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Search results “Industrial mining safety and health administration”
Front-End Loader Safety (1994) - Mine Safety and Health Administration - CharlieDeanArchives
 
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Front-End Loader Safety (C/MNM) Based upon records of actual mining accidents, this video describes some of the fatalities and injuries that can occur in the use (and misuse) of front-end loaders (particularly if the operator is inattentive, careless, disobeys safety rules, and/or takes unnecessary chances). It analyzes these accidents, explains causes and preventive measures, and presents safe operating procedures for various work assignments. This video is designed to motivate front-end loader operators to adopt safe driving and operating habits and to develop a positive attitude toward mine haulage safety in general. MSHA Rev 1994 14 min . CharlieDeanArchives - Archive footage from the 20th century making history come alive!
Views: 3352 Charlie Dean Archives
DAWN OF A NEW DAY - MSA Mining Safety Film
 
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DAWN OF A NEW DAY - MSA COAL MINING Safety Film Mine Safety and Health Administration Dawn of a New Day: Continuous Haulage Safety - (1998) This video addresses the hazards associated with continuous face haulage systems. - SUBSCRIBE to Bright Enlightenment: http://www.youtube.com/BrightEnlightenment - LIKE our page on Facebook: http://www.Facebook.com/BrightEnlightenment - TWITTER: http://www.twitter.com/BrightEnlightenment WEBSITE: http://www.BrightEnlightenment.com #BRIGHTENLIGHTENMENT #DOCUMENTARY #MINING #SAFETY #ENGINEERING #COAL #ENERGY INDUSTRIAL #OSHA #COALMINING
Views: 6235 Bright Enlightenment
How to Get OSHA Certification
 
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Watch more How to Start a Business videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/410112-How-to-Get-OSHA-Certification The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) enforces regulations designed to keep the workplace safe. Get OSHA certification for your occupation and/or business. Step 1: Go to the OSHA website Go to the Certificate and Degree Programs page at osha.gov. Read certificate program descriptions specific to your occupation. Step 2: Go to outreachtrainers.org Go to an OSHA-recommended website, and enter your zip code to search for an OTI (OSHA Training Institute) facility near you. Tip OSHA certification courses at an OTI facility are typically 10 to 30 hours. Step 3: E-mail for a current list of online trainers E-mail the Department of Labor for a current online trainer list at [email protected] if you don't live near an OTI facility. Step 4: Enroll in a training program Enroll in a training program online or at an OTI facility. After taking classes, you'll get your certification or completion card and be OSHA certified. Did You Know? In 2010, the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health's standards board voted to create a committee to consider mandating the use of condoms in the adult film industry.
Views: 55557 Howcast
Mining Safety Engineering Degree Programs
 
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A mining safety engineer probably does exactly what you think he or she might do. He is involved in the safety of mining operations. This means both overall doing what is necessary to keep workers safe in a mining environment, but also to keep a business, industry or operation in compliance with regulations. To do this successfully, a mining safety engineer draws upon his knowledge of the design and practices of mines of varying types, as well as a working knowledge of those regulations and standards. Learn more about this by visiting http://engineeringdegrees101.com or like us http://www.facebook.com/engineeringdegrees101 and follow us on twitter @EDegrees101.
Views: 234 engineeringdegrees
OSHA / ANSI Safety Sign Standards
 
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This video provides an overview of OSHA standards for safety signs & labels. We’ll cover design, label headers, text sizing, label placement & more. Updated for 2015, it includes recent OSHA updates. Get an OSHA Safety Sign Best Practice Guide: https://graphicproducts.com/signbp-pdf Graphic Products is committed to keeping our customers up-to-date on the latest requirements and standards for a wide variety of industries. Graphic Products features Best Practice Guides on industrial topics such as arc flash, GHS, lockout/tagout, floor marking, OSHA sign compliance or mine safety to get you the answers you need to keep OSHA fines at bay and workers safe. To keep up on industry standards, hear the latest OSHA news or to get the inside scoop from the safety experts: subscribe to our channel, like is on Facebook or follow us on LinkedIn, Google+ or Twitter! Facebook https://facebook.com/DuraLabelPrinters LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/company/graphic-products Google+ https://plus.google.com/+GraphicProducts Twitter https://twitter.com/GraphicProducts
Views: 71806 Graphic Products
Roof Evaluations and Decisions
 
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Mine Safety and Health Administration Roof Evaluations and Decisions Encourages miners to visually inspect and evaluate the roof and ribs of their working place, and instructs them on how to identify the hazardous roof conditions they may encounter. This is Part 2 of 3 Parts MSHA DVD 005 - 2004 - Roof Control
Views: 5571 PublicResourceOrg
Safety Questions and Answers
 
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This video was presented during the weekly safety meeting in Saudi Aramco. It briefly discussed different information about safety in work. Due credits were given to the owners of the video clips.
Views: 373540 Alex V. Villamayor
Occupational Safety and Health Act
 
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By making employers and employees more aware of safety and health considerations, OSHA has significantly affected organizations. The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 was enacted to ensure that the health and safety of workers would be protected. Every employer that is engaged in commerce and has one or more employees must comply with the act. Employers in specific industries, such as railroads and mining, are covered under other health and safety acts. A major responsibility of OSHA is to enforce safety regulations in an effort to reduce injuries and illnesses in the workplace. Enforcement includes creating guidelines and rules, investigating, inspecting, and levying fines. Compliance officers have great discretion and authority to ensure worker safety. While national safety statistics show improvement, there are still noteworthy tragic accidents that result in significant human and financial loss.
Views: 522 Gregg Learning
Health & Safety Engineers (excl. Mining Safety Engineers & Inspectors)
 
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The career videos were developed and distributed by the Center for Occupational Employment Information (COEI) under a grant from America's Labor Market Information System (ALMIS), a program of the U.S. Department of Labor's Employment and Training Administration (ETA). They are designed to provide a brief, visual introduction to the world of work for a career. The videos are public domain software and are released without usage restrictions. Public and private vendors are free to use the clips in whatever manner they see fit to promote career decision making.
Views: 63 CoolSpaceCareers
Air Sampling for Worker Silica Dust Exposure 2001 MSHA
 
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Silicosis is an incurable lung disease caused by inhalation of dust that contains free crystalline silica. Overexposure to dust that contains microscopic particles of crystalline silica can cause scar tissue to form in the lungs, which reduces the lungs ability to extract oxygen from the air we breathe. It is not always easy to tell whether workers are being exposed simply by looking. It is the respirable silica dust - the dust you cannot see - that enters the lung. People being affected do not know they are developing chronic silicosis until it is too late. Air sampling is the only way to measure an employee's exposure to respirable crystalline silica. Air sampling results will show whether the working environment must be made safer. By itself, air sampling will do nothing to make a workplace safer. If air sampling results show overexposure, then steps to reduce the exposure need to be implemented. Air sampling is a way of measuring how much silica dust is in the air that workers breathe. This is important because breathing is how silica gets into the lungs. When air sampling is performed, samples of workplace air from the breathing zone are collected by special personal air sampling pumps. Silica dusts are trapped on small, ultra-efficient filters and the filters are sent to a lab to be analyzed. For a good discussion on air sampling and , read the Controlling Chemical Exposure Industrial Hygiene Fact Sheets at http://www.state.nj.us/health/surv/documents/ihfs.pdf. Despite all efforts to prevent it, silicosis still afflicts tens of millions of workers in hazardous occupations and kills thousands of people every year, everywhere in the world. With its potential to cause progressive and permanent physical disability, silicosis continues to be one of the most important occupational health illnesses in the world. For more about silicosis and its prevention, go to http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2004-108/ . This is clipped from the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) 2001 video, A Best Practice Guide to the Milling of Slate (13 minutes). The video is designed to raise awareness of the dust and noise hazards associated with the slate industry. It also shows common methods to control silica dust during work with slate. The video is available from the MSHA website and from Internet Archive.
Views: 7408 markdcatlin
OSHA Nightmares Compilation
 
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OSHA NIGHTMARES COMPILATION ►► The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is there to keep our workers safe on the job. Their sagely advice makes construction sites and jobs safe. And when they see these workers making risky, dangerous, and just dumb decisions, OSHA is gonna pull it's own hair out. ►Visit the Clip'wreck Channel to see more awesome, funny, and amazing Compilation Videos! (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTep0GOBv8YPhCCbXVtDBLQ) ►Follow Clip'wreck on Twitter! (https://twitter.com/ClipwreckVideos) Music ►Silent Partner https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLzCxunOM5WFKdhkL2L__Kjafqa-qzQGeY *********************************************************** I am not the creator of this content. I am just a compiler of online content I find enjoyable. For any concerns about content ownership, please contact me at the address listed in the channel description. ***********************************************************
Views: 620880 Clip'wreck
Open ( Mine Safety ): Personal Stories of Government Accountability
 
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The challenge in working for government transparency is that you are always working against its opposite: opacity. What we don't see is often what's most harmful to us. When the Upper Big Branch Mine exploded in West Virginia last April and killed 29 miners, we were surprised because most of us had never seen it coming. The sad thing is, many of the experts didn't see it coming either. http://blog.sunlightfoundation.com/2010/10/13/mine-safety-and-the-story-of-openness/ MUSIC: Black Lung by Hazel Dickens Blimp by James Beaudreau Sometimes Having a Bad Attitude is All it Takes by Harris Newman Lords and Ladies/Wall Socket Protector by Harris Newman VIDEO USAGE License: Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/ Attribution notes: Attribute all uses to "the Sunlight Foundation" and email [email protected] with the location and purpose of your derivative work. You also must add the attribution made to the musical artist scoring the piece using the information above. Thanks!
Views: 567 SunlightFoundation
All About #SafeAndSound2018
 
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Join us for Safe + Sound Week, August 13-19, 2018 What Is Safe + Sound Week? A nationwide event to raise awareness and understanding of the value of safety and health programs that include management leadership, worker participation, and a systematic approach to finding and fixing hazards in workplaces. Why Participate? Safe workplaces are sound businesses. Successful safety and health programs can proactively identify and manage workplace hazards before they cause injury or illness, improving sustainability and the bottom line. Participating in Safe + Sound Week can help get your program started or energize an existing one. Who Is Encouraged to Participate? Organizations of any size or in any industry looking for an opportunity to show their commitment to safety to workers, customers, the public, or supply chain partners should participate. How to Participate Participating in Safe + Sound Week is easy. To get started, select the activities you would like to do at your workplace. You can host an event just for your workers or host a public event to engage your community. Examples of potential activities and tools to help you plan and promote your events are available. After you've completed your events, you can download a certificate and web badge to recognize your organization and your workers. For more information, visit www.osha.gov/safeandsound/ www.aiha.org Content clips used under Creative Commons License, provided by: Utility Safety in Work Zones; Iowa Department of Transportation 1999; "Video VH-601: Highway Work Zone Safety" PublicResource.Org; Mine Safety and Health Administration; "Safety On or Near the Water" Safe Work Australia; "Safety rules for using power tools" Dosti Realty HSE (Health, Safety, & Environment); "Induction Training"
Views: 117 AIHA
MSHA celebrates National Miners Day, December 6
 
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Congress declared December 6 to be National Miners Day, a day to recognize and honor the more than 370,000 miners who work in the United States today. This video, by the Department of Labor’s Mine Safety and Health Administration, provides an overview of mining today with a brief look back to a more dangerous time.
Views: 3447 USDepartmentofLabor
The Creation of NIOSH in 1970 NIOSH 1996
 
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The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is the US federal agency responsible for conducting research and making recommendations for the prevention of work-related injury and illness. NIOSH provides national and world leadership to prevent work-related illness, injury, disability, and death by gathering information, conducting scientific research, and translating the knowledge gained into products and services, including scientific information products, training videos, and recommendations for improving safety and health in the workplace. The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 created both NIOSH and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). NIOSH is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the Department of Health and Human Services. The Federal Mine Safety and Health Amendments Act of 1977 delegated additional authority to NIOSH for coal mine health research. For more, go to the NIOSH website http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/about.htmlat . This clip is from the 1996 video "The Unfinished Agenda: NIOSH's First 25 years and Beyond" produced by filmmaker Abby Ginzberg (http://abbyginzbergfilms.org/Welcome.html) for NIOSH at a time that some Republicans in Congress were trying to eliminate the Agency as part of an anti-government agenda. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) commemorated their 25th anniversary to highlight the progress made since 1971 in protecting workers from job-related injuries and illnesses, and to note the challenges that still lie ahead. OSHA and NIOSH were created under the Occupational Safety and Health Act, a bipartisan measure enacted on Dec. 29, 1970, and signed by President Richard M. Nixon. OSHA and NIOSH began operations on April 29, 1971. NIOSH conducts research to identify the causes of work-related injuries, illnesses and fatalities, evaluate the hazards of new technologies and work practices, and create ways to control hazards so that workers are protected. NIOSH also supports university programs to train occupational safety and health professionals for the Nation and makes recommendations regarding occupational safety and health standards. For more on the important and invaluable work of NIOSH, go to their website at http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/ . The entire 1996 video is also posted to my YouTube channel.
Views: 784 markdcatlin
Can't Take No More 1980 Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA)
 
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Studs Terkel narrates this fast-paced history of occupational health and safety in the U.S. from the Industrial Revolution to the 1970s, which OSHA released in 1980. Rare archival footage and photos illustrate the problems behind dramatic tragedies as well as the daily dangers that put workers at risk for long-term health problems. It also connects the health and safety movement with the civil rights and environmental movements. This is one of three wonderful films produced and distributed by OSHA during the administration of Dr. Eula Bingham - Can't Take No More; Worker to Worker; and OSHA. Then in 1981, the new head of OSHA, under the Reagan Administration, Thorne Auchter recalled most copies and they disappeared. A few copies were kept alive by union officials who refused to return their copies. The penalty for being discovered in possession of one of these films was losing all OSHA funding for their safety and health programs. This was recalled by Tom Lynch on his blog Workers' Comp Insider at http://www.workerscompinsider.com/archives/000698.html " [in 1975] when I became the Director of the Army's safety efforts throughout New England, and would travel up and down the east coast lecturing on safety and health, it was obvious that OSHA was a big stick. In 1979, with assistance from the AFL-CIO, OSHA produced a 27-minute movie called "Can't Take It No More." Narrated by Studs Terkel, it carried a powerful message, offering a history of the safety movement in America and targeting worker health. As part of our program, my training department would screen the film repeatedly over the next year and a half for soldiers and civilian employees. In 1981, one of the first things the new Reagan administration did as it began to reverse OSHA's aggressive thrust by ushering in "voluntary compliance," was to recall all governmental copies of "Can't Take It No More" and forbid any organization seeking government funding for a safety program from showing the film. I recall having to box up our three copies and send them back to Washington, DC, where they were to be destroyed. That was when I knew that, for OSHA, the good times were over ... " All three films are posted to my YouTube channel and also available for download from the Internet Archive thanks to the work of the nonprofit Public.Resource.Org. Find out more about this wonderful organization and make a donation at https://public.resource.org/about/index.html. This film, produced by Durrin Films, Inc. (now Durrin Productions, Inc) at (http://www.durrinproductions.com/about.html ), won an Honorable Mention at the 1982 American Film Festival; CINE Golden Eagle.
Views: 17935 markdcatlin
Hazards Around Bins And Hoppers (1978) Mine Safety & Health Administration
 
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Please considering supporting the channel through my patreon link to help continue the consistent uploads. https://www.patreon.com/oldmoviesreborn Thanks. "Emphasizes the safety of those who must work around bins and hoppers and acquaints them with the potential hazards of entering these and other material storage areas. Encourages workers to follow the safe and correct operating procedures that apply to their jobs." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining#Safety Safety has long been a concern in the mining business especially in sub-surface mining. The Courrières mine disaster, Europe's worst mining accident, involved the death of 1,099 miners in Northern France on March 10, 1906. This disaster was surpassed only by the Benxihu Colliery accident in China on April 26, 1942, which killed 1,549 miners. While mining today is substantially safer than it was in previous decades, mining accidents still occur. Government figures indicate that 5,000 Chinese miners die in accidents each year, while other reports have suggested a figure as high as 20,000. Mining accidents continue worldwide, including accidents causing dozens of fatalities at a time such as the 2007 Ulyanovskaya Mine disaster in Russia, the 2009 Heilongjiang mine explosion in China, and the 2010 Upper Big Branch Mine disaster in the United States. Mining ventilation is a significant safety concern for many miners. Poor ventilation inside sub-surface mines causes exposure to harmful gases, heat, and dust, which can cause illness, injury, and death. The concentration of methane and other airborne contaminants underground can generally be controlled by dilution (ventilation), capture before entering the host air stream (methane drainage), or isolation (seals and stoppings). Rock dusts, including coal dust and silicon dust, can cause long-term lung problems including silicosis, asbestosis, and pneumoconiosis (also known as miners lung or black lung disease). A ventilation system is set up to force a stream of air through the working areas of the mine. The air circulation necessary for effective ventilation of a mine is generated by one or more large mine fans, usually located above ground. Air flows in one direction only, making circuits through the mine such that each main work area constantly receives a supply of fresh air. Watering down in coal mines also helps to keep dust levels down: by spraying the machine with water and filtering the dust-laden water with a scrubber fan, miners can successfully trap the dust. Gases in mines can poison the workers or displace the oxygen in the mine, causing asphyxiation... Ignited methane gas is a common source of explosions in coal mines... Miners utilize equipment strong enough to break through extremely hard layers of the Earth's crust. This equipment, combined with the closed work space in which underground miners work, can cause hearing loss... Since mining entails removing dirt and rock from its natural location, thereby creating large empty pits, rooms, and tunnels, cave-ins as well as ground and rock falls are a major concern within mines. Modern techniques for timbering and bracing walls and ceilings within sub-surface mines have reduced the number of fatalities due to cave-ins, but ground falls continue to represent up to 50% of mining fatalities. Even in cases where mine collapses are not instantly fatal, they can trap mine workers deep underground. Cases such as these often lead to high-profile rescue efforts, such as when 33 Chilean miners were trapped deep underground for 69 days in 2010. High temperatures and humidity may result in heat-related illnesses, including heat stroke, which can be fatal. The presence of heavy equipment in confined spaces also poses a risk to miners. To improve the safety of mine workers, modern mines use automation and remote operation including, for example, such equipment as automated loaders and remotely operated rockbreakers. However, despite modern improvements to safety practices, mining remains a dangerous occupation throughout the world...
Views: 17 Old Movies Reborn
Respirator User Training 1930s
 
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This clip is part of an early respirator training film. Today in the US, employer must provide training to employees who are required to use respirators. The training must be comprehensive, understandable, and be done, at least, annually, and more often if necessary. This training should include: 1) why the respirator is necessary and how improper fit, use, or maintenance can compromise its protective effect; 2) the limitations and capabilities of the respirator; 3) how to inspect, put on and remove, use and check the seals (for tight-fitting types); 4) how to maintain and store the respirator; 5) how to recognize medical signs and symptoms that may limit or prevent effective use of a respirator; and, 6) the general requirements of OSHA's respirator standard, 29 CFR 1910.134. For examples of good respirator training, go to the Online Curricula Catalog of the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHSWorker Education and Training Program (WETP) at http://tools.niehs.nih.gov/wetp/index.cfm?id=603 . Since 1987, the NIEHS WETP has supported the development of curricula and the initiation of training programs throughout the country to help meet Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements under 29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations & Emergency Response (HAZWOPER). This is clipped from the 1940s film, The Air We Breathe, a ppromotional documentary from the Mine Safety Appliances Company (MSA) on the importance of the air respirator to industrial health and safety. At the end, the film explains that industry and government cooperation has removed the "menace in the air" and urges workers in various industries to use the respirator. This film is available from the National Archives (NARA).
Views: 19959 markdcatlin
[Wikipedia] United States National Mine Health and Safety Academy
 
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The United States National Mine Health and Safety Academy (MSHA) is a federal academy responsible for training the mine safety and health inspectors and technical support personnel of the Mine Safety and Health Administration. The Academy is located in Beckley, West Virginia, on an 80-acre (320,000 m2) site near the Raleigh County Airport. The Academy complex consists of nine buildings: The Residence Hall, Administration Building, Classroom Building, Mine Machinery Laboratory Building, Publication Distribution Center, Gymnasium, Maintenance and Equipment Building, Mine Emergency Operations Building, Mine Rescue Station and Mine Simulation Laboratory. Students are exposed to a variety of different disciplines in nine different laboratories: roof control, ground control, mine emergencies and rescue, ventilation, electrical systems, machinery, industrial hygiene, computer systems and underground mine simulation. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_National_Mine_Health_and_Safety_Academy Please support this channel and help me upload more videos. Become one of my Patreons at https://www.patreon.com/user?u=3823907
Views: 37 WikiTubia
Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 1 of 5
 
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Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 1 of 5 Letcher County notes the tragic mine explosions that occurred at Scotia Mine in 1976. The accidents are noted as being one of the worst mine disasters in U.S. history. When industrial coal mining came to the mountains of southeastern Kentucky in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, it brought both positives and negatives. On the one hand, mining operations brought a steady paycheck to those who had largely lived by the alternating fortunes of farming. Conversely, the mines brought a sense of employment dependence and often unsafe working conditions. By the mid-1900s, mining safety had improved drastically from just a few years before. Battery powered lamps had replaced carbide lanterns and continuous automated mining equipment had taken over for the pick and shovel and draft animals. But, due to the nature of the work, accidents still injured miners. The Scotia Mine began operations in 1962 and was a subsidiary of the Blue Diamond Coal Company. It was located in the Ovenfork Community of Letcher County, about fourteen miles northeast of the town of Cumberland (Harlan County, Kentucky). On March 9, 1976, at approximately 11:45 a.m., an explosion caused by coal dust and gasses rocked the Scotia mine. Two days later, a second explosion happened. The first explosion killed fifteen miners; the second killed eleven. Investigators believed that the explosions were caused by methane gasses that were ignited by a spark caused by a battery-powered locomotive or another electric device. A lack of ventilation figured prominently in the accidents. The explosions at Scotia led to the passage of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977. This law strengthened the previously passed 1969 act, which, at the time, had been the most significant legislation on mine safety ever adopted in the U.S. The 1977 law also moved the Mine Safety and Health Administration from the Department of the Interior to the Department of Labor.
Views: 8330 Jo
Miner Tracking and Safety Software 2018 - NLT Digital Mine
 
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NLT Digital Mine makes mine safety and productivity possible - more info at http://www.nltinc.com/digitalmine NLT Digital Mine is NLT's Real-time Mine Monitoring and Action Suite. As a web-based tool, Digital Mine provides access to live information to anyone in a mine. Digital mine has modules for: -Tracking -Environmental Monitoring -Messaging -Control -Live dashboards and real-time displays -Productivity and administration To learn more about NLT Digital Mine and other solutions for miner safety and productivity, visit http://www.nltinc.com today!
Views: 446 NLTGlobal
Monongah 1907 Mine Disaster
 
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This short clip is from Davitt McAteer's 1985 25-minutes video - Monongah 1907. The entire video, rich with detail about this disaster also traces the development of mine safety laws in the US. Monongah 1907 is now available on DVD for $14.95. For ordering information, send an email to: [email protected] . And don't miss Davitt McAteer's book, Monongah: The Tragic Story of the 1907 Monongah Mine Disaster, the Worst Industrial Accident in U.S. History, recently published by the West Virginia University Press (2007) http://www.wvupress.com. "When I heard that Davitt McAteer was working on a book detailing the unparalleled disaster at the Monongah mines, I though it promising news ... no one is positioned better than Davitt MsAteer to examine the Monongah mining disaster of 1907 from all the perspectives required: historical, sociological, legal, and economic. Monongah is an important book, long overdue." From the Introduction by Robert B. Reich, former Secretary of the US Department of Labor, 1993 to 1997. Davitt McAteer, ESQ., a native of West Virginia, has devoted much of his professional efforts to mine health and safety issues. During the 1970s, Davitt led the safety and health programs of the United Mine Workers and founded the Occupational Safety and Health Law Center. During the Clinton Administration, he served as the Assistant Secretary for Mine Safety and Health at the United States Department of Labor. In January of 2006, West Virginia Governor Joe Manchin asked Mr. McAteer to serve as personal advisor and conduct an independent investigation into the cause or causes of the Sago Mine Disaster and the Aracoma Alma No. 1 Mine Fire, both of which occurred in January 2006.
Views: 51473 markdcatlin
Highwall Hazard Recognition
 
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Mine Safety and Health Administration If your job puts you on or near highwall operations, you need to be especially careful. This video shows an experienced truck driver training a new employee about the dangers of highwalls. More MHSA video here: http://www.archive.org/search.php?query=subject:%22mhsa.gov%22
Views: 4067 carlmalamud
aPHR Study Guide (2018) - Part 2
 
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Part 2 I'm sorry about the audio this time around. I didn't quite nail it. - Employment Law Legislation Con't - Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, 1997 (FCPA) Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health, 2009 (HITECH Act) Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, 1996 (HIPAA) The Immigration and Nationality Act, 1952 (INA) The Immigration Reform and Control Act, 1986 (IRCA) The IRS Intermediate Sanctions, 2002 The Labor Management Relations Act (Taft-Hartley Act),1947 (LMRA) The Labor Management Reporting and Disclosure Act, 1959 (Landrum-Griffin Act, LMRDA) The Mine Safety and Health Act, 1977 (MSHA) The National Industrial Recovery Act, 1933 (NIRA) The National Labor Relations Act, "The Wagner Act," 1935 (NLRA) The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) The Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act, 2000 (NSPA) The Norris-La Guardia Act, 1932 The Occupational Safety and Health Act, 1970 (OSH) The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) OSHA Inspections (Featuring Andrea Moen) --- Have Questions? Need consulting? CONSULT WITH ME: www.hsge.us NOTHING ON THIS CHANNEL CONSTITUTES LEGAL ADVICE!
Views: 6357 HR Whiplash!
Canaries in Mines
 
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Carbon monoxide, a potentially deadly gas devoid of color, taste or smell, can form underground during a mine fire or after a mine explosion. Today's coal miners must rely on carbon monoxide detectors and monitors to recognize its presence underground. However, before the availability of modern detection devices, miners turned to Mother Nature for assistance. Canaries -- and sometimes mice -- were used to alert miners to the presence of the poisonous gas. Following a mine fire or explosion, mine rescuers would descend into the mine carrying a canary in a small wooden or metal cage. Any sign of distress from the canary was a clear signal that the conditions underground were unsafe, prompting a hasty return to the surface. Miners who survive the initial effects of a mine fire or explosion may experience carbon monoxide asphyxia. According to tests conducted by the Bureau of Mines, canaries were preferred over mice to alert coal miners to the presence of carbon monoxide underground, because canaries more visibly demonstrated signs of distress in the presence of small quantities of the noxious gas. For instance, when consumed by the effects of carbon monoxide, a canary would sway noticeably on his perch before falling, a much better indicator of danger than the limited struggle and squatting, extended posture a mouse might assume. For more information on the use of canaries in mines, go to the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) website at http://www.msha.gov/century/canary/canary.asp . During the making of this film, the furor set off by the filmmaker's discoveries about certain practices in the Ag Chem Department of Occidental Chemical Company, at a plant in California, resulted in a nationwide ban on the production of the pesticide DBCP. The filmmakers discovered that every one of the plant's employees involved in the production of that chemical had become sterile. Other abuses are also brought to light. The second half of the film reveals the sorry conditions that workers must endure in textile plants in the American South. This is clipped from the 1979 classic occupational health film, Song of the Canary, by Josh Hanig and David Davis. Song of the Canary is available New Day Films at http://www.newday.com/films_title.html?letter=S .
Views: 8328 markdcatlin
Connecting the Sampling Train - Dust Sampling
 
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Mine Safety and Health Administration Connecting the Sampling Train - Dust Sampling This is Part 2 of 4 Parts DVD011 - 2005 - Respirable Dust Sampling
Views: 11973 PublicResourceOrg
Respirator Testing and Certification 1934
 
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This clip shows the testing of a new air-purifying respirator for approval by the US Bureau of Mines in 1934. Currently all respirators used in US workplaces must be similarly testing and certified by NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health). NIOSH has administered the respirator certification program since 1972, and traces its origins to the early years of the U.S. Bureau of Mines. The Bureau of Mines was created within the Dept of Interior in 1910, and began the development of Schedules covering the design, testing and evaluation of mine emergency respiratory protection equipment. Since then schedules have been published for self contained breathing apparatus for use in mine rescue; gas masks and Air Purifying Respirators to be used by escaping miners during an emergency; airline respirators; gas and vapor-removal (chemical cartridge); and dust-filtration (particulate). The 1969 Federal Mine Health and Safety Act mandated joint approval of respirators by the Departments of Interior and Health, Education and Welfare, and the 1970 Occupational Safety and Health Act created NIOSH. In 1972, NIOSH and the Bureau consolidated the various approval schedules into federal regulations under Title 30, Mineral Resources, of the Code of Federal Regulations. Administration of the respirator approval program was transferred to NIOSH from the U.S. Bureau of Mines. The respirator approval program began to gain increased significance as regulations published by the OSHA and other federal agencies also begin to require the use of approved or accepted respirators in American workplaces. Approval responsibility within the DOI was transferred in 1973 to MESA, formed from the Bureau of Mines under the Act. The MESA was re-designated as the MSHA and transferred from the DOI to the Department of Labor with the respirator approval mandate under the 1977 Mine Act. All respirator approvals were issued jointly by the MSHA and NIOSH until 1995, when the approval requirements for respiratory protection devices were transferred to Title 42, Public Health, of the Code of Federal Regulations. Under current DHHS respirator approval regulations, NIOSH is the sole approving authority for most respirators. MSHA is a co-approver with NIOSH for respirator designs intended for mine rescue and other emergency use in mines. For more about NIOSHs respirator program go to http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npptl/topics/respirators/ . This is clipped from the 1940s film, The Air We Breathe, a ppromotional documentary from the Mine Safety Appliances Company (MSA) on the importance of the air respirator to industrial health and safety. At the end, the film explains that industry and government cooperation has removed the "menace in the air" and urges workers in various industries to use the respirator. This film is available from the National Archives (NARA).
Views: 3626 markdcatlin
OHV Mine Safety Video # 2
 
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OHV Mine Safety Video # 2
Views: 443 Eduardo Duque
Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 4 of 5
 
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Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 4 of 5 Letcher County notes the tragic mine explosions that occurred at Scotia Mine in 1976. The accidents are noted as being one of the worst mine disasters in U.S. history. When industrial coal mining came to the mountains of southeastern Kentucky in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, it brought both positives and negatives. On the one hand, mining operations brought a steady paycheck to those who had largely lived by the alternating fortunes of farming. Conversely, the mines brought a sense of employment dependence and often unsafe working conditions. By the mid-1900s, mining safety had improved drastically from just a few years before. Battery powered lamps had replaced carbide lanterns and continuous automated mining equipment had taken over for the pick and shovel and draft animals. But, due to the nature of the work, accidents still injured miners. The Scotia Mine began operations in 1962 and was a subsidiary of the Blue Diamond Coal Company. It was located in the Ovenfork Community of Letcher County, about fourteen miles northeast of the town of Cumberland (Harlan County, Kentucky). On March 9, 1976, at approximately 11:45 a.m., an explosion caused by coal dust and gasses rocked the Scotia mine. Two days later, a second explosion happened. The first explosion killed fifteen miners; the second killed eleven. Investigators believed that the explosions were caused by methane gasses that were ignited by a spark caused by a battery-powered locomotive or another electric device. A lack of ventilation figured prominently in the accidents. The explosions at Scotia led to the passage of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977. This law strengthened the previously passed 1969 act, which, at the time, had been the most significant legislation on mine safety ever adopted in the U.S. The 1977 law also moved the Mine Safety and Health Administration from the Department of the Interior to the Department of Labor.
Views: 1770 Jo
President Nixon's Remarks at the OSHA Signing Ceremony 1970
 
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These are the remarks of President Richard Nixon before signing the OSHAct into law on December 29, 1970. A written copy of these remarks can be found at http://www.bobsuniverse.com/BWAH/37-Nixon/19701229a.pdf . The House of Representatives had voted 308--60 for the OSHAct, and the Senate adopted it on a voice vote without debate. Sometimes referred to as the Williams-Steiger Act, after its chief sponsors, Democratic Senator Harrison Williams of New Jersey and Republican Representative William Steiger of Wisconsin, the act is known mostly by its familiar acronym, OSHA. Congress passed OSHA "to assure so far as possible every working man and woman in the Nation safe and healthful working conditions." To meet this lofty goal, Congress created a vast federal bureaucracy empowered to regulate most businesses. OSHA touches nearly every American workplace and has become a landmark in the history of labor, employment, and public health law. State regulation of workplace safety began as part of the Progressive response to the industrial revolution during the late nineteenth century. Early in the twentieth century, the burgeoning labor movement lobbied successfully for further regulation. Eventually, the federal government became involved in workplace safety during Franklin Roosevelt's presidency. In 1936, as part of Roosevelt's New Deal, Congress passed the Walsh-Healey Public Contracts Act, which allowed the Department of Labor to ban federal contract work done under hazardous conditions. Under the leadership of Frances Perkins, Roosevelt's secretary of labor and the first woman cabinet member, the federal government aggressively asserted its authority to regulate private business. By the 1960s, however, changes in American industry exposed the ineffectiveness of existing state and federal laws. In 1965, the Public Health Service published an influential report that outlined some of the recently discovered technological dangers, including chemicals linked to cancer. The report called for a major national occupational health effort, criticizing existing federal law as too limited and state programs as uncoordinated and insufficient. The AFL-CIO and other labor organizations urged President Lyndon Johnson to support the report's recommendations. In 1966, President Johnson directed his secretary of labor, Willard Wirtz, to develop a comprehensive national program to protect workers. In the wake of alarming revelations about cancer among uranium miners, Johnson adopted Secretary Wirtz's plan, in 1968, and urged Congress to act. Congress promptly introduced bills embodying the administration's proposal. Wirtz lobbied vigorously for the bills. He testified that each year 14,500 workers died, 2 million were disabled, and more than 7 million hurt as a result of industrial accidents, and that these numbers were steadily rising. He criticized state, local, and private programs as inadequate and fragmented and federal programs as incomplete. Labor unions, public interest groups, and health professionals supported the bills. Industry representatives opposed them. In part because of this opposition, the bills failed to pass Congress in 1968. They also failed because Vietnam War protest, President Johnson's decision not to run for reelection, riots in the inner cities, and other events diverted congressional and national attention away from worker safety and health. In 1969, President Nixon also called for the enactment of a federal occupational safety and health law, though his proposal was substantially weaker than the one introduced by his predecessor. Republicans in Congress introduced bills reflecting the administration's proposal, and, sensing that some worker safety law must pass, industry switched its position and supported these bills. Democrats in Congress introduced stronger legislation supported by the labor unions, a nascent environmental movement, and consumer advocates like Ralph Nader. Ultimately, the House of Representatives voted 308--60 in support of the compromise bill, and the Senate adopted it on a voice vote without debate. Soon after its passage, OSHA became a powerful presence in American workplaces. Many businesses deeply resented the government for telling them how to operate, and the act provoked much controversy. Despite this controversy, however, OSHA itself has remained relatively unchanged. It has only been amended once, in 1998, but these amendments were relatively minor. For more on the history and accomplishments of OSHA, go to http://www.osha.gov/history/OSHA_HISTORY_3360s.pdf . The recording of these remarks was obtained from the US National Archive in College Park, Maryland.
Views: 2786 markdcatlin
MSHA Electrical
 
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This is a clip from the digital training module we have at www.msha46.com
Views: 1106 Terry Weston
OSHA Hazard Communication and HazCom 2012
 
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There’s been a lot of confusion regarding OSHA’s upcoming HazCom 2012 standards, how GHS is incorporated and what a compliant HazCom label looks like. Before the HazCom 2012 standards went into effect, OSHA’s rules for labeling hazardous materials were called Right-To-Know, or RTK standards. Under the RTK standards employers were required to label chemical hazards but were not given label format requirements. This meant multiple label formats were created and used, which led to confusion. This short video will go over what a HazCom compliant label looks like, the elements that comprise it, and the newly required elements of a safety data sheet. Graphic Products is committed to keeping our customers up-to-date on the latest requirements and standards for a wide variety of industries. Graphic Products features Best Practice Guides on industrial topics such as arc flash, GHS, lockout/tagout, floor marking, OSHA sign compliance or mine safety to get you the answers you need to keep OSHA fines at bay and workers safe. To get your free copy of the Graphic Product’s HazCom 2012 Best Practice Guide, visit https://goo.gl/wjiS97 To keep up on industry standards, hear the latest OSHA news or to get the inside scoop from the safety experts: subscribe to our channel, like is on Facebook or follow us on LinkedIn, Google+ or Twitter! Facebook https://www.facebook.com/DuraLabelPrinters?ref=aymt_homepage_panel LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/company/graphic-products Google+ https://plus.google.com/+Graphicproductsinc/posts Twitter https://twitter.com/graphicproducts
Views: 8173 Graphic Products
Workplace Health and Safety Induction - Occupational Health and Safety Information (OH&S / WHS)
 
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Workplace Health and Safety (WHS) Induction film for work experience and work for dole participants. Provides a comprehensive overview of occupational health and safety protocol and regulations within Australia. OH&S - Health and Safety Induction An Into People Inc. production. http://www.intopeopleinc.org
Views: 128108 Into People Inc
Federal officials say the Upper Big Branch mine was closed by the government 29 times in the past ye
 
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HEADLINE: History of safety violations at West Virginia mine CAPTION: Federal officials say the Upper Big Branch mine was closed by the government 29 times in the past year for various safety violations. A congressman from the area says miners told him they were afraid to go back into the mine. (April 7) Montcoal, WV THE COAL MINE THAT EXPLODED MONDAY HAS HISTORY OF SAFETY VIOLATIONS. UPPER BIG BRANCH MINE WAS CLOSED 29 TIMES IN THE LAST YEAR BY THE GOVERNMENT. Kevin Stricklin/MSHA "My people do not have the authority to permanently shut down a mine. We can only shut down a mine until the condition is corrected." KEVIN STRICKLIN FROM THE MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION SAYS THERE ARE MINES IN THE U.S. THAT HAVE RECEIVED TWICE AS MANY VIOLATIONS AS UPPER BIG BRANCH. Kevin Stricklin/MSHA "The teeth we have regardless of their process of assessing it or taking it to court, my guys have the ability to tell them to correct the condition right now." CONGRESSMAN NICK RAHALL REPRESENTS THIS DISTRICT ... AND SAYS THAT MINERS FROM THIS SAME MINE CAME TO HIM WITHIN THE LAST TWO MONTHS TO COMPLAIN ABOUT UNSAFE WORKING CONDITIONS. Rep. Nick Rahall/D-WV "the fact there has been closures due to unsafe ventilation or methane buildup and that they felt under duress, under stress when they went back to work." RAHALL SAYS THE MINERS WERE SCARED THEY WOULD LOSE THEIR JOBS SO THEY DON''T WANT THEIR NAMES KNOWN. BUT HE WON''T CONFIRM IF ANY OF THOSE MINERS DIED IN THIS MINE EXPLOSION. MARK CARLSON/STANDUP RIGHT NOW EVERYONE IS FOCUSSED ON RESCUE AND RECOVERY. ONCE THOSE STEPS ARE COMPLETE, THE GOVERNOR SAYS THE ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION WILL BE SWIFT. MARK CARLSON/AP/MONT COAL, WV. ANCHOR VOICE: Mark Carlson VIDEO PRODUCER: Mark/Donna VIDEO SOURCE: AP VIDEO APPROVAL: Donna Starddard VIDEO RESTRICTIONS: None SCRIPT/WIRE SOURCE: a1124 BC-US--Mine Explosion-Enforcement, 5th Ld-Wri You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/207fca56935df9b346f1c42521b04277 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 120 AP Archive
Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 2 of 5
 
13:02
Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 2 of 5 Letcher County notes the tragic mine explosions that occurred at Scotia Mine in 1976. The accidents are noted as being one of the worst mine disasters in U.S. history. When industrial coal mining came to the mountains of southeastern Kentucky in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, it brought both positives and negatives. On the one hand, mining operations brought a steady paycheck to those who had largely lived by the alternating fortunes of farming. Conversely, the mines brought a sense of employment dependence and often unsafe working conditions. By the mid-1900s, mining safety had improved drastically from just a few years before. Battery powered lamps had replaced carbide lanterns and continuous automated mining equipment had taken over for the pick and shovel and draft animals. But, due to the nature of the work, accidents still injured miners. The Scotia Mine began operations in 1962 and was a subsidiary of the Blue Diamond Coal Company. It was located in the Ovenfork Community of Letcher County, about fourteen miles northeast of the town of Cumberland (Harlan County, Kentucky). On March 9, 1976, at approximately 11:45 a.m., an explosion caused by coal dust and gasses rocked the Scotia mine. Two days later, a second explosion happened. The first explosion killed fifteen miners; the second killed eleven. Investigators believed that the explosions were caused by methane gasses that were ignited by a spark caused by a battery-powered locomotive or another electric device. A lack of ventilation figured prominently in the accidents. The explosions at Scotia led to the passage of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977. This law strengthened the previously passed 1969 act, which, at the time, had been the most significant legislation on mine safety ever adopted in the U.S. The 1977 law also moved the Mine Safety and Health Administration from the Department of the Interior to the Department of Labor.
Views: 3020 Jo
Primary Standard Gas Flow Calibration Systems
 
07:06
Learn how the CalTrak line of primary standard gas flow calibration systems offers end-users fast, easy and accurate mass flow meter and controller validation and calibration in a wide range of applications. Discover the full line at: http://www.sierrainstruments.com/products/flow-calibrators.html Primary standard gas flow calibration systems deliver world-class levels of precision and traceability to flow, reliability and quality labs, or critical industrial hygiene, occupational health, and environmental tools. Primary standard calibrators have wide acceptance for quality control in the manufacturing of air samplers, gas chromatographs, mine safety appliances, OSHA --required respirators and masks, and in hospital and medical devices. For the most accurate calibrations, your gas flow calibration systems should be based on primary standards, not transfer standards. Primary standards are characterized by the basic quantities of time and distance, while transfer or secondary standards, such as laminar flow elements, are calibrated against another device, generally another flow meter. They can also be verified by every national laboratory. This guarantees that the main objective of any calibration is met: reliable, accurate calibrations that are easily traceable to national standards. Sierra Instruments offers a wide range of high-performance digital mass flow meters and controllers, all based on primary standard calibration. This core competency has been extended to the CalTrak line of primary standard calibration systems. These products offer end-users primary standard gas mass flow and volume calibrators for a wide range of applications. All of the flow calibration systems are manufactured to ISO 17025 standards at a NVLAP accredited lab using assets that are directly traceable to NIST. Battery-operated portability, ease-of-use and above all accuracy, are the hallmarks of the CalTrak line of primary flow standards. CalTrak features easy to use push button interface and our CalSoft software. This software makes it fast and easy for end users to collect and use the data they need. Let's look at the entire product line. The CalTrak 500 has plus or minus 0.35% of reading mass flow accuracy and a flow range from 5 sccm up to 50 slpm. The CalTrak 800 is our top of the line modular unit at a mass flow accuracy of plus or minus 0.15% of reading and an expanded flow range from 5 sccm up to 100 slpm. Each system comes with a base and three modular flow cells that can be easily switched out depending on flow rate. Save money by buying only the cell you need, or buy all three for ultimate flexibility. Both models are for inert gases only, ideally suited for Mass Flow Meter and Mass Flow Control calibration for owners and users of many instruments (more than 25) that require calibration/verification one or more times a year. The CalTrak 850 is a high accuracy all-in-one configuration optimized to calibrate or verify mass flow controllers used in the semiconductor industry. Semiconductor gases are toxic or corrosive, and the 850 has been designed with wetted materials that are compatible with many of these gases. End-users transport the portable 850 for factory floor measurements, turn on and start taking measurements. This saves large semiconductor manufacturers thousands of dollars in calibration costs of their mass flow controllers. For very high flows, choose the CalTrak XL. It is designed to replace old-fashioned bell-prover technology. The XL can flow up to 500 slpm with plus or minus 0.25% of reading accuracy and up to 1500 slpm at 0.30% reading accuracy. The CalTrak 300 is the most economical product in the line. The 300 is a primary standard gas flow volume only calibrator for the industrial hygiene and occupational health industries. Since these calibrations are usually made at atmospheric pressure, most users only require volumetric readings at relatively low flows. The flow range is from 5 ccm up to 30,000 ccm (30 L/min) and the volumetric accuracy is plus or minus 0.1% of reading. This portable calibrator is used primarily for quality control in the manufacturing of respirator equipment, personal sampling pumps and other industrial hygiene equipment. Other key markets include occupational safety and health, administration-mandated respirators and masks, mine safety appliances (MSA), military and many large hospital supply companies. The CalTrak 350 is our economical primary standard gas mass flow calibrator for industrial and environmental applications. The 350 offers calibrations and verification of critical industrial and environmental tools, including quality control for manufacturers of air samplers, gas chromatographs, and particle counters. Typically, these devices contain other mass flow meters or controllers which need to be verified during the manufacturing process. The accuracy is plus or minus 1% of reading mass flow rate with flow ranges from 5 sccm up to 50 slpm.
Fire Extinguisher Training - PASS - Fire Safety Training Video
 
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Fire Extinguisher Training - PASS - Fire Safety Training Video The use of a fire extinguisher in the hands of a trained adult can be a life and property saving tool. However, a majority of adults have not had fire extinguisher training and may not know how and when to use them. This short video explains how to properly inspect fire extinguishers. It then covers the P.A.S.S. system for proper, effective fire extinguisher usage. Share this video with your family, friends, relatives, co-workers, employees and people in your community. It provides valuable training in how to use fire extinguishers in an emergency. Remember: The life you save may be your own. For more videos like this one, see our channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/SafetyMemos Never miss a new safety video! Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=safetymemos Extinguisher Basics: https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/evacuation/portable_about.html Fire Extinguishers - A FEMA site: http://www.usfa.fema.gov/citizens/home_fire_prev/extinguishers.shtm Extinguisher Placement and Spacing: https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/evacuation/portable_placement.html
Views: 602923 Safety Memos
Clean Energy, Chinese Competition and California's Imperial Valley
 
28:30
Energy was high on the list of contentious issues facing President Obama and Chinese leader Hu Jintao as they met in Washington this week. The two leaders signed agreements encouraging business partnerships on clean energy and technology, as well as a Clean Energy Research Center. Research and development facilities located here and in China will focus on energy efficiency, carbon capture, and clean vehicles. China is also about to become the world leader in developing clean energy sources - leaping ahead, says the U.S., because of controversial development and trade policies. In Part 3 of his China Factor series, "Clean Energy Competition," chief correspondent Tyler Suiters traveled to China, and saw firsthand why it's becoming the world's clean energy leader. He also talks to experts and industry leaders here in the U.S., who tell him what this country needs to do to regain its edge. On "The Mix," panelists Aimee Christensen of Christensen Global Strategies, Ken Green of the American Enterprise Institute and Mark Fulton, Global Head of Climate Change Investment Research at Deutsche Bank, debate clean energy jobs: How they're defined and the best way to get more of them in this struggling economy. On "Plugged-In" this week, Massachusetts is demanding money back from a solar company that took millions in state aid and is now moving to China. The Mine Safety and Health Administration says Massey Energy could have averted the deaths of 29 coal miners last April if it had properly maintained mining and safety equipment. And President Obama has named General Electric chief Jeffery Immelt to head his new Council on Jobs and Competitiveness. Finally, in Taking Charge: The Promised Land for Renewables, Lee Patrick Sullivan visits Imperial Valley, California, where the state has hit the green jackpot with an abundance of energy resources: Wind, solar, geothermal and algae power. Lee Patrick looks at what is being done in California's poorest county to develop those resources.
Views: 4244 energynownews
Customer and Delivery Truck Drivers Hazard Training
 
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Mine Safety and Health Administration Customer and Delivery Truck Drivers Hazard Training DVD includes both English and Spanish versions -- This video provides hazard information for truckers who frequent mine sites. Covered are safe work behaviors that will help truck drivers avoid the dangers of ground, electrical, transportation, slip and fall, and numerous other hazards that are common in and around mine sites. This video comes with an 8-page guide. Capacitación de riesgos para los choferes de camiones de reparto y de los clientes Este video familiariza a los choferes, que llevan productos a las minas, con los factores de riesgo más comunes que hay en la industria minera. Además, recomienda algunos consejos para evitar accidentes ocasionados por el terreno, la electricidad, el transporte, los resbalones y caídas o por otros riesgos inherentes a las minas. Este video viene con una guía de ocho páginas.
Views: 12683 PublicResourceOrg
Jeffrey Hunter - Energy, Environment and Resources Law Attorney Profile - Perkins Coie
 
01:45
For over 20 years, Jeff Hunter has been counseling corporate, governmental and individual clients both in the United States and internationally on a wide variety of issues related to the environment including: regulatory compliance; administrative enforcement and environmental litigation including white collar criminal matters; permitting and development and defending against permit challenges; cleanup and redevelopment of contaminated industrial and commercial properties and brownfield redevelopment projects; and environmental due diligence in real estate and corporate transactions. Jeff’s environmental counseling and administrative enforcement experience includes extensive representation related to the Clean Air Act (CAA), the Clean Water Act (CWA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act (HMTA), the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), the Emergency Planning & Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the Mine Safety and Health Act (MSHA), state laws operating in lieu of the federal environmental programs; state electronic-waste recycling laws; state product labeling and reporting laws including California Proposition 65 and children’s safe products, and international laws regarding the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS), Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) and the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH). Jeff has lead and advised clients on internal investigations and audits relating to environmental compliance, disclosure of the findings, development of environmental compliance management systems and obtaining ISO 14001 certification.
Views: 43 Perkins Coie
Occupational Safety Introduction
 
02:47
The Department of Occupational & Environmental Safety & Health (OESH) prepares students for rewarding careers protecting America's workforce, the public and the natural environment. As Environmental Safety & Health (ESH) professionals, our graduates are concerned with the interaction between people and the physical, chemical, biological and psychological factors which affect safety, health and productivity. Coursework covers a wide range of subjects including approaches to accident prevention, environmental protection, ergonomics, fire prevention, and legal aspects among others. The students are provided with essential skills that enable them to recognize hazards, and to devise and implement methods to control those risks. In addition, students are provided with a number of practical work site experiences, culminating in a full semester internship with a practicing ESH professional.
Views: 1530 UWW CoBE
Silicosis  A Preventable Disease
 
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Mine Safety and Health Administration Silicosis: A Preventable Disease DVD includes both English and Spanish versions -- An employee's questions about the health effects of silica dust exposure are answered. Silicosis : una enfermedad que se puede prevenir En este video vemos cómo un médico responde las preguntas de un empleadoacerca de los riesgos que representa el trabajar con sílice. MSHA 1999 17 min Cat No: DVD 532-S
Views: 68 SAFE TEAM
Fall Protection: Your Lifeline to Safety (2000)
 
11:04
𝐖𝐞 𝐇𝐈𝐆𝐇𝐋𝐘 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐚𝐭𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐨 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐠𝐨𝐨𝐝 (𝐛𝐞𝐲𝐞𝐫𝐝𝐲𝐧𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐃𝐓 𝟗𝟗𝟎 𝐏𝐑𝐎 𝐎𝐯𝐞𝐫-𝐄𝐚𝐫 𝐒𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐢𝐨) 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐝𝐩𝐡𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐬, 𝐜𝐥𝐢𝐜𝐤 𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞: ► ► ► ► https://amzn.to/2GhkjFJ ◄ ◄ 𝐒𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐮𝐩 𝐭𝐨 𝟖𝟎% 𝐨𝐟𝐟 𝐨𝐧 𝐞𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐢𝐜𝐬, 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐮𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬, 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐝𝐩𝐡𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐌𝐎𝐑𝐄 𝐛𝐲 𝐛𝐫𝐨𝐰𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐀𝐦𝐚𝐳𝐨𝐧'𝐬 𝐝𝐚𝐢𝐥𝐲 𝐝𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐬! 𝐂𝐥𝐢𝐜𝐤 𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞: https://amzn.to/2IsLkr0 Equipment: Camera (Canon EOS Rebel T6): https://amzn.to/2Id1sxJ Speakers (Bose SoundLink Color Bluetooth speaker II): https://amzn.to/2D7BYxo Headphones (beyerdynamic DT 990 PRO Over-Ear Studio Headphones): https://amzn.to/2GhkjFJ Editing Software (Sony Vegas 15): https://amzn.to/2DlmV3x Monitor (ASUS VG248QE 24" Full HD 1920x1080 144Hz): https://amzn.to/2IeA02v Mouse (Logitech G502): https://amzn.to/2D7C73U * The above are affiliate links. This channel participates in the Amazon Affiliate program. Please consider leaving a like and subscribing if you enjoyed the content. It helps tremendously, thank you! This content is licensed under Creative Commons. Please visit https://archive.org/details/gov.msha.dvd506.e to see licensing information and check https://creativecommons.org/licenses/ for more information about the respective license(s). Description: Mine Safety and Health Administration Fall Protection: Your Lifeline to Safety DVD506-S - 2000 This video provides an overview of the hazards associated with doing work at elevated locations and the importance of fall protection. Common types of fall protection systems are presented, including personal fall arrest and restraint devices. Special emphasis is placed on the development of site-specific policies and procedures, with regard to fall protection regulations in the mining industries. Credit: Mine Safety and Health Administration 2000
Views: 24 Tempus Archivum
thyssenkrupp Attends Sustainability Event in Spain
 
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Your daily industry news update: www.elevatorworld.com/industry-news/february-22-2017/ Elevator World is the leading publisher for the International Building Transportation Industry. Our magazines cover the latest news, events, new technologies, market trends and education. Sign up for a print subscription or read the issue on any tablet, PC or mobile device. Purchase a one-year subscription or any single issue on the Elevator World apps available at no extra charge from the Apple or Amazon App stores. Purchase "Full-Cab A18.1/B355 Lifts - An Alternative to LU/LA Elevators" http://www.elevatorbooks.com/Products/EW0217/2017-february-fullcab-a181b355-lifts--an-alternative-to-lula-elevators.aspx THYSSENKRUPP ATTENDS SUSTAINABILITY EVENT IN SPAIN thyssenkrupp attended the 11th annual Cotec Europe Summit in Madrid in February, emphasizing its commitment to reducing waste and energy consumption through support of event host Cotec Foundation, a nonprofit with “a mission to promote innovation as a catalyst for economic and social development.” Chaired by King of Spain Felipe VI and attended by high-ranking officials from Spain, Italy and Portugal, the event was a chance for Cotec to share its first report addressing the circular economy theme. Javier Sesma, general manager of thyssenkrupp’s Innovation Center in Gijon, Spain, states energy-friendly products such as the company’s ACCEL and iwalk moving walks are “poised to change the way people will commute in cities.” LABOR SECRETARY, MSHA: MINE ELEVATORS ARE “WORKING PLACES” The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) and the Secretary of Labor contend mine elevators are "working places" as defined by federal regulations and subject to the same oversight as areas where work is performed, Aggregates Manager reports. The regulations state "a competent person designated by the operator shall examine each working place at least once each shift for conditions that may adversely affect safety or health" and that the operator must promptly take action if problems are found. Citations for failure to do this have been issued. Administrative Law Judges (ALJ) have denied the broadened "working places" definition, agreeing with the mining industry's contention that elevators are simply conveyances, rather than working spaces. ALJs advise mine operators to keep meticulous records to support potential challenges. FOUR ELEVATORS FOR JAKARTA ELEVATED BUS ROUTE City-owned bus operator TransJakarta plans to install a total of four elevators at two passenger shelters in South Jakarta, Indonesia, The Jakarta Post reports. The shelters are at CSW and Velbak, and are along the new corridor 13 elevated route nearing completion connecting South Jakarta and the western suburbs. The elevators, along with the new route, are expected to be operational in June. Subscribe to ELEVATOR WORLD magazine: http://www.elevatorbooks.com/Products/CategoryCenter/SUBS/Subscriptions.aspx Online bookstore: www.elevatorbooks.com Blog: www.elevatorworldunplugged.com Website: www.elevatorworld.com Submit your photos to our 2017 Elevator World Photo Contest! http://www.elevatorworld.com/photocontest Sign up for our newsletters at elevatorworld.com Image courtesy of thyssenkrupp: https://www.thyssenkrupp-elevator.com/uk/press/press-releases/press-release-data-source-45568.html
Best Safety Officer Course (Nebosh / Iosh / Osha)
 
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Welfare institute is one of the best institutes in India. We concentrate in quality training for students. Lots of students have got their jobs in India and Abroad with excellent salary & facilities after completing their courses by us. We guide students to shape their future as per their education and economic condition. There is no discrimination for religion, caste, culture or language. One must contact to do a job oriented course and get a job with an excellent salary and position. Students certificate will be government registered and (An ISO 9001:2015 & OHSAS 18001: 2007) at the same time certificate will be shown online (in our two websites) for certificate verification. COURSES OFFERED Safety Officer Course/ Nebosh-(HSW/IGC/ Oil & Gas/ Nebosh-International Diploma)--(UK-England)/IOSH(MS-5.0)/OSHA/GOHSB/NEOSH/IASP/British Safety Council International Diploma (I-Dip OSH--Eligibility for GradIOSH)/OSHA(30 hours-USA)/ EMS/ OHSAS-LEAD AUDITOR(IRCA)/ Registered Safety Officer (RSO-USA), Registered Safety Manager (RSM-USA), Registered Safety Professional (RSP-USA), Registered Environmental Officer (REO-USA), Registered Mine Safety Office (RMSO-USA), Registered Radiation Safety Officer (RRSO-USA), Registered Aviation Safety Officer (RASO-USA), Registered Healthcare Safety Officer (RHSO-USA) Train The Trainer (TTTP) /NVQ / Fire & Safety/Firefighting/Forklift/JCB/ Excavator/Mobile Crane/Tower Crane/Overhead Crane/Dozer/Loader/AC technician (HVAC)/HVAC Software Designing/ Plumbing/ Plumbing Software Designing//Welding (Argon+Arch)/QA/QC/NDT-(Level-II)/Instrument technician/ Water treatment/Insulator/Pipe fitter/Electrician/Autocad (Draftman)/Catia & many more….. Great discount with 100% regular excellent training by highly qualified, experienced and gulf returned teachers with course material.----(Own practical lab & Plant visit as per course) Career & future counselling completely free with strong motivational speech. Please feel free to give a call or miss call to get all the informations and send it to your relative and friends for the benefit of India. Contact: Asif Qamar (Director) Welfare Industrial Training Institute A government registered & An (ISO 9001:2015 & OHSAS 18001: 2007) certified Institute Ground Floor, 67-Dhatkidih market area (Near Sharma Hotel), Jamshedpur (TATA), Jharkhand, India. What’s up: 9162187216 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/asifhsemanager Call.: +91-8448448432/9162187216/9031409612/8409810924/7070474599 E-mail: [email protected]/[email protected] Website: www.safetyexcellencecenter.com/ www.welfareinstitute.in Office timing: 8.30 a.m. to 5.30 p.m. (Sunday Closed)
Views: 51 Asif Qamar
EIA's Coal Data Browser Tour
 
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The U.S. Energy Information Administration has released its interactive, online Coal Data Browser, a tool with comprehensive government information, statistics, and visualizations about the U.S. coal sector. The Coal Data Browser gives users easy access to a vast array of coal information from EIA's electricity and coal surveys. The browser also allows users to dig through data from the Mine Safety and Health Administration and through coal trade information from the U.S. Census Bureau. Learn to use this tool by watching this video.
Views: 637 EIAgov
Safety: OSHA's Final Ruling on Beryllium (10x's LOWER than prior PEL)
 
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OSHA has yet another final ruling on a substance known as beryllium. Thousands of employers will be affected by this new standard so take a few minutes to watch this video and educate yourself and your team on the changes. They are 10x's lower than the previous PEL...Huge changes
Views: 1568 Summit Safety Group