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Absolute Zero
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry Absolute zero is the coldest possible temperature. We'll look at how to find absolute zero with temperature and volume, and how it relates to the Kelvin temperature scale. We use absolute zero with Charles Law and gases for physics and chemistry.
Views: 73668 Tyler DeWitt
Charles Law and Absolute Zero
 
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How low can you go? Estimate absolute zero by graphing volume versus temperature data for gases in a sealed syringe. This video is part of the Flinn Scientific Best Practices for Teaching Chemistry Video Series, a collection of over 125 hours of free professional development training for chemistry teachers - http://elearning.flinnsci.com ATTENTION: This demonstration is intended for and should only be performed by certified science instructors in a safe laboratory/classroom setting. Be sure to subscribe and check out more videos! Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/FlinnScientific/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FlinnScientific/ Website: https://www.flinnsci.com/
Views: 30386 FlinnScientific
Where does Absolute Zero come from?
 
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How was Absolute Zero discovered? Where does it come from? Absolute zero is the lower limit of the thermodynamic temperature scale, a state at which the enthalpy and entropy of a cooled ideal gas reaches its minimum value, taken as 0. The theoretical temperature is determined by extrapolating the ideal gas law; by international agreement, absolute zero is taken as −273.15° on the Celsius scale (International System of Units), which equates to −459.67° on the Fahrenheit scale (United States customary units).The corresponding Kelvin and Rankine temperature scales set their zero points at absolute zero by definition. It is commonly thought of as the lowest temperature possible, but it is not the lowest enthalpy state possible, because all real substances begin to depart from the ideal gas when cooled as they approach the change of state to liquid, and then to solid; and the sum of the enthalpy of vaporization (gas to liquid) and enthalpy of fusion (liquid to solid) exceeds the ideal gas's change in enthalpy to absolute zero. In the quantum-mechanical description, matter (solid) at absolute zero is in its ground state, the point of lowest internal energy. The laws of thermodynamics dictate that absolute zero cannot be reached using only thermodynamic means, as the temperature of the substance being cooled approaches the temperature of the cooling agent asymptotically. A system at absolute zero still possesses quantum mechanical zero-point energy, the energy of its ground state at absolute zero. The kinetic energy of the ground state cannot be removed. Scientists have achieved temperatures extremely close to absolute zero, where matter exhibits quantum effects such as superconductivity and superfluidity. One of the first to discuss the possibility of an absolute minimal temperature was Robert Boyle. His 1665 New Experiments and Observations touching Cold, articulated the dispute known as the primum frigidum. The concept was well known among naturalists of the time. Some contended an absolute minimum temperature occurred within earth (as one of the four so-called "elements"), others within water, others air, and some more recently within nitre. But all of them seemed to agree that, "There is some body or other that is of its own nature supremely cold and by participation of which all other bodies obtain that quality." The question whether there is a limit to the degree of coldness possible, and, if so, where the zero must be placed, was first addressed by the French physicist Guillaume Amontons in 1702, in connection with his improvements in the air-thermometer. In his instrument, temperatures were indicated by the height at which a column of mercury was sustained by a certain mass of air, the volume, or "spring", of which varied with the heat to which it was exposed. Amontons therefore argued that the zero of his thermometer would be that temperature at which the spring of the air in it was reduced to nothing. On the scale he used, the boiling-point of water was marked at +73 and the melting-point of ice at 51, so that the zero of his scale was equivalent to about −240 on the Celsius scale. This close approximation to the modern value of −273.15 °C for the zero of the air-thermometer was further improved upon in 1779 by Johann Heinrich Lambert, who observed that −270 °C might be regarded as absolute cold. Values of this order for the absolute zero were not, however, universally accepted about this period. Pierre-Simon Laplace and Antoine Lavoisier, in their 1780 treatise on heat, arrived at values ranging from 1,500 to 3,000 below the freezing-point of water, and thought that in any case it must be at least 600 below. John Dalton in his Chemical Philosophy gave ten calculations of this value, and finally adopted −3000 °C as the natural zero of temperature. After James Prescott Joule had determined the mechanical equivalent of heat, Lord Kelvin approached the question from an entirely different point of view, and in 1848 devised a scale of absolute temperature which was independent of the properties of any particular substance and was based on Carnot's theory of the Motive Power of Heat. It followed from the principles on which this scale was constructed that its zero was placed at −273.15 °C, at almost precisely the same point as the zero of the air-thermometer.
Views: 13384 Dr Chris Tisdell
Absolute Zero: Absolute Awesome
 
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Hank explains absolute zero: -273.15 degrees Celsius - and the coldest place in the known universe may surprise you. A correction on our use of the phrase "degrees Kelvin" can be found in this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OA98hl7Q5dQ - beginning at 6:43. Like SciShow on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Follow SciShow on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow References: Minimum zero point energy derived from uncertainty principle: http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/quantum/hosc4.html#c1
Views: 1732097 SciShow
Determine relative min, max, domain, range, and zeros from a graph
 
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Learn how to determine the extrema from a graph. The extrema of a function are the critical points or the turning points of the function. They are the points where the graph changes from increasing to decreasing or vice versa. They are the points where the graph turnes. The points where the graph changes from increasing to decreasing are called the maximum point while the points where the graph changes from decreasing to increasing are called the minimum point. #functions #graphsoffunctions #functions #graphsoffunctions
Views: 18272 Brian McLogan
Charles Law Lab Graph and Conclusion
 
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How to finish the Charles Law lab as performed here at Ranburne high school.
Views: 4050 turdfurg67
How to Find Any Limit (NancyPi)
 
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MIT grad shows how to find any limit as x approaches a finite value/constant value (and not infinity). To skip ahead: 1) For an example of PLUGGING IN/SUBSTITUTION, skip to time 1:45. 2) For FACTORING to simplify, skip to 3:53. 3) For GETTING A COMMON DENOMINATOR, skip to time 8:09. 4) For EXPANDING by opening up parentheses to simplify and find the limit, skip to 12:01. Nancy formerly of MathBFF explains the steps. Jump to the PART 2 video (https://youtu.be/v9fQ_QeCHpI) for how to find the limit for: 5) a SQUARE ROOT in the numerator or denominator (to RATIONALIZE by multiplying by the "CONJUGATE"); 6) something of the form (SIN X)/X; or 7) an ABSOLUTE VALUE in the limit expression. For LIMITS at INFINITY, jump to: https://youtu.be/nViVR1rImUE Follow me on Instagram! https://instagram.com/mathnancy Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/nancypi 1) TRY PLUGGING IN/SUBSTITUTION: The first way to try to find the limit value is to plug in for x. In the limit expression, x is approaching a certain number. If you plug in this number and get a value that is defined, then that is your limit. HOWEVER, if you get ZERO in the denominator when you plug in, then you have not found the limit yet and need to try something else to find the limit value. 2) TRY FACTORING: If you plugged in the value for x, and you got zero in the denominator (or the form 0 over 0), check whether you can factor and simplify to find the limit. If the limit expression is made up of a polynomial in a numerator and a polynomial in the denominator, then it is a very good idea to try factoring because a factor in the top may cancel with a factor in the bottom to give you a simpler expression. Then, plugging into this simpler expression may give you an actual limit value. 3) TRY GETTING A COMMON DENOMINATOR: If you plugged in the value for x, and you got zero in the denominator, and you cannot factor the expression, you have to try something else. If your limit expression has fractions within a fraction ("a complex rational expression"), try getting a common denominator in the expression. Use algebra to get a common denominator between the two fractions that are in the numerator (or denominator), and when simplifying, terms may cancel so that you have a simpler expression you can plug into to get a limit value. 4) TRY EXPANDING/OPENING UP PARENTHESES: Again, if you plugged in and got a zero in the denominator, and you can't factor or get a common denominator, consider opening up parentheses and expanding expressions by FOIL-ing or multiplying out and combining like terms. Simplifying in this way may lead to a simpler expression you can plug into to get a limit value. For more of my math videos, check out: http://nancypi.com
Views: 159698 NancyPi
3 Step Continuity Test, Discontinuity, Piecewise Functions & Limits
 
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This calculus video tutorial explains how to identify points of discontinuity or to prove a function is continuous / discontinuous at a point by using the 3 step continuity test. This involves evaluating piecewise functions using one sided limits. The first step is to determine if the function is defined at the given point. The second step is to prove that the limit exists by showing that the right side equals the left side. If the limit does not exist, it could be a jump discontinuity or an infinite discontinuity which are nonremovable. The 3rd step is to show that the limit equals the function at the given point. If the limit exists but does not equal the function, then it's a point discontinuity also known as a hole which is removable.
Absolute & Local Minimum and Maximum Values - Relative Extrema, Critical Numbers / Points Calculus
 
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This calculus video tutorial explains how to find the absolute minimum and maximum values as well as the local max and local min. It explains the extreme value theorem for finding absolute extrema and discusses the first derivative test to identify relative maximum and minimum values using a sign chart on a number line. It also discusses how to find the critical points or critical numbers of a function. This video contains plenty of examples and difficult / hard practice problems. Here is a list of topics: 1. Absolute Extrema - Absolute Max and Min on a Closed Interval 2. Extreme Value Theorem 3. Graphical Examples With Open and Closed Endpoints / Circles 4. Cusps, Parabola, Vertical Asymptote and Unbounded Behavior 5. How to Identify The Critical Points or Critical Numbers of a Function - f'(c)=0 or f'(c) does not exist 6. First Derivative Test - If the slope of the function or the sign of f'(x) changes from negative to positive - it's a local minimum value. If it changes from positive to negative - it's a relative maximum 7. Identify absolute extreme values - max and min on a closed interval using the endpoints a making an x y table of values 8. f'(c)=0 at local max and local min - slope of horizontal tangent line is zero 9. Identifying Relative Extrema Graphically and Analytically 10. Local Max and Min of Quadratic Functions, Cubic Polynomial Functions, Square Root Functions, Cusp, Exponential Fractions, and Rational Functions 11. Using a Sign Chart on a Number line to identify the relative extreme values 12. Absolute Extrema - Local Minima and Relative Maxima 13. Techniques of Differentiation - Power Rule, Product Rule, Quotient Rule, and Chain Rule Derivatives
Charles' Law
 
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This chemistry video tutorial explains the fundamental concepts behind Charles Law. Charles law shows the relationship between volume and temperature. if you graph it, you should get a straight line. This video contains plenty of examples and practice problems with all of the equations and formulas that go with it. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
Absolute value equations | Linear equations | Algebra I | Khan Academy
 
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Absolute Value Equations Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/math/algebra/solving-linear-equations-and-inequalities/absolute-value-equations/v/absolute-value-equations-example-1?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=AlgebraI Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/math/algebra/solving-linear-equations-and-inequalities/age_word_problems_tut/v/ex-3-age-word-problem?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=AlgebraI Algebra I on Khan Academy: Algebra is the language through which we describe patterns. Think of it as a shorthand, of sorts. As opposed to having to do something over and over again, algebra gives you a simple way to express that repetitive process. It's also seen as a "gatekeeper" subject. Once you achieve an understanding of algebra, the higher-level math subjects become accessible to you. Without it, it's impossible to move forward. It's used by people with lots of different jobs, like carpentry, engineering, and fashion design. In these tutorials, we'll cover a lot of ground. Some of the topics include linear equations, linear inequalities, linear functions, systems of equations, factoring expressions, quadratic expressions, exponents, functions, and ratios. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Algebra channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYZrCV8PNENpJt36V0kd-4Q?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 1024500 Khan Academy
ʕ•ᴥ•ʔ Find the Equation of a Parabola from a Graph with an Easy Walkthrough
 
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Quickly master how to find the quadratic functions for given parabolas. Watch more lessons like this and try our practice at https://www.studypug.com/algebra-help/quadratic-functions/find-the-quadratic-functions-for-given-parabolas In the last lesson, we learned how to draw a parabola from its function. This lesson, we will do the opposite. We will learn how to find the quadratic function when we are given the graph of a parabola. Here we are given a parabola with the vertex at negative 1 and 4. Vertex. The question explicitly tells us the information for the vertex, that means we should use the vertex form to model this parabola, right. Makes sense? Yeah. So let's use the vertex form to model this parabola. Okay? Let's go. So vertex form goes something like this, right, with y on the left side of the equation, x on the right side of the equation with the square right here meaning we are dealing with a quadratic function, right, cool. And the a here is the leading coefficient for the parabola, okay? Cool. Now, vertex. So this vertex information should be able to tell us the information about something here, and something here, right? So let's go. For this vertex the x coordinate is negative 1. So if you want to make the statement look something like this, with a bracket and the x inside, we are looking for a value here, right? Would you say that means we have to move the number to the same side as x, and we can put a bracket around the statement, right? So let's do this. Now, negative 1 is moved to the other side of the equation, it becomes positive 1, right? And now the rest of the equation we just have zero, and now we can put a bracket around this whole thing. And that is gonna be the information we are gonna put down here, right, yeah. So inside the bracket what do we see? X plus 1. So inside the bracket, we just put down x plus 1. And that's done, okay? So the x portion is done. Now let's take care of the y portion. So for the vertex, the y coordinate is 4. Let's do the same thing, move the number to the same side as y. So positive 4 moved to the other side becomes negative 4, and this side of the equation we just have zero. And now, we can put a bracket around this, right. And now we can put this whole thing right here. So inside the bracket we have y minus 4. Inside the bracket we have y minus 4. And now this portion of the equation is done. So now how do you determine the value for the leading coefficient? Well there's still one information we haven't used, so chances are this will help us find a leading coefficient: the information about this point. So let's go. What does this point tell us? What information can we get out of this point? Well, this point is basically telling us that for this quadratic function, when x equals negative 3, the corresponding y value is 12. And guess what? These other values will plug into the equation to find the leading coefficient. Okay? So here, x value, we're going to plug in negative 3. Here, the y value, we're gonna plug in 12. Okay guys? And let's try to solve for a. So left side of the equation we have 12 minus 4, we get-- let me use another color. So, left side of the equation we have 12 minus 4 we get 8 .equals, a is the value we are trying to find. Now, this side we have negative 3 plus 1, we have negative 2. And don't forget outside we gotta have a square, right. Cool. Now, a equals negative 2 squared. Guys, negative 2 squared we get positive, right. Positive of what, 2 squared is 4. So we have 4a. Okay guys. Now, to solve the value for a, to solve the value for a, we simply divide both sides of the equation by 4. That way 4, 4 cancels out. So at the end, a equals 8 divided by 4 is 2. That's it, that's the value for a right here. Okay, guys? So at the end, for this parabola, the quadratic function is right here, okay? Left side of the equation we have y minus 4 equals. . . Guys, what's the value for a right here? A is 2, right? So a is 2. So we put it in right here. Now bracket, inside the bracket we have x plus 1. Watch more step by step examples at https://www.studypug.com === Follow us YOUTUBE http://www.youtube.com/c/StudyPug?sub_confirmation=1 GOOGLE+ https://plus.google.com/+StudyPug FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/StudyPug TWITTER https://twitter.com/StudyPug
Views: 131654 StudyPug
Even, Odd, or Neither Functions The Easy Way! - Graphs & Algebraically, Properties & Symmetry
 
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This algebra 2 and precalculus video tutorial explains how to determine whether a function f is even, odd, or neither algebraically and using graphs. This video contains plenty of examples and practice problems using variables and constants. First, plug in -x into the equation and see if the sign changes. If all signs change, it's an odd function. If they all remain the same, then it's an even function. If some change while others do not, the function is neither even or odd. For graphs, even functions are symmetric about the y axis. For odd functions, the symmetry exists about the origin. For circles with even and odd properties, it does not pass the vertical line test and is therefore not a function.
Calculate the P-Value in Statistics - Formula to Find the P-Value in Hypothesis Testing
 
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Get this complete course at http://www.MathTutorDVD.com In this lesson, we will discuss the very important topic of p-values in statistics. The p-value is a calculation that we make during hypothesis testing to determine if we reject the null hypothesis or fail to reject it. The p-value is calculated by first finding the z test statistic. Once this is known we then need to find the probability of our population having a value more extreme than the test statistic. This is done by looking up the probability in a normal distribution table. We then interpret the results by comparing the p-value to the level of significance. -----------------
Views: 495279 mathtutordvd
Even, Odd, or Neither From a Graph
 
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This is the vid about the to determine whether a function is even, odd, or neither graphically. The video uses reflections. For more math shorts go to www.MathByFives.com
Views: 70102 Mathbyfives
How to calculate opportunity costs
 
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This video goes over the process of calculating opportunity costs. Generally, opportunity costs involve tradeoffs associated with economic choices. Specifically the opportunity cost is the value of the best available alternative (that you have given up). This video goes over my personal method to make sure the opportunity costs are calculated correctly. More information about this is available at: http://www.freeeconhelp.com/2011/09/calculating-marginal-and-total.html
Views: 479294 Free Econ Help
Graphing the absolute value function with transformations
 
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Learn about graphing absolute value equations. An absolute value equation is an equation having the absolute value sign and the value of the equation is always positive. The graph of the parent function of an absolute value equation is a v-shaped graph starting from the origin above the x-axis and rising both sides of the y-axis and is symmetrical to the y-axis. To graph an absolute value equation, we first graph the parent function of the absolute value equation and we then apply the necessary transformation(s) to the graph of the parent function to obtain the required graph of the absolute value equation. #absolutevalue #graphabsequations
Views: 125028 Brian McLogan
How to determine the extrema and zeros from the graph of a polynomial
 
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Learn how to determine the extrema from a graph. The extrema of a function are the critical points or the turning points of the function. They are the points where the graph changes from increasing to decreasing or vice versa. They are the points where the graph turnes. The points where the graph changes from increasing to decreasing are called the maximum point while the points where the graph changes from decreasing to increasing are called the minimum point. #functions #graphsoffunctions #functions #graphsoffunctions
Views: 1384 Brian McLogan
Finding Inflection Points & Concavity on a Graph - Second Derivative - Calculus
 
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This calculus video tutorial shows you how to find the inflection point of a graph and an equation both graphically and analytically by finding the second derivative, setting it equal to zero and solving for x. It also shows you how to find the concavity of a function and determine if it's concave up or concave down using a sign chart on a number line.
Ex: Determining Limits Involving an Absolute Value Function Graphically and Algebraically
 
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This video provides several examples of how to determine limits involving an absolute value function graphically and algebraically. Site: http://mathispower4u.com
Views: 12794 Mathispower4u
Find x-intercepts (roots) of quadratic graphs
 
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Find x-intercepts (roots) of quadratic graphs
Views: 64859 HEGARTYMATHS
IB Physics: Determining Uncertainty in slope and Y intercept
 
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Demonstrates how to determine the uncertainty in the slope and y-intercept, and explains the usefulness of these quantitites.
Views: 30745 Chris Doner
How do you find the x and y intercept of a quadratic
 
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Learn about the parts of a parabola. A parabola is the shape of the graph of a quadratic equation. A regular palabola is the parabola that is facing either up or down while an irregular parabola faces left or right. A quadratic equation is an equation whose highest exponent in the variable(s) is 2. The parts of a parabola include: the axis of symmetry (the line passing through the vertex of the parabola to which the parabola is symmetric about), the vertex (the point at which the parabola turns), the domain (the set of possible x-values of the parabola, usually all real numbers for regular parabolas), the range (the possible y-values of the parabola which is usually the region above the vertex inclusive or below the vertex inclusive for regular parabolas), the x-intercepts (the points where the parabola cuts the x-axis) and the y-intercepts (the point(s) where the parabola cuts the y axis. #quadraticequations #graphquadratics
Views: 131053 Brian McLogan
Graph axis of symmetry vertex and max and min, domain and range
 
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Learn about the parts of a parabola. A parabola is the shape of the graph of a quadratic equation. A regular palabola is the parabola that is facing either up or down while an irregular parabola faces left or right. A quadratic equation is an equation whose highest exponent in the variable(s) is 2. The parts of a parabola include: the axis of symmetry (the line passing through the vertex of the parabola to which the parabola is symmetric about), the vertex (the point at which the parabola turns), the domain (the set of possible x-values of the parabola, usually all real numbers for regular parabolas), the range (the possible y-values of the parabola which is usually the region above the vertex inclusive or below the vertex inclusive for regular parabolas), the x-intercepts (the points where the parabola cuts the x-axis) and the y-intercepts (the point(s) where the parabola cuts the y axis. #quadraticequations #graphquadratics
Views: 104496 Brian McLogan
Calculus - How to find the value of a one sided limit using the equation
 
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This video will show how to find the value of a one sided limit by observing key features of the equation. Remember to find values close to the value x is approaching, this will give you great intuition on what the function is doing. For more videos please visit http://www.mysecretmathtutor.com
Views: 136139 MySecretMathTutor
How to Graph an Absolute Value Function and Find Intercepts
 
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Please Subscribe here, thank you!!! https://goo.gl/JQ8Nys How to Graph an Absolute Value Function and Find Intercepts. Graphing the Absolute Value Function f(x) = |x + 2| - 1
Views: 12927 The Math Sorcerer
Finding the Equation of a Polynomial from a Graph
 
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Finding the equation of a Polynomial from a graph by writing out the factors. This example has a double root. I show you how to find the factors and the leading coefficient. If you liked this video please like, share, comment, and subscribe. Help me help as many students with math as possible. Math with Mr. Barnes is a math video tutorial channel meant to help students with math. I’ve has been a high-school mathematics teachers for 10 years. I make video tutorials on pre-calculus 10, 11, and 12, trigonometry, calculus, Physics, circle geometry, and more. I have videos on: slope, lines, quadratics, exponents, circles, tangents, derivatives, limits, solving equations, and many more. Check out some of my more of my videos: Calculus Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5vENG_g67aHTpcVZWHHREIqa4fAcB0B4 95% Confidence Interval: https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=CAZmr0kx2WQ Newton Egg Drop Fail: https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=s_t1hE89kS8 Finding a relation from a table: https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=1Ww6U__uy6A Trigonometric Proofs: https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=HzmbCGcVWEI Absolute Value Limits: https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=uAGw21BtkSY Inverse of a Quadratic Function: https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=8wBwMpCPgyE
Views: 6139 mathwithmrbarnes
Ex:  Find a Quadratic Function Given the Intercepts of the Graph
 
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This video explains how to determine a quadratic function given the x and y intercepts of the graph. Site: http://mathispower4u.com Blog: http://mathispower4u.wordpress.com
Views: 104718 Mathispower4u
How Do You Find Absolute Zero?
 
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67 f on the fahrenheit temperature scale. Absolute zero sciencedailyabsolute wikipedia. It's the lowest limit on temperature scale, but recent news articles have gas laws and absolute zero. At absolute zero, all motion we call this temperature zero. Absolute zero, temperature at which a thermodynamic system has the lowest energy. Htm url? Q webcache. Googleusercontent search. Theoretically the equivalent value of absolute zero in celsius temperature scale 1 oct 2016 is lowest possible. The coldest place in the universe scientists are trying to create a temperature below absolute zero negative temperatures physics central. When particles in a gas stop moving 3 jan 2013 researchers show they can achieve even lower temperatures than absolute zero for strange realm of 'negative. Absolute zero sciencedaily. This is zero kelvin (the si unit for temperature), and 273 c on the celsius scale. Physicists in massachusetts come to grips with the lowest possible temperature absolute zero when a cold snap hits and drops, there's nothing stop it from falling below zero, whether celsius or fahrenheit. It is the point at which atoms of a substance transmit no thermal energy they are completely rest. What happens at absolute zero? Absolute zero youtubefinding what experiments are there to prove Who the journey other side of temperature & definition video lesson transcript why can't we get down Io9. 15c or 0 kelvin) 2 nov 2011. It corresponds to 273. By international agreement, absolute zero is defined as precisely; 0 k on the kelvin scale, which a thermodynamic (absolute) temperature scale; And 273. But recent experiments using ultracold atoms there is a limit to how cold matter can get. Zero kelvin is the lowest possible temperature. How are temperatures close to absolute zero achieved and determining galileo university of virginia. 15 degrees celsius or 459. 67 degrees fahrenheit thus the natural temperature scale is the absolute temperature measured in kelvin. It appeared that an ideal gas at constant pressure would reach zero what is the coldest temperature possible? In this cool experiment, you'll calculate absolute by extrapolating data on and volume of first, simplest, demonstration existence 'absolute zero' was found in behavior vsif you plot ( 273. Atoms reach record temperature, colder than absolute zero. Here are class experiments to find how the volume and pressure of a fixed mass gas vary with temperature. 17 feb 2010 but scientists found that molecules at frigid temperatures just a few hundred billionths of a degree above absolute zero ( 273. Learn more about what happens when the temperature gets down to absolute zero and cannot get any 2 mar 2012 is zero, does it really exist anywhere in universe? Could we ever reach real life? . 15 degrees celsius on the celsius scale absolute zero is the lower limit of the thermodynamic temperature scale, a state at which the enthalpy and entropy of a cooled ideal gas reaches its minimum the temperature at which
Views: 115 Sea of Question
How to Find The Point Where The Graph has a  Horizontal Tangent Lines Using Derivatives
 
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This calculus video tutorial explains how to find the point where the graph has a horizontal tangent line using derivatives. You need to know the slope of a horizontal tangent line is zero. You need to find the first derivative, set it equal to zero, and solve for x which may involve factoring a trinomial. This video contains a few examples and practice problems. Calculus Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1xATmTI-YY8&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWYThyV4T2Allw6zY0jEumv&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
Solving Quadratic Inequalities
 
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Thanks to all of you who support me on Patreon. You da real mvps! $1 per month helps!! :) https://www.patreon.com/patrickjmt !! Solving Quadratic Inequalities The basic procedure and one full example is shown! For more free math videos, visit http://PatrickJMT.com
Views: 880864 patrickJMT
Introduction to increasing, decreasing, positive or negative intervals | Algebra I | Khan Academy
 
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Sal discusses there Intervals where function is increasing, decreasing, postive or negative and their graphical representation. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/math/algebra/algebra-functions/positive-negative-increasing-decreasing-intervals/v/when-a-function-is-positive-or-negative?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=AlgebraI Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/math/algebra/algebra-functions/maximum-and-minimum-points/v/identifying-relative-and-absolute-maxima-and-minima?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=AlgebraI Algebra I on Khan Academy: Algebra is the language through which we describe patterns. Think of it as a shorthand, of sorts. As opposed to having to do something over and over again, algebra gives you a simple way to express that repetitive process. It's also seen as a "gatekeeper" subject. Once you achieve an understanding of algebra, the higher-level math subjects become accessible to you. Without it, it's impossible to move forward. It's used by people with lots of different jobs, like carpentry, engineering, and fashion design. In these tutorials, we'll cover a lot of ground. Some of the topics include linear equations, linear inequalities, linear functions, systems of equations, factoring expressions, quadratic expressions, exponents, functions, and ratios. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Algebra channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYZrCV8PNENpJt36V0kd-4Q?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 422535 Khan Academy
Sketching the Derivative of a Function
 
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Thanks to all of you who support me on Patreon. You da real mvps! $1 per month helps!! :) https://www.patreon.com/patrickjmt !! Buy my book!: '1001 Calculus Problems for Dummies' - you can get it on my website: http://patrickjmt.com/ Sketching the Derivative of a Function - In this video, I sketch the derivative of two different functions. That is, I give the graph of y = f(x), and do a rough sketch of the graph f ' (x). For more free math videos, visit http://PatrickJMT.com
Views: 787222 patrickJMT
How to Describe End Behavior of Functions
 
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End behavior describes where a function is going at the extremes of the x-axis. In this video we learn the Algebra 2 way of describing those little arrows you have been placing on your graphs all these years.
Views: 197684 MATHRoberg
❖ Concavity, Inflection Points and Second Derivatives ❖
 
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Thanks to all of you who support me on Patreon. You da real mvps! $1 per month helps!! :) https://www.patreon.com/patrickjmt !! Concavity and Second Derivatives - Examples of using the second derivative to determine where a function is concave up or concave down. For more free videos, visit http://PatrickJMT.com Austin Math Tutor, Austin Math Tutoring, Austin Algebra Tutor, Austin Calculus Tutor
Views: 785733 patrickJMT
Find the Formula for a Piecewise Function from Graph
 
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Thanks to all of you who support me on Patreon. You da real mvps! $1 per month helps!! :) https://www.patreon.com/patrickjmt !! Find the Formula for a Piecewise Function from Graph. In this video, I give a graph, and show how to produce the piecewise defined function that would describe that graph! For more free math videos, visit http://PatrickJMT.com
Views: 274456 patrickJMT
Solving Inequalities Interval Notation, Number Line, Absolute Value, Fractions & Variables - Algebra
 
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This Algebra video tutorial explains how to solve inequalities that contain fractions and variables on both sides including absolute value function expressions. It also shows you how to plot / graph the inequality solution on a number line and how to write the solution using interval notation. This video contains plenty of examples and practice problems. Here is a list of topics: 1. Graphing Inequalities on a number line 2. Solving Compound Inequalities 3. Conjunction and Disjunction 4. Writing the solution using interval notation 5. Solving Inequalities by clearing away fractions 6. Common Denominator and Least Common Multiple Technique 7. Inequalities with variables on both sides 8. Solving Inequalities Using Addition and Subtraction 9. Solving Inequalities Using Multiplication and Division 10. Solving Inequalities with absolute value expressions 11. Flipping the inequality sign
Where a function is not differentiable | Taking derivatives | Differential Calculus | Khan Academy
 
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Practice this lesson yourself on KhanAcademy.org right now: https://www.khanacademy.org/math/differential-calculus/taking-derivatives/visualizing-derivatives-tutorial/e/graphs-of-functions-and-their-derivatives?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=DifferentialCalculus Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/math/differential-calculus/taking-derivatives/visualizing-derivatives-tutorial/v/identifying-a-function-s-derivative-example?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=DifferentialCalculus Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/math/differential-calculus/taking-derivatives/visualizing-derivatives-tutorial/v/graphs-of-functions-and-their-derivatives-example-1?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=DifferentialCalculus Differential calculus on Khan Academy: Limit introduction, squeeze theorem, and epsilon-delta definition of limits. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to KhanAcademy’s Differential Calculus channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNLzjGl1HBdZrHXo4Vae3iA?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to KhanAcademy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 309325 Khan Academy
Newton's Method
 
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Thanks to all of you who support me on Patreon. You da real mvps! $1 per month helps!! :) https://www.patreon.com/patrickjmt !! Newton's Method - I discuss the basic idea of Newton's Method and how to use it. I do one example using Newton's Method to approximate a root. For more free math videos, visit http://PatrickJMT.com
Views: 670462 patrickJMT
TI-84 plus graph local max, min, x-intercept(s), y-intercept
 
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Graph the equation x^3 +3x^2-15. Find local min, local max, y-intercept and x-intercept.
Views: 133948 picrustable
Tutorial for writing the equation of a cubic function from a graph
 
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http://www.freemathvideos.com In this video playlist I will show you the basics for polynomial functions. We will start with factoring polynomial equations to determine the zeros of a polynomial. We will then learn how to write the polynomial given a set of zeros. Multiplying, adding and subtracting polynomials will be apart of this series as well as classifying polynomials and determining the Leading coefficient and degree of a polynomial so that we can determine the end behavior. Next we will learn how to find all of the zeros of a polynomial using the rational zero test and descartes rule of signs. This will help us apply the factor and remainder theorem. We will also learn how to sketch the graph of a parabola using the multiplicity and zeros.
Views: 3686 Brian McLogan
Determine where a Graph is Increasing, Decreasing or Constant
 
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From a graph find the x values where the function is increasing, decreasing, and constant. This is presented at a college algebra level and no calculus is involved. For more math shorts go to www.MathByFives.com
Views: 30728 Mathbyfives
Boyle's Law
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry An introduction to the relationship between pressure and volume, and an explanation of how to solve gas problems with Boyle's Law
Views: 505871 Tyler DeWitt
A Level Practical Endorsement - Percentage Uncertainty in a Gradient
 
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Do you have to know this? You could be asked about this in your exams. Learn more about the 'lobf' and the 'walobf' in this video (not proper physics terms). If you would like to see more A Level Physics videos then please Subscribe to my channel to keep updated with new videos and to search the Playlists already created. You can also visit my site 'A Level Physics Online' to see how all the videos relate to your course and for even more resources at http://www.alevelphysicsonline.com/ Thanks for watching, Mr Matheson
❖ Finding Intervals of Increase/Decrease Local Max/Mins ❖
 
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Thanks to all of you who support me on Patreon. You da real mvps! $1 per month helps!! :) https://www.patreon.com/patrickjmt !! For more FREE math videos, visit http://PatrickJMT.com !! Finding Intervals of Increase/Decrease Local Max/Mins - I give the basic idea of finding intervals of increase/decrease as well as finding local maximums and minimums.
Views: 712977 patrickJMT
How to Calculate AUC
 
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A practical guide on how to calculate AUC from pharmacokinetic data. Learn more by registering for my course on noncompartmental analysis at https://www.udemy.com/noncompartmental-pharmacokinetic-analysis/
Views: 115784 learnpkpd
Graphing a linear inequality by the x and y intercepts
 
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Learn how to graph linear inequalities written in standard form. Linear inequalities are graphed the same way as linear equations, the only difference being that one side of the line that satisfies the inequality is shaded. Also broken line (dashes) is used when the linear inequality is 'excluded' (when less than or greater than is used) and a solid line is used when the inequality is 'included' (when greater than or equal to OR less than or equal to is used). To graph a linear inequality written in standard form, we first determine the slope and the y-intercept by rewriting the linear inequality in slope intercept form, we then plot the y-intercept and using the slope, we can determine the rise and the run of the required line and then be able to plot the next point from the y-intercept. We then draw a straight line passing through the two plotted points. Alternatively, we can determine the x-intercept and the y-intercept of the standard form linear inequality by subtituting y = 0, then solve for x and substituting x = 0, then solve for y respectively. Recall that the x-intercept is the value of x when y = 0 and the y-intercept is the value of y when x = 0. After obtaining the values of the x-intercept and the y-intercept, we plot the points on the coordinate plane and then draw a line passing through the points. After the line representing the linear equation form of the linear inequality is drawn, we select a point either side of the line to determine which side of the line is true for the given inequality and then shade the side that satisfies the inequality. #linearinequalities #graphlinearinequalities
Views: 59944 Brian McLogan
Limits: with Absolute Value
 
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I turn most limits into split (piecewise) functions when dealing with absolute values. That lets me evaluate the limit with other methods (like factoring) from the left and the right, so see if the double-sided limit exists.
Views: 20055 mroldridge
Statistics - How to make a relative frequency distribution
 
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This video covers how to make a relative frequency distribution chart. Remember that in a relative frequency distribution we scale back the frequency using the total frequency. Depending on rounding, the total relative frequency might not be one, but should be very close. For more videos please visit http://www.mysecretmathtutor.com
Views: 346404 MySecretMathTutor