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Colorado Experience: Ludlow Massacre
 
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One of the most significant events in the struggle for labor laws in America played out in Las Animas County in the spring of 1914. With the control of much of Colorado's coal mines in the hands of just a few companies, miners grew increasingly intolerant of low wages and dangerous working conditions. Despite efforts to suppress union activity, the United Mine Workers of America called a strike in September of 1913. Over the next few months, tensions escalated as the striking miners ransacked several mines. The dispute culminated in a violent clash on April 20, 1914. Despite this tragic outcome, the event sparked national outrage and led the way of workers' rights in America.
Views: 69627 Rocky Mountain PBS
POWERING THE WEST IN BLM COAL COUNTRY
 
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Coal mining is an important use on public lands and helps meet America’s energy needs. It is a strong economic driver both locally and nationally – for many rural communities, this is particularly true. The Trapper Mine near Craig, Colorado plays a vital role in the town’s economy, providing good paying jobs for members of the local community. BLM staff in the Little Snake Field Office work closely with mine operators to ensure coal development takes place in an environmentally responsible manner. Check out this video to learn more about coal development on #yourworkingpubliclands in Colorado! Video produced by: Jayson Barangan, BLM Colorado
Views: 1231 BLMCOLORADO
Colorado Coal Mining Under Regulatory Fire
 
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Stuart Sanderson from the Colorado Mining Association sits down with host Jon Caldara to discuss Colorado's rich history of mining coal and what lengths bureaucrats - both state and federal - are going to prevent a cheaper and cleaner coal burning future.
Views: 148 IIonKBDI
Colorado Experience: Ludlow Massacre
 
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One of the most significant events in the struggle for labor laws in America played out in Las Animas County in the spring of 1914. With the control of much of Colorado's coal mines in the hands of just a few companies, miners grew increasingly intolerant of low wages and dangerous working conditions. Despite efforts to suppress union activity, the United Mine Workers of America called a strike in September of 1913. Over the next few months, tensions escalated as the striking miners ransacked several mines. The dispute ultimately culminated in a violent clash on April 20, 1914. Despite this tragic outcome, the event sparked national outrage and led the way for workers' rights in America. For more information visit www.rmpbs.org/coloradoexperience
Views: 1201 Rocky Mountain PBS
Coal Mine in Colorado
 
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Exploring a coal mine in Colorado
Views: 1507 West Gaming
The Mystery of Burning Mountain in New Castle, Colorado
 
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A brief history of coal mining in New Castle, Colorado. Narrated by: R.W. "Doc" Boyle Music: Coleman's March (traditional) CD: Paine Trio "Fiddler's Reel" Nate Paine, fiddle Don Paine, banjo Trevor Paine, guitar Video, Photography & Script: Ann Louise Ramsey, ©2014
Views: 13639 Ann Louise Ramsey
Cursed by Coal: Mining the Navajo Nation
 
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There's a resource curse on the Navajo Nation. The 27,000-square-mile reservation straddling parts of Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah has an extremely high abundance of many energy resources — particularly coal. That coal is what's burned to provide much of the Southwest with electricity, and it creates jobs for the Navajo. But the mining and burning have also caused environmental degradation, serious health issues, and displacement. VICE News travels to the Navajo Nation to find out how its abundance of coal is affecting the future of the Navajo people. Watch “Toxic: Coal Ash” - http://bit.ly/1zDaW66 Watch “Petcoke: Toxic Waste in the Windy City” - http://bit.ly/1E2YejO Read "Line 61, the Oil Pipeline That Will Dwarf Keystone XL” - http://bit.ly/18iOKad Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com Follow VICE News here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideos
Views: 198336 VICE News
Explore Wilkeson’s coal mining history and historic coke ovens
 
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It’s a colorful look at Wilkeson’s coal mining history. See historic photos, meet the last living coal miner from Wilkeson, and learn how the County is preserving the historic coke ovens.
Wyman Museum in Northwest Colorado - GO
 
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The television show "American Pickers" visited the Wyman Museum and so should you! Lou "guarantees" that you will see something you've never seen before! All Videos in HD. Check your settings.
Views: 1140 MOFFATCOUNTYPROUD.COM
MROHP Interviews: Joanna Sampson
 
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Joanna Sampson, well known for her research on Marshall, Colorado, and coal mining, talks about her family history, western history in general, and coal mining history in particular. A long-time resident of Marshall, she talks about the area’s residents, the way coal mining shaped the town, and the intractable coal fires that have burned for decades underground. Joanna also was a passionate supporter of the Open Space program in Boulder, and she talks about the founding of the department, public support for it, and the challenges involved in preservation of open space land. This interview, the last of several with Joanna Sampson that are archived in the Maria Rogers Oral History Program collection, was recorded less than four months before Ms. Sampson’s death. This interview was recorded for the Maria Rogers Oral History Program and the City of Boulder Open Space and Mountain Parks Department. The interview was conducted by Sam Bock and filmed by Megan Bowes in 2011. For more oral histories, visit the online archive at http://oralhistory.boulderlibrary.org
Deserado Mine Blue Mountain Energy
 
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Deserado Mine Overview Video Watch how the Deserado Mine an the Desert Power plant work closely together to transform coal to the everyday power you use.
Views: 5595 Connery Benally
EPA releases Gold King Mine blowout footage: 'Get outta here?!... What do we do now?'
 
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On September 2, 2015 EPA posted the following edited footage filmed by EPA contractors of the Gold King Mine blowout of August 5, 2015.
Views: 112139 The HARRY READ ME File
Tom Kitchar - U S  Mining law
 
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Tom Kitchar, president of the Waldo mining district in Josephine County, Oregon, talks about the history of U.S mining law, how it came about, and what it means.
Views: 2791 overregulation
Exploring A Coal Mine - URBEX - Pioneer Coal Mine
 
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Climbed a 200 foot ladder through a narrow manway to get to the small rooms where miners would work. The climb was a little tough, but the adventure was exciting. Was lucky to gain access to the areas you don't see on the tour at Pioneer Mine Tunnel in Ashland, Pa
Views: 348 DD Explores
Canary used for testing for carbon monoxide 1926 US Bureau of Mines
 
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In the early part of the 20th century, miners in Great Britain and the United States took caged canaries into coalmines in order to provide warning of the presence of toxic gases including carbon monoxide and methane. Canaries would visibly show distress and sway on their perches in the presence low concentrations of carbon monoxide before toppling over. The concept of the "canary in the coal mine" giving warning of a human health hazard is based on several principles. First, canaries were found to be more sensitive than both humans and other animals such as mice to the toxic effects of carbon monoxide. Second, the birds were allowed to share the same air exposures as the humans. Third, the occurrence of carbon monoxide poisoning in a bird was quite recognizable to the miners, since sick birds would tend to fall off of their perches and appear visibly ill. An article appearing in a 1914 issue of the Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry provides a simple description of the concept (Burrell G, Seibert F. Experiments with small animals and carbon monoxide. Jl Indust Eng Chem. 1914;6:241--244.): Birds and mice may be used to detect carbon monoxide, because they are much more sensitive to the poisonous action of the gas than are men. Experiments by the Bureau of Mines show that canaries should be used in preference to mice, sparrows, or pigeons, because canaries are more sensitive to the gas. Rabbits, chickens, guinea pigs, or dogs, although useful for exploration work in mines, should be used only when birds or mice are unobtainable, and then, cautiously, because of their greater resistance to carbon monoxide poisoning. . . . Breathing apparatus must be used where birds show signs of distress, and, for this reason, birds are of great value in enabling rescue parties to use breathing apparatus to best advantage. For more on the use of animals as sensitive indicators of environmental hazards, providing an early warning system for public health, read the 2011Public Health Report - Animal Sentinels for Environmental and Public Health (http://www.publichealthreports.org/issueopen.cfm?articleID=2645 ) by John S. Reif, DVM, MSc, at Colorado State University, Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences. This is clipped from the 1926 film by the US Bureau of Mines titles, Oxygen Breathing Apparatus. The film shows the kinds of breathing apparatus used in mine rescues and explains their various parts. A mine rescue team explores a mine, testing for low oxygen content and carbon monoxide. The entire film is posted to my channel. This US Bureau of Mines film and many others are available at the US National Archive in College Park, Maryland.
Views: 10789 markdcatlin
Remember Wilberg
 
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"Remember Wilberg" is a documentary produced by UTA's Department of Art and Art History about a December 1984 fire at the Wilberg Mine in Emery County, Utah. The fire killed 27 coal miners. The documentary took more than two years to produce. While it honors the victims of the disaster, it will also be used as a safety training tool for coal miners. A $1.3 million federal grant that was awarded to UTA's Division of Enterprise Development funded the project.
Views: 30593 USMRA 1
The True Cost of Coal - 350 Colorado Springs
 
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Burning coal has truly ugly economic, social, health & environmental impacts. Time to end coal! Learn why external costs from burning and mining coal make coal much more costly than you may have known! Jim Riggins, Colonel (ret), Air Force, and energy expert with the Southeast chapter of the Colorado Renewable Energy Society will discuss the Harvard Study titled “Full Cost Accounting for the Life Cycle of Coal” detailing how coal and its waste stream costs the public one-third to one half (1/3 – 1/2) trillion dollars annually. cres-energy.org Zach Pierce, the Sierra Club's Beyond Coal Sr. Campaign Representative, discusses the many costs that coal imposes on each resident and business in our community, in addition to providing an overview of the Sierra Club’s BEYOND COAL campaign in Colorado. sierraclub.org/coal Organized by the Colorado Springs chapter of 350Colorado. facebook.com/350ColoradoSprings – 350colorado.org
2018 - Guns & History at The Museum of Northwest Colorado
 
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Dan Davidson, Director of The Museum of Northwest Colorado, previews one of the many reasons to visit and learn about Rural Colorado's rich history.
The Lackawana Coal Mine Tour
 
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A Look at The Anthracite Coal Industry in Northeast Pennsylvania. A detailed look - with news clips - of the 1959 Knox Mine Disaster.
Anthracite Coal Mining circa 1920
 
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more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/ "Lots of diagrammatic animation. Anthracite coal mining. Underground mining shots." Silent. Earth Sciences, mining, oil, etc. playlist:: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=... Public domain film from the Prelinger Archive, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthracite Anthracite... is a hard, compact variety of mineral coal that has a high luster. It has the highest carbon content, the fewest impurities, and the highest calorific content of all types of coals, which also include bituminous coal and lignite. Anthracite is the most metamorphosed type of coal (but still represents low-grade metamorphism), in which the carbon content is between 92.1% and 98%... Anthracite ignites with difficulty and burns with a short, blue, and smokeless flame. Anthracite is categorized into standard grade, which is used mainly in power generation, and high grade (HG) and ultra high grade (UHG), the principal uses of which are in the metallurgy sector. Anthracite accounts for about 1% of global coal reserves, and is mined in only a few countries around the world. China accounts for the lion's share of production; other producers are Russia, Ukraine, North Korea, Vietnam, the UK, Australia and the US. Total production in 2010 was 670 million tons... Terminology Other terms which refer to anthracite are black coal, hard coal, stone coal (not to be confused with the German Steinkohle or Dutch steenkool which are broader terms meaning all varieties of coal of a stonelike hardness and appearance, like bituminous coal and often anthracite as well, as opposed to lignite, which is softer), blind coal (in Scotland), Kilkenny coal (in Ireland), crow coal (or craw coal from its shiny black appearance), and black diamond. "Blue Coal" is the term for a once-popular and trademarked brand... Anthracite is similar in appearance to the mineraloid jet and is sometimes used as a jet imitation. Anthracite differs from ordinary bituminous coal by its greater hardness, its higher relative density of 1.3--1.4, and lustre, which is often semi-metallic with a mildly brown reflection. It contains a high percentage of fixed carbon and a low percentage of volatile matter... The moisture content of fresh-mined anthracite generally is less than 15 percent. The heat content of anthracite ranges from 22 to 28 million Btu per short ton (26 to 33 MJ/kg) on a moist, mineral-matter-free basis... Anthracite may be considered to be a transition stage between ordinary bituminous and graphite, produced by the more or less complete elimination of the volatile constituents of the former... History of mining and use In southwest Wales, anthracite has been burned as a domestic fuel since at least medieval times. It was mined near Saundersfoot. In the United States, anthracite coal history began in 1790 in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, with the discovery of coal made by the hunter Necho Allen in what is now known as the Coal Region... By 1795, an anthracite-fired iron furnace had been built on the Schuylkill River... In spring 1808, John and Abijah Smith shipped the first commercially mined load of anthracite down the Susquehanna River from Plymouth, Pennsylvania, marking the birth of commercial anthracite mining in the United States. From that first mine, production rose to an all-time high of over 100 million tons in 1917. From the late 19th century until the 1950s, anthracite was the most popular fuel for heating homes and other buildings in the northern United States... Many large public buildings, such as schools, were heated with anthracite-burning furnaces through the 1980s... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_mining The goal of coal mining is to obtain coal from the ground. Coal is valued for its energy content, and, since the 1880s, has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United States, United Kingdom, and South Africa, a coal mine and its structures are a colliery... Coal mining has had a lot of developments over the recent years, from the early days of men tunneling, digging and manually extracting the coal on carts to large open cut and long wall mines. Mining at this scale requires the use of draglines, trucks, conveyor, jacks and shearers...
Views: 170 Xiaomi Technology
Hard Coal.  Pennsylvania Anthracite coal mining history. The complete vdieo
 
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Video made by volunteers Van Wagner, Mark Temple, and miners from the Pioneer coal mine in Ashland PA.
Views: 105 vanwags
Coal Mine Xplosion
 
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I went to a coal mine in Colorado for a camp and we saw a blast, so this is my video of it. It's AWESOME!!!
Views: 522 JassBraden
Coal Mining the Modern Way: Newcastle, 1957
 
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A silent newsreel item from 1957 about mechanised coal mining procedures at the Awaba State Coal Mine, near Newcastle in New South Wales. The item opens with shots of miners going down into, and later leaving, the mine. We see older footage of miners underground using picks and shovels to break up the coal and load it onto carts. A pit pony takes the coal away. The newsreel contrasts this with the modern methods of cutting coal from the coalface using a machine. Two miners bore a hole in the coalface and set explosives. Coal is loaded into a truck using a mechanical loader and taken to storage bins by a locomotive. A conveyor belt takes the coal from the mine to the Crusher Shed where it is transported away by truck. Coal Mining the Modern Way, Newcastle, NSW, 1957. NFSA title: 128513
Views: 15246 NFSA Films
World's biggest mine: Inside US coal
 
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Barack Obama’s pledge to cut carbon emissions has not stopped North Antelope Rochelle mine in Wyoming. In fact, production is booming - and climate change is off the agenda. The Guardian's Suzanne Goldenberg gets a rare look inside the biggest coal mine in the world. Subscribe to The Guardian ► http://bit.ly/subscribegdn Get the whole picture ► http://bit.ly/guardianhome ENDBOARD VIDEOS The godless church and the atheists taking the US by storm ► http://bit.ly/GodlessChurch US Democracy doesn't work in this slice of Florida ► http://bit.ly/1EuRyMz GUARDIAN PLAYLISTS Guardian Investigations ► http://bit.ly/gdninvestigations Comment is Free ► http://bit.ly/CIFplaylist Guardian Docs ► http://bit.ly/gdndocs Guardian Animations & Explanations ► http://bit.ly/aninandex Other Guardian channels on YouTube: Guardian Football ► https://www.youtube.com/user/guardianfootball Guardian Music ► https://www.youtube.com/guardianmusic Guardian Membership ► https://www.youtube.com/user/GuardianMembership Guardian Food ► https://www.youtube.com/user/GuardianFood Guardian Culture ► https://www.youtube.com/user/GuardianCultureArts Guardian Tech ► THE GUARDIAN'S TOP 10 VIDEOS Mos Def force fed in Gitmo procedure ► http://bit.ly/1hdvoqM Bangladeshi Sex Workers take steroids ► http://bit.ly/1mqf3fA North Korean military parade in slow-mo ► http://bit.ly/TTEAGk Police assault on Ian Tomlinson at G20 ► http://bit.ly/1rgq6Pg Manny Pacquiao fight highlights ► http://bit.ly/RBczBp Brick-by-brick women's fencing protest ► http://bit.ly/RBcEFc Trouserless on the Tube ► http://bit.ly/SPWOrv Jesus "would have been an atheist" ► http://bit.ly/1kfrKqP Open Heart Surgery ► http://bit.ly/1tPaGQ2 Brick-by-Brick Usain Bolt 2012 Olympic gold ► http://bit.ly/1pxQqQv
Views: 204215 The Guardian
Colorado Experience: Ladies of the Mines
 
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High altitude, groceries delivered by mule train, pack rats and spoiled Thanksgiving turkeys are just a few of the challenges faced by ladies living in Colorado's remote mining towns at the end of the 19th Century. Learn the stories of three inspirational women who held their own while surrounded by a harsh landscape and un-lady-like company.
Views: 13874 Rocky Mountain PBS
"Reflections" Mining History
 
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Mine Safety and Health Administration "Reflections" Mining History DVD509 - 2002 Shows the evolution of health and safety laws and the role of the supervisor.
Views: 27442 PublicResourceOrg
There Goes the Galloping Goose Gold and Coal Mining Train
 
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Get a Complete Hands On History of the Railroad Industry rise through America and Colorado at the Colorado Railroad Museum. Visit http://www.YouTube.com/AboutColoradoTV to see more About Colorado Railroad Museum There's something amazing about trains. The familiar whistle has always promised adventure. The gentle rock of the rails has set the rhythm of our lives. Experience it again at the Colorado Railroad Museum with over 100 narrow and standard gauge steam and diesel locomotives, passenger cars, cabooses HO Model Railroad and G-scale garden railway on our 15-acre railyard. Also, see our exhibit galleries, renowned library, Roundhouse restoration facility and working turntable. Visit the General Store with thousands of train gifts for every rail fan. Robert W. Richardson and Cornelius W. Hauck opened the Colorado Railroad Museum in 1959. Then, and now, our mission is dedicated to preserving for future generations a tangible record of Colorado's dynamic railroad era and particularly its pioneering, narrow gauge mountain railroads. In 1964, the nonprofit Colorado Railroad Historical Foundation was formed to assume ownership and operation of the Museum.
Views: 217 About Colorado TV
Pennsylvania Gold Mining Claim - Colorado - 2017
 
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The Pennsylvania is an incredible 80 acre mining claim, offering rich mining history, and a huge potential for production. The mine produced gold and silver with trace amounts of lead, zinc, iron, and copper. It has a long and detailed history and made millionaires out of many investors prior to 1941.
Ohio's Hidden Mine
 
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This video documents for future generations the important history of the Dessecker Mine Complex – a small scale surface and underground coal mine and tipple in Tuscarawas County, Ohio – and the impressive story of two ingenious and independent Dessecker brothers who built and operated the mine for decades. For the public’s safety, the Ohio Abandoned Mine Land Program is overseeing the removal of the dangerous mine structures and features of what is known as “Ohio’s Hidden Mine". This video creation is a first of its kind mitigation effort collaborated between the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, the Ohio State Historic Preservation Office and the federal Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement.
Views: 98361 OhioDNR
Lectures in History: Ludlow Coal Miners' Strike & Massacre Preview
 
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Full Program Airs Saturday, September 16, 2017 at 8pm & midnight ET. For More Information: https://www.c-span.org/series/?ahtv
Views: 321 C-SPAN
[Wikipedia] Ludlow Massacre
 
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The Ludlow Massacre was an attack by the Colorado National Guard and Colorado Fuel & Iron Company camp guards on a tent colony of 1,200 striking coal miners and their families at Ludlow, Colorado, on April 20, 1914. About two dozen people, including miners' wives and children, were killed. The chief owner of the mine, John D. Rockefeller, Jr., was widely criticized for the incident. The massacre, the culmination of an extensive strike against Colorado coal mines, resulted in the violent deaths of between 19 and 26 people; reported death tolls vary but include two women and eleven children, asphyxiated and burned to death under a single tent. The deaths occurred after a daylong fight between militia and camp guards against striking workers. Ludlow was the deadliest single incident in the southern Colorado Coal Strike, which lasted from September 1913 through December 1914. The strike was organized by the United Mine Workers of America against coal mining companies in Colorado. The three largest companies involved were the Rockefeller family-owned Colorado Fuel & Iron Company, the Rocky Mountain Fuel Company, and the Victor-American Fuel Company. In retaliation for Ludlow, the miners armed themselves and attacked dozens of mines over the next ten days, destroying property and engaging in several skirmishes with the Colorado National Guard along a 40-mile front from Trinidad to Walsenburg. The entire strike would cost between 69 and 199 lives. Thomas G. Andrews described it as the "deadliest strike in the history of the United States". The Ludlow Massacre was a watershed moment in American labor relations. Historian Howard Zinn described the Ludlow Massacre as "the culminating act of perhaps the most violent struggle between corporate power and laboring men in American history". Congress responded to public outcry by directing the House Committee on Mines and Mining to investigate the incident. Its report, published in 1915, was influential in promoting child labor laws and an eight-hour work day. The Ludlow site, 18 miles northwest of Trinidad, Colorado, is now a ghost town. The massacre site is owned by the United Mine Workers of America, which erected a granite monument in memory of the miners and their families who died that day. The Ludlow Tent Colony Site was designated a National Historic Landmark on January 16, 2009, and dedicated on June 28, 2009. Modern archeological investigation largely supports the strikers' reports of the event. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ludlow_Massacre Please support this channel and help me upload more videos. Become one of my Patreons at https://www.patreon.com/user?u=3823907
Views: 18 WikiTubia
Ashland Pennsylvania - Anthracite Coal Mine Tour 2017
 
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Video footage of our tour through an anthracite Coal Mine
Views: 8242 Fugi Man
Packard Gulch - Central City, Colorado, USA. Gold mines and holes in  Historic Gilpin County
 
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Our first flight over one of the richest gold mining areas in history. Packard Gulch in Central City Colorado. Look close at the size of some of the holes down there. Or is it UP there? Phantom 3 4K litchi hub waypoint mission. Reduced to 1080p
ABANDONED Coal Mine Equipment - Dorrance Fan House
 
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►Please Subscribe https://goo.gl/7t6Eqc ►Facebook https://www.facebook.com/JPVideos81 ►Don't forget to hit the like button ►Check out jeffgrantMedia's video https://goo.gl/E4ugMQ Throughout the valley in Northeast Pa there are lots of things that remind us of our history. Especially our history related to coal mining, something that most of our ancestors were a part of. Along the Susquehanna river you can find something very important and historic. This fan house provided fresh air in the mine workings for all the miners. Come see what remains of this amazing place. Enjoy the video
Views: 4303 JPVideos
Ludlow Massacre // Colorado 2009 // Sam Phillips Interview With Film Makers
 
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Was on Tour With The Band Hobo Monk..and as we were driving We ran into Ludlow ..Said a Prayer and this film Makers ask to interview me..then i found out later that it was to become a historic landmark the next day. Funny How The Universe works sometimes........... The Ludlow Massacre was an attack by the Colorado National Guard and Colorado Fuel & Iron Company camp guards on a tent colony of 1,200 striking coal miners and their families at Ludlow, Colorado on April 20, 1914. The massacre resulted in the violent deaths of between 19 and 25 people; sources vary but all sources include two women and eleven children, asphyxiated and burned to death under a single tent. The deaths occurred after a daylong fight between militia and camp guards against striking workers. Ludlow was the deadliest single incident in the southern Colorado Coal Strike, lasting from September 1913 through December 1914. The strike was organized by the United Mine Workers of America (UMWA) against coal mining companies in Colorado. The three largest companies involved were the Rockefeller family-owned Colorado Fuel & Iron Company (CF&I), the Rocky Mountain Fuel Company (RMF), and the Victor-American Fuel Company (VAF). In retaliation for Ludlow, the miners armed themselves and attacked dozens of mines over the next ten days, destroying property and engaging in several skirmishes with the Colorado National Guard along a 40-mile front from Trinidad to Walsenburg.[1] The entire strike would cost between 69 and 199 lives. Thomas Franklin Andrews described it as the "deadliest strike in the history of the United States".[2] The Ludlow Massacre was a watershed moment in American labor relations. Historian Howard Zinn described the Ludlow Massacre as "the culminating act of perhaps the most violent struggle between corporate power and laboring men in American history".[3] Congress responded to public outcry by directing the House Committee on Mines and Mining to investigate the incident.[4] Its report, published in 1915, was influential in promoting child labor laws and an eight-hour work day. The Ludlow site, 12 miles (19 km) northwest of Trinidad, Colorado, is now a ghost town. The massacre site is owned by the UMWA, which erected a granite monument in memory of the miners and their families who died that day.[5] The Ludlow Tent Colony Site was designated a National Historic Landmark on January 16, 2009, and dedicated on June 28, 2009.[5] Modern archeological investigation largely supports the strikers' reports of the event.[
Views: 1081 Sam Phillips
Colorado School of Mines Geology Museum - The View out the Window
 
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This animation, titled "The View from our Window", shows the geologic history of Golden, Colorado as seen through a large picture window in the Colorado School of Mines Geology Museum. The video was developed for the visitors to museum to illustrate how the geology of the Golden area changed through geologic time when looking north from the window. Version 1 was displayed in the museum in early 2006; this version was significantly upgraded with version 2 (shown here) in November 2013. The video is designed to introduce and complement the Geology Walking Trail on campus. Video illustrates: (1) the formation of Precambrian metamorphic rocks (1.8 Ga); (2) latest Cretaceous delta plain and forest (68 Ma); (3) eruption of Table Mountain basalt (64 Ma); (4) erosion of the Golden area (14 Ma to present), (5) White Ash Coal Mine, and (6) the walking geology trail through the Upper Cretaceous outcrops in the clay pits. Video by James Adson, Joseph Rogers, Eric Lobato, Jay Austin, Paul Weimer, and Paul Bartos. A special thanks to Ian Miller, James Hagadorn, Kirk Johnson (all DMNS), and Bob Weimer for their technical input. Interactive Geology Project, University of Colorado-Boulder. igp.colorado.edu
Views: 3390 igpcolorado
Visiting the Hidee Gold Mine in Colorado
 
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USA Today ranked Hidee Mine the #9 best underground attraction in the United States. We toured the #gold mine in the summer and had a fantastic time. A great #COmeToLife moment for our family in #Colorado.
Views: 335 Wayne Devin
Colorado Labor Wars | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colorado_Labor_Wars 00:02:40 1 Western Federation of Miners 00:03:03 1.1 Early victory in Cripple Creek 00:04:23 1.2 WFM builds power 00:06:39 1.3 WFM turns to socialism 00:08:11 1.4 Craft versus industrial unionism 00:09:41 2 Anti-union forces in Colorado 00:11:03 2.1 National employers' movement 00:12:13 2.2 Colorado employers' movement 00:13:41 2.3 Pinkerton detectives 00:14:21 3 Eight-hour day issue 00:16:57 4 Strike in Idaho Springs, May to August 1903 00:19:17 5 Durango smelter strike, August and September 1903 00:20:08 6 First Colorado City mill workers strike, March and April 1903 00:23:34 6.1 Governor sends in troops 00:25:36 7 First Cripple Creek strike, March 1903 00:27:13 7.1 Governor Peabody brokers an agreement 00:28:41 8 Denver mill workers' strike, July 1903 00:32:20 9 Second Colorado City mill workers' strike, July 1903 00:34:36 10 Second Cripple Creek miners' strike, August 1903 00:40:07 10.1 National Guard sent to Cripple Creek 00:42:43 10.2 Military rule 00:50:08 10.3 Plot to derail a train 00:54:36 11 Telluride strike, September 1903 00:57:21 11.1 Telluride inspires a famous poster 01:00:11 12 Strikes not called 01:01:25 12.1 Colorado National Guard ensures its status 01:05:53 12.2 Union violence, anti-union violence, and unnatural disasters 01:07:18 12.3 Explosion in the Vindicator mine 01:12:24 12.4 Hoist accident in the Independence mine 01:14:03 12.5 Explosion at the Independence Depot 01:18:59 13 Deportations and expulsions of union members 01:22:37 13.1 Cripple Creek deportations 01:26:05 14 Aftermath 01:28:19 14.1 Harry Orchard and the Independence Depot explosion 01:34:40 15 Violence 01:36:17 15.1 Independence depot explosion 01:40:26 15.2 Harry Orchard's confession 01:45:18 15.3 Western Federation of Miners after the Colorado Labor Wars 01:47:32 16 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.855956775954254 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Colorado labor wars were a series of labor strikes in 1903 and 1904 in the US state of Colorado, by gold and silver miners and mill workers represented by the Western Federation of Miners (WFM). Opposing the WFM were associations of mine owners and businessmen at each location, supported by the Colorado state government. The strikes were notable and controversial for the accompanying violence, and the imposition of martial law by the Colorado National Guard in order to put down the strikes. A nearly simultaneous strike in Colorado's northern and southern coal fields was also met with a military response by the Colorado National Guard.Colorado's most significant battles between labor and capital occurred between miners and mine operators. In these battles the state government, with one exception, sided with the mine operators. Additional participants have included the National Guard, often informally called the militia; private contractors such as the Pinkertons, Baldwin–Felts, and Thiel detective agencies; and various labor entities, Mine Owners' Associations, and vigilante groups and business-dominated groups such as the Citizens' Alliance. The WFM strikes considered part of the Colorado labor wars include: Colorado City, March to April 1903, and July 1903 to June 1904 Cripple Creek mining district, March to April 1903, and August 1903 to June 1904 Idaho Springs, May to September 1903 Telluride, September to December 1903 Denver, July to November 1903 Durango, August to September 1903Two scholars of American labor violence concluded, "There is no episode in American labor history in which violence was as systematically used by employers as in the Colorado labor war of 1903 and 1904." The WFM as well embraced more violent strike tactics, and "entered into the one of the most insurgent and violent stages that American labor history had ever seen."Page 93
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2004 - Gianella Building
 
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The Luigi Gianella Building, also known as the Aguilar State Bank building, represents the success of a southern Colorado community and its mostly European immigrants to control their own affairs, outside the paternalistic company town model of the time. Aguilar is one of Colorado’s oldest towns. Nestled at the foot of the Twin Spanish Peaks it was first settled by Spaniards who called it the “New Spain.” J. Ramon Aguilar owned the land on which the town now stands and in 1888 it was named in his honor. With the coming of the Aguilar branch of the Colorado & Southern Railroad and the opening of the Peerless Coalmine, numerous coalmine company towns developed. Hundreds of Slavs, Poles, Greeks and Italians came from Europe and became the local coal miners. Aguilar became a melting pot of nationalities with three newspapers, a bank, schools, churches, stores, theaters, saloons, and hotels serving 2,500 residents and coal camps by 1923. The Gianella Building was reportedly designed by Antonio Lo Presto and built of native sandstone by Italian stonemasons. Completed in 1912, It was named after Luigi Gianella, the owner and bank director. The building housed the only bank in the history of Aguilar and it stands as only one of two remaining multi-story buildings on Aguilar’s Main Street. The Aguilar State Bank operated from 1912 to 1927 and was robbed twice in its history. During Prohibition, a large liquor vat made of concrete was built in the basement, where it remains today in silent testimony to free flowing bootlegged whiskey. As coal mining declined, so did the population and bustle of Aguilar. In 1927, the bank went bankrupt and was closed. In later years the building officed a doctor, dentist, and telephone company. The Gianella Building had an uncertain future when listed on the Most Endangered Places in 2004. The original nomination stated that the building was in danger of being disassembled for the stone, which a new owner had planned to use in building a new house. The owner at the time became interested in restoring the building, but its condition proved too decayed. The roof had been missing and the interior walls required stabilization. Colorado Preservation, Inc. helped Aguilar build a support network for the project that now boasts nearly 150 individuals and organizations. Colorado Preservation, Inc. has been working with the out-of-state owner and supporters to develop a future plan for the site. The building was listed on the State Register of Historic Places in 2005. In the meantime, with the owner’s permission and partial funding, the Apishapa Valley Historical Society was awarded a grant from the State Historical Fund for a Historic Structure Assessment, now completed. The assessment presents a preservation plan and a strategy to maintain and preserve the existing fabric of the building. If rehabilitated, there would be more than 6,000 square feet of usable space. One possibility is to stabilize the building as a protected ruin and use it as an open-aired community park. The Town of Aguilar has agreed to take ownership of the building if agreeable terms can be reached with the owner. The local historical society is currently completing a survey of historic resources along the main street in Aguilar. The building is currently listed for sale and the hope is to find a preservation minded buyer who will restore the building.
Colorado Labor Wars
 
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The Colorado labor wars were a series of labor strikes in 1903 and 1904 in the US state of Colorado, by gold and silver miners and mill workers represented by the Western Federation of Miners. Opposing the WFM were associations of mine owners and businessmen at each location, supported by the Colorado state government. The strikes were notable and controversial for the accompanying violence, and the imposition of martial law by the Colorado National Guard in order to put down the strikes. A nearly simultaneous strike in Colorado's northern and southern coal fields was also met with a military response by the Colorado National Guard. Colorado's most significant battles between labor and capital occurred primarily between miners and mine operators. In these battles the state government, with one exception, sided with the mine operators. Additional participants in Colorado's labor struggles have included the National Guard, often informally called the militia; private contractors such as the Pinkertons, Baldwin–Felts, and Thiel detective agencies; and various labor entities, employers' organizations such as the Mine Owners' Associations, and vigilante groups and employer-sponsored citizens groups, such as the Citizens' Alliance. In 1880, miners represented 29 percent of Colorado's working population, declining to 13.7 percent in 1900. Colorado miners were divided into two groups: hard rock miners, and coal miners. Following Colorado's gold rush, most of the easily-worked placer gold deposits were quickly exhausted. Miners turned to hard-rock mining of gold and silver in Colorado's mountainous areas. Numerous mountain communities grew up next to the mines, towns such as Central City, Leadville, Telluride, Idaho Springs, and the Cripple Creek District. The Colorado labor wars took place at the precious metal mines and ore mills. During the same period, but considered separate from the Colorado labor wars, the United Mine Workers of America, attempting to organize the Colorado northern and southern fields, called a strike in September 1903. The Colorado National Guard under Adjutant General Sherman Bell took the side of the mine owners against the miners. There were numerous productive hard rock mines in and around the Cripple Creek District in the mountains west of Colorado Springs. The Cripple Creek District was heavily working class. Many of the mine owners lived in Colorado Springs, on the plain to the east. Mine ore was refined in outlying areas around Colorado Springs, such as Colorado City. Colorado Springs and Cripple Creek were in El Paso County. The miners of the Cripple Creek District resented domination of the county by the mine owners. In 1899, they succeeded in separating the mining areas from El Paso county by establishing Teller County. In late 1902, the Western Federation of Miners boasted seventeen thousand members in one hundred locals. In January 1894, mine owners tried to lengthen the workday for Cripple Creek miners from eight to ten hours without raising pay. This action provoked a strike by the miners. In response, mine owners brought in strike breakers. The miners intimidated the strike breakers, so the mine owners raised a private army of an estimated 1,200 armed men. The gunmen were deputized by El Paso County Sheriff F. M. Bowers, who the companies called upon to break the strike. The miners were also armed, and were prepared for a confrontation. Governor Waite called out the state militia to protect the gold miners and citizens of the district from the gunmen. After the threat of martial law, the mine owners agreed to disband their private army. The Waite agreement on miners' hours and wages subsequently went into effect, and lasted nearly a decade. Video Empire produces videos read aloud. Use the information in this video at your own risk. We cannot always guarantee accuracy. This video uses material from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colorado_Labor_Wars, licensed with CC Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0. This video is licensed with CC Attribution-Share-Alike 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/ In order to adapt this content it is required to comply with the license terms. Image licensing information is available via: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colorado_Labor_Wars
Views: 70 Video Empress
The Coal Vote: Showdown in West Virginia's Midterm Elections
 
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Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News This year's midterm elections are projected to be the most expensive in American history. One of the most notable races, where outside interests are pouring in millions of dollars, is in West Virginia's third district — and the campaign is centered on one thing: coal. The coal industry has dominated West Virginia for the past 150 years, exerting great influence over its economy and politics. Obama’s push to drastically reduce carbon emissions to combat climate change has convinced many West Virginians that the federal government is waging a “war on coal” and, in turn, on West Virginia, as mines close and jobs are cut. The backlash has placed 19-term Democratic incumbent Nick Rahall under fire for his perceived affiliation with Obama. The Koch brothers and other out-of-state energy interests have seized this opportunity to oust Rahall, leading Democratic State Senator Evan Jenkins to switch parties and run as a Republican. VICE News traveled to West Virginia's third district to cover the race between the two candidates as they fight to prove who will be coal's greatest champion, and spoke with locals about coal's outsized importance in the region. Check out "Voters In Colorado and Kansas Are Tuning Out This Year's Election" - http://bit.ly/1rE4mHB Check out "Environmental Groups Target Key Midterm Fight For North Carolina Senate Seat" - http://bit.ly/1wK2X6H Check out "Get Ready For More False Claims By Big Polluters" - http://bit.ly/1G0bLvq Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com Follow VICE News here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews
Views: 144473 VICE News
Life Underground: Labor & Violence in Gilded Age America.
 
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A closer look at the labor movement at the turn of the century via the Colorado coal mines and the Ludlow Massacre.
History of Mining Part 2
 
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John Stewart at Denver Rotary Club, Feb. 17, 2011
GOLD MINE TOUR IN COLORADO
 
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Mine tour near Ouray Colorado 2010
Views: 317 John Ables
Coal Methane Clean Energy Project
 
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Aspen/Snowmass made American business history by being the first company in Colorado to partner with a coal mine to create clean energy. This ground-breaking project at the Elk Creek Mine in Somerset, Colo. generates three megawatts of power annually -- which is the same amount of energy that Aspen Skiing Company uses each year.
Views: 515 Aspen Snowmass
Silverton, Colorado. Animas Forks & Old Hundred Mine
 
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I mention in the first part of this video that I can not say enough good things about Silverton and it's true. A nice little mountain town, exactly what you would expect one to be. The history is worth learning about and a few drives into the mountains are most definitely worth doing. We camped fro a week just west of town on Mineral Creek at a place called Kendal Campground. There are many places along this road to camp for free. The setting is awesome. The Old Hundred Mine Tour is a tourist type thing to do. We enjoyed it. I think the kids really get a kick out of it. Special thanks to our guide Joe who did a really good job. Animas Forks is a ghost town up in the mountains to the northeast of Silverton, two wheel drive passable. It was another really nice trip. From there we continued down a 4x4 road to Ouray. It was a bit more than I would have liked to do but really exciting. I prefer to travel these types of roads with a few other people for safety, since we were alone it was a bit nerve racking. Lots of fun for sure but kind of rough a time or two not to mention very steep in places. The highlight of our trip there was the hike to Ice Lake. It is a do not miss destination, however you need to be in shape for this one, it's long and steep. I have also done a video on that trip with all the details. Credits; Motion Video Background; Backgrounds by Niz.co/ Download link: http://www.niz.co/ Music by Music by Nicolias Heidlas Wings https://soundcloud.com/nicolai-heidlas Cameras; GoPro Hero 3+ and 4 Black, Canon G7X, Nikon 5200 Edit Software; HitFilm3Express
Views: 7241 Dana Hollister
Climax Mine Open Pit Operations
 
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Freeport McMoRan's Climax Mine is situated 13 miles northeast of Leadville , Colorado. This video contains part of a tour which was conducted in August 2012 as part of the mine's Grand Re-Opening. In this video, Climax Mine Operations Superintendent Roy McKinstry discusses the present day open pit operations. Note: some of you former Climax miners will enjoy the points of reference to the former underground operations back in the 1970s.
Views: 5602 LeadvilleToday
The Ludlow Massacre Site - Ludlow, Colorado
 
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Footage of the memorial site on December 14, 2015 The Ludlow Massacre was an attack by the Colorado National Guard and Colorado Fuel & Iron Company camp guards on a tent colony of 1,200 striking coal miners and their families at Ludlow, Colorado, on April 20, 1914. Some two dozen people, including miners' wives and children, were killed.
Views: 562 Steve Ankers