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Tedeschi Trucks Band - Statesboro Blues
 
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TTB performing at the 420 Festival in Atlanta with Brandon 'Taz' Niederauer on April 21, 2018.
Views: 131720 Jackalope
In The End (Official Video) - Linkin Park
 
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Linkin Park's "In The End" off of the album HYBRID THEORY. Directed by Joe Hahn and Nathan "Karma" Cox. Watch the lyric video: https://youtu.be/g9j5UzxEhEM http://www.linkinpark.com | http://LPUnderground.com iTunes: http://go.lprk.co/ml/3pt/ Spotify: http://go.lprk.co/ml/3pu/ Amazon: http://go.lprk.co/ml/3pv/ Google Play: http://go.lprk.co/ml/3pw/ YouTube Subscribe: http://bit.ly/1EBzxN2 Facebook: http://go.lprk.co/ml/3pf/ Instagram: http://go.lprk.co/ml/3pg/ Twitter: http://go.lprk.co/ml/3ph/ Web: http://go.lprk.co/ml/3pi/ http://musicforrelief.org Official Linkin Park Merch: http://go.lprk.co/ml/3pj/
Views: 677445288 Linkin Park
How to Get Into Veterinary School | Tips for Post-Grad
 
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First off, sorry for the blinding lighting in this….one day I'll get my ish together, promise. I'm so happy many of you are reaching out to me about veterinary school and grad school in general! I hope that you guys find this helpful and please comment below with any and all questions! What I talk about is not limited to vet school - it definitely applies to all grad programs like medical school, dental school, and non-science grad schools as well! The video itself is so damn long and I def don't want you guys to be forced to watch the whole thing so I tried to organize the video based on times and what I talked about at each point. Click on the timings below and it should take you to that part. Also, I did a super quick summary at the end if you just want to watch that! 0:58 - Disclaimer -- please understand this is simply my experience. It is NOT a template to follow blindly nor is it assurance of getting into any such program. It should just help you plan ahead & figure things out! 1:16 - da beginning: Basically my childhood and how I figured out the difference between my ‘love’ for animals and my wanting to help animals 1:56 - I began volunteering at an animal shelter/rescue agency when I was 10 years old. 3:20 - I began working at animal hospitals (private practice clinics) in high school 3:56 - Animal experience is important early on - it helps you figure out what you want to do. It helped me realize I wasn’t a huge fan of private clinical practice; I didn't see myself doing that as a job, day in and day out. 6:00 - MOST important job as a high school student = get good grades! Why? I believe it builds a very healthy habit and is a good base for success 6:55 - Also, highschool grades are very important for college and scholarships!!! I personally believe, if you're planning on grad school, you shouldn’t dish out money for undergrad. As long as you're not sacrificing the quality of your education, save money! 7:50 - My college scholarship, how I got it and how it helped me; highschool grades and SAT score 9:30 - Tufts AVM Summer program (Veterinary Camp) 10:09- Most important job as a college student = GET GOOD GRADES! Vet school is so competitive which is why grades are so key. 11:48 - If you’re thinking about vet school, start figuring out all your prerequisites. Do some homework on what certain vet med schools require. 12:47 - Plan ahead! My experience in college - finishing my prereqs early gave me a lot of time for fun. Point of the story? Get good grades! Get money! 13:33 - Research, work experiences and recommendation letters!!! I forgot to mention this, but I also did a few weeks of work with cows and lab animals during college. 15:30 - lol I hate research. Do it anyway. 16:08 - Have fun! PARTY! Balance your life! Learn to work hard and play hard. Have hobbies - good for applications and good for mental health 18:03 - GREs. My GRE score and college GPA 19:20 - The veterinary medical school application process. Which veterinary schools I applied to. My reasonings for the schools I picked. How to choose a grad school that is right for you. 23:35 - Put a lot of effort into your personal statement! 25:16 - Quick summary for middle school, high school, college and veterinary, medical and other grad school applicants. That's basically it. Obviously a lot has been going since vet school started for me (I am currently in my second semester of 2nd year) and based on the response I get from this, I will definitely make a Part II. If you watch this video and are uber stressed, don't be!!! Keep in mind that this is was my dream from day one! Also I came from a family and culture that put a lot of importance on grades and education so I was almost forced (in a good way) to get good grades which made the process a bit easier for me. If you're concerned about grades, don't be deterred. Know that IMPROVEMENT means a lot to these schools and combined with evidence of passion and effort, there are infinite ways to stand out as a candidate. If you still aren't sure about what you even want to do...THAT'S OKAY TOO! There are tons of vet students who took a different path or didn’t know that this is what they wanted to do. If you are late to the game and still want to go to any type of graduate school, you can! You just have to prove your diligence and dedication! If you majored in something else or applied to another field or had a different job, you can always still apply to vet school and get in as long you have the right passion for it and the proper means of succeeding aka hard work! Thank you for your interest! If you have any questions, ask away! ♥ ♥FOLLOW ME♥ ♥ Instagram: niveda108 https://www.instagram.com/niveda108/ Snapchat: niveda ♥ ♥INQUIRIES♥ ♥ [email protected]
Views: 75434 niveda108
Second Skin into Greta - Widespread Panic August 13, 2017
 
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The Peach Festival In Moosic, Pa on August 13, 2017
Views: 1477 Sean Roche
Martay Mattox
 
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Views: 442 GamecockAnthemTube
The Black Creek Band - Try
 
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Blues-Rock at its finest! Official video for Try. 3rd track off our debut EP "Bad Attitude". A montage of our studio recording (17/3/18) and live performance at The Triffid (9/12/17). . . http://theblackcreekband.com
Tedeschi Trucks Band Sugaree Solo LOCKN' Festival 041815
 
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My first concert seeing Derek Trucks at the LOCKN' Festival in Arrington, VA.
Views: 99 Joanne Mitchell
EGO Pro TV - July 28th 2012 - Summer Series Recap Show (part 2)
 
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EGO Pro ~ Recap after the Decatur & two Delano Shows. In this episode, we're taking a look at the Summer Series Matches from Decatur & two Delano shows & who has how many points, and how they obtained those points in the summer series: It's a massive 8 man round robin tournament where the top two point earners will wrestle for the EGO PRO Heavyweight Championship.
Views: 170 EGO Pro
The Great Gildersleeve: House Hunting / Leroy's Job / Gildy Makes a Will
 
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The Great Gildersleeve (1941--1957), initially written by Leonard Lewis Levinson, was one of broadcast history's earliest spin-off programs. Built around Throckmorton Philharmonic Gildersleeve, a character who had been a staple on the classic radio situation comedy Fibber McGee and Molly, first introduced on Oct. 3, 1939, ep. #216. The Great Gildersleeve enjoyed its greatest success in the 1940s. Actor Harold Peary played the character during its transition from the parent show into the spin-off and later in a quartet of feature films released at the height of the show's popularity. On Fibber McGee and Molly, Peary's Gildersleeve was a pompous windbag who became a consistent McGee nemesis. "You're a haa-aa-aa-aard man, McGee!" became a Gildersleeve catchphrase. The character was given several conflicting first names on Fibber McGee and Molly, and on one episode his middle name was revealed as Philharmonic. Gildy admits as much at the end of "Gildersleeve's Diary" on the Fibber McGee and Molly series (Oct. 22, 1940). He soon became so popular that Kraft Foods—looking primarily to promote its Parkay margarine spread — sponsored a new series with Peary's Gildersleeve as the central, slightly softened and slightly befuddled focus of a lively new family. Premiering on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGees' Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where Gildersleeve now oversaw his late brother-in-law's estate and took on the rearing of his orphaned niece and nephew, Marjorie (originally played by Lurene Tuttle and followed by Louise Erickson and Mary Lee Robb) and Leroy Forester (Walter Tetley). The household also included a cook named Birdie. Curiously, while Gildersleeve had occasionally spoken of his (never-present) wife in some Fibber episodes, in his own series the character was a confirmed bachelor. In a striking forerunner to such later television hits as Bachelor Father and Family Affair, both of which are centered on well-to-do uncles taking in their deceased siblings' children, Gildersleeve was a bachelor raising two children while, at first, administering a girdle manufacturing company ("If you want a better corset, of course, it's a Gildersleeve") and then for the bulk of the show's run, serving as Summerfield's water commissioner, between time with the ladies and nights with the boys. The Great Gildersleeve may have been the first broadcast show to be centered on a single parent balancing child-rearing, work, and a social life, done with taste and genuine wit, often at the expense of Gildersleeve's now slightly understated pomposity. Many of the original episodes were co-written by John Whedon, father of Tom Whedon (who wrote The Golden Girls), and grandfather of Deadwood scripter Zack Whedon and Joss Whedon (creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly and Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog). The key to the show was Peary, whose booming voice and facility with moans, groans, laughs, shudders and inflection was as close to body language and facial suggestion as a voice could get. Peary was so effective, and Gildersleeve became so familiar a character, that he was referenced and satirized periodically in other comedies and in a few cartoons. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Gildersleeve
Views: 161172 Remember This
Suspense: Mortmain / Quiet Desperation / Smiley
 
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The program's heyday was in the early 1950s, when radio actor, producer and director Elliott Lewis took over (still during the Wilcox/Autolite run). Here the material reached new levels of sophistication. The writing was taut, and the casting, which had always been a strong point of the series (featuring such film stars as Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Henry Fonda, Humphrey Bogart, Judy Garland, Ronald Colman, Marlene Dietrich, Eve McVeagh, Lena Horne, and Cary Grant), took an unexpected turn when Lewis expanded the repertory to include many of radio's famous drama and comedy stars — often playing against type — such as Jack Benny. Jim and Marian Jordan of Fibber McGee and Molly were heard in the episode, "Backseat Driver," which originally aired February 3, 1949. The highest production values enhanced Suspense, and many of the shows retain their power to grip and entertain. At the time he took over Suspense, Lewis was familiar to radio fans for playing Frankie Remley, the wastrel guitar-playing sidekick to Phil Harris in The Phil Harris-Alice Faye Show. On the May 10, 1951 Suspense, Lewis reversed the roles with "Death on My Hands": A bandleader (Harris) is horrified when an autograph-seeking fan accidentally shoots herself and dies in his hotel room, and a vocalist (Faye) tries to help him as the townfolk call for vigilante justice against him. With the rise of television and the departures of Lewis and Autolite, subsequent producers (Antony Ellis, William N. Robson and others) struggled to maintain the series despite shrinking budgets, the availability of fewer name actors, and listenership decline. To save money, the program frequently used scripts first broadcast by another noteworthy CBS anthology, Escape. In addition to these tales of exotic adventure, Suspense expanded its repertoire to include more science fiction and supernatural content. By the end of its run, the series was remaking scripts from the long-canceled program The Mysterious Traveler. A time travel tale like Robert Arthur's "The Man Who Went Back to Save Lincoln" or a thriller about a death ray-wielding mad scientist would alternate with more run-of-the-mill crime dramas. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_%28radio_drama%29
Views: 125503 Remember This
The Groucho Marx Show: American Television Quiz Show - Book / Chair / Clock Episodes
 
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The interviews on the Groucho Show were sometimes so memorable that the contestants became celebrities. More Groucho: https://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ie=UTF8&tag=tra0c7-20&linkCode=ur2&linkId=468d63b50bad56a2fb92f4f80b0d5aab&camp=1789&creative=9325&index=dvd&keywords=groucho "Nature boy" health advocate Robert Bootzin; hapless Mexican laborer Pedro Gonzalez-Gonzalez and his offhandedly comic remarks; a witty housewife named Phyllis Diller; author Ray Bradbury; virtuoso cellist Ennio Bolognini; blues singer and pianist Gladys Bentley; strongmen Jack LaLanne and Paul Anderson; actors John Barbour and Ronnie Schell all appeared as contestants while working on the fringes of the entertainment industry. Harland Sanders, who talked about his "finger-lickin'" recipe for fried chicken which he parlayed into the Kentucky Fried Chicken chain of restaurants, once appeared as a contestant. A guest purporting to be a wealthy Arabian prince was really writer William Peter Blatty; Groucho saw through the disguise, stating "You're no more a prince than I am because I have an Arabian horse and I know what they look like". Blatty won $10,000 and used the leave of absence the money afforded him to write The Exorcist. No one in the audience knew who contestant Daws Butler was until he began speaking in Huckleberry Hound's voice. He and his partner went on to win the top prize of $10,000. Cajun politician Dudley J. LeBlanc, a Louisiana state senator, demonstrated his winning style at giving campaign speeches in French. General Omar Bradley was teamed with an army private, and Marx goaded the private into telling Bradley everything that was wrong with the army. Professional wrestler Wild Red Berry admitted that the outcomes of matches were determined in advance, but that the injuries were real; he revealed a long list of injuries he had sustained. Other celebrities, already famous, occasionally teamed with their relatives to win money for charity. Arthur Godfrey's mother Kathryn was a contestant and held her own with Marx. Edgar Bergen and his then 11-year-old daughter Candice teamed up with Marx and his daughter Melinda to win $1,000 for the Girl Scouts of the USA; Fenneman played quizmaster for this segment. Ernie Kovacs, Hoot Gibson, Ray Corrigan, John Charles Thomas, Max Shulman, Sammy Cahn, Joe Louis, Bob Mathias, Johnny Weissmuller, Sam Coslow, Harry Ruby, Liberace, Lord Buckley, Don Drysdale, Tor Johnson, and Frankie Avalon also appeared on the program, among others. Harpo Marx appeared in 1961 to promote his just-published autobiography, Harpo Speaks. A much-recounted moment centers around a female contestant named Charlotte Story who had borne eleven children. Supposedly, when Marx asked why she had chosen to raise a large family, the contestant replied, "I love my husband", to which Marx responded with, "I love my cigar, but I take it out of my mouth once in a while!" According to the anecdote, the remark was judged too risqué to be aired, and was edited out before broadcast, but the audio of the audience's explosive laughter was used by NBC for years whenever a wild reception was called for in laugh tracks. No recorded outtake of the exchange exists, and both Marx and Fenneman denied the incident took place. Interviewed for Esquire in 1972, Marx flatly stated "I never said that." However, Hector Arce, Marx's ghost writer for his 1976 autobiography The Secret Word Is Groucho recounted the claim as fact, but Arce compiled the 1976 book from many other sources in addition to Marx himself, who was ailing then. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Groucho_Show
Views: 179366 The Film Archives
The Enormous Radio / Lovers, Villains and Fools / The Little Prince
 
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"The Enormous Radio" is a short story written by John Cheever in 1947. It first appeared in the May 17, 1947 issue of The New Yorker and was later collected in The Enormous Radio and Other Stories. The story deals with a family who purchases a new radio that allows them to listen in on conversations and arguments of other tenants living in their apartment building. According to Alan Lloyd Smith, author of American Gothic Fiction - An Introduction ISBN 0-8264-1595-4, a concept of domestic abjection is one that "disturbs identity, order, and system". This is exactly what the new radio did in the Westcott household. When Mrs. Westcott saw the new radio in the large gumwood cabinet, she did not like the enormousness of it. The Gumwood cabinet is a "dark" cabinet and did not fit in with the living room furnishings and colors that Irene had personally chosen. This cabinet is dark and ugly, bringing darkness into the living room and their lives. Eventually, Irene identifies herself with the object. Another gothic concept of The Enormous Radio is the element of buried secrets. Both Jim and Irene begin to recognize that there is tension in their marriage. Irene had many deep dark secrets that she feels guilty about. She has successfully hidden these secrets all these years until the ugliness of the radio brings up her neighbors problems. Irene has suppressed and hidden her feelings to others and herself for a long time. This is the reason she is drawn to the radio, it exposes the inner life of others and eventually hers. Irene identified with the others in the building as her own problems. It is ironic that the thing purchased to bring joy to the Westcott's life did nothing but cause trouble between them. Secrets revealed are sometimes not able to be handled well. Alan Lloyd Smith also identifies Domestic Gothic as,[2] intimately bound up with the idea of the house, gender, and family, which becomes through metaphor, a way of externalizing the inner life of fictional characters. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_enormous_radio
Views: 189333 Remember This
Calling All Cars: The Long-Bladed Knife / Murder with Mushrooms / The Pink-Nosed Pig
 
01:28:22
The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
Views: 105737 Remember This
You Bet Your Life: Secret Word - Door / Paper / Fire
 
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Julius Henry "Groucho" Marx (October 2, 1890 -- August 19, 1977) was an American comedian and film and television star. He is known as a master of quick wit and widely considered one of the best comedians of the modern era. His rapid-fire, often impromptu delivery of innuendo-laden patter earned him many admirers and imitators. He made 13 feature films with his siblings the Marx Brothers, of whom he was the third-born. He also had a successful solo career, most notably as the host of the radio and television game show You Bet Your Life. His distinctive appearance, carried over from his days in vaudeville, included quirks such as an exaggerated stooped posture, glasses, cigar, and a thick greasepaint mustache and eyebrows. These exaggerated features resulted in the creation of one of the world's most ubiquitous and recognizable novelty disguises, known as "Groucho glasses", a one-piece mask consisting of horn-rimmed glasses, large plastic nose, bushy eyebrows and mustache. Groucho Marx was, and is, the most recognizable and well-known of the Marx Brothers. Groucho-like characters and references have appeared in popular culture both during and after his life, some aimed at audiences who may never have seen a Marx Brothers movie. Groucho's trademark eye glasses, nose, mustache, and cigar have become icons of comedy—glasses with fake noses and mustaches (referred to as "Groucho glasses", "nose-glasses," and other names) are sold by novelty and costume shops around the world. Nat Perrin, close friend of Groucho Marx and writer of several Marx Brothers films, inspired John Astin's portrayal of Gomez Addams on the 1960s TV series The Addams Family with similarly thick mustache, eyebrows, sardonic remarks, backward logic, and ever-present cigar (pulled from his breast pocket already lit). Alan Alda often vamped in the manner of Groucho on M*A*S*H. In one episode, "Yankee Doodle Doctor", Hawkeye and Trapper put on a Marx Brothers act at the 4077, with Hawkeye playing Groucho and Trapper playing Harpo. In three other episodes, a character appeared who was named Captain Calvin Spalding (played by Loudon Wainwright III). Groucho's character in Animal Crackers was Captain Geoffrey T. Spaulding. On many occasions, on the 1970s television sitcom All In The Family, Michael Stivic (Rob Reiner), would briefly imitate Groucho Marx and his mannerisms. Two albums by British rock band Queen, A Night at the Opera (1975) and A Day at the Races (1976), are named after Marx Brothers films. In March 1977, Groucho invited Queen to visit him in his Los Angeles home; there they performed "'39" a capella. A long-running ad campaign for Vlasic Pickles features an animated stork that imitates Groucho's mannerisms and voice. On the famous Hollywood Sign in California, one of the "O"s is dedicated to Groucho. Alice Cooper contributed over $27,000 to remodel the sign, in memory of his friend. In 1982, Gabe Kaplan portrayed Marx in the film Groucho, in a one-man stage production. He also imitated Marx occasionally on his previous TV sitcom Welcome Back, Kotter. Actor Frank Ferrante has performed as Groucho Marx on stage for more than two decades. He continues to tour under rights granted by the Marx family in a one-man show entitled An Evening With Groucho in theaters throughout the United States and Canada with piano accompanist Jim Furmston. In the late 1980s Ferrante starred as Groucho in the off-Broadway and London show Groucho: A Life in Revue penned by Groucho's son Arthur. Ferrante portrayed the comedian from age 15 to 85. The show was later filmed for PBS in 2001. Woody Allen's 1996 musical Everyone Says I Love You, in addition to being named for one of Groucho's signature songs, ends with a Groucho-themed New Year's Eve party in Paris, which some of the stars, including Allen and Goldie Hawn, attend in full Groucho costume. The highlight of the scene is an ensemble song-and-dance performance of "Hooray for Captain Spaulding"—done entirely in French. In the last of the Tintin comics, Tintin and the Picaros, a balloon shaped like the face of Groucho could be seen in the Annual Carnival. In the Italian horror comic Dylan Dog, the protagonist's sidekick is a Groucho impersonator whose character became his permanent personality. The BBC remade the radio sitcom Flywheel, Shyster and Flywheel, with contemporary actors playing the parts of the original cast. The series was repeated on digital radio station BBC7. Scottish playwright Louise Oliver wrote a play named Waiting For Groucho about Chico and Harpo waiting for Groucho to turn up for the filming of their last project together. This was performed by Glasgow theatre company Rhymes with Purple Productions at the Edinburgh Fringe and in Glasgow and Hamilton in 2007-08. Groucho was played by Scottish actor Frodo McDaniel. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Groucho
Views: 54317 Remember This
Young Love: Audition Show / Engagement Ceremony / Visit by Janet's Mom and Jimmy's Dad
 
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Janet Waldo (born February 4, 1924) is an American actress and voice artist with a career encompassing radio, television, animation and live-action films. She is best known in animation for voicing Judy Jetson, Penelope Pitstop and Josie McCoy in Josie and the Pussycats. She was equally famed for radio's Meet Corliss Archer, a title role with which she was so identified that she was drawn into the comic book adaptation. Waldo appeared in several dozen films in uncredited bit parts and small roles, although she was the leading lady in three Westerns, two of them starring Tim Holt. Her big break came in radio with a part on Cecil B. DeMille's Lux Radio Theater. In her radio career, she lent her voice to many programs, including Edward G. Robinson's Big Town, The Eddie Bracken Show, Favorite Story, Four-Star Playhouse, The Gallant Heart, One Man's Family, Sears Radio Theater and Stars over Hollywood. She co-starred with Jimmy Lydon in the CBS situation comedy Young Love (1949--50), and she had recurring roles on The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet (as teenager Emmy Lou), The Red Skelton Show and People Are Funny. However, it was her eight-year run starring as teenager Corliss Archer on CBS's Meet Corliss Archer that left a lasting impression, even though Shirley Temple starred in the film adaptations, Kiss and Tell and A Kiss for Corliss. The radio program was the CBS answer to NBC's popular A Date with Judy. Despite the long run of Meet Corliss Archer, less than 24 episodes are known to exist. Waldo later turned down the offer to portray Corliss in a television adaptation. In 1948 the Meet Corliss Archer comic book, using Waldo's likeness, published by Fox Feature Syndicate, appeared for a run of three issues from March to July 1948, using the original scripts. The same year, Waldo married playwright Robert Edwin Lee, the writing partner of Jerome Lawrence. The couple had two children, and remained married until his death in 1994. Waldo made a rare on-screen television appearance when she appeared as Peggy, a teen smitten with Ricky Ricardo on a 1952 episode of I Love Lucy titled "The Young Fans" with Richard Crenna. Ten years later, Waldo again worked with Lucille Ball, this time playing Lucy Carmichael's sister, Marge, on The Lucy Show. That episode, "Lucy's Sister Pays A Visit" also featured actor Peter Marshall. She also appeared on an episode of The Andy Griffith Show as Amanda. In addition, Waldo reprised the role of Emmy Lou for some early TV episodes of The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet. Later, she was the female lead opposite Anthony Franciosa in the short-lived sitcom Valentine's Day (1964). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janet_Waldo Shirley Mitchell (born November 4, 1919) is an American film and television actress. After moving to Chicago, she appeared in the network broadcast of The First Nighter and played small parts in various soap operas including The Story of Mary Marlin and The Road of Life. After moving to Los Angeles, she played opposite Joan Davis in The Sealtest Village Store. She also starred as Louella in The Life of Riley and joined the cast of Fibber McGee and Molly as Alice Darling in 1943. Her most prominent radio role was that of the charismatic Southern belle Leila Ransom on The Great Gildersleeve radio show beginning in September 1942. In 1953, Shirley joined the cast of I Love Lucy playing the part of Lucy Ricardo's friend Marion Strong. As of 2012, she is the only recurring adult cast member still living following the deaths of Doris Singleton in 2012 and Peggy Rea in 2011. In 1962, she played Mrs. Colton on the CBS-TV comedy series Pete and Gladys, and between 1965--1967, she appeared as neighbor Marge Thornton on NBC-TVs Please Don't Eat the Daisies. In the same year she appeared in Episode 13, Season 2 of The Dick Van Dyke Show when she played Shirley Rogers opposite Bob Crane as Harry Rogers in Somebody Has to Play Cleopatra. In 1963, she appeared on the television program The Beverly Hillbillies as Opal Clampett (the wife of Jake Clampett, an out-of-work actor). In 1966, she appeared in Green Acres as a nurse and as Oliver's old friend Wanda. Between 1967 and 1968, she portrayed Kate Bradley's cousin Mae Belle Jennings on Petticoat Junction. In 1968, she appeared in the Season 1 finale of The Doris Day Show as Mrs. Loomis, a woman who accuses Billy of stealing $5.00 from her purse after she dropped it. In 1972, she was the voice of Laurie Holiday on the Hanna-Barbera cartoon series, The Roman Holidays. In 1994, Mitchell voiced the Sneetches, cousins, Thidwick's mother and Sue the Second Fish in Storybook Weaver and later in 2004, deluxe version in Storybook Weaver Deluxe. In 2012, she voiced her guest star as Betty White in MAD episode, "Betty White & the Huntsman / Ancient Greek Mythbusters". http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shirley_Mitchell
Views: 101054 Remember This
You Bet Your Life: Secret Word - Water / Face / Window
 
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Julius Henry "Groucho" Marx (October 2, 1890 -- August 19, 1977) was an American comedian and film and television star. He is known as a master of quick wit and widely considered one of the best comedians of the modern era. His rapid-fire, often impromptu delivery of innuendo-laden patter earned him many admirers and imitators. He made 13 feature films with his siblings the Marx Brothers, of whom he was the third-born. He also had a successful solo career, most notably as the host of the radio and television game show You Bet Your Life. His distinctive appearance, carried over from his days in vaudeville, included quirks such as an exaggerated stooped posture, glasses, cigar, and a thick greasepaint mustache and eyebrows. These exaggerated features resulted in the creation of one of the world's most ubiquitous and recognizable novelty disguises, known as "Groucho glasses", a one-piece mask consisting of horn-rimmed glasses, large plastic nose, bushy eyebrows and mustache. Groucho Marx was, and is, the most recognizable and well-known of the Marx Brothers. Groucho-like characters and references have appeared in popular culture both during and after his life, some aimed at audiences who may never have seen a Marx Brothers movie. Groucho's trademark eye glasses, nose, mustache, and cigar have become icons of comedy—glasses with fake noses and mustaches (referred to as "Groucho glasses", "nose-glasses," and other names) are sold by novelty and costume shops around the world. Nat Perrin, close friend of Groucho Marx and writer of several Marx Brothers films, inspired John Astin's portrayal of Gomez Addams on the 1960s TV series The Addams Family with similarly thick mustache, eyebrows, sardonic remarks, backward logic, and ever-present cigar (pulled from his breast pocket already lit). Alan Alda often vamped in the manner of Groucho on M*A*S*H. In one episode, "Yankee Doodle Doctor", Hawkeye and Trapper put on a Marx Brothers act at the 4077, with Hawkeye playing Groucho and Trapper playing Harpo. In three other episodes, a character appeared who was named Captain Calvin Spalding (played by Loudon Wainwright III). Groucho's character in Animal Crackers was Captain Geoffrey T. Spaulding. On many occasions, on the 1970s television sitcom All In The Family, Michael Stivic (Rob Reiner), would briefly imitate Groucho Marx and his mannerisms. Two albums by British rock band Queen, A Night at the Opera (1975) and A Day at the Races (1976), are named after Marx Brothers films. In March 1977, Groucho invited Queen to visit him in his Los Angeles home; there they performed "'39" a capella. A long-running ad campaign for Vlasic Pickles features an animated stork that imitates Groucho's mannerisms and voice. On the famous Hollywood Sign in California, one of the "O"s is dedicated to Groucho. Alice Cooper contributed over $27,000 to remodel the sign, in memory of his friend. In 1982, Gabe Kaplan portrayed Marx in the film Groucho, in a one-man stage production. He also imitated Marx occasionally on his previous TV sitcom Welcome Back, Kotter. Actor Frank Ferrante has performed as Groucho Marx on stage for more than two decades. He continues to tour under rights granted by the Marx family in a one-man show entitled An Evening With Groucho in theaters throughout the United States and Canada with piano accompanist Jim Furmston. In the late 1980s Ferrante starred as Groucho in the off-Broadway and London show Groucho: A Life in Revue penned by Groucho's son Arthur. Ferrante portrayed the comedian from age 15 to 85. The show was later filmed for PBS in 2001. Woody Allen's 1996 musical Everyone Says I Love You, in addition to being named for one of Groucho's signature songs, ends with a Groucho-themed New Year's Eve party in Paris, which some of the stars, including Allen and Goldie Hawn, attend in full Groucho costume. The highlight of the scene is an ensemble song-and-dance performance of "Hooray for Captain Spaulding"—done entirely in French. In the last of the Tintin comics, Tintin and the Picaros, a balloon shaped like the face of Groucho could be seen in the Annual Carnival. In the Italian horror comic Dylan Dog, the protagonist's sidekick is a Groucho impersonator whose character became his permanent personality. The BBC remade the radio sitcom Flywheel, Shyster and Flywheel, with contemporary actors playing the parts of the original cast. The series was repeated on digital radio station BBC7. Scottish playwright Louise Oliver wrote a play named Waiting For Groucho about Chico and Harpo waiting for Groucho to turn up for the filming of their last project together. This was performed by Glasgow theatre company Rhymes with Purple Productions at the Edinburgh Fringe and in Glasgow and Hamilton in 2007-08. Groucho was played by Scottish actor Frodo McDaniel. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Groucho
Views: 32230 Remember This
The Great Gildersleeve: Bronco and Marjorie Engaged / Hayride / Engagement Announcement
 
01:29:30
Premiering on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGees' Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where Gildersleeve now oversaw his late brother-in-law's estate and took on the rearing of his orphaned niece and nephew, Marjorie (originally played by Lurene Tuttle and followed by Louise Erickson and Mary Lee Robb) and Leroy Forester (Walter Tetley). The household also included a cook named Birdie. Curiously, while Gildersleeve had occasionally spoken of his (never-present) wife in some Fibber episodes, in his own series the character was a confirmed bachelor. In a striking forerunner to such later television hits as Bachelor Father and Family Affair, both of which are centered on well-to-do uncles taking in their deceased siblings' children, Gildersleeve was a bachelor raising two children while, at first, administering a girdle manufacturing company ("If you want a better corset, of course, it's a Gildersleeve") and then for the bulk of the show's run, serving as Summerfield's water commissioner, between time with the ladies and nights with the boys. The Great Gildersleeve may have been the first broadcast show to be centered on a single parent balancing child-rearing, work, and a social life, done with taste and genuine wit, often at the expense of Gildersleeve's now slightly understated pomposity. Many of the original episodes were co-written by John Whedon, father of Tom Whedon (who wrote The Golden Girls), and grandfather of Deadwood scripter Zack Whedon and Joss Whedon (creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly and Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog). The key to the show was Peary, whose booming voice and facility with moans, groans, laughs, shudders and inflection was as close to body language and facial suggestion as a voice could get. Peary was so effective, and Gildersleeve became so familiar a character, that he was referenced and satirized periodically in other comedies and in a few cartoons. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Great_Gildersleeve
Views: 66022 Remember This
Subways Are for Sleeping / Only Johnny Knows / Colloquy 2: A Dissertation on Love
 
01:29:15
Subways Are for Sleeping is a musical with a book and lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green and music by Jule Styne. The original Broadway production played in 1961-62. The musical was inspired by an article about subway homelessness in the March 1956 issue of Harper's and a subsequent 1957 book based on it, both by Edmund G. Love, who slept on subway trains throughout the 1950s and encountered many unique individuals. With the profits from his book, Love then embarked on a bizarre hobby: over the course of several years, he ate dinner at every restaurant listed in the Manhattan yellow pages directory, visiting them in alphabetical order. After two previews, the Broadway production, directed and choreographed by Michael Kidd, opened on December 27, 1961 at the St. James Theatre, where it ran for 205 performances. The cast included Orson Bean, Sydney Chaplin, Carol Lawrence, Gordon Connell, Grayson Hall, and Green's wife Phyllis Newman (whose costume, consisting solely of a towel, was probably Freddy Wittop's easiest design in his distinguished career), with newcomers Michael Bennett and Valerie Harper in the chorus. Subways Are for Sleeping opened to mostly negative reviews. The show already was hampered by a lack of publicity, since the New York City Transit Authority refused to post advertisements on the city's buses and in subway trains and stations for fear they would be perceived as officially sanctioning the right of vagrants to use these facilities as overnight accommodations. Producer David Merrick and press agent Harvey Sabinson decided to invite individuals with the same names as prominent theatre critics (such as Walter Kerr, Richard Watts, Jr. and Howard Taubman) to see the show and afterwards used their favorable comments in print ads. Thanks to photographs of the seven "critics" accompanying their blurbs (the well-known real Richard Watts was not African American), the ad was discovered to be a deception by a copy editor. It was pulled from most newspapers, but not before running in an early edition of the New York Herald Tribune. However, the clever publicity stunt allowed the musical to continue to run and it eventually turned a small profit. Newman won the Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Musical, and nominations went to Bean for Best Featured Actor and Kidd's choreography. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subways_Are_For_Sleeping
Views: 483526 Remember This
Brian McGinty   Karatbars Gold Review December 2016   Global Gold Bullion   Brian McGinty
 
01:05:55
Get your FREE report at https://goo.gl/dz5njK Register your FREE Account here: https://goo.gl/KZNPYa For More Information Click Here: http://safesoundgold.com/ or Contact [email protected] Its no exageration to say that we are on a mission to change the world! Real money in the form of gold is owned by less than 1% of the population. 95% have no savings At Karatbars we help people save money yet make money at the same time. We help people exchange depreciating fiat currency for 24kt gold bullion in small affordable amounts from just €7 / $8 /£5 with free storage or Fedex delivery. This video explains how you can become a customer or business partner. Both are FREE and the decision is yours. Learn how to start making a passive residual income starting now. Any questions? Get in touch with [email protected] ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I want to give special thanks to Brian McGinty for releasing Karatbars Gold Review December 2016 - Global Gold Bullion. Here are some of my other favorite youtubers and their videos! From Homeless to Karatbars VIP Karatbars Live Presentation 14th August 2017 1year Karatbars Anniversary😊🎉 Karatbars Premium Package Review Karatbars Premium Package Update September 2016 Karatbars Gold - New Brian McGinty Presentation November 2016 WHY GOLD WHY NOW WHY KARATBARS Do Karatbars Sell Real Gold Bars? Karatbars Live Webinar + Q & A - 28th June 2017 TEEN ACIDENTALLY CHARGERS MOTHERS CREDIT CARD $733 FOR MAKEUP ORIGINAL VIDEO Karatbars - Why is Saving In Gold Vital To Your Success? Live Karatbars Webinar 20th July 2017 - Brian McGinty FAKE GOLD & SILVER - Exposing the Fake Silver & Gold Bullion Coming Out Of China Karatbars Explained - New 2017 Why Gold premiums in India surged to a 2 year high Karatbars Complaints And Reviews 2014 Karatbars Complaints And Reviews 2014 Here's My Why. Why Not Karatbars?! Karatbars Gold - Live Webinar - Brian McGinty Gold & Silver Price Update - November 30, 2016 + Next Potential Bottom Dhiggins2830 Mark Daws Dr. Greg Gerrie Mark Daws Viral Videos Elite NWO Agenda Howard Olsen Illuminati Silver Brian Smith Mark Sansom Patricia Cherry iGold Advisor Take a look at Brian McGinty stats and you'll understand why I am a fan. Video Url: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ItZnhFl_LfI Video Title: Karatbars Gold Review December 2016 - Global Gold Bullion Username: Brian McGinty Subscribers: 3.3K Views: 997 views
Views: 73254 Safe Sound Gold
Calling All Cars: Gold in Them Hills / Woman with the Stone Heart / Reefers by the Acre
 
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The Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) is the police department of the city of Los Angeles, California. The LAPD has been copiously fictionalized in numerous movies, novels and television shows throughout its history. The department has also been associated with a number of controversies, mainly concerned with racial animosity, police brutality and police corruption. The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
Views: 42525 Remember This

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