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Idle No More: Protest to Change?
 
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Momentum and a movement: Idle No More organizers, supporters and observers discuss the objectives and significance of the movement with Steve Paikin.
Harvest of Hope: 8 Panel Discussion
 
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In the spirit of Thanksgiving, this timely and insightful forum moderated by Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian Director Kevin Gover (Pawnee/Comanche) focuses on topical issues of reconciliation and highlights national apologies made to Native peoples. The symposium covers the eloquent apology issued in June 2008 by the Canadian government for the abuse and cultural loss suffered by Aboriginal peoples in Canada's residential schools. It includes a presentation on the Native American Apology Resolution recently passed in the United States Senate as well as an examination of reconciliation efforts in Guatemala. A wrap-up speaker considers the issues involved in apologies and reconciliation processes in a broad scope. Concluding with panel discussion and questions from the audience, Harvest of Hope seeks a deeper, more inclusive understanding of our national narratives and the experiences of the Native peoples of the Americas. In Part 8, Kevin Gover moderates a panel discussion with the presenters. This symposium took place in the Rasmuson Theater of the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC on November 13, 2008.This symposium took place in the Rasmuson Theater of the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC on November 13, 2008.
Views: 946 SmithsonianNMAI
The rights of indigenous peoples - James Anaya
 
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James Anaya is a Regents Professor and the James J. Lenoir Professor of Human Rights Law and Policy at the University of Arizona College of Law. An expert in international human rights and issues concerning indigenous groups, Mr. Anaya served as the Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms of Indigenous Peoples for the United Nations. Event date: February 12, 2015
Elder In The Making | Episode 5: A Broken Treaty
 
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What follows from the treaty signing is a genocide in slow motion. Elder Narcisse Blood shares his story growing up in residential school and the person he has become. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Connect with us: Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/optiklocal/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/optiklocal
Views: 9056 STORYHIVE
Why China Will Not Become the Dominant Power in Asia
 
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Public Lecture by Emeritus Professor Paul Dibb and Adjunct Associate Professor John Lee. The belief that China will soon become the dominant power in Asia is based on assumptions that its continued and rapid economic rise, and its emergence as a regional peer of America’s in military terms is all but assured. Such a belief underpins arguments that a fundamental strategic reorganisation of Asia is inevitable, and that it will be necessary and perhaps even desirable to concede to China significant ‘strategic space’. Dependent largely on linear extrapolations about the future, such arguments ignore the implications of China’s economic, social and national fragilities, its lack of major friends or allies in the region as well as the considerable military deficiencies and challenges faced by the People’s Liberation Army. With the Defence White Paper due for release in 2015, the government should bear in mind that planning for an era of Chinese dominance in the region—or even its emergence as an American strategic peer in Asia—would be premature if not improbable. Australia should not design its defence force for war with China, but it should be able to counter Chinese coercion and contribute to Allied military operations if necessary. Paul Dibb is Emeritus Professor of Strategic Studies in the Strategic & Defence Studies Centre, Coral Bell schol of Asia-Pacific Affairs, ANU. He was head of the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre from 1991 to 2004. Before that he held the positions of deputy secretary for Defence, director of the Joint Intelligence Organisation and head of the National Assessments Staff. He studied the former Soviet Union for over 20 years both as a senior intelligence officer and academic. He advised ASIO on certain Soviet activities. His book The Soviet Union--the Incomplete Superpower was published by the International Institute for Strategic Studies , London in 1986, reprinted 1987 and second edition 1988. John Lee is an Australian academic working on international economic and security affairs with a focus on the Asia-Pacific. Lee is an adjunct associate professor at the Australian National University's Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, a Michael Hintze Fellow at the Centre for International Security Studies, University of Sydney and a senior scholar at the Hudson Institute in Washington, DC. Lee is a board member of the Institute for Regional Security.
Views: 425008 ANU TV
RSC 2012 Governor General Lecture Series: We Are All Treaty People: New Models for a Shared Future
 
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The Royal Society of Canada 2012 Governor General Lecture Series Professor James Miller, FRSC February 9th 2012 - University of Victoria Duration: 38:55
Views: 676 RSC SRC
Inside Story Americas - Canada's indigenous movement gains momentum
 
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Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Canada's Idle No More movement began as a small social media campaign - armed with little more than a hashtag and a cause. But it has grown into a large indigenous movement, with protests and ceremonial gatherings held almost daily in many of the country's major cities. The movement is spearheaded by Theresa Spence, the leader of the Attawapiskat, a small native band in northern Ontario. Spence is now 22 days into a hunger strike on Ottawa's Victoria Island just across from the Canadian Parliament. At Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people's lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a 'voice to the voiceless.' Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world's most respected news and current affairs channels. Social Media links: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Instagram: https://instagram.com/aljazeera/?ref=... Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajenglish Website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ google+: https://plus.google.com/+aljazeera/posts
Views: 18591 Al Jazeera English
Dr. Henry Yu, Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada
 
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Simon Fraser University's Centre for Dialogue presents Dr. Henry Yu, UBC History Professor, Co-Chair of City of Vancouver's "Dialogues between Urban Aboriginal, First Nations, and Immigrant Communities" Project (2010-2012), and feature speaker for the Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada community dialogue. About Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada This full-day dialogue drew upon the knowledge and experiences of affected communities to identify shared principles and approaches to support the reconciliation of injustices in Canadian society. The dialogue hosted 120 community leaders involved in the reconciliation of specific injustices, government officials, decision-makers from major institutions and members of the public. More information: www.sfu.ca/reconciling-injustices. About Dr. Henry Yu Dr. Henry Yu was born in Vancouver, B.C., and received his BA in Honours History from UBC and an MA and PhD in History from Princeton University. Besides being the Principal of St. John's College, Yu is involved in the collaborative effort to re-imagine the history of Vancouver and of Canada by focusing on how migrants from Asia, Europe, and other parts of the Americas engaged with each other and with First Nations peoples historically. He was the Co-Chair of the City of Vancouver's project, "Dialogues between First Nations, Urban Aboriginal, and Immigrant Communities". Yu is committed to expanding the engagement between academic research and the communities which the university serves. Between 2010-2012, he was the Project Lead for the $1.175 million "Chinese Canadian Stories" project involving universities and a wide spectrum of over 29 community organizations across Canada. In 2012 he was honoured for his work with a Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Medal. He is currently writing a book entitled "Pacific Canada," another book entitled "How Tiger Woods Lost His Stripes," as well as a third book project which examines the history of Chinese migration in the Pacific world.
Big Think Interview With Sherman Alexie
 
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A conversation with the award-winning author and chronicler of the Native American experience.
Views: 54518 Big Think
Panel Discussion: Art and Reconciliation | Panel sur l’art et la réconciliation
 
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Learn more here: http://c.nac.ca/1RyKruc | En savoir Plus : http://c.nac.ca/1RyKwhw The recent landmark report by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada on the abuses at residential schools states that art has the extraordinary ability to heal. The National Arts Centre hosted a timely panel discussion on art in the context of reconciliation moderated by Dr. Marie Wilson, Commissioner Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, and featuring panelists Rachael Maza, acclaimed Australian theatre director of Jack Charles V The Crown (presented at the NAC), Joseph Boyden, author of the award-winning novels Three Day Road and The Orenda, and John Estacio, JUNO award nominated composer of I Lost My Talk, a new work inspired by the poem of Mi’kmaw elder Rita Joe. The panel discussion was introduced by The Right Honorable Joe Clark. (This is a livestream archive from January 14th, 2016) Dans le rapport historique de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada qui s’est penchée sur les abus commis dans les pensionnats autochtones, on peut lire que l’art a cette faculté extraordinaire de guérir. Le Centre national des Arts est l’hôte d’un panel où seront justement abordés les arts dans le contexte de la réconciliation. Marie Wilson, Ph.D., commissaire au sein de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, agira comme modératrice de cet événement qui accueillera comme panélistes Rachael Maza, célèbre metteure en scène australienne qui a signé la production de Jack Charles V The Crown présentée au CNA, JosephBoyden, auteur des romans primés Three Day Road et The Orenda, et le compositeur John Estacio, cité pour un prix JUNO, à qui l’on doit I Lost My Talk, une nouvelle œuvre inspirée du poème éponyme de l’aînée mi’kmaq Rita Joe. Le très honorable Joe Clark ouvrira la discussion.
Views: 1456 National Arts Centre
Content and Analysis in Native Art Part 1 of 2
 
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Content and Analysis in Native Art: Moving Past Form and Function. This video is part 1 of 2. For part 2, visit: http://youtu.be/uZQO8l7GWmc Speakers: Lara Evans, Cherokee Nation, art historian, art history faculty, Institute of American Indian Arts Kade Twist, Cherokee Nation, mixed media artist Frank Buffalo Hyde, Onondaga, painter Moderator: Carolyn Kastner, Curator, Georgia O'Keeffe Museum (moderator) Many contemporary Native artists have expressed concern that their work is often examined in terms of materials, process, and function, while a more in-depth content analysis is overlooked. This panel discussion looks at the issue and its history. This panel discussion was part of the Indian Arts Research Center at the School for Advanced Research's 2014 Speaker Series, Art in Flux, which was dedicated to discussing key issues and programs affecting artists and art institutions today. Art in Flux was developed by the School for Advanced Research with the help of Professor Lara Evans of the Institute of American Indian Arts. Events took place at SAR and the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts. This event was recorded on Wednesday, April 23, 2014 at the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts.
Decolonizing Language Revitalization
 
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September 25, 2013 - How has Eurocentric anthropology and linguistics affected the way we interpret our elders and ancestors who share their cultural knowledge with foreign researchers? Join us for a presentation with Khelsilem Rivers and April Charlo, indigenous peoples from community-based and cultural revitalization backgrounds, who will be discussing decolonization of language revitalization. Their presentation and open dialogue will address the context of rapid language loss and decline, and how colonization has affected or is embedded in the strategies of revitalization. In an effort to revitalize Indigenous languages, communities may have unknowingly adopted or assimilated colonized ways of thinking as they invest interest and attempt to repair or restore ties to culture and language. Are we learning to speak Sḵwx̱wú7mesh, Nēhiyawēwin, Kanien'kéha, et all with an English-mind or are we learning to speak Sḵwx̱wú7mesh, Nēhiyawēwin, Kanien'kéha with a Sḵwx̱wú7mesh, Nēhiyaw, Kanien'keháka mind? Indigenous languages represent one of the darkest ways in which ethnocide and cultural genocide have occurred. It is expected in the next twenty-five years over 700 of the worlds Indigenous languages will be forgotten. In the Vancouver area alone, the two Indigenous languages are considered critical endangered; Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish) language has five to seven fluent speakers and hən̓q̓əmin̓əm has one fluent speaker left. Decolonizing Language Revitalization aims to put forward perspectives of shifting values, cultural understandings, and impacts on community. It is the stories we tell ourselves (as a people) that impacts who we believe we are, and then who we become. But if the stories -- even including, or especially the Indigenous ones -- are filtered through colonialism, we have become a different people because of it. April Charlo from Bitterroot Salish people and is a member of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Montana. Khelsilem Rivers is a Sḵwx̱wú7mesh-Kwakwa̱ka̱'wakw language revitalization activist from Vancouver. Supported by SFU's Vancity Office of Community Engagement http://sfuwoodwards.ca/index.php/community
Judge Maryka Omatsu, Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada
 
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Simon Fraser University's Centre for Dialogue presents Judge Maryka Omatsu, feature speaker for the Jan 23, 2014 Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada community dialogue. About Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada This full-day dialogue drew upon the knowledge and experiences of affected communities to identify shared principles and approaches to support the reconciliation of injustices in Canadian society. The dialogue hosted 120 community leaders involved in the reconciliation of specific injustices, government officials, decision-makers from major institutions and members of the public. More information: www.sfu.ca/reconciling-injustices. About Judge Maryka Omatsu Maryka Omatsu, a third generation Japanese Canadian, was born in Hamilton, Ontario. She graduated with a M.A. from the U. of T. and an LL.B. from Osgoode Hall Law School. During the following 37 years, Maryka has been a lawyer for 16 years, practised human rights, environmental and criminal law; worked for all levels of Government; taught in Toronto, China and Japan; chaired the Ontario Human Rights Appeals Tribunal and adjudicated for the Ontario Law Society. 21 years ago, Maryka was the first woman of East Asian ancestry to be appointed a judge in Canada. Today, she is semi-retired, judges part time in Toronto, and lives in both Vancouver and Toronto. Maryka was active in the Japanese Canadian community's struggle for redress, as a member of the National Association of Japanese Canadians negotiation team. Her book, Bittersweet Passage documented that history and won several prizes. It was published in Japan in 1994.
Aboriginal Lecture Series 2016: Finding Mile Zero on the Powwow Trail
 
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Dr. Eldon Yellowhorn (Chair of the Department of First Nations Studies at Simon Fraser University) explores the "Brocket Indian Days", the longest running annual powwow in Canada.
The Lucifer Effect in Action: My Journey from Evil to Heroism
 
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Featuring Dr. Philip Zimbardo, Professor Emeritus of Psychology at Stanford University. Dr. Zimbardo is past-president of the American Psychological Association and Western Psychological Association and is now Director of the Center for Interdisciplinary Policy, Education, and Research on Terrorism. Famous as creator of the 1970's Stanford Prison Experiment a world expert on the causes of torture and terrorism, Zimbardo is passionate about cultivating the "heroic imagination," the factors encouraging individuals to rise beyond situational forces to do evil. He is the author of The Lucifer Effect and The Time Paradox as well as hundreds of texts and academic works.
Understanding Aboriginal Identity
 
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Understanding Aboriginal Identity explores the complex issue of self-identification for Aboriginal people. Today, Aboriginal identity remains inextricably linked with past government legislation and the continued stereotyping of Aboriginal people in the media and Canadian history. From a Metis farm in rural Alberta, to the offices of Canada’s leading scholars, Understanding Aboriginal Identity examines the factors that shape who we are. To order this video please go to www.bearpaweducation.ca/videos
Views: 73387 BearPaw Legal
Colonialism and Indian Residential Schools
 
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Part 1 of 3 Central Okanagan School District presents Angela White and the Indian Residential School Survivors' Society as a guest speaker on Canada's Residential Schools. This first video is about the colonial aspect of Residential Schools.
Views: 12821 Aboriginal Education
Aboriginal Education
 
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Education has long been heralded as the key to economic improvement. Leading economist Don Drummond has studied the economic inequality of Canada's First Nations and concluded that every effort must be taken to lead young people to post-secondary education. What barriers make a university or college education extremely difficult to achieve for First Nations young people?
Naveen Girn, Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada
 
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Simon Fraser University's Centre for Dialogue presents Naveen Girn, cultural researcher for SFU's Komagata Maru Journey project, community engagement specialist, and feature speaker for the Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada community dialogue. About Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada This full-day dialogue drew upon the knowledge and experiences of affected communities to identify shared principles and approaches to support the reconciliation of injustices in Canadian society. The dialogue hosted 120 community leaders involved in the reconciliation of specific injustices, government officials, decision-makers from major institutions and members of the public. More information: www.sfu.ca/reconciling-injustices. About Naveen Girn Naveen Girn is a cultural researcher and community engagement specialist whose interests center on Vancouver's South Asian community, intercultural oral history and curation. Naveen was co-curator for the Museum of Vancouver's exhibit, "Bhangra.me: Vancouver's Bhangra Story" which received an Award for Excellence from the Canadian Museum Association. He was the cultural researcher for SFU's Komagata Maru project (komagatamarujourney.ca) and is currently curating several exhibitions on the Komagata Maru for the centennial commemoration in 2014 including the Museum of Vancouver and Surrey Museum. As principal at Digital Handloom, Naveen leads a community storytelling practice that engages with and shares untold community stories.
National Aboriginal Day (2010)
 
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National Aboriginal Day (NAD) is celebrated every June 21st. NAD is a time for all Canadians to recognize the unique heritage, the diverse cultures and the outstanding contributions of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples. For more information about Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, please visit http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca. For more information about National Aboriginal day, please visit http://www.nad.gc.ca. Read a transcript of this video on the AANDC web site: http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100013727/1100100013729
Views: 4186 GCIndigenous
JSGS Public Lecture~Saskatchewan First Nations and the Province's Resource Future
 
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Presented by Chief Bellegarde, Chief of the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations Saskatchewan is in the middle of an unprecedented resource boom. With oil and gas in the south, potash in central Saskatchewan and uranium in the North, along with promising mineral plays in various locations,Saskatchewan's economy is growing rapidly. First Nations are determined to benefit from the boom, as Treaty Peoples with strong ties to the land and with promises from government that we will benefit from development. With duty to consult and accommodate requirements in place, Saskatchewan First Nations have become national leaders in working out appropriate collaboration and impact and benefit agreements with companies and governments. Much more can be done. More First Nations can be employed on the resource projects. Greater care can be taken to protect our traditional lands and protect our people from harm. There are important business opportunities for First Nations companies that remain to be developed. First Nations will not stand in the way of properly managed development that is based on consultations and agreements with our communities, but nor will First Nations agree to open-ended development strategies that do not return a fair share of the benefits from resource development with the Saskatchewan First Nations.
Views: 1417 jsgspp
The Wellbriety Journey to Forgiveness
 
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Documentary on the Abuses of the Indian Boarding Schools. Discusses the intergenerational trauma in native communities. The "Wellbriety Movement: Journey of Forgiveness" is now available on Youtube, www.whitebison.org , or free on DVD. Email [email protected] for DVD, include mailing address.
Views: 106751 Don Coyhis
Think Indigenous 5 Colby Tootoosis_March_19_2015
 
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Colby Tootoosis, Youth Spokesperson, Headman Poundmaker
Views: 2360 Usask
Parable of the Hummingbird: Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas
 
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https://vimeo.com/heartspeakproductions, https://www.facebook.com/HeartspeakProductions/ Featured Presentation at the 2nd International Conference on Restorative Practices: Widening Our Lens, Connecting Our Practice, May 31st - June 5th, 2009, Vancouver, BC. Restorative Practices International in partnership with the Centre for Restorative Justice, SFU. Filmed, edited and posted by Heartspeak Productions, Producer/Director Larry Moore, Videographer/Editor Cathie Douglas Flight of the Hummingbird; A Parable for the Environment - This little book features artwork by internationally renowned artist Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas. His distinct and lively Haida Manga style engages perfectly with this inspirational story that encourages every individual to act on behalf of the worlds limited and precious resources. http://mny.ca/ Athlii Gwaii: The Line at Lyell (46:30 min.) 2003 Part of the Ravens and Eagles: Haida Art series Jeff Bear/Marianne Jones, Ravens and Eagles Productions In the fall of 1985, a small but resolute troupe of Haida elders journeyed by helicopter to Athlii Gwaii (Lyell Island) to join their young counterparts in a stand against clearcutting. Industrial invasion in the remote archipelago had gone too far. Ancient cedar giants and rare spruce trees—lifeblood of Haida art and culture—had been leveled indiscriminately for too long. Buoyed by their courageous Haida elders, protesters united in peaceful resistance. A total of 72 people were arrested, but their tactics garnered global attention and won change: in 1987, the government established the Gwaii Haanas Park Reserve/Haida Heritage Site. http://www.movingimages.ca/catalogue/Art/re_athliigwaii.html
Views: 4676 heartspeak
Is there a traditional perspective of Truth and Reconciliation?
 
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A presentation by Honourable Mr. Justice Murray Sinclair as part of the Indigenous Knowledge Seminar Series offered by Aboriginal Focus Programs, Extended Education, the University of Manitoba, held during an open house held at the University of Manitoba DOWNTOWN: Aboriginal Education Centre. Justice Sinclair is the Chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, established as an outcome of the 2006 Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement. The University of Manitoba has made a commitment to helping the Commission achieve its objectives http://umanitoba.ca/visionary/human-rights.html. Justice Sinclair has served as Associate Chief Judge of the Provincial Court of Manitoba since 1988 and the Court of Queen's Bench of Manitoba since 2001. Shortly after his appointment as Associate Chief Judge of the Provincial Court of Manitoba in 1988, he was appointed Co-Commissioner, along with Court of Queen's Bench Associate Chief Justice A.C. Hamilton, of Manitoba's Aboriginal Justice Inquiry. That inquiry looked into the treatment of Aboriginal people by the justice system and made more than 300 recommendations for change including the establishment of tribal courts. Justice Sinclair was born and raised on the Old St. Peter's Indian Reserve in the Selkirk area north of Winnipeg. He graduated from the University of Manitoba, Faculty of Law in 1979 and taught as an adjunct professor of Law as well as adjunct professor in the Faculty of Graduate Studies at the University of Manitoba. His Ojibway name is Mizanageezhik (One Who Speaks of Pictures in the Sky). He is a member of the traditional Midewiwin Society.
Indigenous Feminisms Power Panel
 
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Views: 6475 Usask
Understanding the TRC Calls to Action
 
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March 23, 2016 Panel Discussion Re-Visioning Teacher Education: Responding to the TRC Calls-to-Action 2016 University of Manitoba
Aboriginal Youth & Media Conference at MOA (Part Two)
 
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Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the Museum of Anthropology. "Assert, Defend, Take Space: Aboriginal Youth Conference on Identity, Activism and Film" was a day-long conference on issues of concern to Aboriginal youth. Artists from the Claiming Space: Voices of Urban Aboriginal Youth exhibition were joined by young filmmakers and activists from across Canada. Building off of the screened films, panelists discussed themes of youth identity and politics, the objectification of Indigenous women, and environmentalism and youth activism. "Claiming Space: Voices of Urban Aboriginal Youth"" is an exhibition that looked at the diverse ways urban Aboriginal youth are asserting their identity and affirming their relationship to both urban spaces and ancestral territories. Unfiltered and unapologetic, over 20 young artists from across Canada, the US, and around the world define what it really means to be an urban Aboriginal youth today. In doing so they challenge centuries of stereotyping and assimilation policies.This exhibit will leave visitors with the understanding that today's urban Aboriginal youth are not only acutely aware of the ongoing impacts of colonization, but are also creatively engaging with decolonizing movements through new media, film, fashion, photography, painting, performance, creative writing and traditional art forms. Artists in the exhibition include Alison Bremner (Tlingit), Deanna Bittern (Ojibwe), Jamie Blankenship-Attig (Nlaka’pamux, Secwepemc, Nez Perce, Muskoday Cree), Kelli Clifton (Tsimshian), Jeneen Frei Njootli (Vuntut Gwitchin), Ippiksaut Friesen (Inuit), Clifton Guthrie (Tsimshian), Cody Lecoy (Okanagan/Esquimalt), Arizona Leger (Fijian, Samoan, Tongan, Maori), Danielle Morsette (Stó:lō /Suquamish), Ellena Neel (Kwakwaka'wakw/Ahousaht), Zach Soakai (Tongan, Samoan), Diamond Point (Musqueam), Crystal Smith de Molina (Git’ga’at), Nola Naera (Maori), Kelsey Sparrow (Musqueam/Anishinabe), Cole Speck (Kwakwaka'wakw), Rose Stiffarm ((Siksika Blackfoot, Chippewa Cree, Tsartlip Saanich, Cowichan, A'aninin, Nakoda, French, & Scottish), Taleetha Tait (Wet’suwet’en), Marja Bål Nango (Sámi, Norway), Harry Brown (Kwakwaka'wakw), Anna McKenzie (Opaskwayak Cree, Manitoba), Sarah Yankoo (Austrian, Scottish, Algonquin, Irish and Romanian), Raymond Caplin (Mi’gmac), Emilio Wawatie (Anishanabe) and the Northern Collection (Toombz/Shane Kelsey [Mohawk], and the Curse/Cory Golder [Mi’maq]). Also included are works from the Urban Native Youth Association, Musqueam youth and the Native Youth Program. The exhibition was curated by Pam Brown (Heiltsuk Nation), Curator, Pacific Northwest, and Curatorial Assistant Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers (Blackfoot, Blood Reserve/Sami, northern Norway).
The Saskatoon Police Service - Never the Same Day Twice
 
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The Saskatoon Police Service offers career opportunities that are worth serious consideration. The city has a rapidly growing Aboriginal population and the service must reflect this change. As protectors and peacemakers, the role police play in any community is invaluable. The police service offers careers both on the front lines and in civilian support positions. For more information visit saskatoonpoliceservice.ca. ©2014 Saskatoon Police Service
Views: 13242 SaskatoonPolice
Think Indigenous 11 Dr Pam Palmater_March 20 2015
 
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Dr. Pam Palmater, Ryerson University
Views: 3005 Usask
Dismantling the Doctrine of Discovery: The Road to Reconciliation Panel
 
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This panel discussion was held June 1st, 2015 at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission closing events in Ottawa, Canada. The Doctrine of Discovery was used as legal and moral justification for colonial dispossession of sovereign Indigenous Nations. Christian explorers claimed lands for their monarchs who could exploit the land, regardless of the original occupiers. To View Grand Chief Ed John's United Nation paper on the Doctrine of Discovery, visit: http://bit.ly/1LN1gfU For more information on the Doctrine of Discovery, visit:http://bit.ly/1LN1gfU
Views: 2181 CFSCVideo
Medicine Walk with Elder Walter Lavallee
 
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This video was filmed during the spring of 2009 on Piapot First Nation in Saskatchewan, Canada. Elder Walter Lavallee is Cree from the Piapot First Nation, Saskatchewan. The video was realized by the First Nations University of Canada under the supervision of Dr. Carrie Bourassa and Dr. Fidji Gendron. The video shows different plants, how to recognize them, and how they are used by First Nations and Métis people. Plants collected during this walk are now on display in the Medicine Room at the First Nations University of Canada.
Views: 26273 medicineroom1
Engaging Youth With Indigenous Materials in Libraries and Classrooms
 
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"Assessing and incorporating teaching and learning resources by and about First Nations, Metis and Inuit peoples is critical for librarians, educators and parents. Awareness of diverse epistemologies, notions of cultural authenticity and historical accuracy, and the influence of colonialism, are essential when considering books, films and interactive media for library and classroom collections. This panel will address challenges facing Indigenous and non-Indigenous librarians, educators and parents when drawing upon materials representing Indigenous peoples and cultures. They will offer insights about such issues as cultural appropriation, stereotypes, addressing colonialism and what to do with dated resources. This session is ideal for teacher candidates, classroom teachers, teacher-librarians, youth librarians and parents. Convener: Jo-Anne Naslund, UBC Education Library Moderator: Lisa P. Nathan, Assistant Professor and Coordinator of the First Nations Curriculum Concentration, School of Library, Archival and Information Studies Panelists: Debra Martel, Associate Director, First Nations House of Learning; Jan Hare, Associate Professor, Department of Language and Literacy Education; Allison Taylor-McBryde, Adjunct Professor, School of Library, Archival and Information Studies."
Haida Art-Northern Villages Part 2.m4v
 
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In November of 2008, Dr. George MacDonald, Director of the Bill Reid Centre for Northwest Coast Art Studies at SFU and author of "Haida Monumental Art", gave a 3-part lecture series on Haida Villages. 

Dr. MacDonald is a renowned expert on Northwest Coast art and has written a series of books on the subject. The presentations are illustrated with historical photographs from the 1870's and onward and explore the distinctive art of twenty-five Haida villages. 

The final instalment of these lectures, "Northern Villages", has been broken down into 2 parts.
Kate Hennessy - Repatriation, Digital Media, and Culture in the Virtual Museum
 
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Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the School of Library, Archival, and Information Studies (SLAIS). Many Canadian First Nations and Aboriginal organizations are using digital media to revitalize their languages and assert control over the representation of their cultures. At the same time, museums, academic institutions, and individuals are digitizing their ethnographic collections to make them accessible to originating communities. In this presentation I will explore how the term "virtual repatriation" is being applied to the digitization and return of heritage to Aboriginal communities, and draw attention to the opportunities, challenges, and critiques associated with digitization, circulation, and remix of Aboriginal cultural heritage. I will discuss recent projects including the collaborative production of a Virtual Museum of Canada exhibit with the Doig River First Nation, a Dane-zaa community in northeastern British Columbia, and a current collaborative production of a virtual exhibit with members of the Inuvialuit community in the western Arctic and curators at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. I will show that while access to cultural heritage in digital collections can facilitate the articulation of intellectual property rights to digital cultural heritage----including the right to restrict circulation----it also amplifies the difficulty of enforcing those rights. Kate Hennessy is an Assistant Professor specializing in Media at Simon Fraser University's School of Interactive Arts and Technology (SIAT). She has a PhD in Anthropology from the University of British Columbia and an MA in the Anthropology of Media from the University of London, School of Oriental and African Studies. As the director of the Making Culture Lab at SIAT, her research explores the role of digital technology in the documentation and safeguarding of cultural heritage, and in the mediation of culture, history, objects, and subjects in new forms. Her video and multimedia works investigate documentary methodologies to address Indigenous and settler histories of place and space. She is a founding member of the Ethnographic Terminalia Curatorial Collective, an international group exploring the borders of anthropological, curatorial, and artistic practice (http://ethnographicterminalia.org). As assistant editor of the journal Visual Anthropology Review, she designed its first multimedia volume. Her work has been published in journals such as American Indian Quarterly, Museum Anthropology Review, and Visual Anthropology Review. She was a Trudeau Foundation Scholar from 2006-2010, a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Graduate Scholar from 2005-2009, a Canadian Polar Commission Scholar in 2006-2007, and a Commonwealth Scholar in 2001-2002.
Genetic/Genomic Faculty Champion Initiative (PM session)
 
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Sept. 25, 2009 presentations provide a starting point for all nursing faculty to begin to explore the implications of genetics and genomics for nursing education and practice. More: http://www.genome.gov/27535172
The River of Healing
 
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On December 4, 2012, the Union of Ontario Indians HIV/AIDS program will launch a new video called "The River of Healing." The Union of Ontario Indians HIV/AIDS program coordinator Jody Cotter produced the video that focuses on harm reduction in drug use. "We focus on positive solutions such as youth prevention programs and strategies that help educate our people on the prevention of transmittable diseases such as Hepatitis C and HIV through unsafe drug use," says Cotter. "The video emphasizes the positive effects, such as healing, that can be brought about through effective methods of harm reduction. The aim of this video is to reduce the stigma and discrimination associated with drug use in our communities." The video launch is in conjunction with the HIV/AIDS "Little Spirit Moon" conference held December 4-5 in Toronto. Produced by The Union of Ontario Indians HIV/AIDS program in collaboration with Regan Pictures, The River of Healing features the participation of the Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network, the Ontario Aboriginal HIV/ AIDS Strategy, Nurture North, the AIDS Committee of North Bay and Area, and others impacted by HIV/AIDS. Funding for The River of Healing was provided by Health Canada and the Ontario Ministry of Health AIDS Bureau. For more information about the Union of Ontario Indians HIV/AIDS program, visit http://www.anishinabek.ca/hiv-aids.asp
Views: 5720 Anishinabek Nation
Early Spring Medicine Walks with Elder Betty McKenna
 
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These videos were filmed during the spring, summer, and fall of 2009 in a Medicine Wheel near Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada. Elder Betty McKenna is Anishnabe and Métis from Shoal River First Nation, Manitoba. The videos were realized by the First Nations University of Canada under the supervision of Dr. Carrie Bourassa and Dr. Fidji Gendron. The videos show different plants during the growing season, how to recognize them, and how they are used by First Nations and Métis people. Plants collected during these walks are now on display in the Medicine Room at the First Nations University of Canada.
Views: 4690 medicineroom1
Douglas Talks About... The National Museum of the American Indian: Part 2
 
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This video is part two of the "Douglas Talks About... The National Museum of the American Indian" episode in a series of short films initiated by the Carleton Centre for Public History as part of the Douglas Cardinal Archive Project. The stories Douglas recounts are inspired by the documents and materials contained within the Douglas Cardinal Collection at Carleton University. Complete footage from the interview (conducted by Elizabeth Paradis on October 26, 2011) will be made available through the Carleton University Library, Archives and Research Collections. Check us out at dcardinalproject.tumblr.com
Views: 429 Cardinalproject
Louis Riel Day 2014
 
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In celebration of Louis Riel Day, the Law Society considered section 91(24) of the Constitution Act and its implications of recent high court decisions on Métis and Aboriginal peoples.
Think Indigenous 8 Micheal Linklater_March_19_2015
 
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Micheal Linklater, Program Coordinator for White Buffalo Youth Lodge
Views: 2940 Usask
National Aboriginal Day: Our Voice, Our Culture, Our Community, Aboriginal Youth Video Project
 
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The Aboriginal Youth Video Project involved teaching 12 young people from Richmond, British Columbia, how to create a video story of their experience as young Aboriginal people living in Richmond. The youth were encouraged to reflect on their history and current issues in society, and to include footage and reflections on Richmonds National Aboriginal Day events which celebrate Aboriginal identity. The video is to be used to support teaching about healing and reconciliation. The video is used with permission from the Richmond Youth Services Agency.
Views: 11883 presvideo
Understanding the Definition and Scope of the Duty to Consult....
 
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Understanding the Definition and Scope of the Duty to Consult and Accommodate Today and How It Impacts You Daniel Pagowski Legal Counsel‚ Department of Justice Aboriginal Law and Strategic Police Christopher Devlin Partner Devlin Gailus Barristers & Solicitors Sandra Gogal Partner Miller Thomson LLP How have recent case law developments shed light on the basic questions, such as: What is the scope of the duty to consult? When is the duty triggered? What is included in "contemplated Crown conduct"? How much of the duty can be delegated a) to municipalities? b) to proponents? How much of what proponents do, goes towards the discharge of the Crown's duty? How are Rio Tinto Alcan Inc. v. Carrier Sekani Tribal Council and Adams Lake Indian Band v. British Columbia being applied by lower courts? Clarifying the role of regulatory bodies with respect to the duty to consult Looking at how the B.C. Court of Appeal decision in West Moberly First Nations v. British Columbia (Chief Inspector of Mines) has further shaped the Crown's duty to consult with respect to past impacts and cumulative effects, and the issue of Crown accommodation Understanding how the recent trend towards complex partnership agreements is affecting accommodation by the Crown There have been developments since last year to the "definition and scope" of the duty to consult. Ensure you get all the crucial updates at The Canadian Institute's 7th Annual Forum on Aboriginal Law, Consultation & Accommodation on February 20-21, 2013 View the list of speakers, program agenda and register at www.CanadianInstitute.com/AboriginalLaw
Niigaan: In Conversation -  Victoria Freeman
 
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Niigaan: In Conversation. March 9, 2013. National Arts Centre, unceded Algonquin territory. Niigaanwewidam James Sinclair introducing the presentation from Victoria Freeman on the history of Canadian colonization. Featuring remarks by event host Niigaanwewidam James Sinclair, and responses to audience questions by Dr. Leanne Betasamosake Simpson.
Views: 677 niigaanfuture
Implementing the Vision: Chapter 2- A Knowledge Gap
 
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The effects of Residential Schools, and the forces of colonization, are examined in relation to First Nations health
Views: 6258 fnhealthcouncil
"All My Relations: Biennale of Sydney 2012"
 
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The Dr. Allen Root Contemporary Art Distinguished Lecture with Gerald McMaster Ph.D., Fredrik S. Eaton Curator, Canadian Art, Art Galley of Ontario Dr. McMaster was recently selected as co-Artistic Director to the 2012 Biennale of Sydney. In his lecture, he will touch on the themes and issues that will shape this important international exhibition. Dr. McMaster, a curator and artist, was responsible for the installation of the permanent exhibitions at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, and more recently the reinstallation of the Canadian Wing at the Art Gallery of Ontario. His publications include New Tribe/New York (2005), Remix (2007), and the critically acclaimed Inuit Modern (2011). His awards and recognitions include the 2001 ICOM-Canada Prize, the 2005 National Aboriginal Achievement Award, and the Order of Canada (2007). Location: Arthur M. Loew Auditorium
Views: 4580 Dartmouth
The Human Microbiome: Emerging Themes at the Horizon of the 21st Century (Day 3)
 
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The Human Microbiome: Emerging Themes at the Horizon of the 21st Century (Day 3) Air date: Friday, August 18, 2017, 8:15:00 AM Category: Conferences Runtime: 04:59:15 Description: The 2017 NIH-wide microbiome workshop will strive to cover advances that reveal the specific ways in which the microbiota influences the physiology of the host, both in a healthy and in a diseased state and how the microbiota may be manipulated, either at the community, population, organismal or molecular level, to maintain and/or improve the health of the host. The goal will be to seek input from a trans-disciplinary group of scientists to identify 1) knowledge gaps, 2) technical hurdles, 3) new approaches and 4) research opportunities that will inform the development of novel prevention and treatment strategies based on host/microbiome interactions over the next ten years. Author: NIH Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?23424
Views: 1982 nihvcast
Behold, America! | Symposium | Part 5
 
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Patricia Kelly, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Critical Studies at the Emily Carr University of Art and Design in Vancouver, Canada Measuring Here and There, or the Decentralization of American Art When influential art critic and curator Lucy Lippard staged 955,000 in Vancouver, BC in January 1970, she was acknowledging the international aspirations and interconnectivity of much American conceptual art. Participating artists such as Robert Smithson, Douglas Huebler, and Sol LeWitt, had, by this time, well established practices concerned with mapping and relationality. Lippard's push towards decentralization signaled a broader desire among contemporary artists and critics to increase opportunities for sustained intellectual and creative inquiry, to understand art practice from a global (rather than regional) perspective, and to expand networks of like-minded artists across national borders in often unexpected and creative ways. Using this exhibition as a point of departure, this paper will explore the circulation of artists between the US and the West Coast of Canada in the late 60s and early 70s, and its potentially destabilizing effect on American art history. Conversation with James Luna & Michael Hatt, Ph.D. Dr. Hatt is Professor in the History of Art at the University of Warwick, England Wang Dang Doodle Encounters, or Representing the Indian, Then and Now James Luna's practice has focused on cross-cultural, multicultural, and current cultural issues in contemporary American Indian society. He will present his most recent installation, which opened last month at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. Luna will be joined by Michael Hatt to discuss his work in relation to art history, the representation of Native Americans in the past, and the ways in which that history is presented to the public. Deborah Butterfield Deborah Butterfield is a major American sculptor whose subject since the 1970s has been the horse. Butterfield earned an MFA from the University of California, Davis, and is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships, from such organizations as the National Endowment for the Arts. In this presentation, Butterfield will overview much of her career, from her college works to her current studio practice. Derrick Cartwright, Ph.D. Director of University Galleries and Professor of Practice, Art History at the University of San Diego Proliferating Participation: American Art Displays in Eras of Crisis Contemporary American museum culture is fraught with challenges. In the face of weakening public support, institutions today claim that they seek audience engagement as a key to maintaining relevance and achieving sustainability. This talk explores the ways that "participation" has often been held up as a virtue by American art exhibitions past and present. From Robert Henri's 1915 exhibition of Modern American Painting at the Panama California Exposition to ambitious projects, like Behold, America!, the stakes of encouraging new participatory practices have at once evolved and grown more urgent across the United States. www.TheSanDiegoMuseumofArt.org Video produced by Balboa Park Online Collaborative
Harvest of Hope: 4 Phil Fontaine
 
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In the spirit of Thanksgiving, this timely and insightful forum moderated by Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian Director Kevin Gover (Pawnee/Comanche) focuses on topical issues of reconciliation and highlights national apologies made to Native peoples. The symposium covers the eloquent apology issued in June 2008 by the Canadian government for the abuse and cultural loss suffered by Aboriginal peoples in Canada's residential schools. It includes a presentation on the Native American Apology Resolution recently passed in the United States Senate as well as an examination of reconciliation efforts in Guatemala. A wrap-up speaker considers the issues involved in apologies and reconciliation processes in a broad scope. Concluding with panel discussion and questions from the audience, Harvest of Hope seeks a deeper, more inclusive understanding of our national narratives and the experiences of the Native peoples of the Americas. In Part 4, Phil Fontaine gives a talk entitled, "The Apology Breakthrough: Now What?" Chief Phil Fontaine (Sagkeeng First Nation) is a dedicated and highly respected leader in Canada. He has been instrumental in facilitating change and advancement for First Nations people from the time he was first elected to public office as Chief, at the young age of twenty-eight. He is a proud member of the Sagkeeng First Nation in Manitoba and still plays an active role in the support of his community. In the early 1980s he was elected to the position of Manitoba Regional Chief for the Assembly of First Nations. When his term expired in 1991, he was elected Grand Chief of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs where he served three consecutive terms. He played a key role in the development of Manitoba's Framework Agreement Initiative and in the defeat of the Meech Lake Accord, and signed an Employment Equity Agreement with thirty-nine federal agencies. In 1997 he stepped onto the national stage where he was elected to the highest elected position in First Nations politics, National Chief. He is now serving an unprecedented third term in office. His list of accomplishments as National Chief include signing the Declaration of Kinship and Cooperation of the Indigenous and First Nations of North America; being the first Indigenous leader to address the Organization of American States; leading the successful resolution and settlement of the 150-year Indian residential school tragedy; the Making Poverty History Campaign; lobbying for the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People; and negotiating a fair and just process for the settlement of specific land claims. National Chief Fontaine has received many awards and honors for his work, including four honorary degrees and membership in the Order of Manitoba. This symposium took place in the Rasmuson Theater of the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC on November 13, 2008.
Views: 2135 SmithsonianNMAI
Implementing the Vision: Chapter 4- Stepping into Governance
 
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A first for Canada, the Tripartite First Nations Health Plan calls on BC, Canada, and BC First Nations to work together to close the health gap. Drawing on the wisdom of our indigenous neighbours -This chapter outlines a vision for increased First Nations control over the design and delivery of health services.
Views: 5288 fnhealthcouncil