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'Buffoons mining & buffoons regulating': Radioactive spill at Ranger uranium mine, Kakadu
 
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'Buffoons mining & buffoons regulating' 8/12/13 The operator of the Ranger mine in the Northern Territory says a spill of uranium and acid has been contained on the site and there will be no impact to the environment.
Views: 1819 Greenshack Dotinfo
A win for Kakadu
 
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Send a message of thanks and congratulations to Jeffrey Lee at: ecnt.org/awinforkakadu In 2013 -- after decades of fighting -- Djok Elder Jeffrey Lee successfully ended the threat of uranium mining on his country. His land at Koongarra has been included in the World Heritage listed Kakadu National Park in Australia's Northern Territory - and permanently protected from mining. The protection of Koongarra is a powerful recognition of Jeffrey's vision and a lasting victory for both Aboriginal and environmental rights. Jeffrey's country is now safe but Kakadu is not. Mirarr country to the north of Koongarra is still threatened by uranium mining. The victory at Koongarra is extraordinary but as Jeffrey has made clear, more needs to be done: "I hope that one day Kakadu will be truly complete with the Mirarr lands at Ranger and Jabiluka included in the National Park." Send a message of thanks and congratulations to Jeffrey Lee at: www.ecnt.org/awinforkakadu
Views: 4260 Anfa Alliance
KOONGARRA NOW PROTECTED FOREVER FROM URANIUM MINING!
 
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CANBERRA, Australia, February 7, 2013 (ENS) -- After 34 years of campaigning to keep uranium mining out of his ancestral land of Koongarra, Djok Senior Traditional Owner Jeffrey Lee sat in the House of Representatives Wednesday to watch this land be protected forever. Environment Minister Tony Burke introduced a bill to repeal the Koongarra Project Area Act -- a 1979 law excluding Koongarra from the original boundaries of Kakadu National Park because of its potential to be the site for a uranium mine. Koongarra in Australia's Northern Territory "In 2010, the Government promised Mr. Lee that we would incorporate Koongarra into Kakadu National Park, to ensure that the threat of mining was banished forever," Burke said. Koongarra is an area of native woodland of great environmental and cultural significance, now incorporated within the boundaries of Kakadu National Park. Kakadu is located within the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory of Australia, 171 kilometers southeast of the territorial capital, Darwin. The Koongarra uranium deposit is estimated at about 14,000 tonnes. Mining companies, most recently the French company AREVA, have been trying to mine the deposit for decades despite the opposition of traditional owners. Lee said, "This is a great day for me, my country and my culture. My mind is at peace now that I know that there will be no mining at Koongarra and that Djok lands will be protected forever in Kakadu National Park." "My mothers and grandmothers who taught me about the plants and animals, my uncles and aunties who shared their knowledge, to all the elders and my creation ancestors -- I give my humble respect for standing here today," he said. "I have said no to uranium mining at Koongarra because I believe that the land and my cultural beliefs are more important than mining and money. Money comes and goes, but the land is always here, it always stays if we look after it and it will look after us," he said. Environment News Service: http://ens-newswire.com/2013/02/07/australia-places-aboriginal-land-in-park-to-bar-uranium-mining/
Views: 225 jrae50021
Uranium mining ban could be overturned
 
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NSW Premier Barry O'Farrell has led a State Cabinet decision to approve a proposal to end a 25-year ban on uranium exploration throughout the state.
Uranium-rich land offered to Kakadu
 
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Northern Territory traditional owner Jeffrey Lee has offered to donate land worth billions to Kakadu National Park.
Uranium miner digs in
 
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Mining company Energy Resources of Australia has begun digging an exploration tunnel at its Ranger uranium mine.
ERA digs in for future of Ranger uranium mine
 
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Energy Resources of Australia is confident about the future of the Ranger uranium mine, despite reporting a big loss.
Kakadu owners call for end to uranium mining
 
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A meeting in Darwin has heard from a group of Aboriginal traditional owners who say uranium mining is polluting their land in the Territory's north.
Views: 1637 ABC News (Australia)
Radioactive Uranium ore, Rum jungle Northern Territory, Australia
 
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Uranium ore specimen from Rum jungle country, Northern Territory. Tested with a 3007a Dosimeter and Labgear fast Dekatron counter.
Views: 1696 rustymotor
JABIRU KAKADU NATIONAL PARK NT AUSTRALIA
 
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CARAVAN TRIP 2007 WIKIPEDIA Jabiru is a town in the Northern Territory of Australia. It was originally built in 1982 as a closed town to house the community living at Jabiru East near the Ranger Uranium Mine eight kilometres away. Both the mine and the town are completely surrounded by Kakadu National Park. [edit] Overview Jabiru Township is thirteen square kilometres in size. The town is Owned by the Director of National Parks and Wildlife as freehold. From which a headlease is held by the Jabiru Town Development Authority. The J.T.D.A. subleases to the mining company, government agencies and private business. The head lease expires in 2021. The J.T.D.A delegated local government responsibility to the Jabiru Town Council. The Northern Territory Government is in the process of amalgamating Jabiru Town Council into the West Arnhem Shire in 2008. Jabiru At the 2001 census, Jabiru had a population of 1,521.[1] Apart from the Ranger Mine, Jabiru's most notable industries are tourism (it is the commercial and accommodation hub of Kakadu National Park), and Aboriginal arts and culture. Jabiru features a small town plaza that includes a video souvenir shop, a supermarket, bank, tackle shop, cafe, hairdresser, post office, news agency, bank and bakery (behind the fire station) as well as government, Northern Land Council offices, Magistrates Courts and emergency services (Police, Fire and Ambulance). During the Wet season (October to April), Jabiru experiences heavy rain that often results in wide spread flooding along the Arnhem Highway and Kakadu Highway. During the 2006-2007 Jabiru had its biggest wet season cutting both highways. The Arnhem Highway was cut off for several weeks as the West Aligator bridge was severely damaged. Jabiru town is administered by the Jabiru Town Council, whose council chambers are in the Town Plaza
Views: 4618 Donald Pugh
ABC TV news Naoto Kan meets Mirarr
 
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Former Japanese Prime Minister visits Mirarr country to discuss shared nuclear concerns The Mirarr traditional owners of parts of Kakadu National Park, including the Ranger and Jabiluka uranium deposits, today welcomed former Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan to their traditional lands. As Prime Minister when the Fukushima nuclear reactor crisis began in March 2011, Mr Kan considered the full-scale evacuation of Tokyo in response to the emergency and subsequently made the decision to shut down all of Japan’s nuclear reactors. In October 2011 the Australian Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Office (ASNO) confirmed the Fukushima nuclear crisis was directly fuelled by uranium from Australia. At the time Mirarr senior traditional owner Yvonne Margarula wrote a letter to UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon expressing her concern and sadness at the devastation that uranium from her lands was causing in Japan: “This is an industry we never supported in the past and want no part of in the future. We are all diminished by the events unfolding at Fukushima,” Ms Margarula wrote at the time. The chairwoman of Gundjeihmi Aboriginal Corporation, Annie Ngalmirama, said today: “Our people have lived with the consequences of unwanted uranium mining for over three decades and we are very sad about the ongoing disaster in Japan. I am glad Mr Kan has come to witness the impacts at the start of the nuclear cycle. Mr Kan’s country is hurting because of uranium, here he will see that the nuclear industry is hurting Mirarr people also.” GAC CEO Justin O’Brien said: “There is a long history between Mirarr country and Japan. Mining began at Ranger - against the wishes of the Mirarr – because of agreements between the Australian and Japan governments. “Mr Kan’s visit marks a new chapter in the longstanding partnership between our two countries. We will discuss the ways in which uranium has damaged both Mirarr country and Japan. We will look at ways we can highlight the human rights and environmental problems at the front end of the nuclear cycle and working together towards peaceful energy sources and better outcomes for all people.” From Kakadu Mr Kan will travel to Perth to meet with community groups and parliamentarians and to visit a wave power facility.
Views: 564 keb1974
Adds footage of Australian national park to protests in London against mining there
 
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London - 12 April 2001 1. Wide-shot of the Jabiluka/Friends of the Earth protesters 2. Various shots of the Jabiluka/Friends of the Earth protesters 3. Various of shareholders arriving for Rio Tinto AGM (Annual General Meeting) 4. Protester handing out leaflet to shareholder 5. Close-up of protester leaflet 6. Shareholders walking past the protesters 7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Jacqui Katona, Spokesperson for the Mirrar Aboriginal people "Rio Tinto cannot lie about this development, they cannot deny that there has been no benefit to Aboriginal people as a result of Uranium mining in Kakadu and we believe that they should back off and fulfill there so called corporate responsibility that they are so busy promoting around the world" 8. Shareholder accepting leaflet from protester 9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Jacqui Katona, Spokesperson for the Mirrar Aboriginal people "We will be mounting a forceful campaign which will expose not only the Human rights abuses taking place in Kakadu National Park but we join many thousands of people around the world who suffer indignities at the hands of mining companies like Rio who splash money around to cover up there horrible activities." 10. Wide-shot of the conference centre 11. Various of shareholders arriving 12. SOUNDBITE: (English) Matt Phillips, Friends of the Earth spokesperson "This is about people and its about the environment and what it is also about is big corporations putting their interests before ordinary people and the planet" 13. SOUNDBITE: (English) Andrew Vickerman, Rio Tinto "If the traditional owners don't want the project to go ahead, if they don't give there consent then the project won't go ahead" 14. Wide-shot of Andrew Vickerman 15. SOUNDBITE: (English) Andrew Vickerman, Rio Tinto "Well clearly I am not going to comment on whether we are or are not going to sell assets. When we acquired North we did a full revue of all the assets that company held. Some were considered non core but we are constantly reviewing our whole portfolio, but I am not going to comment on whether something is up for sale or not." 16. Jacqui Katona entering the building Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory, Australia - FILE 17. Various shots of the Jabiluka site, with sacred cliffs 18. Various aerial shots the Ranger Uranium mine, 20 km from Jabiluka STORYLINE: Environmental protestors have been demonstrating outside the Annual General Meeting of Rio Tinto, the company which plans to mine uranium from a site inside one of Australia's most prized national parks for power stations across Europe. Friends of the Earth campaigners and aboriginal rights campaigners led the protest outside the meeting in London on Thursday. The campaigners were there to raise concerns about plans for a gigantic uranium mine on Aboriginal land at Jabiluka in the Kakadu National Park, Australia. Jabiluka is in the Alligator rivers region of the Northern Territory, about 30 km east of Darwin. The mine site is surrounded by the Kakadu National Park, which is world heritage listed and is on land has been traditionally owned by the Mirrar Aboriginal people. The Aboriginal Mirrar people regard Jabiluka as their ancestral home and a sacred site. The Mirrar have led opposition to the development of Jabiluka, which has resulted in major protests all over Australia and over 500 arrests They point to the damage done by the Ranger mine, which they say has left 20 million tonnes of tailings (a radioactive mining by product) in spoil heaps around its operations. Rio Tinto inherited the Jabiluka development following their takeover of Australian mining company North Limited last year. Likely buyers would include French nuclear utility Cogema. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/c7afd4546a87258f35d0d8e6405be77b Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 45 AP Archive
Question mark over ERA's ability to rehabilitate Ranger mine for inclusion in Kakadu - Jane Bardon
 
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The operator of the Ranger mine Energy Resources of Australia is trying to persuade traditional owners and government regulators it will be ready to restart operations by the end of the month. It follows a spill of more than a million litres of uranium and acid on the site in December. Warnings that it may not be able to afford to rehabilitate the site, if its not allowed to extend the mine underground, has shaken traditional owners' confidence. ABC 7.30 NT, 11 April 2014
Views: 103 Jane Bardon
Stuart Blanch Comments on Limmen National Partk in Kakadu Sept 2011
 
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The Environment Centre NT is the peak community sector environment organisation in the Northern Territory, Australia. The Environment Centre NT has been working to protect the environment since 1983. We are the only community sector environment organisation based in the Top End that addresses all the major environmental and sustainability issues facing the Territory. We are independent and professional, and work hard to represent the interests of our members and supporters in creating a sustainable future for the Territory. The mission of the Environment Centre NT is to protect and restore biodiversity, ecosystems and ecological processes, foster sustainable living and development, and cut greenhouse gas emissions and build renewable energy capacity. The Environment Centre NT works by advocating for the improvement of environmental policies and performance of governments, landholders, business and industry; partnering on projects and campaigns with conservation and climate organisations, governments, Indigenous organisations, community groups, businesses, and landholders; raising awareness amongst community, government, business and industry about environmental issues and assisting people to reduce their environmental impact; supporting community members to participate in decision making processes and action; recognising the rights, aspirations, responsibilities and knowledge of the Territory's Indigenous peoples; and, acknowledging that environmental issues have a social dimension. Our strategic priorities Our work is guided by our Strategic Plan 2009/10 - 2013/14, which was developed through surveying our members about their views on what we should work on, and talking to key stakeholders in government, business, research and community sectors. The Strategic Plan was refined by staff, Board Directors, long term members and a few invited friends through a series of workshops. Our five Campaigns & Programs are: Nature Territory Safe Climate Green Living Nuclear Free NT Living Harbour Within each of these, we work to achieve various key outcomes. Examples include stopping major land clearing (through Nature Territory), increasing renewable energy generation (Safe Climate), supporting household sustainability through our COOLmob program (Green Living), and ending uranium mining inside Kakadu National Park (Nucear Free NT). These strategic priorities are achieved through implementing annual plans that are developed by staff and approved by the Board.
Australian Uranium Fuelled Fukushima
 
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On March 11th 2011 the world watched in horror as news emerged from Japan of the devastating earthquake, tsunami and subsequent nuclear emergency at Fukushima. Two yaers later over 150,000 people cannot return to their homes and farms because of radiation and the long-term contamination footprint is not yet known. The Mirarr people of Kakadu - from whose land uranium is mined and shipped to many countries including Japan - were especially saddened to learn of the nuclear disaster and the ongoing impact on so many people's lives. The Ranger uranium mine was imposed on the Mirarr thirty years ago and Mirarr Senior Traditional Owner Yvonne Margarula wrote to UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon, stating her people's sadness at the events at Fukushima, reiterating Mirarr opposition to the Jabiluka development and urging the Secretary-General to include the viewpoint of Indigenous people (from whose land the majority of mined uranium is sourced) in his deliberations on the nuclear industry. It has since been confirmed that Australian uranium was present in the stricken reactors. As we reflect on the impact of one of the world's worst ever nuclear disasters let us never forget the ongoing negative consequences of the nuclear industry.
Views: 646 keb1974
Our Kakadu West Arnhem Co-Director Mark Djandjomerr
 
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Children's Ground Co-director Mark Djandjomerr dances at Bininj Gunborrk (singing and dancing) on our Mardugal camp in Kakadu West Arnhem.
Views: 3863 Children's Ground
ERA cancels leaching plans
 
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Energy Resources of Australia has scrapped plans to use a controversial method for leaching out uranium at the Ranger Mine near Jabiru in the NT's north.
Aboriginal Culture Kakadu
 
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youtube travel videos http://www.overlander.tv Between Darwin and Kakadu National Park is the Point Stuart Wilderness Lodge. They put on a great Aboriginal Culture Show of a night, around the camp fire, and of a morning introduce guests to bush tucker and natural medicines on a walking tour of the surrounding bushland. They also do a boat tour of the Mary River where you are almost guaranteed the chance to see crocodiles. To film in Kakadu National Park, one must pay for a permit. The management lob all commercial filming in the same basket. I don't think this is terribly fair, or supportive of independent Aussie filmmakers. For self funded filmmakers, hoping to make commercially viable projects, surely National Parks could defer payment, or reduce fees, to encourage independent productions that promote Australia! The slick million dollar taxpayer funded tourism ad campaigns are not the only way to promote our wonderful country. With the advent of online video, Australian citizens should be allowed to film in their National Parks and feature their work online, without fear of fines or imprisonment. As long as they are respectful to Aboriginal cultural sites. Business Enquiries Only : biz at overlander dot tv Subscribe to our Travel Vlog http://www.overlander.tv/subscribe-travel-vlog Like Overlander on Facebook: http://fb.com/overlander.tv Follow Overlander on Twitter: http://twitter.com/overlandertv Subscribe to our youtube channel http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=overlander
Views: 218 Overlander.tv
Kakadu
 
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Uranium Mining within the Kakadu National Park region of Australia
Views: 94 Christine Santiago
Message from Yvonne Margarula
 
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Mirarr Senior Traditional Owner Yvonne Margarula leads the fight to protect Mirarr land. www.mirarr.net The traditional estate of the Mirarr people lies within much of the World Heritage listed Kakadu National Park in the Top End of the Northern Territory, Australia. Since the Ranger Uranium Mine on Mirarr country commenced in 1980, the Mirarr have been fighting to protect their homelands from mining.
Views: 4556 keb1974
JABIRU TOWN KAKADU NT AUSTRALIA
 
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CARAVAN TRIP 2007 WIKIPEDIA Jabiru is a town in the Northern Territory of Australia. It was originally built in 1982 as a closed town to house the community living at Jabiru East near the Ranger Uranium Mine eight kilometres away. Both the mine and the town are completely surrounded by Kakadu National Park. [edit] Overview Jabiru Township is thirteen square kilometres in size. The town is Owned by the Director of National Parks and Wildlife as freehold. From which a headlease is held by the Jabiru Town Development Authority. The J.T.D.A. subleases to the mining company, government agencies and private business. The head lease expires in 2021. The J.T.D.A delegated local government responsibility to the Jabiru Town Council. The Northern Territory Government is in the process of amalgamating Jabiru Town Council into the West Arnhem Shire in 2008. Jabiru At the 2001 census, Jabiru had a population of 1,521.[1] Apart from the Ranger Mine, Jabiru's most notable industries are tourism (it is the commercial and accommodation hub of Kakadu National Park), and Aboriginal arts and culture. Jabiru features a small town plaza that includes a video souvenir shop, a supermarket, bank, tackle shop, cafe, hairdresser, post office, news agency, bank and bakery (behind the fire station) as well as government, Northern Land Council offices, Magistrates Courts and emergency services (Police, Fire and Ambulance). During the Wet season (October to April), Jabiru experiences heavy rain that often results in wide spread flooding along the Arnhem Highway and Kakadu Highway. During the 2006-2007 Jabiru had its biggest wet season cutting both highways. The Arnhem Highway was cut off for several weeks as the West Aligator bridge was severely damaged. Jabiru town is administered by the Jabiru Town Council, whose council chambers are in the Town Plaza.
Views: 1923 Donald Pugh
JABIRU TOWN KAKADU NATIONAL PARK NT AUSTRALIA
 
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CARAVAN TRIP 2007 WIKIPEDIA Jabiru is a town in the Northern Territory of Australia. It was originally built in 1982 as a closed town to house the community living at Jabiru East near the Ranger Uranium Mine eight kilometres away. Both the mine and the town are completely surrounded by Kakadu National Park. [edit] Overview Jabiru Township is thirteen square kilometres in size. The town is Owned by the Director of National Parks and Wildlife as freehold. From which a headlease is held by the Jabiru Town Development Authority. The J.T.D.A. subleases to the mining company, government agencies and private business. The head lease expires in 2021. The J.T.D.A delegated local government responsibility to the Jabiru Town Council. The Northern Territory Government is in the process of amalgamating Jabiru Town Council into the West Arnhem Shire in 2008. Jabiru At the 2001 census, Jabiru had a population of 1,521.[1] Apart from the Ranger Mine, Jabiru's most notable industries are tourism (it is the commercial and accommodation hub of Kakadu National Park), and Aboriginal arts and culture. Jabiru features a small town plaza that includes a video souvenir shop, a supermarket, bank, tackle shop, cafe, hairdresser, post office, news agency, bank and bakery (behind the fire station) as well as government, Northern Land Council offices, Magistrates Courts and emergency services (Police, Fire and Ambulance). During the Wet season (October to April), Jabiru experiences heavy rain that often results in wide spread flooding along the Arnhem Highway and Kakadu Highway. During the 2006-2007 Jabiru had its biggest wet season cutting both highways. The Arnhem Highway was cut off for several weeks as the West Aligator bridge was severely damaged. Jabiru town is administered by the Jabiru Town Council, whose council chambers are in the Town Plaza. DON PUGH
Views: 209 Donald Pugh
Ranger Mine Flight over Kakadu
 
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A Top End Teasers tourist video of a flight from Jabiru over the Ranger Uranium Mine and a very small part of north-eastern Kakadu National Park in July, 2011.
Views: 699 sensitiveNAG
JABIRU KAKADU NATIONAL PARK NT AUSTRALIA
 
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CARAVAN TRIP 2007 WIKIPEDIA Jabiru is a town in the Northern Territory of Australia. It was originally built in 1982 as a closed town to house the community living at Jabiru East near the Ranger Uranium Mine eight kilometres away. Both the mine and the town are completely surrounded by Kakadu National Park. [edit] Overview Jabiru Township is thirteen square kilometres in size. The town is Owned by the Director of National Parks and Wildlife as freehold. From which a headlease is held by the Jabiru Town Development Authority. The J.T.D.A. subleases to the mining company, government agencies and private business. The head lease expires in 2021. The J.T.D.A delegated local government responsibility to the Jabiru Town Council. The Northern Territory Government is in the process of amalgamating Jabiru Town Council into the West Arnhem Shire in 2008. Jabiru At the 2001 census, Jabiru had a population of 1,521.[1] Apart from the Ranger Mine, Jabiru's most notable industries are tourism (it is the commercial and accommodation hub of Kakadu National Park), and Aboriginal arts and culture. Jabiru features a small town plaza that includes a video souvenir shop, a supermarket, bank, tackle shop, cafe, hairdresser, post office, news agency, bank and bakery (behind the fire station) as well as government, Northern Land Council offices, Magistrates Courts and emergency services (Police, Fire and Ambulance). During the Wet season (October to April), Jabiru experiences heavy rain that often results in wide spread flooding along the Arnhem Highway and Kakadu Highway. During the 2006-2007 Jabiru had its biggest wet season cutting both highways. The Arnhem Highway was cut off for several weeks as the West Aligator bridge was severely damaged. Jabiru town is administered by the Jabiru Town Council, whose council chambers are in the Town Plaza. DON PUGH
Views: 125 Donald Pugh
New stage of exploration at Ranger uranium mine
 
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Energy Resources Australia says this will be the last year of open-cut mining at its Ranger uranium mine, located in Kakadu National Park, with exploration to begin in an underground mine.
Jabiluka Uranium Mine Project Video
 
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A project for our AP Environmental Science Class, where Clarice the Bearded Dragon tells everyone about the controversy of the Jabiluka Uranium Mine. By Laurel B-C. and Evelyn P. (Yes, this is ridiculous, but we had fun so screw it.)
Concern grows over Kakadu contamination
 
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Traditional owners of the wetlands in Kakadu National Park in the NT's north are concerned a nearby uranium mine may be contaminating the waterways.
April 22, 2009_Dianne Stokes_World Nuclear Fuel Cycle Conference public meeting_sydney.mp4
 
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The World Nuclear Fuel Cycle Conference is meeting in Sydney April 21-23, 2009. This forum will be used to promote and further entrench Australias involvement in the global nuclear industry. As people around the world demand action on climate change, governments continue to use the climate crisis to push forward regressive and corporate driven policies. There is an aggressive global push to rebrand nuclear power as a green, clean solution to climate change, with claims a nuclear renaissance is ahead. Nuclear Power is No Solution to Climate Change: too dirty, too dangerous. Carbon emissions calculation must take into account the entire life cycle of uranium; mining, processing, transportation, construction and de-commissioning of reactors and radioactive waste disposal and management. Electricity production accounts for only about 25% of carbon emissions globally; doubling nuclear power would reduce greenhouse emissions by less than 5%. In Australia, building a nuclear reactor to supply the capital cities in all six states would reduce national emissions by just 4%. Further, there is still no method for storage or disposal of high level radioactive waste that can guarantee to isolate it from the environment, workers and communities for the hundreds of thousand of years it remains dangerous. And despite safeguards on uranium exports, as Minister Anthony Albanese has said, you can guarantee that uranium mining will lead to nuclear waste, but you can't guarantee it won't lead to nuclear weapons. Australias Role: Beginning and Ending the Global Nuclear Fuel Chain Since the ALP dropped its no new uranium mines policy in April 2007, there has been a plethora of uranium exploration applications across the NT, SA and WA. Olympic Dam Uranium Mine in SA, is proposed to expand four fold to become the biggest uranium mine in the world. At APEC in 2007, the Australian government became a signatory to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), further entrenching its role in the global nuclear fuel chain. Australia has 38% of the worlds known uranium deposits and Resources Minister Martin Ferguson has expressed a wish for Australia to become the largest miner and exporter of uranium in the world. Remaining a signatory of GNEP will increase pressure for Australia to take back high-level radioactive waste produced in overseas reactors in a leasing style arrangement. Nuclear Waste Community Resistance The ALP government is plowing ahead with the plan to force a radioactive waste dump on communities in the NT, despite promising to repeal Howard era legislation- the Commonwealth Radioactive Waste Management Act- that makes the dump possible. Increasing economic disadvantage in remote areas means many Aboriginal communities are feeling pressure to accept nuclear projects on their country as a source of jobs and income- sometimes in exchange for essential infrastructure like roads and housing. Despite this pressure, communities continue to resist the expansion of the nuclear industry in Australia. Successful community campaigns fought the uranium mine proposed for Jabiluka in Kakadu National Park. Central Australian residents are mobilising against uranium exploration at Angela Pamela, 25 km south of Alice Springs in the towns water catchment area. There is continued and strong opposition to the planned federal radioactive waste dump in the NT, already over a year behind schedule. It is important for national awareness and mobilisation to support communities directly targeted by the industry and workers whose health has been impacted. The Rudd Government must be held accountable for its radioactive rollout.
Views: 217 beyondnuclear
Heap Leaching Video
 
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A video interview with Monash University's Dr. Gavin Mudd about the proposed heap leaching expansion of Ranger Uranium Mine in Kakadu National Park.
Views: 24914 NT Environment Centre
Land worth billions donated to Kakadu
 
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The traditional owner of a parcel of Northern Territory land with uranium reserves reportedly worth billions of dollars has decided to gift the land to the Kakadu National Park.
uranium 2008
 
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metanoia
Views: 190 edsam123
Video 5:10
         Ranger Uranium Mine is holding out hope it has a future.
 
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Ranger Uranium Mine is holding out hope it has a future. - The Business - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) Ranger Uranium Mine is holding out hope it has a future. - The Business - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) Ranger Uranium Mine is holding out hope it has a future. - The Business - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) Video 5:10 Ranger Uranium Mine is holding out hope it has a future. Video 5:10 Ranger Uranium Mine is holding out hope it has a future. Video 5:10 Ranger Uranium Mine is holding out hope it has a future.
Views: 46 MarihelmCigo
Australian Robbie Williams parody 'Uranium'
 
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Download mp3 at http://www.reverbnation.com/niboswald In response to Kevin Rudd's recently proposed super profits tax on Australia's mining industry. ********* LYRICS ********* NICK: Prime Minister Kevin Rudd has recently announced a super profit tax on Australia's mining industry. The reform would see a 40% tax placed upon mining giants Rio Tinto and other mining companies within Australia. NIB: But it's no minor issue. Already, BHP is reconsidering future iron mining projects in Western Australia. Which got us thinking... there are currently only three active uranium mines in Australia: Kakadu National Park. NICK: Kakadu! NIB: Jabiluka. NICK: Jabiluka, you beauty! NIB: And Radium Hill. NICK: R... Radium Hill. NIB: Yet Australia has the largest uranium reserves in the world. NICK: I wonder what it would be like if we ended up mining all of that uranium... UUUUUUU UUUUUUU UUUUUUU UUUUUUU [The chemical symbol of Uranium is U] We've got bars that glow gamma rays Radiation powers the place Uranium Deep underneath Australia Below the dusty plain Uranium is in the soil But is it there in vein? Got to dig down (Vrlll vrllll) Deep under ground (It's found underground) Time for nuclear power Cuz the industry's a boom (BOOM!) Those oxides we will stockpile Watch our market shares mushroom Let's go all out (Drill down where it's found) Hope for no fallout (Your hair might fall out) Huge coal mining tax to be payed Solar power dies in the shade Birds hit hydro-electric fan blades Uranium "All employees are reminded to wash their protective underwear after use." Can you name the noble gases making you all cough? It's like that Chernobyl crisis leaking... oops, we're stuffed Uranium "Marge, the acid rains are here!" Uranium "My geraniums!" We run far to make our escape The extra leg helps us to keep pace Like a one man three-legged race Uranium Here at the plant we watch our own skin bake Turning to pink then glows and starts to flake Better escape or we will all vaporise BHP must now come and compensate Nuclear families in every state Got the green lung and lasers shoot from our eyes Everyone can now fly through space (I'm brainier!) We've become a new super race (Big cranium!) I've got a new X-men name IT'S MACE! Uranium! Nuclear construction Build that power plant Of the world resources We've got 23% We're mining all these minerals Refining what we take (So fine!) No oil spills from our business Let our energy radiate! We've got arms, they stick from our face Not like 'arms' as in 'nuclear arms race' It's the decade to be decayed Uranium
Views: 3701 Nib Oswald
Senator Ludlam asks questions about WA uranium mining approvals
 
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Senator Ludlam asks questions at Senate Estimates 18 November 2013 about WA uranium mining approvals, and the role of the Federal Environment Minister
Views: 116 Greens MPs
Environment Centre NT - Yanyuwa IPA
 
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The Environment Centre NT is the peak community sector environment organisation in the Northern Territory, Australia. The Environment Centre NT has been working to protect the environment since 1983. We are the only community sector environment organisation based in the Top End that addresses all the major environmental and sustainability issues facing the Territory. We are independent and professional, and work hard to represent the interests of our members and supporters in creating a sustainable future for the Territory. The mission of the Environment Centre NT is to protect and restore biodiversity, ecosystems and ecological processes, foster sustainable living and development, and cut greenhouse gas emissions and build renewable energy capacity. The Environment Centre NT works by advocating for the improvement of environmental policies and performance of governments, landholders, business and industry; partnering on projects and campaigns with conservation and climate organisations, governments, Indigenous organisations, community groups, businesses, and landholders; raising awareness amongst community, government, business and industry about environmental issues and assisting people to reduce their environmental impact; supporting community members to participate in decision making processes and action; recognising the rights, aspirations, responsibilities and knowledge of the Territory's Indigenous peoples; and, acknowledging that environmental issues have a social dimension. Our strategic priorities Our work is guided by our Strategic Plan 2009/10 - 2013/14, which was developed through surveying our members about their views on what we should work on, and talking to key stakeholders in government, business, research and community sectors. The Strategic Plan was refined by staff, Board Directors, long term members and a few invited friends through a series of workshops. Our five Campaigns & Programs are: Nature Territory Safe Climate Green Living Nuclear Free NT Living Harbour Within each of these, we work to achieve various key outcomes. Examples include stopping major land clearing (through Nature Territory), increasing renewable energy generation (Safe Climate), supporting household sustainability through our COOLmob program (Green Living), and ending uranium mining inside Kakadu National Park (Nucear Free NT). These strategic priorities are achieved through implementing annual plans that are developed by staff and approved by the Board.
Federal Coalition, CLP split over Kakadu
 
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The Federal Opposition's decision to match Labor's commitment to prevent uranium mining at Koongarra is out of step with the CLP's stance on the issue.
Calls for Ranger uranium mine to close until an independent inquiry is carried out
 
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9/12/13 Union officials want the Ranger uranium mine shut down until an independent inquiry is carried out, following yesterday's radioactive spill.
Views: 81 Greenshack Dotinfo
Koongarra Future
 
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He could have become one of Australia's richest men but Jeffrey Lee has turned his back on a fortune. As senior custodian of the Koongarra uranium deposit he has decided not to allow mining on his land.
ERA confident they are mining responsibly
 
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Energy Resources Australia chief Rob Atkinson has had to tell investors the Ranger uranium mine has been shut down by heavy rain.
Jabiru - The Creation of a Town
 
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A corporate film outlining the construction of Jabiru in the late 1970's, early 1980's in the heart of Kakadu National Park. Jabiru was initially constructed to house the workforce of Ranger Mine and the expected workforce of another two mines which were never developed. It has since become an administrative centre for the region as well as a tourism service centre. With the impending closure of Ranger Mine in 2021, this video is an important record of another time and a timely reminder as Jabiru transitions to a new phase in the next few years.
Views: 540 James Bowyer
Ranger Uranium Mine spill
 
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Senator Scott Ludlam questions the Department of Environment about toxic spills and clean-up operations at Ranger Uranium Mine.
Northern Territory - Invasive Species
 
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The Environment Centre NT is the peak community sector environment organisation in the Northern Territory, Australia. The Environment Centre NT has been working to protect the environment since 1983. We are the only community sector environment organisation based in the Top End that addresses all the major environmental and sustainability issues facing the Territory. We are independent and professional, and work hard to represent the interests of our members and supporters in creating a sustainable future for the Territory. The mission of the Environment Centre NT is to protect and restore biodiversity, ecosystems and ecological processes, foster sustainable living and development, and cut greenhouse gas emissions and build renewable energy capacity. The Environment Centre NT works by advocating for the improvement of environmental policies and performance of governments, landholders, business and industry; partnering on projects and campaigns with conservation and climate organisations, governments, Indigenous organisations, community groups, businesses, and landholders; raising awareness amongst community, government, business and industry about environmental issues and assisting people to reduce their environmental impact; supporting community members to participate in decision making processes and action; recognising the rights, aspirations, responsibilities and knowledge of the Territory's Indigenous peoples; and, acknowledging that environmental issues have a social dimension. Our strategic priorities Our work is guided by our Strategic Plan 2009/10 - 2013/14, which was developed through surveying our members about their views on what we should work on, and talking to key stakeholders in government, business, research and community sectors. The Strategic Plan was refined by staff, Board Directors, long term members and a few invited friends through a series of workshops. Our five Campaigns & Programs are: Nature Territory Safe Climate Green Living Nuclear Free NT Living Harbour Within each of these, we work to achieve various key outcomes. Examples include stopping major land clearing (through Nature Territory), increasing renewable energy generation (Safe Climate), supporting household sustainability through our COOLmob program (Green Living), and ending uranium mining inside Kakadu National Park (Nucear Free NT). These strategic priorities are achieved through implementing annual plans that are developed by staff and approved by the Board.
fueling Fukushima: Akira Kawasaki at Ranger mine
 
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On the anniversary of the 3/11 compounded disasters at Fukushima, a small delegation visited Australia to tell of the ongoing impacts of dislocation, contamination and radiation exposure. National authorities have admitted that Australian uranium was present at all of the compromised reactors, and Australian uranium producers have confirmed that they supply fuel to the Japanese nuclear operators. In fact, the Ranger uranium mine in World Heritage listed Kakadu national park was established on the basis of an agreement between our two governments. On visiting the mine, and seeing for the first time the source of the Fukushima fuel, Akira Kawasaki from Peace Boat reflects on our shared suffering, and shared responsibility to work towards a nuclear free future
Views: 182 justin T NT
Jabiluka - Trailer
 
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The struggle of the Mirrar Aboriginal people against the Jabiluka uranium mine, in the Northern Territory.... Jabiluka is about us, blackfellas, whitefellas together... and our belief in the future of our nation... "Is it too much to hope that the natural paradise of Kakadu National Park might be a setting not so much for a human paradise but at least a place where the white man and the black man can at last live in harmony with each other?" Watch the full film: http://meetthefilmmakers.com/film/jabiluka/
Call the honeymoon off!
 
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Clean futures activists in Adelaide, South Australia conduct a mock wedding between the government and the uranium mining industry to highlight the apparently unquestioning attitude of the government in approving the Honeymoon uranium mine. The Honeymoon mine will procedurally dump radioactive and heavy metals waste into groundwater, with no responsibility to remediate the groundwater at the conclusion of operations.
Views: 420 absurdresponse
WUS 2015 Uranium mining & the nuclear fuel chain legacy in Australia
 
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DAVE SWEENEY (AUSTRALIA) Australian Conservation Foundation PETER WATTS (AUSTRALIA) Aboriginal representative of the Arabunna People, Co-Chair for Australian Nuclear Free Alliance THE SYMPOSIUM The World Uranium Symposium addressed issues arising from the nuclear fuel chain, from mining uranium to its end-uses and byproducts for civilian or military purposes. Both scientific and community-based, the Symposium was organized around the following themes: health, environment, economy, ethics, governance, human rights and the rights of indigenous peoples. Open to the public, the symposium had hosted more than 300 people per day from 14 to 16 April 2015, and had included local, national and international representatives from the sectors of health, research, industry, education, civil society, policy makers and indigenous communities. local, national and/or international media were present. All presentations of the symposium will be posted in electronic formats (text and / or videos) after the Symposium, in French and / or English. • April 14 (Day 1): Uranium mines and the nuclear life cycle : health and environmental issues • April 15 (Day 2): Civil and military nuclear : ethics, economics and political issues • April 16 (Day 3): Human rights, indigenous peoples' rights and governance issues ORGANIZATIONS INVOLVED The Symposium is jointly organized by Physicians for Global Survival (1985 Nobel Peace Prize), the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment, Nature Québec, the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility and the Coalition pour que le Québec ait meilleure mine. It also receives support from the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (Swiss chapter), the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Sustainable Development Institute, the Cree Nation of Mistissini, MiningWatch Canada, and a number of other local, national and international partners. CONTEXT The Symposium is occurring at a time when many organizations and governments question the future of nuclear power, currently providing about 11% of the world’s electricity. The year 2015 also marks the seventieth anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the corresponding United Nations negotiations of the Non Proliferation Treaty for the prevention and the abolition of nuclear arms. It will also see the tabling on a new UN treaty on climate change. Canada is one of the largest producers and exporters of uranium worldwide, yet its nuclear energy output is in relative decline. Only two provinces still operate nuclear reactors: Ontario and New Brunswick. While uranium has been primarily mined from Saskatchewan, the provinces of British Columbia and Nova Scotia have officially banned uranium mining. Quebec recently shut down its sole nuclear reactor and has tasked the Bureau d’audiences publiques sur l’environnement (BAPE) with conducting an investigation on issues related to uranium mining. It is expected to release its report by May 20 2015. The Symposium aims to tackle these different issues and to provide recommendations to decision makers to better ensure protection for the human health, global security and a safe environment
Views: 116 Uranium2015
Darwin Harbour - Development and Environmental Issues
 
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The Environment Centre NT is the peak community sector environment organisation in the Northern Territory, Australia. The Environment Centre NT has been working to protect the environment since 1983. We are the only community sector environment organisation based in the Top End that addresses all the major environmental and sustainability issues facing the Territory. We are independent and professional, and work hard to represent the interests of our members and supporters in creating a sustainable future for the Territory. The mission of the Environment Centre NT is to protect and restore biodiversity, ecosystems and ecological processes, foster sustainable living and development, and cut greenhouse gas emissions and build renewable energy capacity. The Environment Centre NT works by advocating for the improvement of environmental policies and performance of governments, landholders, business and industry; partnering on projects and campaigns with conservation and climate organisations, governments, Indigenous organisations, community groups, businesses, and landholders; raising awareness amongst community, government, business and industry about environmental issues and assisting people to reduce their environmental impact; supporting community members to participate in decision making processes and action; recognising the rights, aspirations, responsibilities and knowledge of the Territory's Indigenous peoples; and, acknowledging that environmental issues have a social dimension. Our strategic priorities Our work is guided by our Strategic Plan 2009/10 - 2013/14, which was developed through surveying our members about their views on what we should work on, and talking to key stakeholders in government, business, research and community sectors. The Strategic Plan was refined by staff, Board Directors, long term members and a few invited friends through a series of workshops. Our five Campaigns & Programs are: Nature Territory Safe Climate Green Living Nuclear Free NT Living Harbour Within each of these, we work to achieve various key outcomes. Examples include stopping major land clearing (through Nature Territory), increasing renewable energy generation (Safe Climate), supporting household sustainability through our COOLmob program (Green Living), and ending uranium mining inside Kakadu National Park (Nucear Free NT). These strategic priorities are achieved through implementing annual plans that are developed by staff and approved by the Board.
Footprints: Walk Away From Uranium Mining Australia
 
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"Walk Away From Uranium Mining- Towards Aboriginal Sovereignty" There are currently a group of people walking from Wiluna to Perth via Kalgoorlie. Traditional Owners including special guests from France, the US and New Zealand. Live Coverage - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rt8-ZVNHQRQ Glen Cook a Traditional Owner living in Wiluna and speaking up about uranium mining in WA http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5JIi61kFQk Walk Away from Uranium Mining Speech by Senator Scott Ludlum http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jBWi6oain5Q Daytime Camp Image Journal [Fabulous!]. http://www.flickr.com/photos/footprintsforpeace/ Information about the Walk Away from Uranium Campaign 2011 in Western Australia http://footprints.footprintsforpeace.net/nffcampaign/NFF2011.htm Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/FootPrints-for-Peace/113524090317?ref=ts&sk=wall Footprints for Peace is calling on activists and organizations from Australia and around the world to join with them in Wiluna, Western Australia this September - October for a 10 week walk to Perth to tell the public, the government and industries to walk away from uranium mining as it is an expensive toxic industry which produces radioactive waste and weapons usable material. http://www.foe.org.au/anti-nuclear/media/news-items/2011/footprints-for-peace-walk-wa-august-2011
Views: 1523 Maria Altmann
Fishing in the Northern Territory
 
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The Environment Centre NT is the peak community sector environment organisation in the Northern Territory, Australia. The Environment Centre NT has been working to protect the environment since 1983. We are the only community sector environment organisation based in the Top End that addresses all the major environmental and sustainability issues facing the Territory. We are independent and professional, and work hard to represent the interests of our members and supporters in creating a sustainable future for the Territory. The mission of the Environment Centre NT is to protect and restore biodiversity, ecosystems and ecological processes, foster sustainable living and development, and cut greenhouse gas emissions and build renewable energy capacity. The Environment Centre NT works by advocating for the improvement of environmental policies and performance of governments, landholders, business and industry; partnering on projects and campaigns with conservation and climate organisations, governments, Indigenous organisations, community groups, businesses, and landholders; raising awareness amongst community, government, business and industry about environmental issues and assisting people to reduce their environmental impact; supporting community members to participate in decision making processes and action; recognising the rights, aspirations, responsibilities and knowledge of the Territory's Indigenous peoples; and, acknowledging that environmental issues have a social dimension. Our strategic priorities Our work is guided by our Strategic Plan 2009/10 - 2013/14, which was developed through surveying our members about their views on what we should work on, and talking to key stakeholders in government, business, research and community sectors. The Strategic Plan was refined by staff, Board Directors, long term members and a few invited friends through a series of workshops. Our five Campaigns & Programs are: Nature Territory Safe Climate Green Living Nuclear Free NT Living Harbour Within each of these, we work to achieve various key outcomes. Examples include stopping major land clearing (through Nature Territory), increasing renewable energy generation (Safe Climate), supporting household sustainability through our COOLmob program (Green Living), and ending uranium mining inside Kakadu National Park (Nucear Free NT). These strategic priorities are achieved through implementing annual plans that are developed by staff and approved by the Board.

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