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Seabed Mining in the Deep Sea
 
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) 0:16 - Main Presentation - Lisa Levin 28:24 - Audience Discussion Given the growing demand for deep sea metals created by electronic and green technologies, scientists are faced with decisions about whether to engage in baseline and impacts research that enables development of a new extraction industry, and whether to contribute expertise to the development of environmental protections and guidelines. Lisa A. Levin, distinguished professor of biological oceanography at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, addresses the ethical and societal challenges of exploitation in a relatively unknown realm. Series: "Exploring Ethics" [6/2018] [Show ID: 32160]
Deep-sea mining could transform the globe
 
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Gold alone found on the sea floor is estimated to be worth $150 trn. But the cost to the planet of extracting it could be severe. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 59998 The Economist
Legal Pathways for Addressing Environmental Harm in Deep Seabed Mining Activities
 
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Everyone is aware of off-shore oil rigs; these platforms drill down underwater for valuable resources just off the coast of many nations. But, deep in the ocean beyond national aquatic boundaries lies an abundance of natural resources such as gold, copper, manganese and zinc. State-sponsored companies are surveying and staking claim to these resources, but so far, no one has been granted approval to begin extracting them. The International Seabed Authority (ISA) — the governing body that oversees all activities in international waters (known as the Area) — is currently developing regulations for the extraction of marine minerals. Rules and procedures that govern liability for damage arising from mining activities will be crucial aspect of this regulatory framework. Who is responsible when an environmental disaster occurs as a result of mining activities? To assist in clarifying these legal issues of responsibility and liability, the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI), the Commonwealth Secretariat and the Secretariat of the International Seabed Authority established the Liability Issues for Deep Seabed Mining project. Under the direction of Neil Craik (CIGI), Hannah Lily (Commonwealth Secretariat) and Alfonso Ascencio-Herrera (ISA Secretariat), this project seeks to provide a foundational understanding of key questions surrounding the further development of liability rules.
Your future tech may rely on deep-sea mining
 
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As the demand grows for the metals that power electronics, we may have to look farther and farther for mining opportunities. The next big mining frontier is the deep sea: along the seafloor, mysterious vents shoot scalding hot fluid into the ocean. These vents are a haven for miraculous and unique sea life, but they’re also home to highly concentrated (and very valuable) metals. What happens if we decide that the metals are worth more than the life? Thank you to Ocean Exploration Trust for allowing us to use clips from their deep sea footage. You can follow their next expedition season here: www.nautiluslive.org Subscribe: http://bit.ly/2FqJZMl Like Verge Science on Facebook: http://bit.ly/2hoSukO Follow on Twitter: http://bit.ly/2Kr29B9 Follow on Instagram: https://goo.gl/7ZeLvX Read More: http://www.theverge.com Community guidelines: http://bit.ly/2D0hlAv Subscribe to Verge on YouTube for explainers, product reviews, technology news, and more: http://goo.gl/G5RXGs
Views: 194552 Verge Science
TechKnow - Deep sea gold rush
 
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Oceans cover 70 percent of the earth's surface, but only a fraction of the undersea world has been explored. On this episode of TechKnow, Phil Torres joins a team of scientists on a special expedition to explore and uncover the mysteries at the bottom of the ocean floor. "What we are doing is similar to astronauts and planetary scientists just trying to study life on another planet," says Beth Orcutt, a senior research scientist. The journey begins in Costa Rica aboard the R/V Atlantis, a research vessel operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. From there, Phil gets the chance to take a dive with Alvin, a deep-water submersible capable of taking explorers down to 6,000 metres (20,000 feet) under the sea. Commissioned in 1964, Alvin has a celebrated history, locating an unexploded hydrogen bomb off the coast of Spain and exploring the famous RMS Titanic in the 1980s. Alvin and its first female pilot, Cindy Van Dover, were the first to discover hydrothermal vents, which are underwater springs where plumes of black smoke and water pour out from underneath the earth's crust. The vents were inhabited by previously unknown organisms that thrived in the absence of sunlight. After 40 years of exploration, Alvin got a high-tech upgrade. The storied submersible is now outfitted with high-resolution cameras to provide a 245-degree viewing field and a robotic arm that scientists can use to pull samples of rock and ocean life to then study back on land. But scientists are not the only ones interested in the ocean. These days the new gold rush is not in the hills, it is in the deep sea. For thousands of years miners have been exploiting the earth in search of precious metals. As resources on dry land are depleted, now the search for new sources of metals and minerals is heading underwater. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's national ocean service estimates that there is more than $150tn in gold waiting to be mined from the floor of the world's oceans. "The industry is moving very, very fast. They have far more financial resources than the scientific community," says Cindy Van Dover, Alvin's first female pilot and Duke University Oceanography Professor. Seabed mining is still in the planning stages, but Nautilus Minerals, a Canadian mining company, says it has the technology and the contracts in place with the island nation of Papua New Guinea to start mining in its waters in about two years. What is the future of seabed mining? And what are the consequences of seabed mining for the marine ecosystems? Can science and industry co-exist and work together on viable and sustainable solutions? - Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check out our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
Views: 73210 Al Jazeera English
Breaking the Surface: The Future of Deep Sea Mining in the Pacific
 
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This short film explores how the two Pacific Island nations of Papua New Guinea and Vanuatu are working together with their communities to manage future opportunities and impacts associated with the deep sea mining industry.
Views: 1899 Pacific Community
Exploring Our Sea Floor Production Equipment and How It Will Work
 
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Join us as we highlight our sea floor production vessels and show and describe how our first location, Solwara1, will work. This video is full of information and explores in's and out's of how all of our equipment will work together to mine the sea floor.
Views: 3493 Nautilus Minerals
Deep Sea Mineral Mining
 
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The Worst Thing Since Un-Sliced Bread.
Views: 87 Aralia Pawlick
Overview on Deep Water Drilling
 
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Animation of deepwater drilling
Views: 1418296 edpoperators
ENS351 Deep Sea Mining
 
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Description
Views: 7443 brooke Frohloff
Off Namibia, an underwater diamond harvest
 
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Diamonds are Namibia's biggest source of income -- but the number of precious stones under the Namib desert is dwindling. Now, diamond mining giant De Beers has developed a pioneering diamond boat, that can pluck the stones from under the Atlantic Ocean.
Views: 5951 AFP news agency
DEEP SEA MINING - destroying the oceans
 
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DEEP SEA MINING - deep ocean mining just around the corner. w​hile deep sea minerals could provide much needed revenue for several pacific island nations questions remain about the impacts of mining on the marine environment and the many communities that depend on it for their livelihoods. breaking the surface - the future of deep sea mining in the pacific. - david heydon founder & chairman of deepgreen resources discusses the brave new world of deep ocean mining in international waters. png locals fight sea mining project. several pacific island nations are eagerly eyeing up the potential economic benefits from valuable deep sea mineral resources that have been discovered within their maritime territories. the world’s first ever deep sea mining operation is scheduled to begin offshore from the pacific island nation of papua new guinea in early 2018. deep ocean mining: the new frontier. under pressure: deep sea minerals in the pacific. an exploration into the emerging industry of deep sea mining leads to more questions than answers... deep sea mining.
Views: 793 Love Science
Advanced subsea diamnond mining vessel goes to work
 
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Designed by Marin Teknikk and built by Kleven Verft, Norway, the US$157 million vessel will enable Debmarine Namibia, a 50/50 joint venture between the Government of the Republic of Namibia and De Beers Group, to explore diamond deposits and secure diamond supply in the country well into the future
Views: 6790 marinelogcom
Youngsolwarans against Deep Sea Mining
 
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PNG's 13th Mining and Petroleum Conference commenced this week in Sydney, Australia. This conference is aiming at not only showcasing existing opportunities for destructive investment, but also highlighting PNG’s status as the first country in the world to try the untested and potentially devastating industry of sea bed mining. A group of young protesters called Youngsolwarans in protest had this to share... Solwara Em Laif - Say NO to seabed mining. #WorldVsBank #EnvironmentB4Profit #PeopleB4Profit #LifeB4Profit #NoInvestmentInDestruction
Views: 138 Joey Tau
Under Pressure: Deep Sea Minerals in the Pacific
 
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Several Pacific Island nations are eagerly eyeing up the potential economic benefits from valuable deep sea mineral resources that have been discovered within their maritime territories. With a recent surge in commercial interest the Pacific has now become the centre of an international debate over whether the sustainable economic benefits for Pacific Islanders will outweigh the environmental risks of harvesting these precious metals from the bottom of the sea. This short film examines the issue from a number of key perspectives including; anti-deep sea mining NGO's; politicians; government agencies; deep sea mining companies and; the Secretariat of the Pacific Community.
Views: 12037 Steve Menzies
Deep sea minerals frameworks to inform decision-making
 
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1. The Regional Financial Framework for Deep Sea Minerals Exploration and Exploitation is aimed at providing Pacific countries with a guide to the major issues to be addressed when setting up national financial frameworks. 2. The Regional Environmental Management Framework for Deep Sea Minerals Exploration and Exploitation contains an overview of deep sea mineral deposit environments and potential environmental impacts of deep sea mining projects, as well as management and mitigation strategies, including an environmental impact assessment report template. Read more here; http://www.spc.int/en/media-releases/2538-deep-sea-minerals-frameworks-to-inform-decision-making.html
Views: 183 Pacific Community
Nautilus mining explained.VOB
 
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Activists talk about the proposed deep sea mining operations by Nautilus.
Views: 2752 OceansWatch
PNG DEEP SEA MINING BBC NEWS AT TEN
 
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Plans for the world's first deep sea mine are taking shape in the waters off Papua New Guinea. The ocean floor is rich in gold, copper and other minerals in big demand around the world. But some scientists warn that digging up the seabed will destroy marine life, and Sir David Attenborough is among those objecting. BBC News science editor David Shukman reports.
Views: 3235 David Shukman
Royal NIOZ & STW - Ecology research on Deep Sea Mining - Azores
 
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Can valuable mineral resources on the ocean floor be responsibly mined? To answer this question, we need to know much more about the deep-sea environments where these minerals occur in high concentrations. In April 2015, an international team of marine scientists sailed with the Dutch research vessel 'Pelagia' of Royal NIOZ to a site southwest of the Azores. Their mission: to collect data and perform experiments around a deep-sea hydrothermal vent field located on the Mid Atlantic Ridge. Sulfide minerals precipitating from the hydrothermal exhausts locally form massive sulfide deposits at the seafloor. In places where hydrothermal activity has ceased, these mineral deposits may become economically viable mining sites. Scientific understanding of the key geological, oceanographic and biological processes at those sites is of pivotal importance for policy makers to weigh the potential gain of valuable minerals against the potential environmental risks of deep sea mining.
Views: 475 ScienceMediaNL
The Next Frontier in Mining: Deep Sea Exploitation in the Pacific
 
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The ocean has a wealth of resources. From food, to travel, to pharmaceutical needs, and to energy, the ocean has always provided for mankind. And now, mankind is turning to the ocean for minerals and metals needed for the technology we use in our everyday lives. An exploration into the emerging industry of deep sea mining leads to more questions than answers. Read more: http://pulitzercenter.org/projects/underwater-mining-pacific-ocean
Views: 1470 Pulitzer Center
The deep ocean is the final frontier on planet Earth
 
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The ocean covers 70% of our planet. The deep-sea floor is a realm that is largely unexplored, but cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to go deeper than ever before. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Beneath the waves is a mysterious world that takes up to 95% of Earth's living space. Only three people have ever reached the bottom of the deepest part of the ocean. The deep is a world without sunlight, of freezing temperatures, and immense pressure. It's remained largely unexplored until now. Cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to explore deeper than ever before. They are opening up a whole new world of potential benefits to humanity. The risks are great, but the rewards could be greater. From a vast wealth of resources to clues about the origins of life, the race is on to the final frontier The Okeanos Explorer, the American government state-of-the-art vessel, designed for every type of deep ocean exploration from discovering new species to investigating shipwrecks. On board, engineers and scientists come together to answer questions about the origins of life and human history. Today the Okeanos is on a mission to investigate the wreck of a World War one submarine. Engineer Bobby Moore is part of a team who has developed the technology for this type of mission. The “deep discover”, a remote operating vehicle is equipped with 20 powerful LED lights and designed to withstand the huge pressure four miles down. Equivalent to 50 jumbo jets stacked on top of a person While the crew of the Okeanos send robots to investigate the deep, some of their fellow scientists prefer a more hands-on approach. Doctor Greg stone is a world leading marine biologist with over 8,000 hours under the sea. He has been exploring the abyss in person for 30 years. The technology opening up the deep is also opening up opportunity. Not just to witness the diversity of life but to glimpse vast amounts of rare mineral resources. Some of the world's most valuable metals can be found deep under the waves. A discovery that has begun to pique the interest of the global mining industry. The boldest of mining companies are heading to the deep drawn by the allure of a new Gold Rush. But to exploit it they're also beating a path to another strange new world. In an industrial estate in the north of England, SMD is one of the world's leading manufacturers of remote underwater equipment. The industrial technology the company has developed has made mining possible several kilometers beneath the ocean surface. With an estimated 150 trillion dollars’ worth of gold alone, deep-sea mining has the potential to transform the global economy. With so much still to discover, mining in the deep ocean could have unknowable impact. It's not just life today that may need protecting; reaching the deep ocean might just allow researchers to answer some truly fundamental questions. Hydrothermal vents, hot springs on the ocean floor, are cracks in the Earth's crust. Some claim they could help scientists glimpse the origins of life itself. We might still be years away from unlocking the mysteries of the deep. Even with the latest technology, this kind of exploration is always challenging. As the crew of the Okeanos comes to terms with a scale of the challenge and the opportunity that lies beneath, what they and others discover could transform humanity's understanding of how to protect the ocean. It's the most hostile environment on earth, but the keys to our future may lie in the deep. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 2694017 The Economist
Support to Exploration Activities for Deep Sea Mining : SAGRES project
 
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SAGRES Project is an innovative and disruptive approach developed by ISQ that focus on the conception and validation of an algorithm that supports decision to prospection and exploration (P&E) activities related with deep sea mineral (DSM) resources based on satellite information, and complemented by in-situ data, including CMEMS data. CMEMS model about the ocean physical, chemical and biological parameters together with other satellite and in-situ data are used. For instance, the provision of data on temperature, salinity, and concentration of oxygen, nitrate, phosphate and chlorophyll in sea water at several depth ranges and fairly high resolution grids are important to better constraint and enhance the forecast capability of the SAGRES Project algorithm.
Mega Underwater Excavation - Super Giant Dredgers ( Dredging Technology)
 
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Dredging is an excavation activity or operation usually carried out at least partly underwater, in shallow seas or fresh water areas with the purpose of gath. Dredging is an excavation activity or operation usually carried out at least partly underwater, in shallow seas or fresh water areas with the purpose of gath. ABP's Port of Southampton has now completed a £40M dredge programme which will allow the world's largest ships to access the Southampton Container Terminal w. Visuals Studio Brazil 2012 Director - Producer: Ernst Daniel Nijboer Rio de Janeiro Brazil [email protected] Sur Final Version 20120618 mov.
Views: 768277 Documentary Lab
Deep sea mining!? Leave my down below alone!
 
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Mr Smashing makes a comeback with a deep sea mining disco love song. Destroying the deep sea to get metals for our throw-away mobile phones and other e-devices? Seas At Risk thinks it is better to step up efforts on the circular economy – make devices repairable, re-usable, recyclable. Use mineral resources more efficiently and keep them in the economy loop instead of wasting them. In our leaflet ‘Deep sea mining? Stop and think!’ you can read why we think deep sea mining has no place in the world’s Agenda 2030 for sustainable development. Let’s focus on creating a circular economy instead! http://www.seas-at-risk.org/images/pdf/Infographics/DSM-PDF-leaflet-light.pdf
Views: 7657 Seas At Risk
NOS uitzending over deep-sea mining
 
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Koper, ijzer, goud - deze grondstoffen worden steeds duurder en schaars. Dat is waarom bedrijven zoals IHC Merwede op zoek zijn naar manieren om deze grondstoffen te winnen. De komende jaren wordt gestreefd naar het veroveren van de zeebodem met de inzet van robots.
Views: 1671 Royal IHC
The Clouds Will Clear - Deep Sea Mining
 
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Track: Deep Sea Mining Band: The Clouds Will Clear Visuals: Sabine Füreder & Gerold Brunner (http://www.sabine-fuereder.at, http://www.geroldbrunner.com) Written, performed and recorded by The Clouds Will Clear. Drums recorded by Reinhard 'Bux' Brunner at ATS-Records, Austria (www.ats-records.com) Mixed and mastered by Kai Stahlenberg at Kohlekeller Studio B, Germany (www.kohlekeller.de) Cover Photos and Layout by Oli Hummel (www.hummelgrafik.de) ________________________________________________________ The Clouds Will Clear is: Angelo - Guitars, Synths, Samples Tobias - Guitars, Synths Andreas - Bass Gerold - Drums, Visuals https://thecloudswillclear.bandcamp.com/ https://facebook.com/thecloudswillclearmusic/ @thecloudswillclear Contact and Booking: [email protected] © 2018 The Clouds Will Clear, all rights reserved __________________________________________________________________________________ additional footage by: Mitch Martinez Simon Waldock, https://videvo.net, (CC BY) yasudatakahiro, www.vimeo.com (CC BY) Florian Lalanne, www.vimeo.com (CC BY) Pixeldealer, www.vimeo.com (CC BY) Kiril Dobrev, https://videvo.net Videvo, www.videvo.net
deep sea mining
 
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Views: 75 jmlast1
Nautilus Animated Industrial.mp4
 
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Nautilus Animated Industrial that shows a sterilized version of the Deep Sea mining process.
Views: 26662 Arnie
HUGHES GLOMAR EXPLORER   MINING MINERALS IN THE DEEP OCEAN  MAGANESE NODULE RECOVERY  22324
 
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“Oceanography: Mining Mineral In The Ocean” is an issue of the Science Screen Report, presented by United Technologies Sikorsky Aircraft, that discusses the potential and problems of have deep-sea mining for minerals. The issue opens with shots of the sea, which is a “reserve of global resources,” including metals from deep-sea nodules (polymetallic nodules). These nodules cover vast areas of the sea bottom, and their potential is the reason for a major deep-ocean project being carried out. Deep Sea Nodules can be the size of potatoes, and their porous structure accumulates layers of various metals. They are very slow growing, but sizeable nodules cover areas of the sea floor, providing a significant reserve of metals. As part of the project to determine the mining feasibility of nodules, the first self-propelled robot miner (01:38) is developed and tested. Scientists examine nodules in a lab (02:52), but to answer a number of questions surrounding them, the National Science Foundation uses Research Vessel Melvillle (03:12) to carry out underwater tests. Members of the crew lower sound beacons to create a grid (03:35). Then a robot mapping vehicle is lowered into the water to gather data within the grid. In the control room (04:10), the team monitors the robot’s data. The next step is the collection of sea floor samples (05:08); a box corer is lowered into the water to gather sample nodules, transporting nodules and their environment to the surface. Scientists examine the contents, conduct tests, and record data. The results indicate nodules may grow similar to coral. Next, piston corers (06:52) are used to take out samples of core sections of the floor to add to the mission’s overall understanding. After two weeks, the samples and data are collected, stored, and made accessible to over 50 research centers throughout the world. The next phase involves exploration ship Governor Ray (08:06), which monitors a sea mining research site, and Glomar Explorer (08:22), a surface platform ship (originally built as a deep-sea recovery platform for the CIA as part of Project Azorian also known as Project Jennifer) with an internal dry dock that holds the advanced robot miner. The crew preps for launch day by filling the dry dock, opening the doors (11:00), and moving the robot miner into the water. The robot miner hangs under the ship as pipe attachments are installed, connecting the miner and processor to transport nodule slurry. The robot miner is positioned and the processor is attached to it, enabling the mining operation to begin (12:18). Sonar and TV images show how easily the miner collects nodules as is moves across sea floor capturing images and harvesting nodules, which are crushed into a slurry and piped up to the ship. A commercial miner would be 10 times the size of the robot miner, but the smaller robot miner is the first step in the eventual commercial mining of the sea’s unique nodules. Background on this ... historic film is that it shows techniques used to conduct deep ocean mining of the sea floor, which were pioneered in the 1960s. The potential for this type of mining (particularly of manganese nodules) was never fully realized. Ironically, the program did end up providing the cover for the USNS Hughes Glomar Explorer (T-AG-193), a deep-sea drillship platform built for the United States Central Intelligence Agency Special Activities Division secret operation Project Azorian to recover the sunken Soviet submarine K-129, lost in April 1968. Hughes Glomar Explorer (HGE), as the ship was called at the time, was built between 1973 and 1974, by Sun Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. for more than US$350 million at the direction of Howard Hughes for use by his company, Global Marine Development Inc. This is equivalent to $1.67 billion in present-day terms. She set sail on 20 June 1974. Hughes told the media that the ship's purpose was to extract manganese nodules from the ocean floor. This marine geology cover story became surprisingly influential, spurring many others to examine the idea. But in sworn testimony in United States district court proceedings and in appearances before government agencies, Global Marine executives and others associated with Hughes Glomar Explorer project unanimously maintained that the ship could not be used in any economically viable ocean mineral operation. This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 1223 PeriscopeFilm
Race to the bottom? India plans deep dive for seabed minerals
 
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In the 1870 Jules Verne classic "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea", underwater explorer Captain Nemo predicted the mining of the ocean floor's mineral bounty - zinc, iron, silver and gold. India is catching up with that only now, as it prepares to unearth treasures down below, aiming to boost its economy. The floor of the world's seas is scattered with vast beds of black potato-shaped polymetallic nodules comprising copper, nickel, cobalt, manganese, iron and rare earth elements. These natural goodies are key to making modern gadgets, from smartphones and laptops to pacemakers, hybrid cars and solar panels. As expanding technology and infrastructure fuel global demand for these resources - whose supply is dwindling fast onshore - more and more countries, including manufacturing powerhouses India and China, are eyeing the ocean. Read full story: http://www.thisisplace.org/i/?id=422fdb8b-c6d4-4620-a6d7-1754aca1f9c8 ABOUT THOMSON REUTERS FOUNDATION The Thomson Reuters Foundation acts to promote the highest standards in journalism and spread the practice of legal pro bono worldwide. The organisation runs free services that provide individuals and organisations with vital access to information and services around the globe: free legal assistance to NGOs and social enterprises, editorial coverage of the world’s under-reported news, media development and training, and Trust Conference (http://www.trustconference.com). Read our news: http://news.trust.org/ Learn more: http://www.trust.org/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/TR_Foundation or Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Thomson.Reuters.Foundation/ We welcome all comments that contribute constructively to the debate. We have the right to remove any posting if, in our opinion, your post does not comply with the content standards set out in the Acceptable Use Policy on http://news.trust.org/.
How a Deep-Sea Offshore Drilling Rig Works
 
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After 22 hours, the crew of the Maersk Interceptor have assembled and lowered 551 feet of pipes into the water. Through them, a hydraulic hammer will operate to drive these pipes 131 feet below the seafloor. From: MIGHTY SHIPS: Maersk Interceptor http://bit.ly/2biRHN1
Views: 877164 Smithsonian Channel
Deep Sea Mining Concerns
 
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The group is concerned about the impacts associated with seabed mining. The feel their concern on this serious issue of experimental seabed mining was taken lightly because they were not formally recognized...
Views: 425 EMTV Online
Destroying the Oceans, World’s First Deep Sea Mining Venture
 
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The world’s first deep-sea mining operation will kick off in early 2019 when a Canadian firm, Nautilus Minerals Inc., lowers a trio of massive remote-controlled mining robots to the floor of the Bismarck Sea off the coast of Papua New Guinea in pursuit of rich copper and gold reserves.
Views: 2051 Mary Greeley
Blue economy and Deep sea mining: An opportunity for Africa?”
 
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How to leverage strategic opportunities for structural transformation offered by the blue economy paradigm in the extractive industry?
JPI Oceans: Ecological Aspects of Deep-Sea Mining
 
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In 1989 German ocean researchers started a unique long-term experiment off the coast of Peru. To explore the effects of potential deep sea mining on the seabed, they plowed in about eleven square kilometer area around the seabed. (c) GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel 2016
Views: 2114 GEOMAR Kiel
Copper Mining Moves From Land to Sea
 
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Nautilus Minerals is borrowing a page from the oil and gas industry’s playbook, and is looking to expand into deep sea mining for minerals like copper. Nautilus Minerals is hoping to become the first deep sea mining company, using technology that is similar to that used by the energy industry. CEO Mike Johnston said minerals from the seafloor are of much higher grade than they are on land. ‘The high grades make it a very competitive operation, in terms of cost, ‘ said Johnston. ‘The grade for copper is ten times what it is on average on land so it’s the grade that makes the whole thing work. It allows you to have a tight very compact footprint from an environmental point of view that’s great because we have lower CO2 emissions and we have almost no waste,’ he added. Johnston said copper would be shipped directly to China, where demand is high. Johnston said China is the largest consumer of copper in the world, accounting for about 40% of all consumption. He says he’s not worried about any potential economic slowdown in China and says the company currently has a contract with China’s largest copper producer. Nautilus’ mine is scheduled to be up and running in the first quarter of 2018. At the moment, the company is building the mining vessel in China, which will then be brought to Papua New Guinea, where the mining will take place. Subscribe to TheStreetTV on YouTube: http://t.st/TheStreetTV For more content from TheStreet visit: http://thestreet.com Check out all our videos: http://youtube.com/user/TheStreetTV Follow TheStreet on Twitter: http://twitter.com/thestreet Like TheStreet on Facebook: http://facebook.com/TheStreet Follow TheStreet on LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/company/theStreet Follow TheStreet on Google+: http://plus.google.com/+TheStreet
Drilling The Sea for Oil - Deep Sea Drillers
 
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Views: 28042 Documentary Films
Impact of deep sea mining enquiry- Environmental Audit Committee
 
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Geraint Davies MP questioned Professor Gideon Henderson, Chair of Future Ocean Resources, Royal Society, Michael Lodge, Secretary General, International Seabed Authority and Christopher Williams, Managing Director, UK Seabed Resources at a meeting of the Environmental Audit Committee. Mr Davies enquired about the impact of deep sea mining on marine environments. He was particularly concerned by the far field effects of mining in the deep sea whereby marine pollution drifts from designated mining zones to protected areas of the ocean., destroying wildlife and habitats.
Views: 11 Geraint Davies
More Opposition on Deep Sea Mining
 
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A land researcher has questioned the rationale behind opening more mines when 80 percent of the country's population receives little or nothing.
Views: 382 EMTV Online
Deep Sea (Offshore) Drilling Oil Well Exploration
 
01:44:15
They are virtual cities stuck in the middle of some of the most dangerous seas on earth. Life on them is hard and fraught with danger from calamitous fires a. Animation of deepwater drilling. Drilling wells is one of the most important activities in the process of finding hydrocarbon reservoirs and producing oil and gas from these reservoirs to me. Auxillary Drilling Supervisor, Louise takes us through her daily life onboard the Deepsea Metro I drill ship. Louise overseas the team that make up the drill.
Views: 181240 Documentary Lab
Deep sea robots reveal mineral riches in the abyss
 
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From the safety of their research vessel, scientists are exploring one of Earth's last frontiers – the sea floor – to discover more about valuable minerals vital in the manufacture of smartphones. Subscribe to us on YouTube: https://goo.gl/lP12gA Download our APP on Apple Store (iOS): https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/cctvnews-app/id922456579?l=zh&ls=1&mt=8 Download our APP on Google Play (Android): https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.imib.cctv Follow us on: Website: https://www.cgtn.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ChinaGlobalTVNetwork/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cgtn/?hl=zh-cn Twitter: https://twitter.com/CGTNOfficial Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/CGTNOfficial/ Tumblr: http://cctvnews.tumblr.com/ Weibo: http://weibo.com/cctvnewsbeijing
Views: 320 CGTN
Deep Sea Mining under EU Law
 
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The video is part of the Workshop "Limits to Blue Growth in the Deep Sea" at the European Maritime Day, held in Bremen, Germany on 19 May 2014 organised by World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and the Institute for the Law of the Sea and International Marine Environmental Law (ISRIM).
Views: 262 ISRIM
General Red's Marine Adventure Episode 3 - Commencing Deep Sea Mining Operations!
 
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'Ey up, viewers and vieweresses! Episode 3 of my Marine Adventure is here! Apologies if there are moments where sound and video are out of sync - PC issues! Also, bear in mind that since I am now back at university, channel updates will inevitably become less frequent - just a heads-up!
Deep Sea Exploration Documentary - Into The Sea Abyss - Documentary Films
 
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Deep Sea Exploration Documentary - Into The Sea Abyss - Documentary Films Deep-sea exploration is the investigation of physical, chemical, and biological conditions on the sea bed, for scientific or commercial purposes. Deep-sea exploration is considered as a relatively recent human activity compared to the other areas of geophysical research, as the depths of the sea have been investigated only during comparatively recent years. The ocean depths still remain as a largely unexplored part of the planet, and form a relatively undiscovered domain. In general, modern scientific Deep-sea exploration can be said to have begun when French scientist Pierre Simon de Laplace investigated the average depth of the Atlantic ocean by observing tidal motions registered on Brazilian and African coasts. He calculated the depth to be 3,962 m (13,000 ft), a value later proven quite accurate by soundings measurement.[1] Later on, with increasing demand for submarine cables installment, accurate soundings was required and the first investigations of the sea bottom were undertaken. First deep-sea life forms were discovered in 1864 when Norwegian researchers obtained a sample of a stalked crinoid at a depth of 3,109 m (10,200 ft). The British Government sent out the Challenger expedition (a ship called the HMS Challenger) in 1872 which discovered 715 new genera and 4,417 new species of marine organisms over the space of 4 years.[1] The first instrument used for deep-sea investigation was the sounding weight, used by British explorer Sir James Clark Ross.[2] With this instrument, he reached a depth of 3,700 m (12,140 ft) in 1840.[3] The Challenger expedition used similar instruments called Baillie sounding machines to extract samples from the sea bed.[4] Teleoperated Robotics is one of the safest way to explore deep waters: a remotely operated robot vehicle (ROV) becomes the divers eyes and hands in deep marine environments. Decompression sickness ('the bends') can occur if a diver surfaces too quickly from extreme depths; nitrogen in the blood will come out of solution during rapid ascent, and can cause serious injury or death. Using teleoperated robotics or Atmospheric Diving Suits (ADS), which are human shaped (anthropomorphic) submarine exoskeletons, provide a relatively safe method of exploration, with the disadvantage that the lack of fine motor control limits how much of the environment can be closely examined. Bhargav Gajjar of Vishwa Robotics and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, with funding from the Office of Naval Research of the US Navy, is conducting research into deep-sea manipulators in an effort to create a more sensitive system for deep-sea work. This technological breakthrough is a major milestone in human exploration of the last frontier.[5] In 1960, Jacques Piccard and US Navy Lieutenant Donald Walsh descended in the bathyscaphe Trieste into the Mariana Trench, the deepest part of the world's oceans, to make the deepest dive in history: 10,915 meters (35,810 ft).[6] On 25 March 2012, filmmaker James Cameron descended into the Mariana Trench and, for the first time, is expected to have filmed and sampled the bottom. Read More: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep-sea_exploration Subscribe For More Documentary Films: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAon78w-konzufu-4SixkBg?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 10281 Andrea J. Riley

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