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How to Break Cryptography | Infinite Series
 
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Viewers like you help make PBS (Thank you 😃) . Support your local PBS Member Station here: https://to.pbs.org/donateinfi Only 4 steps stand between you and the secrets hidden behind RSA cryptography. Find out how to crack the world’s most commonly used form of encryption. Tweet at us! @pbsinfinite Facebook: facebook.com/pbsinfinite series Email us! pbsinfiniteseries [at] gmail [dot] com Previous Episode: Can We Combine pi & e into a Rational Number? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bG7cCXqcJag&t=25s Links to other resources: Shor's paper: https://arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/9508027v2 Lecture on Shor's Algorithm: https://arxiv.org/pdf/quant-ph/0010034.pdf Blog on Shor's algorithm: http://www.scottaaronson.com/blog/?p=208 Video on RSA cryptography: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wXB-V_Keiu8 Another video on RSA cryptography: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4zahvcJ9glg Euler's Big Idea: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euler%27s_theorem (I can find a non-wiki article, but I don't actually use this in the video. It's just where to learn more about the relevant math Euler did.) Written and Hosted by Kelsey Houston-Edwards Produced by Rusty Ward Graphics by Ray Lux Made by Kornhaber Brown (www.kornhaberbrown.com) Challenge Winner - Reddles37 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bG7cCXqcJag&lc=z135cnmgxlbwch1ds233sbzgaojkivaz004 Comments answered by Kelsey: Joel David Hamkins https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bG7cCXqcJag&lc=z13zdpcwyk2ofhugh04cdh4agsr2whmbsmk0k PCreeper394 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bG7cCXqcJag&lc=z135w324kw21j1qi104cdzvrpoixslmq1jw
Views: 197713 PBS Infinite Series
Secret Sharing Schemes
 
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Cryptography and Network Security by Prof. D. Mukhopadhyay, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 13774 nptelhrd
How WanaCrypt Encrypts Your Files - Computerphile
 
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Wanacrypt works super fast and even when you're offline. Dr Pound explains how hybrid ransomware systems work. Original Wana Decrypt0r video: https://youtu.be/88jkB1V6N9w The Perfect Code: https://youtu.be/WPoQfKQlOjg http://www.facebook.com/computerphile https://twitter.com/computer_phile This video was filmed and edited by Sean Riley. Computer Science at the University of Nottingham: http://bit.ly/nottscomputer Computerphile is a sister project to Brady Haran's Numberphile. More at http://www.bradyharan.com
Views: 272110 Computerphile
3. Signatures
 
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MIT MAS.S62 Cryptocurrency Engineering and Design, Spring 2018 Instructor: Tadge Dryja View the complete course: https://ocw.mit.edu/MAS-S62S18 YouTube Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP61KHzhg3JIJdK08JLSlcLId Discussion of hash signatures, public and private keys, examples of how to use elliptic curves vs. hashes. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at https://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at https://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 359 MIT OpenCourseWare
2011 Killian Lecture: Ronald L. Rivest, "The Growth of Cryptography"
 
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Lecture title: "The Growth of Cryptography" Ronald L. Rivest, a professor of electrical engineering and computer science who helped develop one of the world's most widely used Internet security systems, was MIT’s James R. Killian, Jr. Faculty Achievement Award winner for 2010–2011. Rivest, the Andrew and Erna Viterbi professor in MIT's Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, is known for his pioneering work in the field of cryptography, computer, and network security. February 8, 2011 Huntington Hall (10-250)
Christoph Sorge: Legal requirements for cryptographic security: Necessity, annoyance, or both?
 
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Smart Contracts Day: Cryptography & Law: Information, Privacy and Smart Contracts In this single day event, expert speakers presented talks on the topic of Information, Privacy and Smart Contracts in the interdisciplinary field merging Cryptography and Law. The talks are high level targeting a general public audience. In this talk, Christoph Sorge talks about Legal requirements for cryptographic security: Necessity, annoyance, or both? Slides for this talk: https://law.bitcoinschool.gr/assets/slides/sorge.pdf Prof. Dr. Ing. Christoph Sorge is the holder of the juris professorship of legal informatics, co-director of the Institute of Law and Informatics, and member of the Center for IT Security, Privacy and Accountability (CISPA) at Saarland University. He is also a senior fellow of the German Research Institute for Public Administration Speyer. Event website: https://law.bitcoinschool.gr/
Views: 63 Decrypto org
An NSA Whistleblower's Guide to Encryption
 
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Thomas Drake, a former senior executive at the NSA turned whistleblower, sat down with the Real News to talk about the USA Freedom Act as ersatz reform and how the public can take matters into their own hands by encrypting their phones and computers.
Views: 3167 The Real News Network
Calcul formel - partie 6a : courbes et surfaces (1)
 
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Chapitre "Calcul formel" - Partie 6a : Courbes et surfaces (1) Plan : Courbes paramétrées ; Courbes en coordonnées polaires ; Courbes définies par une équation ; Courbes de l’espace ; Surfaces Exo7. Cours et exercices de mathématiques pour les étudiants. Retrouvez le polycopié sur http://exo7.emath.fr
Views: 3418 Exo7Math
CppCon 2018: Chandler Carruth “Spectre: Secrets, Side-Channels, Sandboxes, and Security”
 
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http://CppCon.org — Presentation Slides, PDFs, Source Code and other presenter materials are available at: https://github.com/CppCon/CppCon2018 — The discovery of speculative execution side-channel attacks (called "Spectre") fundamentally changes the security model of every modern superscalar microprocessor. Extracting secret data (credit cards, cryptographic keys) through side-channels is not new and has challenged the cryptographic community for decades. Despite this, the industry has often been complacent in our response, viewing these attacks as impacting a tiny amount of code and being nearly impossible to weaponize. But speculative execution attack techniques have fundamentally altered the ease and applicability of side-channels, making them a serious threat to computer security. Responding to these issues has impacted CPU design, compiler design, library design, sandbox techniques and even the C++ programming language and standard. This talk will explain how these kinds of attacks work at a high level and provide a clear set of terminology to describe these classes of vulnerabilities and attacks. It will show how the different variants work at the low level of modern hardware to give a detailed and precise understanding of the mechanics involved on CPUs today. It will also provide guidance about what makes applications and services vulnerable and how to analyze your software to understand the degree of its exposure. It will include an overview of the numerous different mitigation techniques available, how to deploy them, and what tradeoffs come with them. Some of these mitigations will be covered in detail: how they work at a hardware level, where they don't work, and what attack vectors remain. Finally, the talk will show how traditional side-channel risks are made substantially easier to exploit due to speculative execution. This will cover how cryptographic and other libraries dealing in high-value secrets need to be adapted to correctly defend against these attacks. Further, it will introduce general problems of sandboxing untrusted code from secret data and the current best techniques in those circumstances. This talk will be accessible to most C and C++ programmers. No deep background on CPUs, assembly, hardware instructions, Spectre, side-channels, or security is needed. — Chandler Carruth, Google Software Engineer Chandler Carruth leads the Clang team at Google, building better diagnostics, tools, and more. Previously, he worked on several pieces of Google’s distributed build system. He makes guest appearances helping to maintain a few core C++ libraries across Google’s codebase, and is active in the LLVM and Clang open source communities. He received his M.S. and B.S. in Computer Science from Wake Forest University, but disavows all knowledge of the contents of his Master’s thesis. He is regularly found drinking Cherry Coke Zero in the daytime and pontificating over a single malt scotch in the evening. — Videos Filmed & Edited by Bash Films: http://www.BashFilms.com
Views: 26448 CppCon
Introduction
 
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Cryptography and Network Security by Prof. D. Mukhopadhyay, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 203345 nptelhrd
Reverse engineering obfuscated JavaScript - PopUnder Chrome 59
 
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In this video we figure out how to do a popunder in Chrome version 59, by using a trick. Hopefully Chrome fixes this, because I resent this kind of advertisement. PoC: https://liveoverflow.com/poc/popunder.html -=[ 🔴 Stuff I use ]=- → Microphone:* https://amzn.to/2LW6ldx → Graphics tablet:* https://amzn.to/2C8djYj → Camera#1 for streaming:* https://amzn.to/2SJ66VM → Lens for streaming:* https://amzn.to/2CdG31I → Connect Camera#1 to PC:* https://amzn.to/2VDRhWj → Camera#2 for electronics:* https://amzn.to/2LWxehv → Lens for macro shots:* https://amzn.to/2C5tXrw → Keyboard:* https://amzn.to/2LZgCFD → Headphones:* https://amzn.to/2M2KhxW -=[ ❤️ Support ]=- → per Video: https://www.patreon.com/join/liveoverflow → per Month: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClcE-kVhqyiHCcjYwcpfj9w/join -=[ 🐕 Social ]=- → Twitter: https://twitter.com/LiveOverflow/ → Website: https://liveoverflow.com/ → Subreddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/LiveOverflow/ → Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LiveOverflow/ -=[ 📄 P.S. ]=- All links with "*" are affiliate links. LiveOverflow / Security Flag GmbH is part of the Amazon Affiliate Partner Programm. #ReverseEngineering
Views: 73737 LiveOverflow
Crypto Defenses for Real-World System Threats - Kenn White - Ann Arbor
 
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Modern encryption techniques provide several important security properties, well known to most practitioners. Or are they? What are in fact the guarantees of, say, HTTPS TLS cipher suites using authenticated encryption, IPSec vs. SSL VPNs, Property Preserving Encryption, or token vaults? We live in an era of embedded Hardware Security Modules that cost less than $1 in volume, and countless options now exist for encrypting streaming network data, files, volumes, and even entire databases. Let's take a deep dive into the edge of developed practice to discuss real-world threat scenarios to public cloud and IoT data, and look closely at how we can address specific technical risks with our current encryption toolkits. Advanced math not required. Bio: Kenneth White is a security researcher whose work focuses on networks and global systems. He is co-director of the Open Crypto Audit Project (OCAP), currently managing a large-scale audit of OpenSSL on behalf of the Linux Foundation's Core Infrastructure Initiative. Previously, White was Principal Scientist at Washington DC-based Social & Scientific Systems where he led the engineering team that designed and ran global operations and security for the largest clinical trial network in the world, with research centers in over 100 countries. White co-founded CBX Group which provides security services to major organizations including World Health, UNICEF, Doctors without Borders, the US State Department, and BAO Systems. Together with Matthew Green, White co-founded the TrueCrypt audit project, a community-driven initiative to conduct the first comprehensive cryptanalysis and public security audit of the widely used TrueCrypt encryption software. White holds a Masters from Harvard and is a PhD candidate in neuroscience and cognitive science, with applied research in real-time classification and machine learning. His work on network security and forensics and been cited by media including the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Reuters, Wired and Nature. White is a technical reviewer for the Software Engineering Institute, and publishes and speaks frequently on computational modeling, security engineering, and trust. He tweets @kennwhite.
Views: 1209 Duo Security
OpenScore presentation at FOSDEM 2019
 
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"OpenScore: Open-sourcing sheet music" presented at FOSDEM 2019 in Brussels, Belgium https://fosdem.org/2019/schedule/event/openscore_sheet_music/ This presentation describes our method for digitising public domain sheet music, and shares details of some of the key challenges and hurdles we have had to overcome since the launch of our Kickstarter campaign in 2017. Follow us for updates when new scores are released! https://openscore.cc/ https://twitter.com/OpenScore https://www.facebook.com/OpenScore.cc/ OpenScore is a crowdsourced initiative to transcribe the world's public domain sheet music into an open source, digital format. This brings music notation into the 21st Century, enabling its convenient use on devices such as phones, tablets and computers. OpenScore extends the principles of open source to apply not only to software, but also to the content produced by the software, thereby opening up a new avenue of funding for open source software development.
Views: 200 OpenScore