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Search results “Industrial mining safety and health administration”
Front-End Loader Safety (1994) - Mine Safety and Health Administration - CharlieDeanArchives
 
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Front-End Loader Safety (C/MNM) Based upon records of actual mining accidents, this video describes some of the fatalities and injuries that can occur in the use (and misuse) of front-end loaders (particularly if the operator is inattentive, careless, disobeys safety rules, and/or takes unnecessary chances). It analyzes these accidents, explains causes and preventive measures, and presents safe operating procedures for various work assignments. This video is designed to motivate front-end loader operators to adopt safe driving and operating habits and to develop a positive attitude toward mine haulage safety in general. MSHA Rev 1994 14 min . CharlieDeanArchives - Archive footage from the 20th century making history come alive!
Views: 3310 Charlie Dean Archives
DAWN OF A NEW DAY - MSA Mining Safety Film
 
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DAWN OF A NEW DAY - MSA COAL MINING Safety Film Mine Safety and Health Administration Dawn of a New Day: Continuous Haulage Safety - (1998) This video addresses the hazards associated with continuous face haulage systems. - SUBSCRIBE to Bright Enlightenment: http://www.youtube.com/BrightEnlightenment - LIKE our page on Facebook: http://www.Facebook.com/BrightEnlightenment - TWITTER: http://www.twitter.com/BrightEnlightenment WEBSITE: http://www.BrightEnlightenment.com #BRIGHTENLIGHTENMENT #DOCUMENTARY #MINING #SAFETY #ENGINEERING #COAL #ENERGY INDUSTRIAL #OSHA #COALMINING
Views: 6153 Bright Enlightenment
Occupational Safety and Health Act
 
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By making employers and employees more aware of safety and health considerations, OSHA has significantly affected organizations. The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 was enacted to ensure that the health and safety of workers would be protected. Every employer that is engaged in commerce and has one or more employees must comply with the act. Employers in specific industries, such as railroads and mining, are covered under other health and safety acts. A major responsibility of OSHA is to enforce safety regulations in an effort to reduce injuries and illnesses in the workplace. Enforcement includes creating guidelines and rules, investigating, inspecting, and levying fines. Compliance officers have great discretion and authority to ensure worker safety. While national safety statistics show improvement, there are still noteworthy tragic accidents that result in significant human and financial loss.
Views: 390 Gregg Learning
Open ( Mine Safety ): Personal Stories of Government Accountability
 
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The challenge in working for government transparency is that you are always working against its opposite: opacity. What we don't see is often what's most harmful to us. When the Upper Big Branch Mine exploded in West Virginia last April and killed 29 miners, we were surprised because most of us had never seen it coming. The sad thing is, many of the experts didn't see it coming either. http://blog.sunlightfoundation.com/2010/10/13/mine-safety-and-the-story-of-openness/ MUSIC: Black Lung by Hazel Dickens Blimp by James Beaudreau Sometimes Having a Bad Attitude is All it Takes by Harris Newman Lords and Ladies/Wall Socket Protector by Harris Newman VIDEO USAGE License: Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/ Attribution notes: Attribute all uses to "the Sunlight Foundation" and email [email protected] with the location and purpose of your derivative work. You also must add the attribution made to the musical artist scoring the piece using the information above. Thanks!
Views: 567 SunlightFoundation
Roof Evaluations and Decisions
 
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Mine Safety and Health Administration Roof Evaluations and Decisions Encourages miners to visually inspect and evaluate the roof and ribs of their working place, and instructs them on how to identify the hazardous roof conditions they may encounter. This is Part 2 of 3 Parts MSHA DVD 005 - 2004 - Roof Control
Views: 5498 PublicResourceOrg
Safety Questions and Answers
 
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This video was presented during the weekly safety meeting in Saudi Aramco. It briefly discussed different information about safety in work. Due credits were given to the owners of the video clips.
Views: 365168 Alex V. Villamayor
Highwall Hazard Recognition
 
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Mine Safety and Health Administration If your job puts you on or near highwall operations, you need to be especially careful. This video shows an experienced truck driver training a new employee about the dangers of highwalls. More MHSA video here: http://www.archive.org/search.php?query=subject:%22mhsa.gov%22
Views: 4037 carlmalamud
All About #SafeAndSound2018
 
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Join us for Safe + Sound Week, August 13-19, 2018 What Is Safe + Sound Week? A nationwide event to raise awareness and understanding of the value of safety and health programs that include management leadership, worker participation, and a systematic approach to finding and fixing hazards in workplaces. Why Participate? Safe workplaces are sound businesses. Successful safety and health programs can proactively identify and manage workplace hazards before they cause injury or illness, improving sustainability and the bottom line. Participating in Safe + Sound Week can help get your program started or energize an existing one. Who Is Encouraged to Participate? Organizations of any size or in any industry looking for an opportunity to show their commitment to safety to workers, customers, the public, or supply chain partners should participate. How to Participate Participating in Safe + Sound Week is easy. To get started, select the activities you would like to do at your workplace. You can host an event just for your workers or host a public event to engage your community. Examples of potential activities and tools to help you plan and promote your events are available. After you've completed your events, you can download a certificate and web badge to recognize your organization and your workers. For more information, visit www.osha.gov/safeandsound/ www.aiha.org Content clips used under Creative Commons License, provided by: Utility Safety in Work Zones; Iowa Department of Transportation 1999; "Video VH-601: Highway Work Zone Safety" PublicResource.Org; Mine Safety and Health Administration; "Safety On or Near the Water" Safe Work Australia; "Safety rules for using power tools" Dosti Realty HSE (Health, Safety, & Environment); "Induction Training"
Views: 112 AIHA
OSHA Nightmares Compilation
 
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OSHA NIGHTMARES COMPILATION ►► The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is there to keep our workers safe on the job. Their sagely advice makes construction sites and jobs safe. And when they see these workers making risky, dangerous, and just dumb decisions, OSHA is gonna pull it's own hair out. ►Visit the Clip'wreck Channel to see more awesome, funny, and amazing Compilation Videos! (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTep0GOBv8YPhCCbXVtDBLQ) ►Follow Clip'wreck on Twitter! (https://twitter.com/ClipwreckVideos) Music ►Silent Partner https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLzCxunOM5WFKdhkL2L__Kjafqa-qzQGeY *********************************************************** I am not the creator of this content. I am just a compiler of online content I find enjoyable. For any concerns about content ownership, please contact me at the address listed in the channel description. ***********************************************************
Views: 598368 Clip'wreck
[Wikipedia] United States National Mine Health and Safety Academy
 
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The United States National Mine Health and Safety Academy (MSHA) is a federal academy responsible for training the mine safety and health inspectors and technical support personnel of the Mine Safety and Health Administration. The Academy is located in Beckley, West Virginia, on an 80-acre (320,000 m2) site near the Raleigh County Airport. The Academy complex consists of nine buildings: The Residence Hall, Administration Building, Classroom Building, Mine Machinery Laboratory Building, Publication Distribution Center, Gymnasium, Maintenance and Equipment Building, Mine Emergency Operations Building, Mine Rescue Station and Mine Simulation Laboratory. Students are exposed to a variety of different disciplines in nine different laboratories: roof control, ground control, mine emergencies and rescue, ventilation, electrical systems, machinery, industrial hygiene, computer systems and underground mine simulation. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_National_Mine_Health_and_Safety_Academy Please support this channel and help me upload more videos. Become one of my Patreons at https://www.patreon.com/user?u=3823907
Views: 35 WikiTubia
OSHA / ANSI Safety Sign Standards
 
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This video provides an overview of OSHA standards for safety signs & labels. We’ll cover design, label headers, text sizing, label placement & more. Updated for 2015, it includes recent OSHA updates. Get an OSHA Safety Sign Best Practice Guide: https://graphicproducts.com/signbp-pdf Graphic Products is committed to keeping our customers up-to-date on the latest requirements and standards for a wide variety of industries. Graphic Products features Best Practice Guides on industrial topics such as arc flash, GHS, lockout/tagout, floor marking, OSHA sign compliance or mine safety to get you the answers you need to keep OSHA fines at bay and workers safe. To keep up on industry standards, hear the latest OSHA news or to get the inside scoop from the safety experts: subscribe to our channel, like is on Facebook or follow us on LinkedIn, Google+ or Twitter! Facebook https://facebook.com/DuraLabelPrinters LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/company/graphic-products Google+ https://plus.google.com/+GraphicProducts Twitter https://twitter.com/GraphicProducts
Views: 68140 Graphic Products
Cal OSHA Safety and Health Program Management
 
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Visit: http://www.apsafetytrainingsolutions.com/contact/ A safe Workplace Is A sound Business! All Purpose Safety Training Solutions (APSTS) offers a step-by-step approach to implementing health and safety programs for businesses. We develop and tailor a 12-month customized safety and health management system around business’ specific needs, culminating in a successful safety program. We provide in-depth site/safety audits, develop and implement written programs and policies, and provide specialized behavior-based training programs guaranteed to produce a positive change in employee attitude and productivity. Prevention: of Injuries and illnesses, equating to a safer workplace. Improved: compliance with laws and regulations, decreasing liabilities. Reduced: costs, including significant reductions in workers’ compensation premiums. Engaged: workers who feel safer and more confident in the work they’re doing. Enhanced: social responsibility goals that promote an overall better workplace culture. Increased: productivity and enhanced overall business Register Today: By calling 888-501-1355 or by email: [email protected]
Health & Safety Engineers (excl. Mining Safety Engineers & Inspectors)
 
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The career videos were developed and distributed by the Center for Occupational Employment Information (COEI) under a grant from America's Labor Market Information System (ALMIS), a program of the U.S. Department of Labor's Employment and Training Administration (ETA). They are designed to provide a brief, visual introduction to the world of work for a career. The videos are public domain software and are released without usage restrictions. Public and private vendors are free to use the clips in whatever manner they see fit to promote career decision making.
Views: 63 CoolSpaceCareers
What Causes Accidents - Safety Training Video - Preventing Accidents & Injuries
 
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What Causes Accidents - Safety Training Video - Preventing Accidents & Injuries Never miss a new safety video! Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=safetymemos It is hard to find an accident that could not have been prevented. Although it is often difficult to foresee every unsafe condition or potential hazard - training, constant vigilance and hazard awareness can prevent the vast majority of incidents and fatalities. Carelessness, distractions, ignorance and unnecessary risk-taking will lead to accidents and injuries. This safety training video outlines the two causes of most accidents and the human behaviors that make accidents happen. Understanding these causes and behaviors can help us reduce both the frequency and severity of accidents. For more videos like this one, see our channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/SafetyMemos Never miss a new safety video! Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=safetymemos Safety and Health Topics: https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/index.html IRB Guidebook for BIOMEDICAL AND BEHAVIORAL RESEARCH: AN OVERVIEW; US Dept of Health & Human Services: http://www.hhs.gov/ohrp/archive/irb/irb_chapter5.htm#h3 Human factors: Behavioural safety: http://www.hse.gov.uk/humanfactors/topics/behaviouralsafety.htm
Views: 543563 Safety Memos
MSHA celebrates National Miners Day, December 6
 
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Congress declared December 6 to be National Miners Day, a day to recognize and honor the more than 370,000 miners who work in the United States today. This video, by the Department of Labor’s Mine Safety and Health Administration, provides an overview of mining today with a brief look back to a more dangerous time.
Views: 3274 USDepartmentofLabor
How to Get OSHA Certification
 
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Watch more How to Start a Business videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/410112-How-to-Get-OSHA-Certification The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) enforces regulations designed to keep the workplace safe. Get OSHA certification for your occupation and/or business. Step 1: Go to the OSHA website Go to the Certificate and Degree Programs page at osha.gov. Read certificate program descriptions specific to your occupation. Step 2: Go to outreachtrainers.org Go to an OSHA-recommended website, and enter your zip code to search for an OTI (OSHA Training Institute) facility near you. Tip OSHA certification courses at an OTI facility are typically 10 to 30 hours. Step 3: E-mail for a current list of online trainers E-mail the Department of Labor for a current online trainer list at [email protected] if you don't live near an OTI facility. Step 4: Enroll in a training program Enroll in a training program online or at an OTI facility. After taking classes, you'll get your certification or completion card and be OSHA certified. Did You Know? In 2010, the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health's standards board voted to create a committee to consider mandating the use of condoms in the adult film industry.
Views: 53452 Howcast
Hazard Identification - The Safety Inspection
 
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Produced by the Oregon OSHA Public Education Team Hazard Identification Topic page: https://osha.oregon.gov/Pages/topics/hazard-identification.aspx Online Course: https://osha.oregon.gov/edu/courses/Pages/hazard-identification-online-course.aspx
Hazards Around Bins And Hoppers (1978) Mine Safety & Health Administration
 
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"Emphasizes the safety of those who must work around bins and hoppers and acquaints them with the potential hazards of entering these and other material storage areas. Encourages workers to follow the safe and correct operating procedures that apply to their jobs." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining#Safety Safety has long been a concern in the mining business especially in sub-surface mining. The Courrières mine disaster, Europe's worst mining accident, involved the death of 1,099 miners in Northern France on March 10, 1906. This disaster was surpassed only by the Benxihu Colliery accident in China on April 26, 1942, which killed 1,549 miners. While mining today is substantially safer than it was in previous decades, mining accidents still occur. Government figures indicate that 5,000 Chinese miners die in accidents each year, while other reports have suggested a figure as high as 20,000. Mining accidents continue worldwide, including accidents causing dozens of fatalities at a time such as the 2007 Ulyanovskaya Mine disaster in Russia, the 2009 Heilongjiang mine explosion in China, and the 2010 Upper Big Branch Mine disaster in the United States. Mining ventilation is a significant safety concern for many miners. Poor ventilation inside sub-surface mines causes exposure to harmful gases, heat, and dust, which can cause illness, injury, and death. The concentration of methane and other airborne contaminants underground can generally be controlled by dilution (ventilation), capture before entering the host air stream (methane drainage), or isolation (seals and stoppings). Rock dusts, including coal dust and silicon dust, can cause long-term lung problems including silicosis, asbestosis, and pneumoconiosis (also known as miners lung or black lung disease). A ventilation system is set up to force a stream of air through the working areas of the mine. The air circulation necessary for effective ventilation of a mine is generated by one or more large mine fans, usually located above ground. Air flows in one direction only, making circuits through the mine such that each main work area constantly receives a supply of fresh air. Watering down in coal mines also helps to keep dust levels down: by spraying the machine with water and filtering the dust-laden water with a scrubber fan, miners can successfully trap the dust. Gases in mines can poison the workers or displace the oxygen in the mine, causing asphyxiation... Ignited methane gas is a common source of explosions in coal mines... Miners utilize equipment strong enough to break through extremely hard layers of the Earth's crust. This equipment, combined with the closed work space in which underground miners work, can cause hearing loss... Since mining entails removing dirt and rock from its natural location, thereby creating large empty pits, rooms, and tunnels, cave-ins as well as ground and rock falls are a major concern within mines. Modern techniques for timbering and bracing walls and ceilings within sub-surface mines have reduced the number of fatalities due to cave-ins, but ground falls continue to represent up to 50% of mining fatalities. Even in cases where mine collapses are not instantly fatal, they can trap mine workers deep underground. Cases such as these often lead to high-profile rescue efforts, such as when 33 Chilean miners were trapped deep underground for 69 days in 2010. High temperatures and humidity may result in heat-related illnesses, including heat stroke, which can be fatal. The presence of heavy equipment in confined spaces also poses a risk to miners. To improve the safety of mine workers, modern mines use automation and remote operation including, for example, such equipment as automated loaders and remotely operated rockbreakers. However, despite modern improvements to safety practices, mining remains a dangerous occupation throughout the world...
Views: 10 Old Movies Reborn
Customer and Delivery Truck Drivers Hazard Training
 
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Mine Safety and Health Administration Customer and Delivery Truck Drivers Hazard Training DVD includes both English and Spanish versions -- This video provides hazard information for truckers who frequent mine sites. Covered are safe work behaviors that will help truck drivers avoid the dangers of ground, electrical, transportation, slip and fall, and numerous other hazards that are common in and around mine sites. This video comes with an 8-page guide. Capacitación de riesgos para los choferes de camiones de reparto y de los clientes Este video familiariza a los choferes, que llevan productos a las minas, con los factores de riesgo más comunes que hay en la industria minera. Además, recomienda algunos consejos para evitar accidentes ocasionados por el terreno, la electricidad, el transporte, los resbalones y caídas o por otros riesgos inherentes a las minas. Este video viene con una guía de ocho páginas.
Views: 12585 PublicResourceOrg
Springbelt Industrial Seatbelt safety for OSHA MHSA
 
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Springbelt film is a short demo to give viewers the concept of the Springbelt and its employment on industrial vehicles. For use with mining, earth moving construction forklifts and agricultural vehicles
Views: 2856 shockwatch2001
Can't Take No More 1980 Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA)
 
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Studs Terkel narrates this fast-paced history of occupational health and safety in the U.S. from the Industrial Revolution to the 1970s, which OSHA released in 1980. Rare archival footage and photos illustrate the problems behind dramatic tragedies as well as the daily dangers that put workers at risk for long-term health problems. It also connects the health and safety movement with the civil rights and environmental movements. This is one of three wonderful films produced and distributed by OSHA during the administration of Dr. Eula Bingham - Can't Take No More; Worker to Worker; and OSHA. Then in 1981, the new head of OSHA, under the Reagan Administration, Thorne Auchter recalled most copies and they disappeared. A few copies were kept alive by union officials who refused to return their copies. The penalty for being discovered in possession of one of these films was losing all OSHA funding for their safety and health programs. This was recalled by Tom Lynch on his blog Workers' Comp Insider at http://www.workerscompinsider.com/archives/000698.html " [in 1975] when I became the Director of the Army's safety efforts throughout New England, and would travel up and down the east coast lecturing on safety and health, it was obvious that OSHA was a big stick. In 1979, with assistance from the AFL-CIO, OSHA produced a 27-minute movie called "Can't Take It No More." Narrated by Studs Terkel, it carried a powerful message, offering a history of the safety movement in America and targeting worker health. As part of our program, my training department would screen the film repeatedly over the next year and a half for soldiers and civilian employees. In 1981, one of the first things the new Reagan administration did as it began to reverse OSHA's aggressive thrust by ushering in "voluntary compliance," was to recall all governmental copies of "Can't Take It No More" and forbid any organization seeking government funding for a safety program from showing the film. I recall having to box up our three copies and send them back to Washington, DC, where they were to be destroyed. That was when I knew that, for OSHA, the good times were over ... " All three films are posted to my YouTube channel and also available for download from the Internet Archive thanks to the work of the nonprofit Public.Resource.Org. Find out more about this wonderful organization and make a donation at https://public.resource.org/about/index.html. This film, produced by Durrin Films, Inc. (now Durrin Productions, Inc) at (http://www.durrinproductions.com/about.html ), won an Honorable Mention at the 1982 American Film Festival; CINE Golden Eagle.
Views: 17652 markdcatlin
Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 1 of 5
 
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Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 1 of 5 Letcher County notes the tragic mine explosions that occurred at Scotia Mine in 1976. The accidents are noted as being one of the worst mine disasters in U.S. history. When industrial coal mining came to the mountains of southeastern Kentucky in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, it brought both positives and negatives. On the one hand, mining operations brought a steady paycheck to those who had largely lived by the alternating fortunes of farming. Conversely, the mines brought a sense of employment dependence and often unsafe working conditions. By the mid-1900s, mining safety had improved drastically from just a few years before. Battery powered lamps had replaced carbide lanterns and continuous automated mining equipment had taken over for the pick and shovel and draft animals. But, due to the nature of the work, accidents still injured miners. The Scotia Mine began operations in 1962 and was a subsidiary of the Blue Diamond Coal Company. It was located in the Ovenfork Community of Letcher County, about fourteen miles northeast of the town of Cumberland (Harlan County, Kentucky). On March 9, 1976, at approximately 11:45 a.m., an explosion caused by coal dust and gasses rocked the Scotia mine. Two days later, a second explosion happened. The first explosion killed fifteen miners; the second killed eleven. Investigators believed that the explosions were caused by methane gasses that were ignited by a spark caused by a battery-powered locomotive or another electric device. A lack of ventilation figured prominently in the accidents. The explosions at Scotia led to the passage of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977. This law strengthened the previously passed 1969 act, which, at the time, had been the most significant legislation on mine safety ever adopted in the U.S. The 1977 law also moved the Mine Safety and Health Administration from the Department of the Interior to the Department of Labor.
Views: 7996 Jo
OSHA Hazard Communication and HazCom 2012
 
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There’s been a lot of confusion regarding OSHA’s upcoming HazCom 2012 standards, how GHS is incorporated and what a compliant HazCom label looks like. Before the HazCom 2012 standards went into effect, OSHA’s rules for labeling hazardous materials were called Right-To-Know, or RTK standards. Under the RTK standards employers were required to label chemical hazards but were not given label format requirements. This meant multiple label formats were created and used, which led to confusion. This short video will go over what a HazCom compliant label looks like, the elements that comprise it, and the newly required elements of a safety data sheet. Graphic Products is committed to keeping our customers up-to-date on the latest requirements and standards for a wide variety of industries. Graphic Products features Best Practice Guides on industrial topics such as arc flash, GHS, lockout/tagout, floor marking, OSHA sign compliance or mine safety to get you the answers you need to keep OSHA fines at bay and workers safe. To get your free copy of the Graphic Product’s HazCom 2012 Best Practice Guide, visit https://goo.gl/wjiS97 To keep up on industry standards, hear the latest OSHA news or to get the inside scoop from the safety experts: subscribe to our channel, like is on Facebook or follow us on LinkedIn, Google+ or Twitter! Facebook https://www.facebook.com/DuraLabelPrinters?ref=aymt_homepage_panel LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/company/graphic-products Google+ https://plus.google.com/+Graphicproductsinc/posts Twitter https://twitter.com/graphicproducts
Views: 7843 Graphic Products
Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 2 of 5
 
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Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 2 of 5 Letcher County notes the tragic mine explosions that occurred at Scotia Mine in 1976. The accidents are noted as being one of the worst mine disasters in U.S. history. When industrial coal mining came to the mountains of southeastern Kentucky in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, it brought both positives and negatives. On the one hand, mining operations brought a steady paycheck to those who had largely lived by the alternating fortunes of farming. Conversely, the mines brought a sense of employment dependence and often unsafe working conditions. By the mid-1900s, mining safety had improved drastically from just a few years before. Battery powered lamps had replaced carbide lanterns and continuous automated mining equipment had taken over for the pick and shovel and draft animals. But, due to the nature of the work, accidents still injured miners. The Scotia Mine began operations in 1962 and was a subsidiary of the Blue Diamond Coal Company. It was located in the Ovenfork Community of Letcher County, about fourteen miles northeast of the town of Cumberland (Harlan County, Kentucky). On March 9, 1976, at approximately 11:45 a.m., an explosion caused by coal dust and gasses rocked the Scotia mine. Two days later, a second explosion happened. The first explosion killed fifteen miners; the second killed eleven. Investigators believed that the explosions were caused by methane gasses that were ignited by a spark caused by a battery-powered locomotive or another electric device. A lack of ventilation figured prominently in the accidents. The explosions at Scotia led to the passage of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977. This law strengthened the previously passed 1969 act, which, at the time, had been the most significant legislation on mine safety ever adopted in the U.S. The 1977 law also moved the Mine Safety and Health Administration from the Department of the Interior to the Department of Labor.
Views: 2915 Jo
Fall Protection: Your Lifeline to Safety (2000)
 
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𝐖𝐞 𝐇𝐈𝐆𝐇𝐋𝐘 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐚𝐭𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐨 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐠𝐨𝐨𝐝 (𝐛𝐞𝐲𝐞𝐫𝐝𝐲𝐧𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐃𝐓 𝟗𝟗𝟎 𝐏𝐑𝐎 𝐎𝐯𝐞𝐫-𝐄𝐚𝐫 𝐒𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐢𝐨) 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐝𝐩𝐡𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐬, 𝐜𝐥𝐢𝐜𝐤 𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞: ► ► ► ► https://amzn.to/2GhkjFJ ◄ ◄ 𝐒𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐮𝐩 𝐭𝐨 𝟖𝟎% 𝐨𝐟𝐟 𝐨𝐧 𝐞𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐢𝐜𝐬, 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐮𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬, 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐝𝐩𝐡𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐌𝐎𝐑𝐄 𝐛𝐲 𝐛𝐫𝐨𝐰𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐀𝐦𝐚𝐳𝐨𝐧'𝐬 𝐝𝐚𝐢𝐥𝐲 𝐝𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐬! 𝐂𝐥𝐢𝐜𝐤 𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞: https://amzn.to/2IsLkr0 Equipment: Camera (Canon EOS Rebel T6): https://amzn.to/2Id1sxJ Speakers (Bose SoundLink Color Bluetooth speaker II): https://amzn.to/2D7BYxo Headphones (beyerdynamic DT 990 PRO Over-Ear Studio Headphones): https://amzn.to/2GhkjFJ Editing Software (Sony Vegas 15): https://amzn.to/2DlmV3x Monitor (ASUS VG248QE 24" Full HD 1920x1080 144Hz): https://amzn.to/2IeA02v Mouse (Logitech G502): https://amzn.to/2D7C73U * The above are affiliate links. This channel participates in the Amazon Affiliate program. Please consider leaving a like and subscribing if you enjoyed the content. It helps tremendously, thank you! This content is licensed under Creative Commons. Please visit https://archive.org/details/gov.msha.dvd506.e to see licensing information and check https://creativecommons.org/licenses/ for more information about the respective license(s). Description: Mine Safety and Health Administration Fall Protection: Your Lifeline to Safety DVD506-S - 2000 This video provides an overview of the hazards associated with doing work at elevated locations and the importance of fall protection. Common types of fall protection systems are presented, including personal fall arrest and restraint devices. Special emphasis is placed on the development of site-specific policies and procedures, with regard to fall protection regulations in the mining industries. Credit: Mine Safety and Health Administration 2000
Views: 22 Tempus Archivum
Connecting the Sampling Train - Dust Sampling
 
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Mine Safety and Health Administration Connecting the Sampling Train - Dust Sampling This is Part 2 of 4 Parts DVD011 - 2005 - Respirable Dust Sampling
Views: 11716 PublicResourceOrg
Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 4 of 5
 
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Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 4 of 5 Letcher County notes the tragic mine explosions that occurred at Scotia Mine in 1976. The accidents are noted as being one of the worst mine disasters in U.S. history. When industrial coal mining came to the mountains of southeastern Kentucky in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, it brought both positives and negatives. On the one hand, mining operations brought a steady paycheck to those who had largely lived by the alternating fortunes of farming. Conversely, the mines brought a sense of employment dependence and often unsafe working conditions. By the mid-1900s, mining safety had improved drastically from just a few years before. Battery powered lamps had replaced carbide lanterns and continuous automated mining equipment had taken over for the pick and shovel and draft animals. But, due to the nature of the work, accidents still injured miners. The Scotia Mine began operations in 1962 and was a subsidiary of the Blue Diamond Coal Company. It was located in the Ovenfork Community of Letcher County, about fourteen miles northeast of the town of Cumberland (Harlan County, Kentucky). On March 9, 1976, at approximately 11:45 a.m., an explosion caused by coal dust and gasses rocked the Scotia mine. Two days later, a second explosion happened. The first explosion killed fifteen miners; the second killed eleven. Investigators believed that the explosions were caused by methane gasses that were ignited by a spark caused by a battery-powered locomotive or another electric device. A lack of ventilation figured prominently in the accidents. The explosions at Scotia led to the passage of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977. This law strengthened the previously passed 1969 act, which, at the time, had been the most significant legislation on mine safety ever adopted in the U.S. The 1977 law also moved the Mine Safety and Health Administration from the Department of the Interior to the Department of Labor.
Views: 1728 Jo
Monongah 1907 Mine Disaster
 
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This short clip is from Davitt McAteer's 1985 25-minutes video - Monongah 1907. The entire video, rich with detail about this disaster also traces the development of mine safety laws in the US. Monongah 1907 is now available on DVD for $14.95. For ordering information, send an email to: [email protected] . And don't miss Davitt McAteer's book, Monongah: The Tragic Story of the 1907 Monongah Mine Disaster, the Worst Industrial Accident in U.S. History, recently published by the West Virginia University Press (2007) http://www.wvupress.com. "When I heard that Davitt McAteer was working on a book detailing the unparalleled disaster at the Monongah mines, I though it promising news ... no one is positioned better than Davitt MsAteer to examine the Monongah mining disaster of 1907 from all the perspectives required: historical, sociological, legal, and economic. Monongah is an important book, long overdue." From the Introduction by Robert B. Reich, former Secretary of the US Department of Labor, 1993 to 1997. Davitt McAteer, ESQ., a native of West Virginia, has devoted much of his professional efforts to mine health and safety issues. During the 1970s, Davitt led the safety and health programs of the United Mine Workers and founded the Occupational Safety and Health Law Center. During the Clinton Administration, he served as the Assistant Secretary for Mine Safety and Health at the United States Department of Labor. In January of 2006, West Virginia Governor Joe Manchin asked Mr. McAteer to serve as personal advisor and conduct an independent investigation into the cause or causes of the Sago Mine Disaster and the Aracoma Alma No. 1 Mine Fire, both of which occurred in January 2006.
Views: 50812 markdcatlin
Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 5 of 5
 
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Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 5 of 5 Letcher County notes the tragic mine explosions that occurred at Scotia Mine in 1976. The accidents are noted as being one of the worst mine disasters in U.S. history. When industrial coal mining came to the mountains of southeastern Kentucky in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, it brought both positives and negatives. On the one hand, mining operations brought a steady paycheck to those who had largely lived by the alternating fortunes of farming. Conversely, the mines brought a sense of employment dependence and often unsafe working conditions. By the mid-1900s, mining safety had improved drastically from just a few years before. Battery powered lamps had replaced carbide lanterns and continuous automated mining equipment had taken over for the pick and shovel and draft animals. But, due to the nature of the work, accidents still injured miners. The Scotia Mine began operations in 1962 and was a subsidiary of the Blue Diamond Coal Company. It was located in the Ovenfork Community of Letcher County, about fourteen miles northeast of the town of Cumberland (Harlan County, Kentucky). On March 9, 1976, at approximately 11:45 a.m., an explosion caused by coal dust and gasses rocked the Scotia mine. Two days later, a second explosion happened. The first explosion killed fifteen miners; the second killed eleven. Investigators believed that the explosions were caused by methane gasses that were ignited by a spark caused by a battery-powered locomotive or another electric device. A lack of ventilation figured prominently in the accidents. The explosions at Scotia led to the passage of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977. This law strengthened the previously passed 1969 act, which, at the time, had been the most significant legislation on mine safety ever adopted in the U.S. The 1977 law also moved the Mine Safety and Health Administration from the Department of the Interior to the Department of Labor.
Views: 1977 Jo
Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 3 of 5
 
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Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 3 of 5 Letcher County notes the tragic mine explosions that occurred at Scotia Mine in 1976. The accidents are noted as being one of the worst mine disasters in U.S. history. When industrial coal mining came to the mountains of southeastern Kentucky in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, it brought both positives and negatives. On the one hand, mining operations brought a steady paycheck to those who had largely lived by the alternating fortunes of farming. Conversely, the mines brought a sense of employment dependence and often unsafe working conditions. By the mid-1900s, mining safety had improved drastically from just a few years before. Battery powered lamps had replaced carbide lanterns and continuous automated mining equipment had taken over for the pick and shovel and draft animals. But, due to the nature of the work, accidents still injured miners. The Scotia Mine began operations in 1962 and was a subsidiary of the Blue Diamond Coal Company. It was located in the Ovenfork Community of Letcher County, about fourteen miles northeast of the town of Cumberland (Harlan County, Kentucky). On March 9, 1976, at approximately 11:45 a.m., an explosion caused by coal dust and gasses rocked the Scotia mine. Two days later, a second explosion happened. The first explosion killed fifteen miners; the second killed eleven. Investigators believed that the explosions were caused by methane gasses that were ignited by a spark caused by a battery-powered locomotive or another electric device. A lack of ventilation figured prominently in the accidents. The explosions at Scotia led to the passage of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977. This law strengthened the previously passed 1969 act, which, at the time, had been the most significant legislation on mine safety ever adopted in the U.S. The 1977 law also moved the Mine Safety and Health Administration from the Department of the Interior to the Department of Labor.
Views: 2078 Jo
Southeast Mine Safety and Health Conference Video
 
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This video will help you get to know the Southeast Mine Safety and Health Conference. We hope to see you at our next conference. Get more details at our website https://southeastmineconf.org/.
Views: 211 Andrew Perkins
Respirator Testing and Certification 1934
 
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This clip shows the testing of a new air-purifying respirator for approval by the US Bureau of Mines in 1934. Currently all respirators used in US workplaces must be similarly testing and certified by NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health). NIOSH has administered the respirator certification program since 1972, and traces its origins to the early years of the U.S. Bureau of Mines. The Bureau of Mines was created within the Dept of Interior in 1910, and began the development of Schedules covering the design, testing and evaluation of mine emergency respiratory protection equipment. Since then schedules have been published for self contained breathing apparatus for use in mine rescue; gas masks and Air Purifying Respirators to be used by escaping miners during an emergency; airline respirators; gas and vapor-removal (chemical cartridge); and dust-filtration (particulate). The 1969 Federal Mine Health and Safety Act mandated joint approval of respirators by the Departments of Interior and Health, Education and Welfare, and the 1970 Occupational Safety and Health Act created NIOSH. In 1972, NIOSH and the Bureau consolidated the various approval schedules into federal regulations under Title 30, Mineral Resources, of the Code of Federal Regulations. Administration of the respirator approval program was transferred to NIOSH from the U.S. Bureau of Mines. The respirator approval program began to gain increased significance as regulations published by the OSHA and other federal agencies also begin to require the use of approved or accepted respirators in American workplaces. Approval responsibility within the DOI was transferred in 1973 to MESA, formed from the Bureau of Mines under the Act. The MESA was re-designated as the MSHA and transferred from the DOI to the Department of Labor with the respirator approval mandate under the 1977 Mine Act. All respirator approvals were issued jointly by the MSHA and NIOSH until 1995, when the approval requirements for respiratory protection devices were transferred to Title 42, Public Health, of the Code of Federal Regulations. Under current DHHS respirator approval regulations, NIOSH is the sole approving authority for most respirators. MSHA is a co-approver with NIOSH for respirator designs intended for mine rescue and other emergency use in mines. For more about NIOSHs respirator program go to http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npptl/topics/respirators/ . This is clipped from the 1940s film, The Air We Breathe, a ppromotional documentary from the Mine Safety Appliances Company (MSA) on the importance of the air respirator to industrial health and safety. At the end, the film explains that industry and government cooperation has removed the "menace in the air" and urges workers in various industries to use the respirator. This film is available from the National Archives (NARA).
Views: 3608 markdcatlin
OHV Mine Safety Video # 2
 
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OHV Mine Safety Video # 2
Views: 442 Eduardo Duque
Mine Safety Hearing: Dennis O'Dell
 
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Dennis O'Dell, a former miner and the Safety and Health Director for the United Mine Workers of America, testifies at a U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Education and Labor Subcommittee on Workforce Protections hearing examining two mine safety bills, H.R. 2768, the S-MINER Act, and H.R. 2769, The Miner Health Enhancement Act of 2007, on July 26, 2007.
Miner Tracking and Safety Software 2018 - NLT Digital Mine
 
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NLT Digital Mine makes mine safety and productivity possible - more info at http://www.nltinc.com/digitalmine NLT Digital Mine is NLT's Real-time Mine Monitoring and Action Suite. As a web-based tool, Digital Mine provides access to live information to anyone in a mine. Digital mine has modules for: -Tracking -Environmental Monitoring -Messaging -Control -Live dashboards and real-time displays -Productivity and administration To learn more about NLT Digital Mine and other solutions for miner safety and productivity, visit http://www.nltinc.com today!
Views: 411 NLTGlobal
SilverCrest Mines: Safety, Orientation and the Environment
 
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Between 2008 and 2010, Resource Intelligence created a suite of videos for SilverCrest Mines to assist in communication not only with shareholders, but also with staff and visitors to the mine site. The SilverCrest Mines Orientation Video: Safety and the Environment became more than the sum of its parts. The company wanted to share its corporate philosophy with visitors, staff and stakeholders from the get-go. We created a logo to accompany these efforts and to reflect Responsibility, Safety and the environment. This is displayed on site as posters and handed out in the form of stickers in an effort to encourage all visitors to the site to adhere to the company's safety and environmental policies.
Views: 5888 resourceINTELLIGENCE
The Creation of NIOSH in 1970 NIOSH 1996
 
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The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is the US federal agency responsible for conducting research and making recommendations for the prevention of work-related injury and illness. NIOSH provides national and world leadership to prevent work-related illness, injury, disability, and death by gathering information, conducting scientific research, and translating the knowledge gained into products and services, including scientific information products, training videos, and recommendations for improving safety and health in the workplace. The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 created both NIOSH and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). NIOSH is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the Department of Health and Human Services. The Federal Mine Safety and Health Amendments Act of 1977 delegated additional authority to NIOSH for coal mine health research. For more, go to the NIOSH website http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/about.htmlat . This clip is from the 1996 video "The Unfinished Agenda: NIOSH's First 25 years and Beyond" produced by filmmaker Abby Ginzberg (http://abbyginzbergfilms.org/Welcome.html) for NIOSH at a time that some Republicans in Congress were trying to eliminate the Agency as part of an anti-government agenda. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) commemorated their 25th anniversary to highlight the progress made since 1971 in protecting workers from job-related injuries and illnesses, and to note the challenges that still lie ahead. OSHA and NIOSH were created under the Occupational Safety and Health Act, a bipartisan measure enacted on Dec. 29, 1970, and signed by President Richard M. Nixon. OSHA and NIOSH began operations on April 29, 1971. NIOSH conducts research to identify the causes of work-related injuries, illnesses and fatalities, evaluate the hazards of new technologies and work practices, and create ways to control hazards so that workers are protected. NIOSH also supports university programs to train occupational safety and health professionals for the Nation and makes recommendations regarding occupational safety and health standards. For more on the important and invaluable work of NIOSH, go to their website at http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/ . The entire 1996 video is also posted to my YouTube channel.
Views: 765 markdcatlin
Mining Safety Engineering Degree Programs
 
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A mining safety engineer probably does exactly what you think he or she might do. He is involved in the safety of mining operations. This means both overall doing what is necessary to keep workers safe in a mining environment, but also to keep a business, industry or operation in compliance with regulations. To do this successfully, a mining safety engineer draws upon his knowledge of the design and practices of mines of varying types, as well as a working knowledge of those regulations and standards. Learn more about this by visiting http://engineeringdegrees101.com or like us http://www.facebook.com/engineeringdegrees101 and follow us on twitter @EDegrees101.
Views: 227 engineeringdegrees
Industrial Safety & Health Engineers
 
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This career video was developed and is distributed by the Center for Occupational Employment Information (COEI) under a grant from America's Labor Market Information System (ALMIS), a program of the U.S. Department of Labor's Employment and Training Administration (ETA). It is designed to provide a brief, visual introduction to the world of work for a career. Note: Career Point/IGS has uploaded these videos to a public forum as a service to those looking for information and ideas on which careers might be the best fit for them or someone they know. The videos provide a good overview of the type of work and skills needed for success in these jobs. All available videos have been uploaded, from executive to clerical, lawyer to laborer. If you're interested in whether or not this career might be a good match for your own passions, consider taking the Passions Igniter Career Inventory. Learn more at http://passionsindex.com.
Views: 23 IGSAssessments
Jeffrey Hunter - Energy, Environment and Resources Law Attorney Profile - Perkins Coie
 
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For over 20 years, Jeff Hunter has been counseling corporate, governmental and individual clients both in the United States and internationally on a wide variety of issues related to the environment including: regulatory compliance; administrative enforcement and environmental litigation including white collar criminal matters; permitting and development and defending against permit challenges; cleanup and redevelopment of contaminated industrial and commercial properties and brownfield redevelopment projects; and environmental due diligence in real estate and corporate transactions. Jeff’s environmental counseling and administrative enforcement experience includes extensive representation related to the Clean Air Act (CAA), the Clean Water Act (CWA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act (HMTA), the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), the Emergency Planning & Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the Mine Safety and Health Act (MSHA), state laws operating in lieu of the federal environmental programs; state electronic-waste recycling laws; state product labeling and reporting laws including California Proposition 65 and children’s safe products, and international laws regarding the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS), Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) and the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH). Jeff has lead and advised clients on internal investigations and audits relating to environmental compliance, disclosure of the findings, development of environmental compliance management systems and obtaining ISO 14001 certification.
Views: 42 Perkins Coie
8 Extreme Tracked Vehicles You Must See
 
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These extreme off-road vehicles will impress you………………… FREEZE LISTS ESPAÑOL https://goo.gl/bM38rd FREEZE LISTS DEUTSCH https://goo.gl/IKd6xM FREEZE LISTS ENGLISH http://goo.gl/LqNRbT LINKS MINIRIP http://www.howeandhowe.com/ RIPCHAIR http://www.howeandhowe.com/ IGUANA YACHTS http://www.iguana-yachts.com/ LAMBORGHINI 5C http://bit.ly/2ixdu94 TRACK N GO http://trucktracks.com/en/ TINGER TRACK http://tingeratv.com/ ROBOT SHIELD http://bit.ly/2w76owE MUTT http://bit.ly/2wxZD84 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ATTRIBUTIONS Copyright Free Images From Pixabay: https://pixabay.com/ GI Joe: Retaliation: Paramount Pictures The Fate of the Furious: Universal Pictures File: Lamborghini BC.jpg: By No machine-readable author provided. EPO assumed (based on copyright claims). [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) or CC BY 2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5)], via Wikimedia Commons File: Ferruccio Lamborghini.jpg: Automobili Lamborghini S.p.A., PRESS DATABASE File: Lamborghini 22PS 1951.jpg: By Späth Chr. (user ChiemseeMan) (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons File: Lamborghini Trattori.jpg: By Gabriele Bellotti (contact Lellovski77) (Own work (Gabriele Bellotti)) [Public domain, GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons File: 1144 Transportation BN training.jpg (Re-named “Riot Shield”: By United States Army [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons File: ANDROS WolverineV2 Borehole Robot.jpg (Renamed “Bomb Disposal Robot”): By Mine Safety and Health Administration [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
Views: 603554 Freeze Lists
Workplace Health and Safety Induction - Occupational Health and Safety Information (OH&S / WHS)
 
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Workplace Health and Safety (WHS) Induction film for work experience and work for dole participants. Provides a comprehensive overview of occupational health and safety protocol and regulations within Australia. OH&S - Health and Safety Induction An Into People Inc. production. http://www.intopeopleinc.org
Views: 123991 Into People Inc
MSHA Electrical
 
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This is a clip from the digital training module we have at www.msha46.com
Views: 1087 Terry Weston
Confined Spaces In Construction
 
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This program is designed to assist employers and employees in understanding the requirements for practices and procedures to protect employees engaged in construction activities at a worksite with one or more confined spaces and will cover the following: OSHA Standards, General Requirements, Hazards of Confined Spaces, Permit Required Confined Spaces, Training, Duties of Authorized Entrants, Duties of Attendants, Duties of Entry Supervisors, Emergency Rescue, Personal Protective Equipment. For more information on these materials please contact National Safety Compliance at 1.877.922.7233 or visit us online at www.osha-safety-training.net.
Views: 10316 oshasafetytraining
Silicosis  A Preventable Disease
 
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Mine Safety and Health Administration Silicosis: A Preventable Disease DVD includes both English and Spanish versions -- An employee's questions about the health effects of silica dust exposure are answered. Silicosis : una enfermedad que se puede prevenir En este video vemos cómo un médico responde las preguntas de un empleadoacerca de los riesgos que representa el trabajar con sílice. MSHA 1999 17 min Cat No: DVD 532-S
Views: 68 SAFE TEAM
Safety Tips
 
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This movie is part of public domain. Info: Mine Safety and Health Administration Downloaded from https://archive.org
Views: 1 Public Domain
Fire Extinguisher Training - PASS - Fire Safety Training Video
 
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Fire Extinguisher Training - PASS - Fire Safety Training Video The use of a fire extinguisher in the hands of a trained adult can be a life and property saving tool. However, a majority of adults have not had fire extinguisher training and may not know how and when to use them. This short video explains how to properly inspect fire extinguishers. It then covers the P.A.S.S. system for proper, effective fire extinguisher usage. Share this video with your family, friends, relatives, co-workers, employees and people in your community. It provides valuable training in how to use fire extinguishers in an emergency. Remember: The life you save may be your own. For more videos like this one, see our channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/SafetyMemos Never miss a new safety video! Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=safetymemos Extinguisher Basics: https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/evacuation/portable_about.html Fire Extinguishers - A FEMA site: http://www.usfa.fema.gov/citizens/home_fire_prev/extinguishers.shtm Extinguisher Placement and Spacing: https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/evacuation/portable_placement.html
Views: 577135 Safety Memos
Plain talk about a serious problem ...silicosis 1983 North Carolina DOL NIOSH
 
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This video discusses the possible health effects from working with silica, as known in 1983. The video is narrated by North Carolina born actor Andy Griffith known for his television roles, playing the lead characters in The Andy Griffith Show, and, Matlock. The video discusses the prevalence of silica in rock and soil, medical surveillance, engineering controls and the use of respirators. While originally created for miners, the information contained on the tape applies to all workers exposed to silica. In 1997, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified occupational exposure to crystalline silica as carcinogenic to humans. Large amounts of epidemiological data have been published showing this, including studies on workers in dusty trades in North Carolina. According to one such study in 1991 ( American Journal Industrial Medicine. 1991;20(1):57-70), Silicosis and lung cancer in North Carolina dusty trades workers, Since 1940, 760 cases of silicosis had been diagnosed as part of the State of North Carolina's (NC) pneumoconiosis surveillance program for dusty trades workers. OSHA is in the process of updating current exposure limits for crystalline silica (set in 1972 based on science from the1960s), classified as a human carcinogen. Construction workers are exposed to silica dust in a number of different ways. Long-term exposure to high levels of the substance can cause silicosis, which is fatal. "Exposure to crystalline silica has also been associated with an increased risk of developing tuberculosis and other nonmalignant respiratory diseases, as well as renal and autoimmune diseases," OSHA reports. "Exposure studies and OSHA enforcement data indicate that some workers continue to be exposed to levels of crystalline silica far in excess of current exposure limits...There is a particular need for the agency to modernize its exposure limits for construction and shipyard workers, and to address some specific issues that will need to be resolved to propose a comprehensive standard." OSHA began its rulemaking in 2003 and may complete it by 2014. OSHA faces many legal requirements when issuing new or updated standards and ten years is a common length of time to promulgate a health or safety standard. At least 1.7 million U.S. workers are exposed to respirable crystalline silica in a variety of industries and occupations, including construction, sandblasting, and mining. Silicosis, an irreversible but preventable disease, is the illness most closely associated with occupational exposure to the material, which also is known as silica dust. Occupational exposures to respirable crystalline silica are associated with the development of silicosis, lung cancer, pulmonary tuberculosis, and airways diseases. These exposures may also be related to the development of autoimmune disorders, chronic renal disease, and other adverse health effects. For more on silica and silicosis, go to the NIOSH website - http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/silica/. This video, Plain talk about a serious problem ...silicosis -- was produced by the North Carolina Department of Labor, Mine and Quarry Division, and NIOSH in 1983 and runs 18 minutes.
Views: 3403 markdcatlin
Safety Devices (2004)
 
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This is a portion of a video (public domain) by the Mine Safety and Health Administration, which focuses on mechanical safeguarding. The Paul Law Firm does not endorse any specific services, products, or information contained in this video. The firm does not have control of the content of this video. The Paul Law Firm is a leading national law firm dedicated to representing those suffering from asbestos-related diseases and severe occupational injury. For further information, please visit ThePaulLawFirm.com
Views: 43 Jerry Neil Paul