was unable to return to the House for over a year. Finally, he decided not to run for a 19th full term in 1998. He had long groomed his son, Charlie, to succeed him. Charlie Gonzalez won easily in 1998 and still holds the seat; between them, father and son have served 50 consecutive years in Congress (as of November 2011). He was an outspoken critic of the Federal Reserve System and in 1993 proposed an audit of the central bank. According to Gretchen Morgenson's book on the 2008 financial meltdown, "Reckless Endangerment," while head of the House Banking Committee, Gonzalez invited the organization ACORN "to help legislators define the goals when they were devising the new legislation covering Fannie and Freddie." On October 24, 2006, it was announced that Rep. González's personal notes, correspondence and mementos would become part of the Congressional History Collection at the University of Texas at Austin's Center for American History. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Gonzalez
Views: 107653 The Film Archives
Suspense: Murder Aboard the Alphabet / Double Ugly / Argyle Album
 
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The program's heyday was in the early 1950s, when radio actor, producer and director Elliott Lewis took over (still during the Wilcox/Autolite run). Here the material reached new levels of sophistication. The writing was taut, and the casting, which had always been a strong point of the series (featuring such film stars as Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Henry Fonda, Humphrey Bogart, Judy Garland, Ronald Colman, Marlene Dietrich, Eve McVeagh, Lena Horne, and Cary Grant), took an unexpected turn when Lewis expanded the repertory to include many of radio's famous drama and comedy stars — often playing against type — such as Jack Benny. Jim and Marian Jordan of Fibber McGee and Molly were heard in the episode, "Backseat Driver," which originally aired February 3, 1949. The highest production values enhanced Suspense, and many of the shows retain their power to grip and entertain. At the time he took over Suspense, Lewis was familiar to radio fans for playing Frankie Remley, the wastrel guitar-playing sidekick to Phil Harris in The Phil Harris-Alice Faye Show. On the May 10, 1951 Suspense, Lewis reversed the roles with "Death on My Hands": A bandleader (Harris) is horrified when an autograph-seeking fan accidentally shoots herself and dies in his hotel room, and a vocalist (Faye) tries to help him as the townfolk call for vigilante justice against him. With the rise of television and the departures of Lewis and Autolite, subsequent producers (Antony Ellis, William N. Robson and others) struggled to maintain the series despite shrinking budgets, the availability of fewer name actors, and listenership decline. To save money, the program frequently used scripts first broadcast by another noteworthy CBS anthology, Escape. In addition to these tales of exotic adventure, Suspense expanded its repertoire to include more science fiction and supernatural content. By the end of its run, the series was remaking scripts from the long-canceled program The Mysterious Traveler. A time travel tale like Robert Arthur's "The Man Who Went Back to Save Lincoln" or a thriller about a death ray-wielding mad scientist would alternate with more run-of-the-mill crime dramas. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_%28radio_drama%29
Views: 178135 Remember This
Savings and Loan Scandal: Taxpayer Bailout
 
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The thrift industry has its origins in the British building society movement that emerged in the late 18th century. American thrifts (known then as "building and loans" or "B&Ls") shared many of the same basic goals: to help working-class men and women save for the future and purchase homes. Thrifts were not-for-profit cooperative organizations that were typically managed by the membership and local institutions that served well-defined groups of aspiring homeowners. While banks offered a wide array of products to individuals and businesses, thrifts often made only home mortgages primarily to working-class men and women. Thrift leaders believed they were part of a broader social reform effort and not a financial industry. According to thrift leaders, B&Ls not only helped people become better citizens by making it easier to buy a home, they also taught the habits of systematic savings and mutual cooperation which strengthened personal morals. The first thrift was formed in 1831, and for 40 years there were few B&Ls, found in only a handful of Midwestern and Eastern states. This situation changed in the late 19th century as urban growth and the demand for housing related to the Second Industrial Revolution caused the number of thrifts to explode. The popularity of B&Ls led to the creation of a new type of thrift in the 1880s called the "national" B&L. The "nationals" were often for-profit businesses formed by bankers or industrialists that employed promoters to form local branches to sell shares to prospective members. The "nationals" promised to pay savings rates up to four times greater than any other financial institution. The Depression of 1893 (the Panic of 1893) caused a decline in members, and so "nationals" experienced a sudden reversal of fortunes. Because a steady stream of new members was critical for a "national" to pay both the interest on savings and the hefty salaries for the organizers, the falloff in payments caused dozens of "nationals" to fail. By the end of the 19th century, nearly all the "nationals" were out of business (National Building and Loans Crisis). This led to the creation of the first state regulations governing B&Ls, to make thrift operations more uniform, and the formation of a national trade association to not only protect B&L interests, but also promote business growth. The trade association led efforts to create more uniform accounting, appraisal, and lending procedures. It also spearheaded the drive to have all thrifts refer to themselves as "savings and loans" not B&Ls, and to convince managers of the need to assume more professional roles as financiers. In the 20th century, the two decades that followed the end of World War II were the most successful period in the history of the thrift industry. The return of millions of servicemen eager to take up their prewar lives led to a dramatic increase in new families, and this "baby boom" caused a surge in new mostly suburban home construction. By the 1940s S&Ls (the name change occurred in the late 1930s) provided most of the financing for this expansion. The result was strong industry expansion that lasted through the early 1960s. An important trend involved raising rates paid on savings to lure deposits, a practice that resulted in periodic rate wars between thrifts and even commercial banks. These wars became so severe that in 1966 the United States Congress took the highly unusual move of setting limits on savings rates for both commercial banks and S&Ls. From 1966 to 1979, the enactment of rate controls presented thrifts with a number of unprecedented challenges, chief of which was finding ways to continue to expand in an economy characterized by slow growth, high interest rates and inflation. These conditions, which came to be known as stagflation, wreaked havoc with thrift finances for a variety of reasons. Because regulators controlled the rates thrifts could pay on savings, when interest rates rose depositors often withdrew their funds and placed them in accounts that earned market rates, a process known as disintermediation. At the same time, rising rates and a slow growth economy made it harder for people to qualify for mortgages that in turn limited the ability to generate income. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_scandal
Views: 37498 The Film Archives
The Great Gildersleeve: The Matchmaker / Leroy Runs Away / Auto Mechanics
 
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The Great Gildersleeve (1941--1957), initially written by Leonard Lewis Levinson, was one of broadcast history's earliest spin-off programs. Built around Throckmorton Philharmonic Gildersleeve, a character who had been a staple on the classic radio situation comedy Fibber McGee and Molly, first introduced on Oct. 3, 1939, ep. #216. The Great Gildersleeve enjoyed its greatest success in the 1940s. Actor Harold Peary played the character during its transition from the parent show into the spin-off and later in a quartet of feature films released at the height of the show's popularity. On Fibber McGee and Molly, Peary's Gildersleeve was a pompous windbag who became a consistent McGee nemesis. "You're a haa-aa-aa-aard man, McGee!" became a Gildersleeve catchphrase. The character was given several conflicting first names on Fibber McGee and Molly, and on one episode his middle name was revealed as Philharmonic. Gildy admits as much at the end of "Gildersleeve's Diary" on the Fibber McGee and Molly series (Oct. 22, 1940). Premiering on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGees' Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where Gildersleeve now oversaw his late brother-in-law's estate and took on the rearing of his orphaned niece and nephew, Marjorie (originally played by Lurene Tuttle and followed by Louise Erickson and Mary Lee Robb) and Leroy Forester (Walter Tetley). The household also included a cook named Birdie. Curiously, while Gildersleeve had occasionally spoken of his (never-present) wife in some Fibber episodes, in his own series the character was a confirmed bachelor. In a striking forerunner to such later television hits as Bachelor Father and Family Affair, both of which are centered on well-to-do uncles taking in their deceased siblings' children, Gildersleeve was a bachelor raising two children while, at first, administering a girdle manufacturing company ("If you want a better corset, of course, it's a Gildersleeve") and then for the bulk of the show's run, serving as Summerfield's water commissioner, between time with the ladies and nights with the boys. The Great Gildersleeve may have been the first broadcast show to be centered on a single parent balancing child-rearing, work, and a social life, done with taste and genuine wit, often at the expense of Gildersleeve's now slightly understated pomposity. Many of the original episodes were co-written by John Whedon, father of Tom Whedon (who wrote The Golden Girls), and grandfather of Deadwood scripter Zack Whedon and Joss Whedon (creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly and Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog). The key to the show was Peary, whose booming voice and facility with moans, groans, laughs, shudders and inflection was as close to body language and facial suggestion as a voice could get. Peary was so effective, and Gildersleeve became so familiar a character, that he was referenced and satirized periodically in other comedies and in a few cartoons. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Gildersleeve
Views: 58862 Remember This
Dysentery | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Dysentery 00:00:21 1 Signs and symptoms 00:01:43 2 Mechanism 00:04:28 2.1 Amoebic dysentery 00:06:06 2.2 Bacillary dysentery 00:06:36 2.3 Other bacterial diarrhea 00:06:57 3 Diagnosis 00:07:18 3.1 Physical exam 00:07:35 3.2 Stool and blood tests 00:08:02 4 Treatment 00:09:57 5 Prognosis 00:10:32 6 Epidemiology 00:11:00 7 Society and culture 00:11:21 7.1 Notable cases 00:14:42 8 Research 00:15:45 9 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Dysentery is an inflammatory disease of the intestine, especially of the colon, which always results in severe diarrhea and abdominal pains. Other symptoms may include fever and a feeling of incomplete defecation. The disease is caused by several types of infectious pathogens such as bacteria, viruses and parasites.
Views: 11 wikipedia tts
History of Germany | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Germany 00:06:46 1 Prehistory 00:08:00 2 Germanic tribes, 750 BC – 768 AD 00:08:13 2.1 Migration and conquest 00:11:16 2.2 Stem Duchies and Marches 00:12:56 2.3 Frankish Empire 00:16:44 3 Middle Ages 00:16:52 3.1 Foundation of the Holy Roman Empire 00:18:17 3.2 Otto the Great 00:20:54 3.3 Hanseatic League 00:21:36 3.4 Eastward expansion 00:22:10 3.5 Church and state 00:26:25 3.6 Change and reform 00:28:11 3.7 Towns and cities 00:30:00 3.8 Women 00:31:15 3.9 Science and culture 00:32:56 4 Early modern Germany 00:33:11 4.1 Reformation 00:35:56 4.2 Thirty Years War, 1618–1648 00:37:55 4.3 Culture and literacy 00:39:54 4.4 Science 00:40:53 5 1648–1815 00:41:58 5.1 Wars 00:44:14 5.2 Smaller states 00:46:45 5.3 Nobility 00:47:38 5.4 Peasants and rural life 00:50:59 5.5 Bourgeois values spread to rural Germany 00:52:39 5.6 Enlightenment 00:55:39 5.6.1 Women 00:56:50 5.7 French Revolution, 1789–1815 01:00:44 6 1815–1867 01:00:55 6.1 Overview 01:01:53 6.2 German Confederation 01:02:50 6.3 Society and economy 01:02:59 6.3.1 Population 01:04:19 6.3.2 Industrialization 01:05:54 6.3.3 Urbanization 01:07:00 6.3.4 Railways 01:08:46 6.3.5 Newspapers and magazines 01:09:51 6.3.6 Science and culture 01:12:27 6.3.7 Religion 01:15:35 6.4 Politics of restoration and revolution 01:15:45 6.4.1 After Napoleon 01:17:43 6.4.2 1848 01:18:32 6.4.3 1850s 01:19:12 6.4.4 Bismarck takes charge, 1862–1866 01:21:13 6.4.5 North German Federation, 1866–1871 01:21:54 7 German Empire, 1871–1918 01:22:06 7.1 Overview 01:23:53 7.2 Age of Bismarck 01:24:01 7.2.1 The new empire 01:27:33 7.2.2 Classes 01:27:41 7.2.2.1 Aristocracy 01:29:50 7.2.2.2 Middle class 01:30:35 7.2.2.3 Working class 01:31:52 7.2.3 Kulturkampf 01:34:14 7.2.4 Foreign policy 01:37:06 7.3 Wilhelminian Era 01:37:14 7.3.1 Wilhelm II. 01:38:08 7.3.2 Alliances and diplomacy 01:41:05 7.3.3 Economy 01:43:20 7.3.4 Women 01:44:33 7.3.5 Colonies 01:45:24 7.4 World War I 01:45:33 7.4.1 Causes 01:47:13 7.4.2 Western Front 01:48:17 7.4.3 Eastern Front 01:49:13 7.4.4 1918 01:50:01 7.5 Homefront 01:51:17 7.6 Revolution 1918 01:54:40 8 Weimar Republic, 1919–1933 01:54:52 8.1 Overview 01:56:08 8.2 The early years 01:59:27 8.3 Reparations 02:00:47 8.4 Economic collapse and political problems, 1929–1933 02:02:58 8.5 Science and culture 02:04:48 9 Nazi Germany, 1933–1945 02:06:25 9.1 Establishment of the Nazi regime 02:10:20 9.2 Antisemitism and the Holocaust 02:12:30 9.3 Military 02:13:23 9.4 Women 02:15:27 9.5 Foreign policy 02:18:01 9.6 World War II 02:20:34 10 Germany during the Cold War, 1945–1990 02:21:45 10.1 Post-war chaos 02:26:02 10.2 East Germany 02:30:08 10.3 West Germany (Bonn Republic) 02:31:10 10.3.1 Economic miracle 02:32:28 10.3.2 1948 currency reform 02:34:38 10.3.3 Adenauer 02:35:34 10.3.4 Erhard 02:37:26 10.3.5 Grand coalition 02:38:06 10.3.6 Guest workers 02:39:09 10.3.7 Brandt and Ostpolitik 02:40:33 10.3.8 Economic crisis of 1970s 02:43:13 10.4 Kohl 02:43:59 10.5 Reunification 02:45:13 11 Federal Republic of Germany, 1990–present 02:45:24 11.1 Schröder 02:46:21 11.2 Merkel 02:49:01 12 Historiography 02:49:10 12.1 Sonderweg debate 02:50:38 13 See also 02:50:47 14 Notes 02:50:55 14.1 Footnotes Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9630936642269607 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The concept of Germany as a distinct region in central Europe can be traced to Roman commander Julius Caesar, who referred to the unconquered area east of the Rhine as Germania, thus distinguishing it from Gaul (France), which he had conquered. The victory of the Germanic tribes in the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest (AD 9) prevented annexation by the Roman Empire, although the Roman provinces of Germania Superior and Germania Inferior were established along the Rhine. Following the Fall of the Western Roman Empire, the Franks conqu ...
Views: 109 wikipedia tts
Calling All Cars: True Confessions / The Criminal Returns / One Pound Note
 
01:27:24
The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
Views: 97176 Remember This
My Friend Irma: Aunt Harriet to Visit / Did Irma Buy Her Own Wedding Ring / Planning a Vacation
 
01:13:00
My Friend Irma, created by writer-director-producer Cy Howard, is a top-rated, long-run radio situation comedy, so popular in the late 1940s that its success escalated to films, television, a comic strip and a comic book, while Howard scored with another radio comedy hit, Life with Luigi. Marie Wilson portrayed the title character, Irma Peterson, on radio, in two films and a television series. The radio series was broadcast from April 11, 1947 to August 23, 1954. Dependable, level-headed Jane Stacy (Cathy Lewis, Diana Lynn) began each weekly radio program by narrating a misadventure of her innocent, bewildered roommate, Irma, a dim-bulb stenographer from Minnesota. The two central characters were in their mid-twenties. Irma had her 25th birthday in one episode; she was born on May 5. After the two met in the first episode, they lived together in an apartment rented from their Irish landlady, Mrs. O'Reilly (Jane Morgan, Gloria Gordon). Irma's boyfriend Al (John Brown) was a deadbeat, barely on the right side of the law, who had not held a job in years. Only someone like Irma could love Al, whose nickname for Irma was "Chicken". Al had many crazy get-rich-quick schemes, which never worked. Al planned to marry Irma at some future date so she could support him. Professor Kropotkin (Hans Conried), the Russian violinist at the Princess Burlesque theater, lived upstairs. He greeted Jane and Irma with remarks like, "My two little bunnies with one being an Easter bunny and the other being Bugs Bunny." The Professor insulted Mrs. O'Reilly, complained about his room and reluctantly became O'Reilly's love interest in an effort to make her forget his back rent. Irma worked for the lawyer, Mr. Clyde (Alan Reed). She had such an odd filing system that once when Clyde fired her, he had to hire her back again because he couldn't find anything. Useless at dictation, Irma mangled whatever Clyde dictated. Asked how long she had been with Clyde, Irma said, "When I first went to work with him he had curly black hair, then it got grey, and now it's snow white. I guess I've been with him about six months." Irma became less bright as the program evolved. She also developed a tendency to whine or cry whenever something went wrong, which was at least once every show. Jane had a romantic inclination for her boss, millionaire Richard Rhinelander (Leif Erickson), but he had no real interest in her. Another actor in the show was Bea Benaderet. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/My_Friend_Irma_%28radio-TV%29 Katherine Elisabeth Wilson (August 19, 1916 -- November 23, 1972), better known by her stage name, Marie Wilson, was an American radio, film, and television actress. She may be best remembered as the title character in My Friend Irma. Born in Anaheim, California, Wilson began her career in New York City as a dancer on the Broadway stage. She gained national prominence with My Friend Irma on radio, television and film. The show made her a star but typecast her almost interminably as the quintessential dumb blonde, which she played in numerous comedies and in Ken Murray's famous Hollywood "Blackouts". During World War II, she was a volunteer performer at the Hollywood Canteen. She was also a popular wartime pin-up. Wilson's performance in Satan Met a Lady, the second film adaptation of Dashiell Hammett's detective novel The Maltese Falcon, is a virtual template for Marilyn Monroe's later onscreen persona. Wilson appeared in more than 40 films and was a guest on The Ed Sullivan Show on four occasions. She was a television performer during the 1960s, working until her untimely death. Wilson's talents have been recognized with three stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame: for radio at 6301 Hollywood Boulevard, for television at 6765 Hollywood Boulevard and for movies at 6601 Hollywood Boulevard. Wilson married four times: Nick Grinde (early 1930s), LA golf pro Bob Stevens (1938--39), Allan Nixon (1942--50) and Robert Fallon (1951--72). She died of cancer in 1972 at age 56 and was interred in the Columbarium of Remembrance at Forest Lawn Cemetery in Hollywood Hills. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie_Wilson_%28American_actress%29
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Suspense: Heart's Desire / A Guy Gets Lonely / Pearls Are a Nuisance
 
01:30:01
One of the series' earliest successes and its single most popular episode is Lucille Fletcher's "Sorry, Wrong Number," about a bedridden woman (Agnes Moorehead) who panics after overhearing a murder plot on a crossed telephone connection but is unable to persuade anyone to investigate. First broadcast on May 25, 1943, it was restaged seven times (last on February 14, 1960) — each time with Moorehead. The popularity of the episode led to a film adaptation, Sorry, Wrong Number (1948), starring Barbara Stanwyck. Nominated for an Academy Award for her performance, Stanwyck recreated the role on Lux Radio Theater. Loni Anderson had the lead in the TV movie Sorry, Wrong Number (1989). Another notable early episode was Fletcher's "The Hitch Hiker," in which a motorist (Orson Welles) is stalked on a cross-country trip by a nondescript man who keeps appearing on the side of the road. This episode originally aired on September 2, 1942, and was later adapted for television by Rod Serling as a 1960 episode of The Twilight Zone. After the network sustained the program during its first two years, the sponsor became Roma Wines (1944--1947), and then (after another brief period of sustained hour-long episodes, initially featuring Robert Montgomery as host and "producer" in early 1948), Autolite Spark Plugs (1948--1954); eventually Harlow Wilcox (of Fibber McGee and Molly) became the pitchman. William Spier, Norman MacDonnell and Anton M. Leader were among the producers and directors. The program's heyday was in the early 1950s, when radio actor, producer and director Elliott Lewis took over (still during the Wilcox/Autolite run). Here the material reached new levels of sophistication. The writing was taut, and the casting, which had always been a strong point of the series (featuring such film stars as Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Henry Fonda, Humphrey Bogart, Judy Garland, Ronald Colman, Marlene Dietrich, Eve McVeagh, Lena Horne, and Cary Grant), took an unexpected turn when Lewis expanded the repertory to include many of radio's famous drama and comedy stars — often playing against type — such as Jack Benny. Jim and Marian Jordan of Fibber McGee and Molly were heard in the episode, "Backseat Driver," which originally aired February 3, 1949. The highest production values enhanced Suspense, and many of the shows retain their power to grip and entertain. At the time he took over Suspense, Lewis was familiar to radio fans for playing Frankie Remley, the wastrel guitar-playing sidekick to Phil Harris in The Phil Harris-Alice Faye Show. On the May 10, 1951 Suspense, Lewis reversed the roles with "Death on My Hands": A bandleader (Harris) is horrified when an autograph-seeking fan accidentally shoots herself and dies in his hotel room, and a vocalist (Faye) tries to help him as the townfolk call for vigilante justice against him. With the rise of television and the departures of Lewis and Autolite, subsequent producers (Antony Ellis, William N. Robson and others) struggled to maintain the series despite shrinking budgets, the availability of fewer name actors, and listenership decline. To save money, the program frequently used scripts first broadcast by another noteworthy CBS anthology, Escape. In addition to these tales of exotic adventure, Suspense expanded its repertoire to include more science fiction and supernatural content. By the end of its run, the series was remaking scripts from the long-canceled program The Mysterious Traveler. A time travel tale like Robert Arthur's "The Man Who Went Back to Save Lincoln" or a thriller about a death ray-wielding mad scientist would alternate with more run-of-the-mill crime dramas. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_%28radio_drama%29
Views: 91249 Remember This
Calling All Cars: The 25th Stamp / The Incorrigible Youth / The Big Shot
 
01:28:24
The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
Views: 407742 Remember This
My Friend Irma: The Red Hand / Billy Boy, the Boxer / The Professor's Concerto
 
01:28:31
My Friend Irma, created by writer-director-producer Cy Howard, is a top-rated, long-run radio situation comedy, so popular in the late 1940s that its success escalated to films, television, a comic strip and a comic book, while Howard scored with another radio comedy hit, Life with Luigi. Marie Wilson portrayed the title character, Irma Peterson, on radio, in two films and a television series. The radio series was broadcast from April 11, 1947 to August 23, 1954. Dependable, level-headed Jane Stacy (Cathy Lewis, Diana Lynn) began each weekly radio program by narrating a misadventure of her innocent, bewildered roommate, Irma, a dim-bulb stenographer from Minnesota. The two central characters were in their mid-twenties. Irma had her 25th birthday in one episode; she was born on May 5. After the two met in the first episode, they lived together in an apartment rented from their Irish landlady, Mrs. O'Reilly (Jane Morgan, Gloria Gordon). Irma's boyfriend Al (John Brown) was a deadbeat, barely on the right side of the law, who had not held a job in years. Only someone like Irma could love Al, whose nickname for Irma was "Chicken". Al had many crazy get-rich-quick schemes, which never worked. Al planned to marry Irma at some future date so she could support him. Professor Kropotkin (Hans Conried), the Russian violinist at the Princess Burlesque theater, lived upstairs. He greeted Jane and Irma with remarks like, "My two little bunnies with one being an Easter bunny and the other being Bugs Bunny." The Professor insulted Mrs. O'Reilly, complained about his room and reluctantly became O'Reilly's love interest in an effort to make her forget his back rent. Irma worked for the lawyer, Mr. Clyde (Alan Reed). She had such an odd filing system that once when Clyde fired her, he had to hire her back again because he couldn't find anything. Useless at dictation, Irma mangled whatever Clyde dictated. Asked how long she had been with Clyde, Irma said, "When I first went to work with him he had curly black hair, then it got grey, and now it's snow white. I guess I've been with him about six months." Irma became less bright as the program evolved. She also developed a tendency to whine or cry whenever something went wrong, which was at least once every show. Jane had a romantic inclination for her boss, millionaire Richard Rhinelander (Leif Erickson), but he had no real interest in her. Another actor in the show was Bea Benaderet. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/My_Friend_Irma_%28radio-TV%29 Katherine Elisabeth Wilson (August 19, 1916 -- November 23, 1972), better known by her stage name, Marie Wilson, was an American radio, film, and television actress. She may be best remembered as the title character in My Friend Irma. Born in Anaheim, California, Wilson began her career in New York City as a dancer on the Broadway stage. She gained national prominence with My Friend Irma on radio, television and film. The show made her a star but typecast her almost interminably as the quintessential dumb blonde, which she played in numerous comedies and in Ken Murray's famous Hollywood "Blackouts". During World War II, she was a volunteer performer at the Hollywood Canteen. She was also a popular wartime pin-up. Wilson's performance in Satan Met a Lady, the second film adaptation of Dashiell Hammett's detective novel The Maltese Falcon, is a virtual template for Marilyn Monroe's later onscreen persona. Wilson appeared in more than 40 films and was a guest on The Ed Sullivan Show on four occasions. She was a television performer during the 1960s, working until her untimely death. Wilson's talents have been recognized with three stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame: for radio at 6301 Hollywood Boulevard, for television at 6765 Hollywood Boulevard and for movies at 6601 Hollywood Boulevard. Wilson married four times: Nick Grinde (early 1930s), LA golf pro Bob Stevens (1938--39), Allan Nixon (1942--50) and Robert Fallon (1951--72). She died of cancer in 1972 at age 56 and was interred in the Columbarium of Remembrance at Forest Lawn Cemetery in Hollywood Hills. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie_Wilson_%28American_actress%29
Views: 311246 Remember This
WINI Büromöbel: Referenzobjekt STUDITEMPS Köln
 
03:02
Im Kölner Medienpark entstanden die neuen Büroräume des Startup-Unternehmens STUDITEMPS. Objektanspruch: Realisierung einer Einrichtungslösung mit modernen Open-Space-Strukturen, durchdachter Technikintegration und akustischer Raumkonditionierung für konzentriertes Arbeiten. Möbelsysteme: WINEA PRO Tischsystem als 4-Fuß-Ausführung und Workbench, WINEA ECO Tischsystem, CONTAINER, TWISTER Klapptischsystem als Besprechungstische, WINEA MAXX Stauraumsystem, WINEA SINUS Akustiksystem Objektgröße: ca. 250 Arbeitsplätze Architekten: arctum Architekten GmbH, Köln WINI Fachhandelspartner: Sharp Business Systems Deutschland GmbH, Köln Objektgröße: ca. 250 Arbeitsplätze
The Great Gildersleeve: Leroy Suspended from School / Leila Returns Home / Marjorie the Ballerina
 
01:29:27
The Great Gildersleeve (1941--1957), initially written by Leonard Lewis Levinson, was one of broadcast history's earliest spin-off programs. Built around Throckmorton Philharmonic Gildersleeve, a character who had been a staple on the classic radio situation comedy Fibber McGee and Molly, first introduced on Oct. 3, 1939, ep. #216. The Great Gildersleeve enjoyed its greatest success in the 1940s. Actor Harold Peary played the character during its transition from the parent show into the spin-off and later in a quartet of feature films released at the height of the show's popularity. On Fibber McGee and Molly, Peary's Gildersleeve was a pompous windbag who became a consistent McGee nemesis. "You're a haa-aa-aa-aard man, McGee!" became a Gildersleeve catchphrase. The character was given several conflicting first names on Fibber McGee and Molly, and on one episode his middle name was revealed as Philharmonic. Gildy admits as much at the end of "Gildersleeve's Diary" on the Fibber McGee and Molly series (Oct. 22, 1940). He soon became so popular that Kraft Foods—looking primarily to promote its Parkay margarine spread — sponsored a new series with Peary's Gildersleeve as the central, slightly softened and slightly befuddled focus of a lively new family. Premiering on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGees' Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where Gildersleeve now oversaw his late brother-in-law's estate and took on the rearing of his orphaned niece and nephew, Marjorie (originally played by Lurene Tuttle and followed by Louise Erickson and Mary Lee Robb) and Leroy Forester (Walter Tetley). The household also included a cook named Birdie. Curiously, while Gildersleeve had occasionally spoken of his (never-present) wife in some Fibber episodes, in his own series the character was a confirmed bachelor. In a striking forerunner to such later television hits as Bachelor Father and Family Affair, both of which are centered on well-to-do uncles taking in their deceased siblings' children, Gildersleeve was a bachelor raising two children while, at first, administering a girdle manufacturing company ("If you want a better corset, of course, it's a Gildersleeve") and then for the bulk of the show's run, serving as Summerfield's water commissioner, between time with the ladies and nights with the boys. The Great Gildersleeve may have been the first broadcast show to be centered on a single parent balancing child-rearing, work, and a social life, done with taste and genuine wit, often at the expense of Gildersleeve's now slightly understated pomposity. Many of the original episodes were co-written by John Whedon, father of Tom Whedon (who wrote The Golden Girls), and grandfather of Deadwood scripter Zack Whedon and Joss Whedon (creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly and Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog). The key to the show was Peary, whose booming voice and facility with moans, groans, laughs, shudders and inflection was as close to body language and facial suggestion as a voice could get. Peary was so effective, and Gildersleeve became so familiar a character, that he was referenced and satirized periodically in other comedies and in a few cartoons. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Gildersleeve
Views: 63014 Remember This
The Great Gildersleeve: Gildy the Executive / Substitute Secretary / Gildy Tries to Fire Bessie
 
01:29:30
Aiding and abetting the periodically frantic life in the Gildersleeve home was family cook and housekeeper Birdie Lee Coggins (Lillian Randolph). Although in the first season, under writer Levinson, Birdie was often portrayed as saliently less than bright, she slowly developed as the real brains and caretaker of the household under writers John Whedon, Sam Moore and Andy White. In many of the later episodes Gildersleeve has to acknowledge Birdie's commonsense approach to some of his predicaments. By the early 1950s, Birdie was heavily depended on by the rest of the family in fulfilling many of the functions of the household matriarch, whether it be giving sound advice to an adolescent Leroy or tending Marjorie's children. By the late 1940s, Marjorie slowly matures to a young woman of marrying age. During the 9th season (September 1949-June 1950) Marjorie meets and marries (May 10) Walter "Bronco" Thompson (Richard Crenna), star football player at the local college. The event was popular enough that Look devoted five pages in its May 23, 1950 issue to the wedding. After living in the same household for a few years with their twin babies Ronnie and Linda, the newlyweds move next door to keep the expanding Gildersleeve clan close together. Leroy, aged 10--11 during most of the 1940s, is the all-American boy who grudgingly practices his piano lessons, gets bad report cards, fights with his friends and cannot remember to not slam the door. Although he is loyal to his Uncle Mort, he is always the first to deflate his ego with a well-placed "Ha!!!" or "What a character!" Beginning in the Spring of 1949, he finds himself in junior high and is at last allowed to grow up, establishing relationships with the girls in the Bullard home across the street. From an awkward adolescent who hangs his head, kicks the ground and giggles whenever Brenda Knickerbocker comes near, he transforms himself overnight (November 28, 1951) into a more mature young man when Babs Winthrop (both girls played by Barbara Whiting) approaches him about studying together. From then on, he branches out with interests in driving, playing the drums and dreaming of a musical career. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Gildersleeve
Views: 51292 Remember This