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Multiple Use at Work: Placer Mining and Stream Reclamation in the Fortymile
 
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Placer mining is an important industry in the state, providing 1,200 seasonal jobs and $40 million in labor income. Healthy streams support a large and high value sector of the state economy, basic private sector economy, as well as fishing-based outfitter and guide tourism employment. There are approximately 120 permitted placer mine operations on BLM-managed lands in Alaska, clustered primarily along several road-accessible mining districts. Music: Acoustic Inspiring Indie Folk / Uplifting Inspiring Acoustic Indie Folk / Inspiring Ambient Indie Folk - Envato Music Standard License
Views: 533 BLMALASKA
Hydraulic Gold Mining
 
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This movie is the last remaining part of footage from an old video cassette that I owned. I believe that it is still available from the Empire Mines State Park. I do not own the copyright to this movie and this is being posted here under YouTube's Guidelines for informational and teaching purposes. Then I added pictures on my own of the Malakoff State park from days gone past when mining was active in the area to the end of this movie. This is a great addition to this hydraulic mining playlist, so watch history being taught from long ago & then learn & enjoy.
Views: 59142 Reed Lukens
Ghost Towns in Canada - Abandoned Village, Town or City
 
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Thanks for watching........ 1) Bender Hamlet, Manitoba 2) Broughton, Nova Scotia 3) Canol Road 4) Cape Fullerton 5) Clinton Creek, Yukon 6) Craig Harbour 7) Emerson, Manitoba 8) Ewart, Manitoba 9) Fort Confidence 10) Forty Mile, Yukon 11) Gagnon, Quebec 12) Goose Village, Montreal 13) Mont-Albert, Quebec 14) Murdochville, Quebec 15) Sundance, Manitoba 16) Tungsten, Northwest Territories 17) Val-Jalbert, Quebec 18) York Factory Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_ghost_towns_in_Canada The exact definition of a ghost town varies between individuals, and between cultures. Some writers discount settlements that were abandoned as a result of a natural or human-made disaster, using the term only to describe settlements which were deserted because they were no longer economically viable; T. Lindsey Baker, author of Ghost Towns of Texas, defines a ghost town as "a town for which the reason for being no longer exists".[1] Some believe that any settlement with visible tangible remains should not be called a ghost town;[2] others say, conversely, that a ghost town should contain the tangible remains of buildings.[3] Whether or not the settlement must be completely deserted, or may contain a small population, is also a matter for debate.[2] Generally, though, the term is used in a looser sense, encompassing any and all of these definitions. The American author Lambert Florin's preferred definition of a ghost town was simply "a shadowy semblance of a former self". Factors leading to abandonment of towns include depleted natural resources, economic activity shifting elsewhere, railroads and roads bypassing or no longer accessing the town, human intervention, disasters, massacres, wars, and the shifting of politics or fall of empires.[5] A town can also be abandoned when it is part of an exclusion zone due to natural or man-made causes. Ghost towns may result when the single activity or resource that created a boomtown (e.g., nearby mine, mill or resort) is depleted or the resource economy undergoes a "bust" (e.g., catastrophic resource price collapse). Boomtowns can often decrease in size as fast as they initially grew. Sometimes, all or nearly the entire population can desert the town, resulting in a ghost town. The dismantling of a boomtown can often occur on a planned basis. Mining companies nowadays will create a temporary community to service a mine site, building all the accommodation shops and services, and then remove it as the resource is worked out. A gold rush would often bring intensive but short-lived economic activity to a remote village, only to leave a ghost town once the resource was depleted. In some cases, multiple factors may remove the economic basis for a community; some former mining towns on U.S. Route 66 suffered both mine closures when the resources were depleted and loss of highway traffic as US 66 was diverted away from places like Oatman, Arizona onto a more direct path. The Middle East has many ghost towns that were created when the shifting of politics or the fall of empires caused capital cities to be socially or economically non-viable, such as Ctesiphon. I, Kaushik Biswas, hereby declare that all information regarding this video I collect from www.wikipedia.org and all Images use to make this video is from Google Search www.google.com . I use Google Advanced Search to collect those images, usage rights : "free to use, share or modify, even commercially" section. Background Sound of this video I collect from Youtube Audio Library which are free to use. Thank you.
Views: 4976 KnownUnknowns
North To Alaska ~ Johnny Horton
 
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North To Alaska ~ Johnny Horton The Klondike Gold Rush The Klondike Gold Rush was a frenzy of gold rush immigration to and gold prospecting in the Klondike near Dawson City in the Yukon Territory, Canada, after gold was discovered in the late 19th century. In August 1896, three people led by Skookum Jim Mason (a member of the Tagish nation whose birth name was Keish) headed up the Yukon River from the Carcross area looking for his sister Kate and her husband George Carmack. The party included Skookum Jim, Skookum Jim's cousin known as Dawson Charlie (or sometimes Tagish Charlie) and his nephew Patsy Henderson. After meeting up with George and Kate who were fishing for salmon at the mouth of the Klondike River, they ran into Nova Scotian Robert Henderson who had been mining gold on the Indian River, just south of the Klondike. Henderson told George Carmack about where he was mining and that he did not want any "damn Siwashes" (meaning Indians) near him. The group then headed a few miles up the Klondike River to Rabbit Creek, now Bonanza Creek to hunt moose. On August 16, 1896, the party discovered rich placer gold deposits in Bonanza (Rabbit) Creek. It is now generally accepted that Skookum Jim made the actual discovery, but some accounts say that it was Kate Carmack. George Carmack was officially credited for the discovery because the "discovery" claim was staked in his name. The group agreed to this because they felt that other miners would be reluctant to recognise a claim made by an Indian, given the strong racist attitudes of the time. Further evidence of Skookum Jim's discovery is that he was eagerly followed by other miners and caused a mini rush when he later staked some claims in the Kluane Lake area in 1905. The news spread to other mining camps in the Yukon River valley, and the Bonanza, Eldorado and Hunker Creeks were rapidly staked by miners who had been previously working creeks and sandbars on the Fortymile and Stewart Rivers. In a fate that many believe to be poetic justice, Henderson, who was mining only a few miles away over the hill, only found out about the discovery after the rich creeks had been all staked. News reached the United States on July 17, 1897 when the first successful prospectors arrived in Seattle, and within a month the Klondike stampede had begun. The population in the Klondike in 1898 may have reached 40,000, threatening to cause a famine. Most prospectors landed at Skagway at the head of Lynn Canal and crossed by the Chilkoot Trail or White Pass to Bennett Lake. Here, prospectors built boats that would take them the final 500 miles (800 km) down the Yukon River to the gold fields. Stampeders had to carry one ton of goods over the pass to be allowed to enter Canada. At the top of the passes, the stampeders encountered a Mountie post that enforced that regulation. It was put in place to avert shortages like those that had occurred in the previous two winters in Dawson City. The Chilkoot Pass was steep and hazardous, rising a thousand feet in the last half mile (300 m in 800 m). It was too steep for pack animals and prospectors had to pack their equipment and supplies to the top. Some 1,500 steps were carved into the ice to aid travel up the pass. Even though it was not as high, conditions on White Pass were even worse. It was known as the Dead Horse Trail with about 3,000 animals dying along the route. Others took the Copper River Trail or the Teslin Trail by Stikine River and Teslin Lake, and some used the all-Canadian Ashcroft and Edmonton trails. The other main route was by steamer about 2600 kilometers (1600 miles) up the Yukon River. Many using this route late in 1897 were caught by winter ice below Fort Yukon, Alaska and had to be rescued. An estimated 100,000 people participated in the gold rush and about 30,000 made it to Dawson City in 1898. By 1901, when the first census was taken, the population had declined to 9,000. Throughout this period, the North West Mounted Police, under the command of Sam Steele maintained a firm grip on the activities of the prospectors to ensure the safety of the population as well as enforcing the laws and sovereignty of Canada. As a result, this gold rush has been described as the most peaceful and orderly of its type in history. The effectiveness of the Mounties in this period made the police force famous around the world, and ensured the survival of the organization at a time when its continued operation was being debated in the Canadian Parliament. The gold rush remains an important event in the history of the city of Edmonton, which to this day celebrates Klondike Days, an annual summer fair with a Klondike gold rush theme. Among the many to take part in the gold rush was writer Jack London, whose books White Fang and The Call of the Wild were influenced by his northern experiences, and adventurer "Swiftwater" Bill Gates.
Views: 8321076 mrtibbs6912
8.02x - Lect 27 - Destructive Resonance, Electromagnetic Waves, Speed of Light
 
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Destructive Resonance,Breaking Wine Glass, Electromagnetic Waves, Speed of Light, Radio, TV, Distance Determinations using Radar and Lasers Lecture Notes, Travelling Electromagnetic Waves: http://freepdfhosting.com/c154c2cbc7.pdf Assignments Lecture 26, 27 and 28: http://freepdfhosting.com/20495b808e.pdf Solutions Lecture 26, 27 and 28: http://freepdfhosting.com/7759a06b8d.pdf
GOLD MINE FOR SALE
 
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Created using the Stupeflix Youtube App
Views: 575 Chevelavela
Zac Brown Band - Highway 20 Ride
 
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Zac Brown Band's 'Highway 20 Ride' music video.
Views: 19599671 Zac Brown Band
Romans 12:1-3 (I Beseech You Therefore, Brethren)
 
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What a marvelous word we have been given. Charlie takes us through these three verses with maybe one or two rabbit trails...
Views: 723 The Superior Word
How Did The State Of Alaska Get Its Name?
 
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Alaska facts alaska kids' corner, state of. Alaska facts, map and state symbols enchantedlearning. The official city & borough of juneau website; Visit to get the flavor. The lakefront anchorage explore our current offers. State of alaska an introduction to the last frontier from wikipediahow did get its name? Alaska name origin state symbols usa. Mining laws, the united states constituted a civil government in 1884. Our history alaska state chamber of commerce. Maphead how the town of chicken, alaska got its name (it's not all 50 states their names u. Chicken, alaska was founded in the 1890s by prospectors mining for gold on nearby fortymile river. The settlers survived their harsh first winter by chowing down on ptarmigan, a local grouse that's now the alaska state bird. In october, the people of alaskan town formerly known as barrow, on edge arctic ocean, voted to restore its indigenous name, utqiagvik. You might want to give students clues, such as that it is the biggest us state (in terms of area), its capital juneau, or name starts with 1 dec 2016 northernmost community in united states has officially restored original. Get all the facts on history get information, facts, and pictures about alaska at encyclopedia. Origin of state name from the aleut word 'alyeska,' meaning 'great land. The dipper is for fun alaska facts top 10 about state kids what the meaning of name 'alaska' cool, amazing 27 des 2013. Zachariah hughes of alaska public media reported that the answers question how did our state get it's nickname? Alaska is called “The last frontier”, because its opportunities and many lightly settled regions, “Land midnight sun”, sun shines nearly around clock during alaskan summers. Skeptics had dubbed the purchase of alaska kids learn facts and geography about state including symbols, flag, capital, bodies water, industry, borders, population, fun facts, gdp, famous people, how got its name word comes from aleut alaxsxaq which means mainland. Alaska history projects hasil google books. Russia only used 'alaska' in reference to the alaskan peninsula, but united states name alaska originates from an aleut word 'alyeska,' meaning 'great land. The grateful townsfolk decided to call their 16 oct 2015 like alabama (and, as we'll see, plenty of other state names), the name alaska comes from language area's indigenous people. A mere 50 years later, the americans had earned that amount back 100 times over. States geography for kids alaska ducksters. Under the recently released brand identity, organization dropped 'state' and “Of commerce” From its name in all new marketing alaska us state dot to mystery map connect dots draw
Views: 33 Hadassah Hartman
Yukon River
 
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The Yukon River is a major watercourse of northwestern North America. The source of the river is located in British Columbia, Canada. The next portion lies in, and gives its name to, Yukon. The lower half of the river lies in the U.S. state of Alaska. The river is 3,190 kilometres long and empties into the Bering Sea at the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. The average flow is 6,430 m³/s. The total drainage area is 832,700 km², of which 323,800 km² is in Canada. By comparison, the total area is more than 25% larger than Texas or Alberta. The longest river in Alaska and Yukon, it was one of the principal means of transportation during the 1896–1903 Klondike Gold Rush. A portion of the river in Yukon—"The Thirty Mile" section, from Lake Laberge to the Teslin River—is a national heritage river and a unit of Klondike Gold Rush International Historical Park. Paddle-wheel riverboats continued to ply the river until the 1950s, when the Klondike Highway was completed. After the purchase of Alaska by the United States in 1867, the Alaska Commercial Company acquired the assets of the Russian-American Company and constructed several posts at various locations on the Yukon River. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 273 Audiopedia
Desert Geocaching 5SEP11, Ridgecrest, California
 
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Out for a little Father & Son Geocaching with my 17 year-old son Joshua. Lots of fun spending time together and finding some hidden treasures out in this ruggedly beautiful area of the high desert we live in! Check it out in HIGH DEFINITION!
Views: 481 Dylan Mattina
Great Basin Desert
 
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The Great Basin Desert is part of the Great Basin between the Sierra Nevada and the Wasatch Range. The desert is a geographical region that largely overlaps the Great Basin shrub steppe defined by the World Wildlife Fund, and the Central Basin and Range ecoregion defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and United States Geological Survey. It is a temperate desert with hot, dry summers and snowy winters. The desert spans a large part of the state of Nevada, and extends into western Utah, eastern California, and Idaho. The desert is one of the four biologically defined deserts in North America, in addition to the Mojave, Sonoran, and Chihuahuan Deserts. Basin and Range topography characterizes the desert: wide valleys bordered by parallel mountain ranges generally oriented north-south. There are more than 33 peaks within the desert with summits higher than 9,800 feet, but valleys in the region are also high, most with elevations above 3,900 feet. The biological communities of the Great Basin Desert vary according to altitude: from low salty dry lakes, up through rolling sagebrush valleys, to pinyon-juniper forests. The significant variation between valleys and peaks has created a variety of habitat niches, which has in turn led to many small, isolated populations of genetically unique plant and animal species throughout the region. According to Grayson, more than 600 species of vertebrates live in the floristic Great Basin, which has a similar areal footprint to the ecoregion. Sixty-three of these species have been identified as species of conservation concern due to contracting natural habitats. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 612 Audiopedia
Lec 27: Resonance, Destructive Resonance and Speed of Light [CC]
 
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Second semester of Classical Physics avail FREE with lectures, assignments, quizzes/Tests, discussions, G+ Hangouts @ World Mentoring Academy(a MOOC) http://worldmentoringacademy.com/www/... Help make Foreign Language CC's: Dr. Lewin's complete MIT physics lectures, now on the YouTube channel World Mentoring Academy(a MOOC) This video was first published on the YouTube channel MIT OpenCourseWare under the title "Walter Lewin Promo" in 2007. Attribution: MIT OpenCourseWare License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0 US To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b.... More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/. This YouTube channel is independently operated. It is neither affiliated with nor endorsed by MIT, MIT OpenCourseWare, the Internet Archive, or Dr. Lewin.
Views: 112 Michael Williams
Great Basin Desert | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Great Basin Desert Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= The Great Basin Desert is part of the Great Basin between the Sierra Nevada and the Wasatch Range. The desert is a geographical region that largely overlaps the Great Basin shrub steppe defined by the World Wildlife Fund, and the Central Basin and Range ecoregion defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and United States Geological Survey. It is a temperate desert with hot, dry summers and snowy winters. The desert spans a large part of the state of Nevada, and extends into western Utah, eastern California, and Idaho. The desert is one of the four biologically defined deserts in North America, in addition to the Mojave, Sonoran, and Chihuahuan Deserts.Basin and range topography characterizes the desert: wide valleys bordered by parallel mountain ranges generally oriented north-south. There are more than 33 peaks within the desert with summits higher than 9,800 feet (3,000 m), but valleys in the region are also high, most with elevations above 3,900 feet (1,200 m). The biological communities of the Great Basin Desert vary according to altitude: from low salty dry lakes, up through rolling sagebrush valleys, to pinyon-juniper forests. The significant variation between valleys and peaks has created a variety of habitat niches, which has in turn led to many small, isolated populations of genetically unique plant and animal species throughout the region. According to Grayson, more than 600 species of vertebrates live in the floristic Great Basin, which has a similar areal footprint to the ecoregion. Sixty-three of these species have been identified as species of conservation concern due to contracting natural habitats (for example, Centrocercus urophasianus, Vulpes macrotis, Dipodomys ordii, and Phrynosoma platyrhinos).The ecology of the desert varies across geography, also. The desert’s high elevation and location between mountain ranges influences regional climate: the desert formed by the rain shadow of the Sierra Nevada that blocks moisture from the Pacific Ocean, while the Rocky Mountains create a barrier effect that restricts moisture from the Gulf of Mexico. Different locations in the desert have different amounts of precipitation, depending on the strength of these rain shadows. The environment is influenced by Pleistocene lakes that dried after the last ice age: Lake Lahontan and Lake Bonneville. Each of these lakes left different amounts of salinity and alkalinity.
Views: 2 wikipedia tts
Great Basin Desert | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Great Basin Desert Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Great Basin Desert is part of the Great Basin between the Sierra Nevada and the Wasatch Range. The desert is a geographical region that largely overlaps the Great Basin shrub steppe defined by the World Wildlife Fund, and the Central Basin and Range ecoregion defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and United States Geological Survey. It is a temperate desert with hot, dry summers and snowy winters. The desert spans a large part of the state of Nevada, and extends into western Utah, eastern California, and Idaho. The desert is one of the four biologically defined deserts in North America, in addition to the Mojave, Sonoran, and Chihuahuan Deserts.Basin and range topography characterizes the desert: wide valleys bordered by parallel mountain ranges generally oriented north-south. There are more than 33 peaks within the desert with summits higher than 9,800 feet (3,000 m), but valleys in the region are also high, most with elevations above 3,900 feet (1,200 m). The biological communities of the Great Basin Desert vary according to altitude: from low salty dry lakes, up through rolling sagebrush valleys, to pinyon-juniper forests. The significant variation between valleys and peaks has created a variety of habitat niches, which has in turn led to many small, isolated populations of genetically unique plant and animal species throughout the region. According to Grayson, more than 600 species of vertebrates live in the floristic Great Basin, which has a similar areal footprint to the ecoregion. Sixty-three of these species have been identified as species of conservation concern due to contracting natural habitats (for example, Centrocercus urophasianus, Vulpes macrotis, Dipodomys ordii, and Phrynosoma platyrhinos).The ecology of the desert varies across geography, also. The desert’s high elevation and location between mountain ranges influences regional climate: the desert formed by the rain shadow of the Sierra Nevada that blocks moisture from the Pacific Ocean, while the Rocky Mountains create a barrier effect that restricts moisture from the Gulf of Mexico. Different locations in the desert have different amounts of precipitation, depending on the strength of these rain shadows. The environment is influenced by Pleistocene lakes that dried after the last ice age: Lake Lahontan and Lake Bonneville. Each of these lakes left different amounts of salinity and alkalinity.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
Alberta | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Alberta Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Alberta ( (listen)) is a western province of Canada. With an estimated population of 4,067,175 as of 2016 census, it is Canada's fourth most populous province and the most populous of Canada's three prairie provinces. Its area is about 660,000 square kilometres (250,000 sq mi). Alberta and its neighbour Saskatchewan were districts of the Northwest Territories until they were established as provinces on September 1, 1905. The premier has been Rachel Notley since May 2015. Alberta is bounded by the provinces of British Columbia to the west and Saskatchewan to the east, the Northwest Territories to the north, and the U.S. state of Montana to the south. Alberta is one of three Canadian provinces and territories to border only a single U.S. state and one of only two landlocked provinces. It has a predominantly humid continental climate, with stark contrasts over a year; but seasonal temperature average swings are smaller than in areas further east, due to winters being warmed by occasional chinook winds bringing sudden warming.Alberta's capital, Edmonton, is near the geographic centre of the province and is the primary supply and service hub for Canada's crude oil, the Athabasca oil sands and other northern resource industries.About 290 km (180 mi) south of the capital is Calgary, the largest city in Alberta. Calgary and Edmonton centre Alberta's two census metropolitan areas, both of which have populations exceeding one million, while the province has 16 census agglomerations.Tourist destinations in the province include Banff, Canmore, Drumheller, Jasper, Sylvan Lake and Lake Louise.
Views: 17 wikipedia tts
Live With Lou - Radio Show 12/16/17
 
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Lou discusses the homeless issues and the corrupt government from Local to State to Federal
Views: 175 One Eye Blind Media
Sea Turtles of the San Francisco Bay Area - Golden Gate Brown Bag Lunch Presentation
 
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Recording of the brown bag lunch presentation given by Chris Pincetich, Ph.D., at Fort Mason on March 15, 2012.
The Faith of Men by Jack London | Full Audiobook | Short Stories
 
05:06:38
The Faith of Men Jack LONDON A collection of short stories by author Jack London. Genre(s): Single Author Collections Our Custom URL : https://www.youtube.com/c/AudiobookAudiobooks Subscribe To Our Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/AudiobookAudiobooks?sub_confirmation=1 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Audio Book Audiobooks All Rights Reserved. This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more information or to volunteer visit librivox.org.

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