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Peru Gold | Real destruction of illegal gold mines on Amazon rainforest revealed | Sunday Night
 
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There’s a vast stretch of the Amazon the Peruvians call Madre de Dios - Mother of God - but tragically these days, it looks more like something concocted by the devil. Once-pristine jungle has been stripped by illegal miners, leaving a desolate lunar landscape. It’s so lucrative, even drug lords are in on the act, switching from cocaine to gold - which makes this part of the world a very dangerous place indeed. Denham Hitchcock travels deep into the Amazon with Miss Peru to investigate a crime which could have a devastating effect on all of us. Here’s Denham Hitchcock. This story originally aired on the 14th April 2019. Subscribe to get new videos every week - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSgeCjcPYYZXR62Cykv43sA?sub_confirmation=1 Discover more Sunday Night stories - http://www.sundaynight.com.au Like Sunday Night’s Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/SundayNightOn7 Follow Sunday Night’s Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/SundayNightOn7 Follow Sunday Night’s Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/SundayNightOn7
Views: 6323 Sunday Night
Gold Miners in Guyana Are Destroying the Amazon (2008)
 
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Hidden Gold Rush (2008): For the local Guyanese, mining gold is one of the few sources of income available to them - but it comes with a heavy environmental cost. For similar stories, see: The Controversial Road Destroying The Amazon https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQPC6MHjAyw The Brazilian Locals Fighting Back Against Illegal Logging in the Amazon https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k82WytYKoKM What Is The Human Cost Of Gold? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qgIQj761YH8 Subscribe to journeyman for daily uploads: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=journeymanpictures For downloads and more information visit: http://www.journeyman.tv/film/3786 Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/journeymanpictures Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JourneymanVOD https://twitter.com/JourneymanNews Follow us on Instagram: https://instagram.com/journeymanpictures As more and more investors turn to gold, Guyana'’s rainforests are paying a heavy price. After more than a decade of illegal mining, the country is facing an environmental disaster. "First the miners burn down the rainforest. Then they dig a giant crater, hosing away the muddy earth and polluting rivers and forests." There are over a thousand illegal mines like this in French Guyana. They’'re steadily destroying the rainforest’'s ecosystem. "“They will never be able to stop it because the jungle is so big and we are so tenacious”," states one miner. Most of this illegal gold is mixed together with gold from other sources and ends up abroad. "“There needs to be much greater political impetus behind regulating this very destructive trade”," states MEP Caroline Lucas. But how do you regulate an industry if the origins of its products are untraceable? Production Company – Ref. 3786 Journeyman Pictures is your independent source for the world's most powerful films, exploring the burning issues of today. We represent stories from the world's top producers, with brand new content coming in all the time. On our channel you'll find outstanding and controversial journalism covering any global subject you can imagine wanting to know about.
Views: 68881 Journeyman Pictures
🇵🇪Gold at any cost: Illegal mining in Peru | TechKnow
 
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For more than 50 million years, the Amazon rainforest has been a cradle of life. Its pristine forests, however, are increasingly under threat due to illegal gold mining. TechKnow's Phil Torres heads to La Pampa, the buffer zone of Tambopata National Reserve, to witness how illegal mining is turning forests into toxic wastelands. There, more than 100,000 acres of rainforest have been cleared. - Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check out our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
Views: 14785 Al Jazeera English
NEED TO KNOW | Illegal gold mining in the Amazon | PBS
 
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http://www.pbs.org/wnet/need-to-know/environment/video-the-price-of-gold-illegal-gold-mining-in-the-amazon/11114/ With the price of gold at an all-time high, veteran war photographer Ron Haviv documents the environmental destruction illegal gold mining has caused in the Peruvian Amazon. Need to Know visited the Phoenix suburbs. Need to Know airs Fridays on PBS. Watch full-length episodes of Need to Know at http://video.pbs.org/program/1458405365/
Views: 7818 PBS
Golden Amazon (full documentary)
 
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The woods are running along the Amazon due to illegal trafficking. This episode of the series examines the clandestine exploitation of certain resources of the Amazon. Along with the problems arising from the spoliation timber know fishing and illegal sale of Pirarucú, freshwater fish's largest planet, endangered today. Seems that conquering spirit is still alive and there are many who believe that the forest is a place to get rich. In this chapter we will visit famous as Serra Pelada gold deposits and discover the impact that caused this reef, and exhausted today, but whose mines killed hundreds of prospectors, gold prospectors.
Peru’s military tries to curb illegal gold mining in Amazon - aerial footage
 
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(16 May 2019) LEAD IN: For a decade, a gold rush accelerated in Peru's Tambopata province, a center for an illicit activity that is among the most lucrative, and destructive, in the Amazonian wilderness. Security forces came and went; miners scattered and returned. Then Peru announced something different: It has installed permanent military bases in hopes of curbing not just illegal mining but also human trafficking and other associated crimes. STORY-LINE: By day, Peruvian police and soldiers search for and destroy equipment used by illegal gold miners in a part of the Amazon rainforest where mining has transformed once-dense foliage into a desert with dead trees and toxic pools. For a decade, a gold rush accelerated in Peru's Tambopata province, a center for an illicit activity that is among the most lucrative, and destructive, in the Amazonian wilderness. Security forces came and went; miners scattered and returned. Then Peru announced something different: It installed permanent military bases in hopes of curbing not just illegal mining but also human trafficking and other associated crimes. "Operation Mercury" began in February when authorities evicted thousands of illegal gold miners from the area and deployed hundreds of police and soldiers for the long term, lodging them in some cases in the same makeshift quarters once used by gold dealers. In March, the Associated Press observed "Operation Mercury" from the skies, using a camera-mounted drone. The men in uniform regularly patrol in vehicles and on motorcycles, though some miners emerge at night and there are concerns that others will wait for the military presence to subside, or simply relocate elsewhere. What is certain is the devastation left behind - partly because of the mercury used to separate gold from debris during excavation. Tens of thousands of acres (hectares) of rainforest have been destroyed. The area known as "La Pampa," which surrounds a national park and doesn't appear on state maps, has yielded roughly 25 tons of illegally mined gold a year, much more than the output of Yanacocha, Peru's most productive legal gold mine, according to the Peruvian government. Peru is the No. 1 producer of gold in Latin America. It is a pattern being repeated to varying degrees elsewhere in the Amazon, including in Venezuela, Bolivia, Ecuador, Colombia and Brazil. Fueled by rising global prices, illegal gold mining destroyed 92,000 square miles (238,000 square kilometers) of forest between 2000 and 2015, according to the Amazonian Network of Geo Referenced Socio-Environmental Information, a coalition of non-government groups that analyzed data from the Amazon in nine countries. The use of hundreds of tons of toxic mercury in illegal mining across the continent has raised concerns about health problems on affected land, some of which is occupied by indigenous people. One base occupied by security forces in La Pampa is surrounded by two lakes contaminated with mercury, as well as debris left by miners. The police and soldiers occasionally find machinery used by the illegal miners and blow it up with dynamite. They also destroy metal tubing used to mine gold. Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP_Archive Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/APArchives Google+: https://plus.google.com/b/102011028589719587178/+APArchive​ Tumblr: https://aparchives.tumblr.com/​​ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/ You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/70bdd89b58104e90fba6bc1ca4c8b34a
Views: 64 AP Archive
Gold at the Amazon's expense - 08 Jun 08
 
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Thousands of gold miners have flocked to Brazil's Amazon rainforest to find their fortune. Now, only about 1,000 miners remain, still hoping there's more gold to be found. But their mining activities are leaving behind a trail of destruction across the rainforest. Gabriel Elizondo reports.
Views: 42862 Al Jazeera English
Peru’s military tries to curb illegal gold mining in Amazon - aerial footage
 
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(16 May 2019) LEAD IN: For a decade, a gold rush accelerated in Peru's Tambopata province, a center for an illicit activity that is among the most lucrative, and destructive, in the Amazonian wilderness. Security forces came and went; miners scattered and returned. Then Peru announced something different: It has installed permanent military bases in hopes of curbing not just illegal mining but also human trafficking and other associated crimes. STORY-LINE: By day, Peruvian police and soldiers search for and destroy equipment used by illegal gold miners in a part of the Amazon rainforest where mining has transformed once-dense foliage into a desert with dead trees and toxic pools. For a decade, a gold rush accelerated in Peru's Tambopata province, a center for an illicit activity that is among the most lucrative, and destructive, in the Amazonian wilderness. Security forces came and went; miners scattered and returned. Then Peru announced something different: It installed permanent military bases in hopes of curbing not just illegal mining but also human trafficking and other associated crimes. "Operation Mercury" began in February when authorities evicted thousands of illegal gold miners from the area and deployed hundreds of police and soldiers for the long term, lodging them in some cases in the same makeshift quarters once used by gold dealers. In March, the Associated Press observed "Operation Mercury" from the skies, using a camera-mounted drone. The men in uniform regularly patrol in vehicles and on motorcycles, though some miners emerge at night and there are concerns that others will wait for the military presence to subside, or simply relocate elsewhere. What is certain is the devastation left behind - partly because of the mercury used to separate gold from debris during excavation. Tens of thousands of acres (hectares) of rainforest have been destroyed. The area known as "La Pampa," which surrounds a national park and doesn't appear on state maps, has yielded roughly 25 tons of illegally mined gold a year, much more than the output of Yanacocha, Peru's most productive legal gold mine, according to the Peruvian government. Peru is the No. 1 producer of gold in Latin America. It is a pattern being repeated to varying degrees elsewhere in the Amazon, including in Venezuela, Bolivia, Ecuador, Colombia and Brazil. Fueled by rising global prices, illegal gold mining destroyed 92,000 square miles (238,000 square kilometers) of forest between 2000 and 2015, according to the Amazonian Network of Geo Referenced Socio-Environmental Information, a coalition of non-government groups that analyzed data from the Amazon in nine countries. The use of hundreds of tons of toxic mercury in illegal mining across the continent has raised concerns about health problems on affected land, some of which is occupied by indigenous people. One base occupied by security forces in La Pampa is surrounded by two lakes contaminated with mercury, as well as debris left by miners. The police and soldiers occasionally find machinery used by the illegal miners and blow it up with dynamite. They also destroy metal tubing used to mine gold. Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP_Archive Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/APArchives Google+: https://plus.google.com/b/102011028589719587178/+APArchive​ Tumblr: https://aparchives.tumblr.com/​​ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/ You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/143e28a72d4f531b47446217ac8e0d92
Views: 119 AP Archive
Peru: Illegal Gold Miners Cause Deforestation in the Amazon
 
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Learn more: http://pulitzercenter.org/projects/peru-gold-mining-deforestation-environment-health-risks-poverty In collaboration with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, special correspondent Steve Sapienza reports on illegal gold mining in southeastern Peru, where one of the world's richest ecosystems is being mutilated by illegal gold miners. Deemed fortune hunters, illegal gold miners increasingly prey on the resources of the Madre De Dios region, transforming Peru's rainforests into mining towns and extending the problem deeper into the Amazon. Close to 30,000 people tied to illegal gold mining activity now call the region in Peru home. Specifically in the region's capital, Puerto Maldonado, and a nearby town, La Pampa, deforestation caused by illegal gold miners is on the rise, and with police efforts to halt the illegal gold mining proving futile, the destruction of Peru continues. The owners of farm and forestry concessions in Peru face a daily threat of invasion by illegal gold miners who claim to have mining rights to the land. The resulting illegal mining fosters criminal activities and destroys the natural resources of the region. Once illegal gold miners relocate, the land remains a barren desert of sand pits--a destroyed ecosystem carved out by deforestation. This report is part of the Pulitzer Center sponsored project "Peru's Gold Rush: Wealth and Woes" (http://bit.ly/yaU3Xb).
Views: 9086 Pulitzer Center
The fight against illegal gold mining in French Guiana
 
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Subscribe to France 24 now: http://f24.my/youtubeEN FRANCE 24 live news stream: all the latest news 24/7 http://f24.my/YTliveEN In French Guiana, illegal gold mining has been thriving for decades. Fuelled by clandestine workers from neighbouring Suriname and Brazil, this criminal enterprise has reached near-industrial proportions, destroying thousands of hectares of precious rainforest. But lately, the French armed forces have been cracking down on this illegal activity. FRANCE 24's Nicolas Pouillot reports on their efforts. A programme prepared by Patrick Lovett and Florence Viala. http://www.france24.com/en/reportages Visit our website: http://www.france24.com Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://f24.my/youtubeEN Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FRANCE24.English Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/France24_en
Views: 13832 FRANCE 24 English
Peru’s No. 1 illegal export isn’t what you think it is
 
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Peru, the world’s largest producer of cocaine, has a new booming illicit business: gold. Visit us at: http://www.fusion.net Like us at: http://www.facebook.com/FusionNetwork Follow us at: http://twitter.com/thisisfusion View us: http://instagram.com/ThisIsFusion Read more: http://thisisfusion.tumblr.com/
Views: 2851 FUSION
Peru’s military tries to curb illegal gold mining
 
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(16 May 2019) By day, Peruvian police and soldiers search for and destroy equipment used by illegal gold miners in a part of the Amazon rainforest where mining has transformed once-dense foliage into a desert pocked with dead trees and toxic pools. As night falls, they play cards and soccer or call family from their remote outpost. For a decade, a gold rush accelerated in Peru's Tambopata province, a centre for an illicit activity that is among the most lucrative, and destructive, in the Amazonian wilderness. Security forces came and went; miners scattered and returned. Then Peru announced something different: It installed long-term military bases in hopes of curbing not just illegal mining but also human trafficking and other associated crimes. "Operation Mercury" began in February when authorities evicted thousands of illegal gold miners from the area and deployed hundreds of police and soldiers for the long term, lodging them in some cases in the same makeshift quarters once used by gold dealers. The men in uniform regularly patrol in vehicles and on motorcycles, though some miners emerge at night and there are concerns that others will wait for the military presence to subside, or simply relocate to more remote areas. Jimena Diaz Leiva, a PhD student at the University of California, Berkeley who has studied the illegal industry said that the small-scale miners feel ignored and vilified by a government that they say has shown little interest in their economic wellbeing and whose initiatives to bring them into the legal mining industry have not been effective. "Ensuring a livelihood for these miners or for others in the region requires that you consider their well-being as well as you know what the future of the forests are", Diaz Leiva said. What is certain is the devastation left behind, partly because of the mercury used to separate gold from debris during excavation. Tens of thousands of acres of rainforest have been destroyed. Maj. Gustavo Cerdena, head of a police unit, said he had come to the area before the law enforcement operation began in February, posing as a gold buyer in order to gather intelligence on the criminal syndicate dominating the illegal trade. The area known as "La Pampa," which surrounds a national park and doesn't appear on state maps, has yielded roughly 25 tons of illegally mined gold a year, much more than the output of Yanacocha, Peru's most productive legal gold mine, according to the Peruvian government. Peru is the No. 1 producer of gold in Latin America. It is a pattern being repeated to varying degrees elsewhere in the Amazon, including in Venezuela, Bolivia, Ecuador, Colombia and Brazil. Fueled by rising global prices, illegal gold mining destroyed 92,000 square miles (238,000 square kilometres) of forest between 2000 and 2015, according to the Amazonian Network of GeoReferenced Socio-Environmental Information, a coalition of non-government groups that analyzed data from the Amazon in nine countries. The use of hundreds of tons of toxic mercury in illegal mining across the continent has raised concerns about health problems on affected land, some of which is occupied by indigenous people. The military bases in La Pampa will remain at least through mid-2021, when the term of the current government ends. One base occupied by security forces in is surrounded by two lakes contaminated with mercury, as well as debris left by miners. They also destroy metal tubing used to mine gold. Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP_Archive Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/APArchives Google+: https://plus.google.com/b/102011028589719587178/+APArchive​ Tumblr: https://aparchives.tumblr.com/​​ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/ You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/d85ebb64bf95990fd1c3832f245b87e0
Views: 233 AP Archive
Peru's dirty gold - TechKnow
 
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The Amazon rainforest is home to 10 percent of the world's known species, and its ancient trees remove millions of tons of carbondioxide per year from the atmosphere. Its pristine forests, however, are increasingly under threat. The soil underneath some of the rainforests is laced with gold, and each year, thousands of kilometres of the Amazon rainforest are devastated by illegal gold mining. In Peru, where the rainforest covers about 60 percent of the country, illegal mining operations threaten local communities and turn swathes of rainforest into barren waste sites. So what are the consequences of illegal mining for local communities and the ecosystem? What can be done to stop the destruction of the rainforest? And what happens to the dirty gold once it leaves Peru? - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
Views: 153284 Al Jazeera English
Brazil probes ‘Amazon massacres’ by illegal miners
 
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Authorities in Brazil are investigating the reported massacre of up to 10 members of an isolated Amazonian tribe. It is believed that the indigenous people were killed by gold miners, who reportedly bragged about the attack afterwards. Al Jazeera's Lucia Newman reports from the Javari valley. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
Views: 6156 Al Jazeera English
Pollution in the Amazon Rainforest from Illegal Gold Mining
 
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In 2015 I spent three weeks in the wilds of Peru making a documentary about illegal gold mining in the Amazon rainforest for VICELAND. Something went wrong in the US office and it was never released, but I do have this bit of footage. I was given a ride through the polluted area of the rainforest that had been destroyed due to the liquid mercury the miners pour into the environment. - jakehanrahan.com
Views: 318 Jake Hanrahan
Final Presentation: Amazon Gold Mining/ Compilation
 
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Citation Page Alonso, Luis Fernando. “Nearly 1,000 Complaints against Peru Police This Year.” InSight Crime, 20 Sept. 2017, www.insightcrime.org/news/brief/nearly-1-000-complaints-against-peru-police-this-year/. DuPée, Matthew C. “Peru's Militarized Response to Illegal Mining Isn't Enough to Protect the Amazon.” World Politics Review, 21 Mar. 2019, www.worldpoliticsreview.com/articles/27679/peru-s-militarized-response-to-illegal-mining-isn-t-enough-to-protect-the-amazon. Gaworecki, Mike. “How Small-Scale Gold Mining Is Devastating the Peruvian Amazon.” Pacific Standard, 27 Dec. 2018, psmag.com/environment/how-small-scale-gold-mining-is-devastating-the-peruvian-amazon. Quigley, John. “Peru Raids Biggest Illegal Mines to Stem Amazon Gold Rush.” Bloomberg.com, Bloomberg, 19 Feb. 2019, 12:37 PM, www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-02-20/peru-raids-biggest-illegal-mining-zone-to-stem-amazon-gold-rush. “Rainforest Facts.” Facts and Information on the Amazon Rainforest, www.rain-tree.com/facts.htm. Reuters. “Peru Cracks down on Illegal Gold Mining to Save Deforested Amazon Area.” NBCNews.com, NBCUniversal News Group, 20 Feb. 2019, 10:28 AM, www.nbcnews.com/news/latino/peru-cracks-down-illegal-gold-mining-save-deforested-amazon-area-n973551. Rubey, Lawrence. “Illegal Gold Mining | Peru.” U.S. Agency for International Development, 2 Oct. 2018, www.usaid.gov/peru/our-work/illegal-gold-mining. Youtube footage/info gathered: Joshua Turner: Sunset drone flight deep in Amazon Jungle, Bolivia National Geographic: Creatures of the Amazon Rainforest Sunday Night: Peru Gold | Real destruction of illegal gold mines on Amazon rainforest revealed | Sunday Night CGTN America: Time is Dust: Illegal gold mining in Peru Pulitzer Center: Peru: Illegal Gold Miners Cause Deforestation in the Amazon AP Archive: Peru protesters call for action on corruption
Views: 7 Carlos Menacho
Peru's military tries to curb illegal gold mining in Amazon
 
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By day, Peruvian police and soldiers search for and destroy equipment used by illegal gold miners in a part of the Amazon rainforest where mining has transformed once-dense foliage into a desert pocked with dead trees and toxic pools. As night falls, they play cards and soccer, call family from their remote outpost or have a medic pluck burrowing parasites from their feet. For a decade, a gold rush accelerated in Peru's Tambopata province, a center for an illicit activity that is among the most lucrative, and destructive, in the Amazonian wilderness. Security forces came and went; miners scattered and returned. Then Peru announced something different: It installed long-term military bases in hopes of curbing not just illegal mining but also human trafficking and other associated crimes. "Operation Mercury" began in February when authorities evicted thousands of illegal gold miners from the area and deployed hundreds of police and soldiers for the long term, lodging them in some cases in the same makeshift quarters once used by gold dealers. The men in uniform regularly patrol in vehicles and on motorcycles, though some miners emerge at night and there are concerns that others will wait for the military presence to subside, or simply relocate to more remote areas. "As many miners tell me, these interventions just push miners into areas further and further into the rainforest, because they want to prevent being caught," said Jimena Diaz Leiva, a PhD student at the University of California, Berkeley who has studied the illegal industry. She also said the small-scale miners feel ignored and vilified by a government that they say has shown little interest in their economic wellbeing and whose initiatives to bring them into the legal mining industry have not been effective. What is certain is the devastation left behind — partly because of the mercury used to separate gold from debris during excavation. Tens of thousands of acres (hectares) of rainforest have been destroyed. "The damage to nature here is so terrible that all the water is poisoned," said Maj. Gustavo Cerdeña, head of a police unit. Cerdeña said he had come to the area before the law enforcement operation began in February, posing as a gold buyer in order to gather intelligence on the criminal syndicate dominating the illegal trade. "It was full of people. It was like Gomorrah before it rained fire," he said, referring to the biblical city's destruction. "Now everything is quieter." The area known as "La Pampa," which surrounds a national park and doesn't appear on state maps, has yielded roughly 25 tons of illegally mined gold a year, much more than the output of Yanacocha, Peru's most productive legal gold mine, according to the Peruvian government. Peru is the No. 1 producer of gold in Latin America. It is a pattern being repeated to varying degrees elsewhere in the Amazon, including in Venezuela, Bolivia, Ecuador, Colombia and Brazil. Fueled by rising global prices for go
Mapping the Damage Caused by Gold Mining in the Amazon
 
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Carnegie Airborne Observatory ecologist Dr. Greg Asner at the Carnegie Institution for Science. Full video: https://youtu.be/SZCbvJDN2y4
Views: 3616 FORA.tv
Americas Now— Time is dust: Peru's illegal gold mining 03/07/2016
 
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Thousands of small-time miners are digging up and destroying the Peruvian Amazon. The police and army are after them. Environmentalists the world around condemn them. It’s a disaster and its only getting worse. But what do the miners themselves have to say? For more: http://peru.cctv-america.com/ Subscribe to us on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/CCTVcomInternational Follow us on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cctvcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/cctv Instagram: http://instagram.com/cctvenglish
Views: 4183 CCTV English
Illegal Loggers: The Tribe Waging War in the Amazon
 
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On the Alto Rio Guamá reserve in Brazil, the Tembe tribe has been battling for decades to save its land from illegal loggers and settlers. As tension escalates, the Tembe people have now been forced to take up arms and confront the loggers, sparking violent clashes deep within the jungle. With the odds stacked against the tribe, VICE News traveled to the northern Brazilian state of Para to meet the Tembe and witness the tribe’s struggle to protect its land. Watch “Peru’s War on Drugs” - http://bit.ly/1NRZ0cH Watch “Coca and Faith in the Amazon” - http://bit.ly/1GM7wEr The Chevron Tapes: Video Shows Oil Giant Allegedly Covering Up Amazon Contamination - http://bit.ly/1IPvCAi Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com Follow VICE News here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideos
Views: 462585 VICE News
Time is Dust: Illegal gold mining in Peru
 
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Thousands of small-time miners are digging up and destroying the Peruvian Amazon. The police and army are after them. Environmentalists the world around condemn them. It’s a disaster and its only getting worse. But what do the miners themselves have to say? Hear what they have to say - and see how they live and work - on an unprecedented journey into the illegal mines. Where crooks and killers toil alongside otherwise honest men in search of gold – and a way out of life-threatening poverty. See more: http://peru.cctv-america.com/ Watch CCTV America LIVE on your computer, tablet or mobile www.cctvamericalive.com Subscribe to CCTV America on YouTube: CCTVAmerica1 Follow CCTV America: Twitter: @cctv_america Facebook: CCTVAmerica Google+: CctvamericaTvnews »» Watch CCTV America «« Washington, DC (and greater area) • MHz - Channel 3 • COMCAST (Xfinity) - Channel 273 • FIOS - Channel 277 New York City • Time Warner - Channel 134 • FiOS (Verizon) - Channel 277 Los Angeles • Charter Cable - Channel 562 • Time Warner - Channel 155 Satellite Nationwide • DISH TV - Channel 279
Views: 10460 CGTN America
Peru declares a state of emergency on illegal gold mining
 
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Illegal gold mining has been having a devastating effect on forests across South America for years. The Peruvian government recently launched a formidable operation to stop the epidemic. It’s called “Operation Mercurio.” A force of some 1800 police and military officers are behind the mission to stop the activity. The special forces were deployed to Peru’s Amazon. The habitat destruction caused by illegal gold mining has been so severe it’s unclear if the area can ever recover. The practice not only destroys the Amazon rainforest but drives modern-day slavery, human trafficking and the sexual exploitation of children. Correspondent Dan Collyns travelled to Peru’s Madre De Dios. He reports on whether the government’s attempt to crackdown on the illicit industry can succeed after many others have failed. Watch CGTN LIVE on your computer, tablet or mobile http://america.cgtn.com/livenews Subscribe to CGTN America on YouTube Follow CGTN America: Twitter: @cgtnamerica Facebook: @cgtnamerica
Views: 656 CGTN America
Gold Lures Illegal Miners to Peru's Rainforests
 
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Click for more: http://to.pbs.org/uIvJkW In southeastern Peru, where the Andes Mountains meet the Amazon, lies one of the world\'s richest ecosystems and the destructive lure of gold. In a collaboration with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, special correspondent Steve Sapienza reports on illegal gold mining in Peru.
Views: 8451 PBS NewsHour
Peru's military tries to curb illegal gold mining in Amazon
 
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Peru's military tries to curb illegal gold mining in Amazon LA PAMPA, Peru – By day, Peruvian police and soldiers search for and destroy equipment used by illegal gold miners in a part of the Amazon rainforest where mining has transformed once-dense foliage into a desert pocked with dead trees and toxic pools. As night falls, they play cards and soccer, call family from their remote outpost or have a medic pluck burrowing parasites from their feet. For a decade, a gold rush accelerated in Peru's Tambopata province, a center for an illicit activity that is among the most lucrative, and destructive, in the Amazonian wilderness. Security forces came and went; miners scattered and returned. Then Peru announced something different: It installed long-term military bases in hopes of curbing not just illegal mining but also human trafficking and other associated crimes. "Operation Mercury" began in February when authorities evicted thousands of illegal gold miners from the area and deployed hundreds of police and soldiers for the long term, lodging them in some cases in the same makeshift quarters once used by gold dealers. The men in uniform regularly patrol in vehicles and on motorcycles, though some miners emerge at night and there are concerns that others will wait for the military presence to subside, or simply relocate to more remote areas. "As many miners tell me, these interventions just push miners into areas further and further into the rainforest, because they want to prevent being caught," said Jimena Diaz Leiva, a PhD student at the University of California, Berkeley who has studied the illegal industry. She also said the small-scale miners feel ignored and vilified by a government that they say has shown little interest in their economic wellbeing and whose initiatives to bring them into the legal mining industry have not been effective. What is certain is the devastation left behind — partly because of the mercury used to separate gold from debris during excavation. Tens of thousands of acres hectares of rainforest have been destroyed. "The damage to nature here is so terrible that all the water is poisoned," said Maj. Gustavo Cerdeña, head of a police unit. Cerdeña said he had come to the area before the law enforcement operation began in February, posing as a gold buyer in order to gather intelligence on the criminal syndicate dominating the illegal trade. "It was full of people. It was like Gomorrah before it rained fire," he said, referring to the biblical city's destruction. "Now everything is quieter. "The area known as "La Pampa," which surrounds a national park and doesn't appear on state maps, has yielded roughly 25 tons of illegally mined gold a year, much more than the output of Yanacocha, Peru's most productive legal gold mine, according to the Peruvian government. Peru is the No. 1 producer of gold in Latin America. It is a pattern being repeated to varying degrees elsewhere in the Amazon, including in Venezuela, Bolivia, Ecuador, Colombia and Brazil. Fueled by rising global prices for gold, illegal mining destroyed 92,000 square miles 238,000 square kilometers of forest between 2000 and 2015, according to the Amazonian Network of GeoReferenced Socio-Environmental Information, a coalition of non-government groups that analyzed data from the Amazon in nine countries. The use of hundreds of tons of toxic mercury in illegal mining across the continent has raised concerns about health problems on affected land, some of which is occupied by indigenous people. The military bases in La Pampa will remain at least through mid-2021, when the term of the current government ends. One base occupied by security forces is surrounded by two lakes contaminated with mercury as well as debris left by miners. There are abandoned shops, and a small memorial site for a dead miner, marked with artificial flowers and bottles of alcohol. A few dogs and cats wander around the bleak landscape. The police and soldiers occasionally find machinery used by the illegal miners, and blow it up with dynamite. They also destroy metal tubing used to mine gold. Ernesto Ráez, a biology professor in the Peruvian capital of Lima, said it would take generations to restore and reforest areas affected by mining. "It will take more than a lifetime to see a forest comparable to the one that was destroyed," he said. "But it's worth it." Thanks for watching, Hit that like button, and do subscribe, to get notified on upcoming videos
Views: 10 News 24x7
Uncontacted Tribe in The Amazon Reportedly Massacred by Illegal Gold Miners
 
04:05
Prosecutors in Brazil are investigating reports that illegal gold miners allegedly massacred up to 10 members of a remote, uncontacted tribe in the Brazilian Amazon. The alleged attack, which is said to have taken place last month, occurred along the River Jandiatuba in western Brazil, and may have gone forever unnoticed by the outside world, were it not for the the miners being overheard boasting about the killings in a nearby town afterwards. "It was crude bar talk," Leila Silvia Burger Sotto-Maior, a coordinator for Brazil's indigenous affairs agency, FUNAI, told The New York Times. "They even bragged about cutting up the bodies and throwing them in the river." Two of the gold miners – known as garimpeiros – have been arrested and taken to the city of Tabatinga to provide testimony about the incident, which, if confirmed, is feared to have wiped out one-fifth of the entire tribe, including women and children. The Amazon region where the massacre is said to have happened is called the Javari Valley (aka the Uncontacted Frontier), bordered by Peru, Brazil, and Bolivia. This area is thought to contain more uncontacted tribes than anywhere else on the planet, with an estimated 2,000 individuals across up to 20 isolated groups. This tribe is known locally as Fleicheros, or "the ones who throw arrows", but as they're an isolated people with little or no contact with the outside world, not an awful lot is actually recorded about them – something which makes attacks like this hard to investigate. "We are following up, but the territories are big and access is limited," the prosecutor in charge of the case, Pablo Luz de Beltrand, told The New York Times. "These tribes are uncontacted – even FUNAI has only sporadic information about them. So it's difficult work that requires all government departments working together." The region has a history of indigenous peoples being threatened by the illegal encroachment of miners, which commentators say is a direct result of agencies like FUNAI having their funding slashed under the government of the current Brazilian president, Michel Temer. Temer provoked uproar less than a month ago after attempting to abolish protections shielding a vast reserve of Amazon rainforest from mining interests. That move – dubbed "the biggest attack on the Amazon of the last 50 years" – has been temporarily foiled by a federal court, but if the action goes ahead, it could increase the dangers and displacement indigenous peoples in the rainforest are clearly already facing from illegal miners. "If these [massacre] reports are confirmed, President Temer and his government bear a heavy responsibility for this genocidal attack," Stephen Corry, the director of tribal rights organisation Survival, said in a statement. "The slashing of FUNAI's funds has left dozens of uncontacted tribes defenceless against thousands of invaders – gold miners, ranchers, and loggers – who are desperate to steal and ransack their lands." In this instance, it's unclear whether the evidence will be sufficient to prosecute the alleged killers. An audio recording of the boasting in a bar does exist, however, and the miners are reported to have collected tools and jewellery from the victims, which could corroborate the prosecution's case. Whether those items alone will be enough to punish this alleged horror is unknown, but it's clear that more grave injustices could occur if the sanctity of these isolated people's lands isn't defended by modern forces surrounding them. "All these tribes should have had their lands properly recognised and protected years ago," Corry said. "[T]he government's open support for those who want to open up indigenous territories is utterly shameful, and is setting indigenous rights in Brazil back decades."
Views: 447 The Science Channel
A Toxic Legacy: Gold Mining in Peru
 
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Find more Earth Focus content at https://www.linktv.org/earthfocus Earth Focus profiles the new film Amazon Gold that depicts the apocalyptic destruction of the rainforest in pursuit of illegally mined gold and the health impacts of mercury pollution, a by-product of gold mining. Amazon Gold reaffirms the importance of the rainforest as a repository of biological diversity and the global implications of its destruction.
Views: 33317 Link TV
Gold mining in the Amazon rain forest (German with Portuguese subtitles)
 
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A film of Pforzheim University in cooperation with Baden TV (Oct. 2013)
Views: 1468 INEC REM
Illegal mining in Peru destroying Amazon rainforest Part I
 
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Illegal gold miners in Peru are destroying thousands of hectares of the Amazon forest, home to some of the world's most important biodiversity. Biologists are working to save wildlife in the area, as their habitats are destroyed or endangered by the gold diggers. At the same time, stopping the mining is presenting a tough challenge for the government. In the final instalment of a three-part series, Al Jazeera's Mariana Sanchez reports from Madre de Dios in Peru. Source: AlJazeeraEnglish
Views: 1895 MiningNewsTodayTV
Gold Rush in the Amazon
 
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Learn more: http://pulitzercenter.org/projects/south-america/gold-guns-and-garimpeiros Gold is always a good business. It never goes bankrupt or needs a bail-out. Gold is the go-to investment when financial markets suffer. For the last few years, as "Western" Markets have sank, gold prices, predictably, have soared, reaching record high values. Consequently, gold mining increases. In France, Brazilians make their way illegally into French Guiana, crossing rivers nightly into Europe's Amazon, to mine for gold. French Gendarme battle illegal Brazilian miners (garimpeiros) daily. Patrolling rivers, aerial surveillance and foot patrols through the dense Amazon forest, the Gendarme try to mitigate the environmental damage done to Europe's only rainforest. Meanwhile, Brazilian garimpeiros, an estimated 30,000, live clandestinely throughout the jungle in an archipelago of mining camps and mines, both large and small. Miners bring materials, petrol, chicken, engine parts, 4-wheeler ATVs, even earth-moving tractors and trucks, up rivers and small creeks in wooden canoes. Everything in the jungle is paid with gold, a plate of rice and beans, a cold beer, a prostitute. This report is part of Pulitzer Center-sponsored project "Gold, Guns and Garimpeiros" (http://bit.ly/z3xh3b).
Views: 8836 Pulitzer Center
Brazil under fire over Amazon forest mining decree
 
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Brazil's government is scrambling to respond to public outcry after it dismantled a vast national reserve in the Amazon to open up the area to mining. The National Reserve of Copper and Associates (Renca) banned mining in roughly 46,000 square km of Amazon rainforest, an area larger than Denmark. It was set up in 1984 by the then military government to reserve its mineral resources for future extraction rather to protect the forest. The area, which straddles the northern states of Amapa and P… READ MORE : http://www.euronews.com/2017/08/29/brazil-under-fire-over-amazon-forest-mining-decree What are the top stories today? Click to watch: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLSyY1udCyYqBeDOz400FlseNGNqReKkFd euronews: the most watched news channel in Europe Subscribe! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=euronews euronews is available in 13 languages: https://www.youtube.com/user/euronewsnetwork/channels In English: Website: http://www.euronews.com/news Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/euronews Twitter: http://twitter.com/euronews Google+: http://google.com/+euronews VKontakte: http://vk.com/en.euronews
Views: 1581 euronews (in English)
Ross Kemp: Battle for the Amazon - Drug Production & Gold Mining in Peru | Ross Kemp Extreme World
 
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Ross heads to Peru to investigate the impact drug production and gold mining has on the Amazon Rainforest. Whilst there, he discovers how the global demand for drugs wreaks its own local destruction and how the rise in the price of gold has lead to people destroying the environment just to earn a living. Be sure to subscribe for more incredible clips and full episodes, click here: http://bit.ly/10d7UKK Ross Kemp Extreme World is the home of your favourite Ross Kemp series, including Ross Kemp On Pirates, Ross Kemp On Gangs, Ross Kemp In Afghanistan and Ross Kemp On The Frontline, as well as some of the most hard-hitting, jaw-dropping interviews and scenes. Have a favourite clip of Ross Kemp? Let us know in the comments!
Uncontacted Tribe in The Amazon Reportedly Massacred by Illegal Gold Miners
 
04:52
Prosecutors in Brazil are investigating reports that illegal gold miners allegedly massacred up to 10 members of a remote, uncontacted tribe in the Brazilian Amazon. The alleged attack, which is said to have taken place last month, occurred along the River Jandiatuba in western Brazil, and may have gone forever unnoticed by the outside world, were it not for the the miners being overheard boasting about the killings in a nearby town afterwards. "It was crude bar talk," Leila Silvia Burger Sotto-Maior, a coordinator for Brazil's indigenous affairs agency, FUNAI, told The New York Times. "They even bragged about cutting up the bodies and throwing them in the river." Two of the gold miners – known as garimpeiros – have been arrested and taken to the city of Tabatinga to provide testimony about the incident, which, if confirmed, is feared to have wiped out one-fifth of the entire tribe, including women and children. The Amazon region where the massacre is said to have happened is called the Javari Valley (aka the Uncontacted Frontier), bordered by Peru, Brazil, and Bolivia. This area is thought to contain more uncontacted tribes than anywhere else on the planet, with an estimated 2,000 individuals across up to 20 isolated groups. This tribe is known locally as Fleicheros, or "the ones who throw arrows", but as they're an isolated people with little or no contact with the outside world, not an awful lot is actually recorded about them – something which makes attacks like this hard to investigate. "We are following up, but the territories are big and access is limited," the prosecutor in charge of the case, Pablo Luz de Beltrand, told The New York Times. "These tribes are uncontacted – even FUNAI has only sporadic information about them. So it's difficult work that requires all government departments working together." The region has a history of indigenous peoples being threatened by the illegal encroachment of miners, which commentators say is a direct result of agencies like FUNAI having their funding slashed under the government of the current Brazilian president, Michel Temer. Temer provoked uproar less than a month ago after attempting to abolish protections shielding a vast reserve of Amazon rainforest from mining interests. That move – dubbed "the biggest attack on the Amazon of the last 50 years" – has been temporarily foiled by a federal court, but if the action goes ahead, it could increase the dangers and displacement indigenous peoples in the rainforest are clearly already facing from illegal miners. "If these [massacre] reports are confirmed, President Temer and his government bear a heavy responsibility for this genocidal attack," Stephen Corry, the director of tribal rights organisation Survival, said in a statement. "The slashing of FUNAI's funds has left dozens of uncontacted tribes defenceless against thousands of invaders – gold miners, ranchers, and loggers – who are desperate to steal and ransack their lands." In this instance, it's unclear whether the evidence will be sufficient to prosecute the alleged killers. An audio recording of the boasting in a bar does exist, however, and the miners are reported to have collected tools and jewellery from the victims, which could corroborate the prosecution's case. Whether those items alone will be enough to punish this alleged horror is unknown, but it's clear that more grave injustices could occur if the sanctity of these isolated people's lands isn't defended by modern forces surrounding them. "All these tribes should have had their lands properly recognised and protected years ago," Corry said. "[T]he government's open support for those who want to open up indigenous territories is utterly shameful, and is setting indigenous rights in Brazil back decades."
Views: 332 The Science Channel
Illegal mining in Peru destroying Amazon
 
02:26
Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Illegal gold miners in Peru are destroying thousands of hectares of the Amazon forest, home to some of the world's most important biodiversity. Al Jazeera's Mariana Sanchez reports from Madre de Dios in Peru. At Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people's lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a 'voice to the voiceless.' Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world's most respected news and current affairs channels. Social Media links: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Instagram: https://instagram.com/aljazeera/?ref=... Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajenglish Website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ google+: https://plus.google.com/+aljazeera/posts
Views: 4873 Al Jazeera English
Illegal Mining In Peru Destroying Amazon Rainforest Part II
 
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Illegal gold miners in Peru are destroying thousands of hectares of the Amazon forest, home to some of the world's most important biodiversity. Biologists are working to save wildlife in the area, as their habitats are destroyed or endangered by the gold diggers. At the same time, stopping the mining is presenting a tough challenge for the government. In the final instalment of a three-part series, Al Jazeera's Mariana Sanchez reports from Madre de Dios in Peru.
Views: 882 MiningNewsTodayTV
Illegal Gold Mining is Destroying South American Rainforests
 
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What's destroying the South American rainforest? Most people would point to agriculture, cattle operations, and a booming population. But researchers are starting to recognize another threat: Gold mining . According to a new study , gold mining razed 650 square miles of tropical forest in South America between 2001 and 2013. That may not sound like a lot — the area is about the size of Hong Kong — the devastation is far greater than just the loss in forest cover. http://feeds.mashable.com/~r/Mashable/~3/cV1OIjwRo70/ http://www.wochit.com
Views: 1001 Wochit News
Stop gold mining in the Amazon
 
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Claudio Maretti, leader of WWF's Living Amazon Initiative, calls for a stop to gold mining in the Amazon. Join us in saving the Amazon: http://wwf.panda.org/amazon
Views: 1208 WWF International
Searching for Gold - Amazon with Bruce Parry - BBC
 
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Watch this clip of Parry's visit to a Brazilian gold mine as he nears the end of his epic journey from the source of the Amazon to the sea. Taken from the amazing BBC documentary series Amazon with Bruce Parry. Watch more high quality videos on the Explore YouTube channel from BBC Worldwide here: http://www.youtube.com/bbcexplore
Views: 43206 BBCExplore
Illegal mining in Peru destroying Amazon
 
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Illegal gold miners in Peru are destroying thousands of hectares of the Amazon forest, home to some of the world's most important biodiversity and animal life. Mariana Sanchez reports in the final installment of a three-part series.
Views: 3150 Al Jazeera English
Gold Mining in the Amazon Basin
 
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FLVS Earth/Space Science Honors Rocks and Minerals as Resources Assessment
Views: 1403 brookewphotography
Destruction From Illegal Gold Mining
 
00:12
www.amazonrainforestconservancy.com
Peruvian amazon destruction through illegal gold mining
 
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This has many implications.
Views: 47 tad hauser
Illegal Mining Poisons Brazilian Amazon Communities
 
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During the gold extraction process, illegal mining companies in the Brazilian Amazon pollute rivers with mercury. This is affecting the water and food sources of over 19 Yanomami and Yekuana indigenous communities. http://multimedia.telesurtv.net/v/illegal-mining-poisons-brazilian-amazon-communities/
Views: 455 TeleSUR English
Uncontacted Amazon tribe endangered by illegal gold miners
 
00:49
Anthropologists in Brazil have released a set of rare photos of an uncontacted Amazon tribe in an effort to save the group from the encroachment of illegal gold miners. The aerial photos show a clearing in the jungle where the Yanonami-Moxihatetema indigenous group has built a communal house. The group lives deep in the Amazon and has avoided contact with the outside world for generations. Activists said they released the photos, which were shot from a plane in September, in an effort to alert the world about the existence of the group and the risk they’re facing. http://fusion.net/story/371107/activists-release-rare-photos-of-lost-amazon-tribe-thats-being-threatened-by-gold-miners/ http://www.wochit.com This video was produced by YT Wochit News using http://wochit.com
Views: 1186 Wochit News
Peru renews raids on illegal Amazonian gold mines - Daily Mail
 
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The raid on the town of La Pampa, in Peru's southeastern region of Madre de Dios, saw the destruction of hundreds of homes, shops, nightclubs and even brothels. It came as part of a government crackdown on illegal mining, which has drawn hundreds of thousands of workers to the region and destroyed 60,000 hectares of land in the last decade. No one realised how severe the damage was until a U.S.-Peruvian report released in 2013. The government has vowed to eradicate deforestation in Peru by 2021. Original Article: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3174243/Police-destroy-entire-TOWN-including-grocery-stores-nightclub-sprung-support-illegal-gold-miners-Peruvian-rainforest.html Original Video: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/video/news/video-1201732/Peru-renews-raids-illegal-Amazonian-gold-mines.html Daily Mail Facebook: http://facebook.com/dailymail Daily Mail IG: http://instagram.com/dailymail Daily Mail Snap: https://www.snapchat.com/discover/Daily-Mail/8392137033 Daily Mail Twitter: http://twitter.com/MailOnline Daily Mail Pinterest: http://pinterest.co.uk/dailymail Daily Mail Google+: https://plus.google.com/+DailyMail/posts Get the free Daily Mail mobile app: http://dailymail.co.uk/mobile
Views: 28 Daily Mail
Peru’s illegal gold mining prompts public health emergency
 
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Peru’s illegal gold mining prompts public health emergency A study in the US has found that more than 500 kilometres of Peru's Amazon River is contaminated with mercury. For decades, illegal gold miners have been pouring thousands of tons of mercury into rivers. Peruvian officials now say nearly 50 thousand people, or 50 percent of the population of Madre de Dios may be affected. In May the government declared a state of emergency. Al Jazeera’s Mariana Sanchez reports from Madre de Dios, Peru. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
Views: 2642 Al Jazeera English
Amazon gold introduction
 
05:40
The Amazon Aid Foundation's mission is to bring awareness and environmental sustainability to the Amazon rainforest. The Foundation produces multimedia materials to educate the public about the Amazon while assisting partners on the ground who provide solutions to issues such as illegal gold mining and deforestation.
Views: 207 ICAPeace
Illegal Gold Mining Operation in the Amazon Jungle- on the Tombopata River, Peru
 
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Illegal Gold Mining Operation in the Amazon Jungle- on the Tombopata River, Peru - http://www.RichTrek.com for more
Views: 303 Richard Birecki
Trip to Graystone mining site, Amazon Rain Forest, Peru
 
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Boat ride to gold mining site in Peru Amazon Rain Forest
Views: 522 phowarth212