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Toxoplasmosis and Mind Control - Plain and Simple
 
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The parasite that controls your brain... or maybe not so much. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/elsevetchannel?sub_confirmation=1 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Else-Vet/1500749850142258?ref=hl Twitter: Nope More info: My previous video about Toxoplasma biology, cats and pregnancy: https://youtu.be/U9MU-FxsKRg A summary of recent findings regarding the topic: http://prfdec.natur.cuni.cz/flegr/pdf/toxomodel.pdf Latent toxoplasmosis and traffic accidents: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC117239/ http://www.fsijournal.org/article/S0379-0738(05)00601-8/abstract Changes in animal host behaviour: http://schizophreniabulletin.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2007/01/11/schbul.sbl073.full.pdf Prolonged reaction times: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=82691&fileId=S0031182001007624 And the opposite – better reflexes: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0889159113005357 Schizophrenia and Toxo-positivity: http://schizophreniabulletin.oxfordjournals.org/content/33/3/729.short Changes in social behaviour in men and women: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0020751906002864 http://web.natur.cuni.cz/flegr/pdf/Tehul3.pdf http://web.natur.cuni.cz/flegr/pdf/money.pdf http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/per.838/abstract;jsessionid=4AB439B7DA0A2BC24E6DE656A7D3B246.f03t01?userIsAuthenticated=false&deniedAccessCustomisedMessage= Suicide rates in women with toxoplasmosis: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3128543/ Special thanks to Deirdre Ashdown, Jeanette Obal and Lajos Rózsa for their awesome help! ______________________________________________________ Media not created by me: SFX from freesound.org (Creative Commons Zero licence): http://freesound.org/people/cognito%20perceptu/sounds/31676/ http://freesound.org/people/sagetyrtle/sounds/33986/ http://freesound.org/people/UncleSigmund/sounds/36328/ http://freesound.org/people/galeku/sounds/46938/ http://freesound.org/people/uzerx/sounds/60138/ http://freesound.org/people/mrmayo/sounds/77039/ http://freesound.org/people/SGAK/sounds/87564/ http://freesound.org/people/BMacZero/sounds/94121/ http://freesound.org/people/thefsoundman/sounds/118513/ http://freesound.org/people/Sempoo/sounds/125213/ http://freesound.org/people/CeebFrack/sounds/132593/ http://freesound.org/people/Cyberkineticfilms/sounds/135435/ http://freesound.org/people/myfreemickey/sounds/147630/ http://freesound.org/people/videog/sounds/149193/ http://freesound.org/people/kvgarlic/sounds/149418/ http://freesound.org/people/winsx87/sounds/152016/ http://freesound.org/people/klangfabrik/sounds/160002/ http://freesound.org/people/timgormly/sounds/162803/ http://freesound.org/people/Kneedless/sounds/167455/ http://freesound.org/people/couchHero/sounds/168910/ http://freesound.org/people/ninebilly/sounds/173008/ http://freesound.org/people/x86cam/sounds/177769/ http://freesound.org/people/Mixedupmoviestuff/sounds/179222/ http://freesound.org/people/jamesrodavidson/sounds/192365/ http://freesound.org/people/crashoverride61088/sounds/193610/ http://freesound.org/people/martinimeniscus/sounds/199332/ http://freesound.org/people/BlenderDiplom/sounds/201094/ http://freesound.org/people/SoundsExciting/sounds/204363/ http://freesound.org/people/ngruber/sounds/204777/ http://freesound.org/people/Planman/sounds/208111/ http://freesound.org/people/djnicke/sounds/208759/ http://freesound.org/people/nick121087/sounds/232176/ http://freesound.org/people/squareal/sounds/237375/ http://freesound.org/people/Celticvalkyria/sounds/240665/ http://freesound.org/people/audiosmedia/sounds/243519/ http://freesound.org/people/hintringer/sounds/249926/ http://freesound.org/people/lwdickens/sounds/261224/ http://freesound.org/people/gabbermikeg/sounds/266034/ http://freesound.org/people/HaraldDeLuca/sounds/266839/ http://freesound.org/people/jobel0092/sounds/268056/ http://freesound.org/people/Coral_Island_Studios/sounds/277670/ SFX and music from the Youtube Audio Library: 1940's Slow Dance (Doug Maxwell) Bitters at the Saloon (Bird Creek) Brown Bag (Silent Partner) Day of Recon (Max Surla) Into the Depths - sting (Jingle Punks) Pop - SFX
Views: 43088 Else-Vet
Ignored Adult cat Was found by Hearted Man, And he has a better life Now
 
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Ignored Adult cat Was found by Hearted Man, And he has a better life Now. Skimble stray six years cat who was begging food from people and many people ignored him- except one man, the man brought him to local vet . Skimble reached out to the rescue organization called Milo’s Sanctuary. and they agreed to take care of him. Michelle from Milo’s Sanctuary said Skimble was diagnosed with Cryptococcus, which is a severe fungal infection and it can several years before Skimble is free from the infection. The test result was negative, but it still could be in his system. he looks great after months of treatment and he is happy now, Skimble is now part of Milo’s Lifetime Care Program. and he will never live her life in the streets again. #cat #cats #cat_video ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For Any Copyright Issues Please Contact Us : [email protected] ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mypetssite/ Twitter : https://twitter.com/mypetssite Pintrest: https://www.pinterest.com/mypetssite Tumblr : https://mypetssite.tumblr.com/ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- You can download our application for pets wallpaper : https://goo.gl/S24sus ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.mypets.pet/ ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 1434 My Pets
Sporotrichosis Top # 8 Facts
 
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Sporotrichosis Top # 8 Facts
Views: 1783 Ganesha Jignesh
What is the most common infections after a dog bite?
 
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ID: Pasteurella canis is the most common cause within 24 hours and Capnocytophaga canimorsus is the most common after 24 hours.
🔶 SPOROTRICHOSIS - You and your pet can get it (with captions)
 
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References and suggestions: https://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article?id=10.1371/journal.ppat.1005638 - Sporothrix Species Causing Outbreaks in Animals and Humans Driven by Animal–Animal Transmission (Rodrigues et al., 2016) https://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article?id=10.1371/journal.ppat.1006077 - Zoonotic Epidemic of Sporotrichosis: Cat to Human Transmission (Gremião et al., 2017) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3194828/ - Sporothrix schenckii and Sporotrichosis (Barros et al., 2011) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4295339/ - Sporotrichosis: An Overview and Therapeutic Options (Mahajan, 2014) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5674690/ - Sporotrichosis: an update on epidemiology, etiopathogenesis, laboratory and clinical therapeutics (Orofino-Costa et al., 2017) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22682194 - Sporotrichosis (Vásquez-del-Mercado et al., 2012) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25526781 - Global epidemiology of sporotrichosis (Chakrabarti et al., 2015) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30009528 - Sporotrichosis in Southern Brazil, towards an epidemic? (Poester et al., 2018) https://www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/sporotrichosis/index.html - CDC, Fungal diseases, Sporotrichosis https://www.gaffi.org/wp-content/uploads/Sporotrichosis-GAFFI-Fact-sheet-v4-.pdf - Global Action Fund for Fungal Infections, Felix Bongomin, 2018 http://agencia.fapesp.br/sporotrichosis-an-emerging-disease-that-affects-cats-can-be-transmitted-to-humans/25049/ - Sporotrichosis, an emerging disease that affects cats, can be transmitted to humans (Agência FAPESP, Peter Moon, 2017) https://youtu.be/qC655Dr7J5I - Sporotrichosis by Prof Alexandro Bonifaz, Hospital General de Mexico (Leading International Fungal Education) Welcome. This project has the ultimate goal of helping you prevent some common diseases and maintain a healthy life. This channel’s videos also attempt to debunk some myths and spread science-based knowledge. References are displayed in the slides, so that viewers can read full texts. But no reference or video is presented just to be swallowed with bigotry. Perhaps one of the mainstays of science and reason is doubt; therefore, viewers are not expected to accept and agree with every evidence, article, or statement. The comments section is enabled, so you’re free to share your ideas and critiques. It is also good to bear in mind that the research which built the basis for these videos was limited - thus, might have ignored important information - and that science is ever-changing. As new articles are published daily, part of this content may become obsolete or incorrect. Moreover, even recent articles could have wrong conclusions, and flaws regarding methodology and data analysis. Hence, it is always better to consider many studies than to attach too much weight to just one conclusion. Epidemiological studies also have other problems: they don’t distinguish so well between causality and mere correlation, and their results cannot be perfectly extrapolated to people that did not take part in them. Differences among persons (behavioral, environmental, genetic) generate confounding variables that are sometimes ignored. Professionals and specialists can help in solving doubts and in adapting generalizations to a specific individual. If you wish to help translating this video, you can select the gear icon in the player, Subtitles/CC, Add subtitles or CC (https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/6054623). Otherwise, you can use this link: http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_video?ref=share&v=17K2ApGDHBI
Views: 38 Pyrro of Elis
Why Is Your Cat’s Mouth Health So Important?
 
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If untreated, the bacteria in your cat’s mouth can leader to bigger problems causing your cat discomfort or worse. Feline specialist, Dr. Elizabeth Ruelle explains how to keep your cat’s mouth healthy and how to tell if an unhealthy mouth has caused further problems. For more information, please visit http://cathealthy.ca
Views: 397 Cat Healthy
#4 Cat, head dropping (degenerative neurologic disease)
 
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This video shows my 5-yr old cat's head dropping down to the ground after he's been looking up. (It's one of many symptoms of his degenerative neurologic disease). My 5-year old cat Churro is suffering from an undiagnosed degenerative neurologic disease. He started developing balance problems when he was only 2 ½ years old by miscalculating distances when he tried to jump. At 3 ½ years, he was losing his ability to jump at all; his gait started to change into a high-stepped, deliberate gait; and he was having a harder time coordinating his steps to run. He also started having periodic seizures where his body would freeze up for several seconds (I call these episodes "seizures" for lack of another word, but the vets tell me they're not seizures because his body isn't convulsing, he isn't foaming at the mouth, etc.) These symptoms kept progressing, and now at 5 years old, he: • Can't run or jump at all; • Falls over when he walks (see other videos at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIx7YJRxqCk; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KTy5GTH_OI&feature=youtu.be); and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=metywqDtjkA.); • Has difficulty walking and controlling his legs (it's like he's losing the ability to control where his legs go and his back legs are atrophying); • Is losing the ability to perceive distance because his nose bumps into things when he sniffs them; • Has a hard time focusing and his head will bob a little bit sometimes when he's trying to focus (you can see a little bit of his head bob in this video at 18 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=metywqDtjkA); And look how his body wobbles when he walks between the couch and the wall in this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxK9S7pHUDg&feature=youtu.be; • Has seizure episodes where his whole body tenses up, his legs stick straight out, his head pulls back, and his eye go wide and blank for about 5-10 seconds. His whole body turns rock solid and every muscle tenses up. Here is a seizure caught on video (but it's slightly blurry: http://youtu.be/wpV-FchJxeA). There is also a slight example of his body freezing up in this video at 16 seconds(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svnlg2SJo6Q); • Drops his head straight down to the ground after he looks up or backwards, and when he's coming out of his seizures. (THIS VIDEO) and • Muscles twitch a lot when he's lying down (see this video at 3, 8, 18, 21, and 27 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mf0ywEMkZxQ). Despite all of this, Churro is still the same ornery and fun-loving cat he has always been, which is why it's so incredibly sad and painful to watch him deteriorate from this undiagnosed neurologic disease. TREATMENT: Churro has been to three different neurologists (one at a vet school), and several internists to try to figure out what's going on. He's had a slew of tests and has been on every antibiotic imaginable in case it was a brain infection, but the tests were inconclusive and no drugs helped him. The final diagnosis was simply that he has degenerative brain disease (degenerative cerebellar abiotrophy?). I'd be really interested to see if anyone has any thoughts or ideas. TESTS/PROCEDURES: 1. Ear infection (April '12): treated and cured w/ DMSO drops. 2. CT scan (May '12) showed large mass in left nasal sinus and septum deviated to right. 3. Rhinoscopy (May '12) to clear out mass. Biopsy showed chronic rhinitis. 4. Cryptococcus test: normal 5. Toxoplasmosis test: normal 6. Thyroid test: normal 7. UPenn genetic testing: normal 8. MRI and CSF Spinal tap (August 8th, 2012): Brain normal, fluid normal. ANTIBIOTICS/DRUGS: Zeniquen, Chloramphenicol, Cefpodoxime, Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Clindamycin, SMZ/TMP (sulfa-methoxazole trimethoprim), prednisone.
Views: 1691 Susie Lorden
Cat having seizure (neurologic disease)
 
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Here is video of my 5-year old cat, Churro, having a seizure (or muscle spasm?). See his legs sticking straight out, trembling from his muscles tensed rock solid, his head strained backwards. The episode lasted until he's placed down on the floor. These episodes have been getting steadily worse over the last year or so, as his neurologic disease progresses. Sorry the video starts out blurry! *********** My 5-year old cat Churro is suffering from an undiagnosed degenerative neurologic disease. He started developing balance problems when he was only 2 ½ years old by miscalculating distances when he tried to jump. At 3 ½ years, he was losing his ability to jump at all; his gait started to change into a high-stepped, deliberate gait; and he was having a harder time coordinating his steps to run. He also started having periodic seizures where his body would freeze up for several seconds (I call these episodes "seizures" for lack of another word, but the vets tell me they're not seizures because his body isn't convulsing, he isn't foaming at the mouth, etc.) These symptoms kept progressing, and now at 5 years old, he: • Can't run or jump at all; • Falls over when he walks (see videos at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIx7YJRxqCk; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KTy5GTH_OI&feature=youtu.be); • Has difficulty walking and controlling his legs (it's like he's losing the ability to control where his legs go and his back legs are atrophying); • Is losing the ability to perceive distance because his nose bumps into things when he sniffs them; • Has a hard time focusing and his head will bob a little bit sometimes when he's trying to focus (you can see a little bit of his head bob in THIS VIDEO at 18 seconds); And look how his body wobbles when he walks between the couch and the wall in this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxK9S7pHUDg&feature=youtu.be; • Has seizure episodes where his whole body tenses up, his legs stick straight out, his head pulls back, and his eye go wide and blank for about 5-10 seconds. His whole body turns rock solid and every muscle tenses up. This is in this video, and also there is a slight example of his body freezing up in this video at 16 seconds(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svnlg2SJo6Q), but I haven't caught the full-body seizure on video; • Drops his head straight down to the ground after he looks up or backwards, and when he's coming out of his seizures. (you can see an example of his head dropping down to the ground after looking backwards at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNEMBY3feMY); and • Muscles twitch a lot when he's lying down (see this video at 3, 8, 18, 21, and 27 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mf0ywEMkZxQ). Despite all of this, Churro is still the same ornery and fun-loving cat he has always been, which is why it's so incredibly sad and painful to watch him deteriorate from this undiagnosed neurologic disease. TREATMENT: Churro has been to three different neurologists (one at a vet school), and several internists to try to figure out what's going on. He's had a slew of tests and has been on every antibiotic imaginable in case it was a brain infection, but the tests were inconclusive and no drugs helped him. The final diagnosis was simply that he has degenerative brain disease (degenerative cerebellar abiotrophy?). I'd be really interested to see if anyone has any thoughts or ideas. TESTS/PROCEDURES: 1. Ear infection (April '12): treated and cured w/ DMSO drops. 2. CT scan (May '12) showed large mass in left nasal sinus and septum deviated to right. 3. Rhinoscopy (May '12) to clear out mass. Biopsy showed chronic rhinitis. 4. Cryptococcus test: normal 5. Toxoplasmosis test: normal 6. Thyroid test: normal 7. UPenn genetic testing: normal 8. MRI and CSF Spinal tap (August 8th, 2012): Brain normal, fluid normal. ANTIBIOTICS/DRUGS: Zeniquen, Chloramphenicol, Cefpodoxime, Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Clindamycin, SMZ/TMP (sulfa-methoxazole trimethoprim), prednisone.
Views: 23987 Susie Lorden
Man loses hands and feet after dog-related infection
 
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Story highlightsCapnocytophaga canimorsus is a type of bacterium found in the saliva of dogs and catsIt rarely causes infections in humans (CNN)By the time Greg Manteufel, 48, reached the hospital in late June, "my face was all red and blue, and it started going down the rest of my body," he said."My arms, my chest, everything was changing colors," said Manteufel, of West Bend, Wisconsin.Manteufel initially thought he had a bad case of the flu, but in his blood, doctors discovered a type of bacteria normally found in the mouths of dogs and cats. These bacteria rarely make humans sick, but Manteufel's infection -- and how his body responded -- caused surgeons to amputate parts of his nose and limbs, including both hands and feet."Just do whatever you have to do to save my life," Manteufel recalled telling his doctors at Froedtert Hospital in Milwaukee.Doctors conducted multiple amputations after Greg Manteufel's rare infection led to severe complications. Read MoreThe type of bacterium, Capnocytophaga canimorsus, is "completely normal flora of a dog's mouth and usually doesn't cause any sort of significant disease. However, in the wrong place, at the wrong time, in the wrong patient ... it can lead to severe infections -- but very, very rarely," said Dr. Stephen Cole, a lecturer in veterinary microbiology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine. Cole was not involved in Manteufel's care.  Fascinating, mysterious, and medically amazing case files. This series is the most interesting education into the world of medicine and disease and the human body. When the bacteria spread to humans, they do so through bites, scratches or other close contact with dogs and cats, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.In rare cases, patients like Manteufel can develop sepsis. They can also develop a complication, as he did, known as disseminated intravascular coagulation. In this disorder, small blood clots form rapidly and can then plug blood vessels and block normal circulation."The infection cleared fairly quickly" with antibiotics, said Dr. Silvia Munoz-Price, an infectious disease physician who treated Manteufel at Froedtert Hospital. "However, down the road, he developed poor circulation, poor blood flow into his arms and legs."And the blood flow was so low that he developed a process called gangrene. Basically, the tissue dies and becomes blue," said Munoz-Price, also an epidemiologist and a professor of medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin.Doctors knew that they couldn't save his arms and legs. What they didn't know was how an otherwise healthy 48-year-old became infected in the first place. Want to live longer? Get a dogThose at greatest risk are people with weakened immune systems, such as cancer patients and people who have had their spleens removed, according to the CDC."I've been basically [the] healthiest person in the world so far up to this point," Manteufel said. "They said I could have hit
Views: 173 Health & Fitness