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A-1 SKYRAIDER "FLYING DUMPTRUCK" / "SANDY" S.A.R. MISSION IN VIETNAM  74222E
 
05:09
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm This segment of "Air Force Now" features the A-1 Skyraider in action inVietnam with the First Special Operations Squadron also known as the "Hobos". In this instance the Skyraider is seen flying cover for "Jolly Green Giant" rescue helicopters performing search and rescue operations. As American involvement in the Vietnam War began, the A-1 Skyraider was still the medium attack aircraft in many carrier air wings, although it was planned to be replaced by the A-6A Intruder as part of the general switch to jet aircraft. Skyraiders from Constellation and Ticonderoga participated in the first U.S. Navy strikes against North Vietnam on 5 August 1964 as part of Operation Pierce Arrow in response to the Gulf of Tonkin Incident, striking against fuel depots at Vinh, with one Skyraider from Ticonderoga damaged by anti-aircraft fire, and a second from Constellation shot down, killing its pilot. As they were released from U.S. Navy service, Skyraiders were introduced into the South Vietnamese Air Force (VNAF). They were also used by the USAF to perform one of the Skyraider's most famous roles: the "Sandy" helicopter escort on combat rescues. USAF Major Bernard F. Fisher piloted an A-1E on 10 March 1966 mission for which he was awarded the Medal of Honor for rescuing Major "Jump" Myers at A Shau Special Forces Camp. USAF Colonel William A. Jones, III piloted an A-1H on 1 September 1968 mission for which he was awarded the Medal of Honor. In that mission, despite damage to his aircraft and suffering serious burns, he returned to his base and reported the position of a downed U.S. airman. After November 1972, all A-1s in U.S. service in Southeast Asia were transferred to the South Vietnamese Air Force (VNAF) and their roles taken over by the subsonic LTV A-7 Corsair II. The Skyraider in Vietnam pioneered the concept of tough, survivable aircraft with long loiter times and large ordnance loads. The USAF lost 201 Skyraiders to all causes in Southeast Asia, while the Navy lost 65 to all causes. Of the 266 lost A-1s, five were shot down by surface-to-air missiles (SAMs), and three were shot down in air-to-air combat; two by North Vietnamese MiG-17s. In contrast to the Korean War, fought a decade earlier, the U.S. Air Force used the naval A-1 Skyraider for the first time in Vietnam. As the Vietnam War progressed, USAF A-1s were painted in camouflage, while USN A-1 Skyraiders were gray/white in color; again, in contrast to the Korean War, when A-1s were painted dark blue. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 350781 PeriscopeFilm
FDR DECLARES WAR (12/8/41) - Franklin Delano Roosevelt , WWII , Infamy Speech , 24400
 
08:00
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm The Presidential Address to Congress on December 8, 1941. Known as the Infamy Speech, it was delivered at 12:30 p.m. that day to a Joint Session of Congress by United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt, one day after the Empire of Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor Naval Base, Hawaii. Roosevelt famously describes the previous day as "a date which will live in infamy." Within an hour of the speech, Congress passed a formal declaration of war against Japan and officially brought the U.S. into World War II. The address is regarded as one of the most famous American political speeches of the 20th century. This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 910214 PeriscopeFilm
1950s LUMBERJACK & LUMBER INDUSTRY FILM  "TREEPTOP DARDEVILS" 55174
 
08:53
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm The Monty Python song "I'm a lumberjack..." might have been inspired by this wonderful film from 1953 "Treetop Daredevils", shot in the Pacific Northwest. The film shows lumberjacks and axemen working in an era before power tools were brought to bear on the forest, and almost everything was done by muscle. In addition to showing the cutting down of old growth forest logs and their floating down the river, the film includes a lengthy segment (starting at 5:30) showing lumberjack games and sports, including climbing a tree and taking the top off, tree climbing races, log hurtling, throwing axes shaving with an axe, etc. Despite the mocking commentary it provides insight into a lost era in American logging. At 4:00 an actual logjam is shown, and the threat of forest fire is also seen at 4:55, with lumberjacks working on the fire lines to contain the blaze. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 180947 PeriscopeFilm
WWII CHUCK JONES CARTOON  "POINT RATIONING OF FOODS"  77354
 
06:19
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm Made in 1943 and animated by Chuck Jones under the Leon Schlesinger Unit, this very serious animated documentary short film demonstrating the reasons and methods of the point system of wartime food rationing. In the face of wartime demands and agricultural personnel shortages during World War II, food rationing was necessary. This film explains the US Government's answer of of these wartime realities, point based rationing. Furthermore, the system's application is illustrated as we follow a typical grocery shopper at the store who learns to use it in her favor. Ask anyone who remembers life on the Home Front during WWII about their strongest memories and chances are they will tell you about rationing. WWII caused shortages of all sorts of things: rubber, metal, clothing, etc. But it was the shortages of various types of food that effected just about everyone on a daily basis. Food was in short supply for a variety of reasons: much of the processed and canned foods was reserved for shipping overseas to our military and our Allies; transportation of fresh foods was limited due to gasoline and tire rationing and the priority of transporting soldiers and war supplies instead of food; imported foods, like coffee and sugar, was limited due to restrictions on importing. Because of these shortages, the U.S. government’s Office of Price Administration established a system of rationing that would more fairly distribute foods that were in short supply. Every American was issued a series of ration books during the war. The ration books contained removable stamps good for certain rationed items, like sugar, meat, cooking oil, and canned goods. A person could not buy a rationed item without also giving the grocer the right ration stamp. Once a person’s ration stamps were used up for a month, she couldn’t buy any more of that type of food. This meant planning meals carefully, being creative with menus, and not wasting food. More than 8,000 ration boards across the country administered the program. The Office of Price Administration (OPA) was established within the Office for Emergency Management of the United States government by Executive Order 8875 on August 28, 1941. The functions of the OPA were originally to control money (price controls) and rents after the outbreak of World War II. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 39432 PeriscopeFilm
AFTERMATH OF PEARL HARBOR ATTACK & DECLASSIFIED FOOTAGE RELEASED IN 1942   23582
 
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Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm Stock footage note: some portions of this film may not be licensable. Please contact us prior to use for more information. Narrated by Lowell Thomas, this WWII propaganda newsreel purports to show previously classified footage of the aftermath of the Pearl Harbor attack, including shots of the crippled USS Arizona. It also shows the salvage of the battleship West Virginia in Pearl Harbor. The battleship USS California, as well as USS Nevada, USS Maryland, USS Oklahoma and mine layer USS Oglala is also shown, as well as wreckage of sea planes and aircraft on Ford Island. The film also features and celebrates Al Brick, the veteran Movietone Newsreel cameraman who was at sea with the Pacific Fleet in 1940-41, and who filmed the Japanese attack. It was by all rights got the "scoop of the war" for the American press. Fox Movietone News released this single-subject newsreel on December 7th, 1942 to celebrate the work of Brick and show the full extent of Japanese treachery to an already engaged and outraged American public. The film was then quickly mass-produced by the U.S. Government and shown far and wide for propaganda purposes as part of the Army-Navy Newsmagazine of the Screen. A short time later "Life" magazine printed frame enlargements from Brick's film as part of its anniversary article on the subject. The film ends with footage of the U.S. fleet attacking the Japanese in the Solomon Islands. Much of the footage shown in this film was utilized in WWII American propaganda films including John Ford's famous "December 7th" which featured almost every shot seen in the film prior to the 5 minute mark. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 148100 PeriscopeFilm
CHEVROLET 1950s HEAVY TRUCK FILM HEADING UP THE HEAVY DUTIES  88854
 
05:46
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm One of a series of films made for General Motors by the Jam Handy Organization, 1949's "Heading up the Heavy Duties" shows the Chevy heavy duty trucks of the 1950s, built to "carry the load". These trucks (according to the film) were more efficient and heavier duty than their competitors thanks to design innovations affiliated with the frame, suspension, and power train. Some interesting Chevy heavy trucks are seen including cab over designs. Chevrolet's first major redesign post-World War II, the Advance-Design series trucks were billed as a bigger, stronger, and sleeker design in comparison to the earlier AK Series. First available on Saturday June 28, 1947, these trucks were sold with various minor changes over the years until March 25, 1955, when the Task Force Series trucks replaced the aging Advance-Design model. The same basic design family was used for all of its trucks including the Suburban, panel trucks, canopy express and cab overs. The cab overs used the same basic cab configuration and similar grille but used a shorter and taller hood and different fenders. The unique Cab Over fenders and hood required a custom cowl area which makes the Cab Over Engine cabs and normal truck cabs incompatible with one another while all truck cabs of all weights interchange. From 1947 until 1955, Chevrolet trucks were number one in sales in the United States, with rebranded versions sold at GMC locations. While General Motors used this front end sheet metal, and to a slightly lesser extent the cab, on all of its trucks except for the Cab Overs, there are three main sizes of this truck: the half-, three-quarter-, and full ton capacities in short and long wheelbase. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 23728 PeriscopeFilm
ASSEMBLING THE APOLLO SPACECRAFT & SATURN V ROCKET for MOON MISSIONS 79964
 
05:50
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm Made during the Apollo program, “Assembling Apollo” is an official NASA film produced circa 1968 that tracks the numerous pieces used to create the rockets and spacecrafts that took man to the moon. The film opens with the various parts being brought to the Kennedy Space Center via all sorts of airplane, ship, and vehicle, as engineers carefully assemble the various stages of the Saturn V rocket. Workers attach communication and fuel lines at mark 02:10, and at mark 03:15 put the “brains” of the rocket — the instrument unit — in place. Starting mark 03:35, the film checks in on the assembly of the lunar spacecraft (including the lunar module, service module, and command module) in the Command Spacecraft Operations Building at NASA before showing it lifted atop the waiting Saturn V at mark 04:40. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 31261 PeriscopeFilm
UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD BIG BOY STEAM LOCOMOTIVE FILM  71522
 
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Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm A tribute to the "Big Boy" locomotives produced by Union Pacific, "Last of the Giants" shows the end of a memorable era in Western Railroading. The "Big Boy" is the popular name of the American Locomotive Company 4000-class 4-8-8-4 articulated, coal-fired, steam locomotives manufactured between 1941 and 1944 and operated by the Union Pacific Railroad until 1959. In "Last of the Giants" you'll see the development of steam power on the Union Pacific from 4-6-0s, 2-8-0s, and 2-8-2s up to 2-10-2s and even 4-12-2s, shown through film, photos and animated diagrams. This is followed by the development of compound articulated Mallets and simple articulateds such as the Challengers. The Big Boy fleet of twenty five locomotives were used primarily in the Wyoming Division to haul freight over the Wasatch mountains between Green River, Wyoming and Ogden, Utah. They were the only locomotives to use a 4-8-8-4 wheel arrangement consisting of a four-wheel leading truck for stability entering curves, two sets of eight driving wheels, and a four-wheel trailing truck to support the large firebox. According to Union Pacific senior manager of Heritage Operations Ed Dickens Jr., the 4-8-8-4 series originally was to have been called "Wasatch". One day while one of the engines was being built an unknown worker scrawled "Big Boy" in chalk on its front. With that, the legendary name was born, and has stuck ever since. Measuring 132 feet long and weighing one and one-quarter million pounds, the Big Boys were appropriately named. These were the largest and heaviest of their type and could pull a loaded 5-1/2 mile long train on level track. Their tenders carried a massive 28 tons of coal and 25,000 gallons of water; and with a heavy train a Big Boy could use all of this up in the first half of a 57-mile rum. Although there were only 25 Big Boys ever built, they ran up a total of nearly 26 million miles in 18 years, hauling billions of tons. This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2K. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 590538 PeriscopeFilm
HISTORY OF OSHKOSH TRUCKS  Fire engines, military and rescue vehicles 3390
 
07:40
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm Made in the 1980s, this industrial film shows the history of Oshkosh Trucks and many of the models in production in that decade. Oshkosh Corporation, formerly Oshkosh Truck, is an American industrial company that designs and builds specialty trucks and truck bodies and access equipment. Based in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, the company employs 12,300 people around the world. It is organized in four primary business groups: access equipment, defense, fire and emergency, and commercial. Founded in 1917 as the Wisconsin Duplex Auto Company, the company was created to build a severe-duty four-wheel-drive truck. After the first prototype was built, the company began to develop rapidly. This first four-wheel-drive truck, known today as "Old Betsy", is still owned by Oshkosh Corporation and housed in one of its assembly plants in Oshkosh. The vehicle still runs and is used frequently in demonstrations and parades. This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 132602 PeriscopeFilm
TORONTO CANADA WWII STREET SCENES HOME MOVIE 72672
 
04:20
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm This silent home movie dates to 1943 and shows street scenes in Toronto, Canada. At the 1:19:00 mark you will see various buildings adorned with patriotic flags and bunting, and you will also note the lack of car traffic. During the war emphasis was put on the use of public transportation including the trolley cars seen in many shots in this film. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 76056 PeriscopeFilm
LUFTWAFFE FW-190 and BF-110 FIGHTER KILLS  GUN CAMERA FILMS 1944 43724
 
09:26
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm This silent compilation of German gun camera footage, shot in June of 1944, shows fighter aircraft including the Fw-190, Bf-110s attacking American B-24 Liberators and Boeing B-18s. At 4:50, footage is seen of a dogfight between a P-51 Mustang and an Fw-190. Some of the footage is quite spectacular but nothing compares to the last piece of footage, showing a Bf-110 coming in close for the kill on a B-17. Apparently the B-17 tail gunner and possibly the ball turret gunner were both incapacitated by the Bf-110's initial assault, allowing the fighter to come in close and decimate the airplane. Note that the ball turret's cannons are facing downwards and not moving in the final moments of the film. Gun cameras are cameras used primarily in aircraft to help measure tactical effectiveness. These cameras are triggered by the firing of a weapon, hence the name. The use of gun cameras first became common for gunnery training in the 1920s though examples were used during World War I by the British Royal Flying Corps. A special version of the standard Lewis Machine gun was manufactured as a Camera Gun. During World War II, gun cameras were commonly used on operational aircraft to record kills of enemy aircraft. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 353067 PeriscopeFilm
1920s HOLLYWOOD CALIFORNIA  & HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD HOLLYWOODLAND TRAVELOGUE  76894
 
05:27
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm This silent travelogue shows Los Angeles and Hollywood in the late 1920s or early 30s, with shots of Hollywood Blvd., Grauman's Chinese Theater, the Hollywoodland sign (now the Hollywood sign), El Capitan Theater, First National Bank building, the Hotel Hollywood, Grauman's Egyptian Theater, the Warner Brothers' Famous Theater, Hotel Roosevelt, and more. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 31713 PeriscopeFilm
1936 VOYAGE AROUND CAPE HORN BY SCHOONER WANDERBIRD  31014
 
09:43
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm Produced in 1936, this wonderful old film shows a voyage aboard a schooner named Wanderbird around South America. The captain of this vessel is Warwick M. Tompkins of Gloucester, Massachusetts, who later wrote a book about the journey entitled "50 South to 50 South". For decades, the book has inspired many to seek out their own nautical adventures. The film is rich in imagery of the age of sail, including shots of sailors at work, Gloucester harbor, a woman at the helm of the vessel, a massive storm, becalmed, images of the Altantic and Pacific Oceans, and the Golden Gate Bridge and San Francisco Bay. Incidentally, you can find a amazing documentary based on this film at: http://lifeonthewater.us/cape-horn-passage-in-schooner-wander-bird.html We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 128897 PeriscopeFilm
1951 CHEVROLET AUTOMOBILE AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION PROMOTIONAL FILM 78424
 
11:20
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm This 1951 Chevrolet promotional film THE VELVET GLOVE, promotes the new PowerGlide automatic transmission, first introduced in 1950. The automatic transmission, which removes the friction clutch from the driver's hands, is thoroughly explained through the use of models and a "mechanical hand" in a "velvet glove." The Powerglide is a two-speed automatic transmission designed by General Motors. It was available primarily on Chevrolet from January 1950 through 1973, although some Pontiac models also used this automatic transmission after the fire at the Hydra-Matic factory in 1953. Powerglides were used extensively on Pontiacs produced for the Canadian market with Chevrolet powertrains. When introduced on upper-level Chevrolet models in 1950, the Powerglide represented the first automatic transmission offered in a low-priced automobile; in contrast, Ford did not offer their automatic transmission until 1951, while Plymouth car buyers had to wait until 1954. The transmission was simple and very durable, which satisfied customers. The 1950, 1951, and 1952 Powerglide transmissions did not automatically shift between low and high (direct drive) which made for very sluggish take-offs and many drivers started in "Low" and shifted to "Drive" at about 30–40 mph (48–64 km/h), which was hard on the transmission. The 1953 and later units when in "Drive" started in low and automatically up shifted to high at a speed determined by the throttle opening. By the mid-1950s, more than half of all new Chevrolets were sold with Powerglide. This film was made by the Jam Handy Corp., makers of some of the most famous industrial films of the 20th Century. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 38471 PeriscopeFilm
THE LIFE AND DEATH OF THE USS HORNET PART 1 2122
 
09:22
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm Attention! A new complete version of this film is now available at: http://youtu.be/ZJ5MS7lFJSg One of the U.S. Navy's industrial incentive films, the Life and Death of the USS Hornet traces the valiant career of CV-8. Footage includes the launching of the Doolittle Raider B-25s on their mission to strike Tokyo in 1942, including White House reaction by President Roosevelt that the planes came from "Shangri-La." Also on this film, is footage of the ill-fated Torpedo 8 Squadron which was sacrificed at the Battle of Midway. The carrier USS Hornet was sunk during the Battle of Santa Cruz, and the film ends with the launch of a "new" Hornet CV-12. This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 109115 PeriscopeFilm
HOW AN OIL REFINERY WORKS   SHELL OIL HISTORIC FILM 71862
 
21:04
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm Made in the 1950s by the Shell Oil Company, "Refinery Process" goes behind the scenes at a huge oil refinery to show how crude oil is transformed into finished products. The film uses a combination of animation and live-action to present the story in a simple and entertaining style, how crude oil is separated into major fractions or "cuts". It then describes how complicated molecules are "cracked" into simpler molecules of the lighter, more valuable products by the application of heat and pressure. This film is one of a series made by Shell as part of its public relations efforts. All the films in the series are well-made and use innovative techniques for their time. The company spent over $1 million dollars in the 1950s -- roughly $10 million in today's world -- on its film library. An oil refinery or petroleum refinery is an industrial process plant where crude oil is processed and refined into more useful products such as petroleum naphtha, gasoline, diesel fuel, asphalt base, heating oil, kerosene and liquefied petroleum gas. Oil refineries are typically large, sprawling industrial complexes with extensive piping running throughout, carrying streams of fluids between large chemical processing units. In many ways, oil refineries use much of the technology of, and can be thought of, as types of chemical plants. The crude oil feedstock has typically been processed by an oil production plant. There is usually an oil depot (tank farm) at or near an oil refinery for the storage of incoming crude oil feedstock as well as bulk liquid products. An oil refinery is considered an essential part of the downstream side of the petroleum industry. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 209339 PeriscopeFilm
M47 PATTON TANK PLANETARY GEARS PRINCIPLES AND OPERATION 85464
 
17:59
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm A U.S. Army training film circa 1953, the first of a two part instructional video describing the advancements of planetary gears (used in the newer tanks such as the M47 Patton) as compared to the older system used on such tanks as the M-4 Sherman. A technician demonstrates the principles of operation governing multiple sets, while a narrator gives a short review of how the planet-carrier gears work. Features original footage of tanks performing tests and exercises as well as the demonstration on a planetary gear model. This video was mainly used to instruct tank drivers during the Korean War about their vehicles and its gear mechanisms. The M47 Patton is the second American tank to be named after General George S. Patton, commander of the U.S. Third Army during World War II and one of the earliest American advocates of tanks in battle. It was a development of the M46 Patton tank mounting an updated turret, and was in turn further developed as the M48 Patton. An epicyclic gear train consists of two gears mounted so that the center of one gear revolves around the center of the other. A carrier connects the centers of the two gears and rotates to carry one gear, called the planet gear, around the other, called the sun gear. The planet and sun gears mesh so that their pitch circles roll without slip. A point on the pitch circle of the planet gear traces an epicycloid curve. In this simplified case, the sun gear is fixed and the planetary gear(s) roll around the sun gear. An epicyclic gear train can be assembled so the planet gear rolls on the inside of the pitch circle of a fixed, outer gear ring, or ring gear, called an annular gear. In this case, the curve traced by a point on the pitch circle of the planet is a hypocycloid. The combination of epicycle gear trains with a planet engaging both a sun gear and an annular gear is called a planetary gear train In this case, the annular gear is usually fixed and the sun gear is driven. Epicyclic gears get their name from their earliest application, which was the modeling of the movements of the planets in the heavens. Believing the planets, as everything in the heavens, to be perfect, they could only travel in perfect circles, but their motions as viewed from Earth could not be reconciled with circular motion. At around 500 BC, the Greeks invented the idea of epicycles, of circles traveling on the circular orbits. With this theory Claudius Ptolemy in the Almagest in 148 AD was able to predict planetary orbital paths. The Antikythera Mechanism, circa 80 BC, had gearing which was able to approximate the moon's elliptical path through the heavens, and even to correct for the nine-year precession of that path. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 41578 PeriscopeFilm
CESSNA 150 / 152 AEROBAT 1960s AIRCRAFT AEROBATICS PROMOTIONAL FILM 53264
 
12:47
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm “Flying Fun” is a 1960s color film created by the Cessna Aircraft Company to promote aviation and aerobatics. The first 90 seconds of the film features scenes of a Cessna in action in the sky before the narrator explains at mark 01:50 how pilots are constantly looking for excitement in the air and can find it via such aircraft as the Cessna 172 Skyhawk, Silver Eagle, or Gull, nearly becoming capable of imitating the free-flight of a bird. We are introduced to Mary Akins (mark 02:22), the US Women’s Aerobatics Champion, and Don Pittman (mark 02:28), the men’s champion, who are shown chatting as the narrator explains the premise behind aerobatics (including the idea that “it’s just plain fun”). In flight at mark 04:00, Pittman demonstrates various rolls and maneuvers, while back on the ground Atkins explains how a Cessna is a perfect plane for a pro or an average pilot (mark 07:52). A Cessna executive discusses an aircraft’s design and structural features with the pilots (and by proxy the audience) starting at mark 08:24 before Pittman is shown in flight once again (mark 11:11), treating the viewers to additional aerobatic moves before the film comes to a close. The Cessna 152 is an American two-seat, fixed tricycle gear, general aviation airplane, used primarily for flight training and personal use. It was based on the earlier Cessna 150, including a number of minor design changes and a slightly more powerful engine running on 100LL aviation gasoline. First delivered in 1977 as the 1978 model year, the 152 was a modernization of the proven Cessna 150 design. The 152 was intended to compete with the new Beechcraft Skipper and Piper Tomahawk, both of which were introduced the same year.[1] Additional design goals were to improve useful load through a gross weight increase to 1670 lbs (757 kg), decrease internal and external noise levels and run better on the then newly introduced 100LL fuel. As with the 150, the great majority of 152s were built at the Cessna factory in Wichita, Kansas. A number of aircraft were also built by Reims Aviation of France and given the designation F152/FA152. Production of the 152 was ended in 1985 when Cessna ended production of all of their light aircraft; by that time, a total of 7,584 examples of the 152, including A152 and FA152 Aerobat aerobatic variants, had been built worldwide. The Cessna 150 and 152 became the most popular civilian training aircraft after World War II, as well as economical recreational vehicles for weekend pilots. The series still serves as the principal two-seat, general aviation trainer in the United States. The A152 Aerobat, with greater structural strength to withstand up to +6g and -3g forces, appeals to those looking for a little more basic aerobatic and spin capability. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 35192 PeriscopeFilm
BUILDING THE B-24 BOMBER DURING WWII  " STORY OF WILLOW RUN " 74182
 
33:30
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm Made by the Ford Motor Company during WWII, "The Story of Willow Run" explains the company's role in producing the Consolidated B-24 Liberator heavy bomber. Narrated by Harry Wismer, the film explains how Ford manufactured and built B-24 Liberators under license from Consolidated Aircraft Company. Production rates were so great at the plant that a new B-24 rolled off the production line every 55 minutes. The plant began production in summer 1941; the dedication plaque is dated June 16. The plant initially built components; Douglas Aircraft and the plane's designer Consolidated Aircraft assembled the finished aircraft. Remote assembly proved problematic, and by October 1941 Ford received permission to produce complete Liberators. Willow Run's Liberator assembly line ran through May 1945, building almost half of all the Liberators produced. In early 1941 the Federal government established the Liberator Production Pool Program to meet the projected demand for the B-24, and the Ford company, joined the program shortly thereafter. Ford Motor would not only build the bombers, it would supply the airfield as well; the farm at Willow Run was an ideal location for the airfield's runways. Architect Albert Kahn designed the main structure of the Willow Run bomber plant, which had 3,500,000 square feet (330,000 m2) of factory space, and an aircraft assembly line over a mile long. It was thought to be the largest factory under one roof anywhere in the world. The Willow Run plant featured a large turntable two-thirds of the way along the assembly line, allowing the B-24 production line to make a 90° turn before continuing to final assembly. Despite intensive design efforts led by Ford production executive Charles E. Sorensen, the opening of the plant still saw some mismanagement and bungling, and quality was uneven for some time. Although the Ford Trimotor had been a success in the 1920s, the company had since shied away from aviation, and initially, Ford was assigned to provide B-24 components with final assembly performed by Consolidated at its Fort Worth plant, or by fellow licensee Douglas Aircraft at its Tulsa, Oklahoma plant. However, in October 1941 Ford received permission from Consolidated and the Army to assemble complete Liberators on its own at its new Willow Run facility. Even then it would take nearly a year before finished Liberators left the factory. A 1943 committee authorized by Congress to examine problems at the plant issued a highly critical report; the Ford Motor Company had created a production line that too closely resembled an automobile assembly line "despite the warning of many experienced aircraftmen." Although the jumping of an automotive company into aircraft production posed these quality problems, it also brought remarkable production rates. The plant held the distinction of being the world's largest enclosed "room." The first Ford-built Liberator rolled off the Willow Run line in September 1942; the first series of Willow Run Liberators was the B-24E.Henry Ford was cantankerous and rigid in his ways. He was violently anti-union and there were serious labor difficulties, including a massive strike. In addition, Henry Ford refused on principle to hire women. However, he finally relented and did employ "Rosie the Riveters" on his assembly lines, probably more because so many of his potential male workers had been drafted into the military than due to any sudden development of a social conscience on his part At the request of the government, Ford began to decentralize operations and many parts were assembled at other Ford plants as well as by the company's sub-contractors, with the Willow Run plant concentrating on final aircraft assembly. The bugs were eventually worked out of the manufacturing processes, and by 1944, Ford was rolling a Liberator off the Willow Run production line every 63 minutes, 24 hours a day,7 days a week.At its peak, Willow Run produced 650 B-24s per month. By 1945, Ford produced 70% of the B-24s in two 9-hour shifts. Ford produced half of the 18,000 total B-24s at Willow Run, and the B-24 holds the distinction of being the most produced heavy bomber in history. A total of 6,972 Liberators were built at Ford, and 1,893 knock-down parts were provided for other manufacturers. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 631942 PeriscopeFilm
CHEVROLET ADVANCE DESIGN 1950s PANEL TRUCK SALES FILM 89194
 
06:24
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm One of the many films made by Jam Handy for Chevrolet and General Motors, "It's Your Money" shows a customer examining a Chevy panel truck. The 3100 Truck, part of the Advance Design Series, was one of the most popular delivery trucks in its era because of its efficient engine, with a valve and head design, steering-column shifter, and large useable load space. It was sold in a variety of models including pick-ups, panel vans, and double duty models. Chevrolet's first major redesign post-World War II, the Advance-Design series was billed as a bigger, stronger, and sleeker design in comparison to the earlier AK Series. First available on Saturday June 28, 1947, these trucks were sold with various minor changes over the years until March 25, 1955, when the Task Force Series trucks replaced the aging Advance-Design model. The same basic design family was used for all of its trucks including the Suburban, panel trucks, canopy express and cab overs. The cab overs used the same basic cab configuration and similar grille but used a shorter and taller hood and different fenders. The unique Cab Over fenders and hood required a custom cowl area which makes the Cab Over Engine cabs and normal truck cabs incompatible with one another while all truck cabs of all weights interchange. From 1947 until 1955, Chevrolet trucks were number one in sales in the United States, with rebranded versions sold at GMC locations. While General Motors used this front end sheet metal, and to a slightly lesser extent the cab, on all of its trucks except for the Cab Overs, there are three main sizes of this truck: the half-, three-quarter-, and full ton capacities in short and long wheelbase. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 17165 PeriscopeFilm
GENERAL MOTORS DIESEL: THE MODERN POWER  DIESEL LOCOMOTIVES BURLINGTON ZEPHYR 89444
 
22:30
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm First made in 1937 by General Motors and then repackaged for the WWII war effort, DIESEL THE MODERN POWER tells the story of the development and principles of the diesel engine. The film uses live action and animation to show how the diesel engine works, and live action footage of Sherman tanks, streamlined locomotives, switching engines, ships, and more. The film begins with an historical overview that includes a brief lesson on how to make fire, including two stones, rubbing pieces of wood, and even the "fire syringe" that was used by the people of Southeast Asia. The syringe is used to demonstrate the operation of a piston in an engine. At 14:30, 600 hp diesel engine are seen at the Century of Progress Exposition in Chicago. At 14:46, the Burlington Pioneer Zephyr is seen running from Chicago to Denver. Mainline passenger locomotives are seen, providing up to 6000 hp. Diesel switch engines are seen at the 15:30 mark. At 18:40, lumber equipment, oil pumps, and earth moving equipment are seen -- all driven by diesel engines. The Detroit Diesel works is seen at the 19 minute mark. Diesel powered submarines, mine sweepers and coast patrol boats as well as fleet tugs, are also seen. A two-stroke diesel engine is a diesel engine that works in two strokes. A diesel engine is an internal combustion engine that operates using the Diesel cycle. Invented in 1892 by German engineer Rudolf Diesel, it was based on the hot-bulb engine design and patented on February 23, 1893. During the period of 1900 to 1930, four-stroke diesel engines enjoyed a relative dominance in practical diesel applications. Charles F. Kettering and colleagues, working at the various incarnations of Electro-Motive and at the General Motors Research Corporation during the 1930s, advanced the art and science of two-stroke diesel technology to yield engines with much higher power-to-weight ratios than the two-stroke diesels of old. This work was instrumental in bringing about the dieselisation of railroads in the 1940s and 1950s. All diesel engines use compression ignition, a process by which fuel is injected after the air is compressed in the combustion chamber, thereby causing the fuel to self-ignite. By contrast, gasoline engines utilize the Otto cycle, or, more recently, the Atkinson cycle, in which fuel and air are mixed before entering the combustion chamber and then ignited by a spark plug. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 137584 PeriscopeFilm
OIL WELL FIRE FIGHTER RED ADAIR  PROMOTIONAL FILM  "DEVIL'S CIGARETTE LIGHTER" 51414
 
33:15
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm The Red Adair Co., Inc. presents “The Devil’s Cigarette Lighter.” This circa 1962 color film features the first person narration of famed oil well fire fighter Red Adair, who takes you step by step as he and his fire fighters (including Boots Hansen and Coots Mathews) extinguished the oil well fire that put the Red Adair Company on the map and made him a celebrity. The natural gas well fire was nicknamed “The Devil’s Cigarette Lighter. The fire, in the Sahara Desert of Algeria, ignited in 1961 when a pipe ruptured on a Phillips Petroleum Company-owned well. The blowout and fire were estimated to have consumed enough gas to supply Paris for three months. After burning almost six months, the fire was extinguished by Adair by using explosives to deprive the flame of oxygen. The incident became the basis of the film Hellfighter starring John Wayne in the role of Adair. The film opens with scenes from the Sahara and the fire (mark 01:37), as Adair explains how he and his crews had to dig for water to first try to extinguish the blaze. His calm and reassuring drawl covers each step of the operation as he is occasionally asked questioned about the project. At mark 08:17 streams of water are shown cooling the area before work crews moved in, and at mark 11:30 viewers get a close-up look of the flames. After attacking the base of the fire with water, Adair is shown at mark 14:00 preparing drums which will hold the explosives that eventually be used to extinguish the blaze. He carefully explains the process as events plays out on screen, and the camera shakes at mark 16:25 as the explosives go off. By mark 18:50, Adair uses to diagrams to further explain the process used to extinguish the Devil’s Cigarette Lighter before returning to footage that includes preparing to cap the well (mark 22:55). Following a series of more graphics and preparation, the flow of gas is finally shut off at mark 30:32. Paul Neal "Red" Adair (June 18, 1915 – August 7, 2004) was an American oil well firefighter. He became notable as an innovator in the highly specialized and hazardous profession of extinguishing and capping oil well blowouts, both land-based and offshore. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 39876 PeriscopeFilm
NORTHROP F-20 TIGERSHARK  SALES FILM  F-16 RIVAL  77364
 
11:05
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm This sales film for the Northrop F-20 Tigershark (initially F-5G) was made by Northrop in the 1980s. The F-20 was a privately financed light fighter, designed and built by Northrop. Its development began in 1975 as a further evolution of Northrop's F-5E Tiger II, featuring a new engine that greatly improved overall performance, and a modern avionics suite including a powerful and flexible radar. Compared with the F-5E, the F-20 was much faster, gained beyond-visual-range air-to-air capability, and had a full suite of air-to-ground modes capable of firing most U.S. weapons. With these improved capabilities, the F-20 became competitive with contemporary fighter designs such as the General Dynamics F-16 Fighting Falcon, but was much less expensive to purchase and operate. Much of the F-20's development was carried out under a US Department of Defense (DoD) project called "FX". FX sought to develop fighters that would be capable in combat with the latest Soviet aircraft, but excluding sensitive front-line technologies used by the United States Air Force's own aircraft. FX was a product of the Carter administration's military export policies, which aimed to provide foreign nations with high quality equipment without the risk of US front-line technology falling into Soviet hands. Northrop had high hopes for the F-20 in the international market, but policy changes following Ronald Reagan's election meant the F-20 had to compete for sales against aircraft like the F-16, the USAF's latest fighter design. Northrop signed a Memorandum of Agreement with the Air Force in May 1983 that made the Air Force responsible for certifying the F-20's performance, air worthiness and fixed-price program. Aerospace legend Chuck Yeager, employed as a spokesperson for Northrop, touted the aircraft as "magnificent" and was featured in advertising. In November 1982, Bahrain became the first customer. South Korea also explored local production of the F-20, and in support improvements were implemented. These included avionics upgrades, an expanded fuel tank, and the use of fibreglass composites. The changes were so extensive that a fourth prototype was built to test them. By 1983, Northrop was involved in a number of simultaneous negotiations for the F-20, and its prospects appeared positive. On 10 October 1984, GG1001 crashed in South Korea on a demonstration flight, killing Northrop pilot Darrell Cornell. An investigation cleared the F-20 of mechanical or design faults; it concluded Cornell had blacked out due to excessive g-forces. GI1001 crashed in May 1985 at Goose Bay, Labrador, killing Northrop pilot Dave Barnes. Again the crash was blamed on G-LOC; Barnes had been practicing his aerobatic routine for the Paris Air Show. Because of these accidents, the political climate and other issues, Northrop's development program was abandoned in 1986 after three prototypes had been built and a fourth partially completed. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 44140 PeriscopeFilm
1952 SEMI TRUCKS & TRUCK DRIVER  DRIVER'S EDUCATION FILM  " KNIGHTS OF THE HIGHWAY " 50814
 
17:08
This 1952 black and white film about the adventures of being a long-haul truck driver was written and directed by Arthur Cohen, and narrated by Ed Herlihy. Various 1940s and 1950s semi-trucks pass the camera, with a close-up of rolling tires of the 1950s White 3000 Cabover Tractor Trailer, shown for much of the film. The driver in the cab wears a white shirt, tie, and brimmed hat (:29-:54). A view of an interstate is shown (1:02). A traffic officer directs at a downtown intersection (1:22-1:31). A New Jersey Highway 17 sign is shown (1:32). A woman with a steaming car engine flags the semi down, who uses a fire extinguisher to put it out (2:00-2:33). The camera rides parallel to the cab (2:35-2:40). A woman in a 1940s Ford convertible is out of gas on the railroad tracks. The dashboard is shown close-up. The semi pushes the car to safety just before a passenger train crosses (2:42-3:30). The car ahead of the semi is driving erratically as the driver falls asleep. The driver pulls the horn cord and the horns are shown (3:36-4:05). A car barely passes the semi before oncoming traffic. Another passing car doesn’t make it and the crash is shown. The truck driver gets out and pulls a man out. The road sign says “Drive Careful Death Rides the Curves” (4:12-4:55). The trucker illegally passes on a curve, which is recorded on a car dash video camera by a hired security service to record first-time drivers and shown to the driver (4:57-6:00). The American Trucking Associations sponsors a driving competition at a fairgrounds. A semi drives through pegs and poles spaced barely wider than the tires, and backs into a framed space to win the trophy (6:02-7:11). The sleepy driver pulls into the Reinauer Brothers Truck Stop. He writes a wake-up call time on the chalkboard at the door for bunks and showers. A line of bunk beds has one already occupied by a snoring driver. He shakes him somewhat awake and pushes the man in his underware through a “Snorers Hall” door (7:30-9:19). The semi pulls into a 50-ton scale, with the weights shown inside the office (9:38-10:07). The driver enters a diner, where the waitress also waits on drivers at the counter (10:14-12:05). The driver stops at a rotary phone booth to call the State Patrol to report a suspected truck hijacking. The uniformed Officer in his office calls the report out. Two Officers in a 1940s State Patrol car screech onto the highway and pull the truck over. The real driver is tied up in the back. The Officers handcuff the hijacker and put him in the patrol car (12:13-14:28). The driver, going down a steep hill, pumps the brakes multiple times and pulls the emergency brake but they don’t work. Ahead, school children get off a bus and cross the road. The driver chooses to drive the truck into the trees and emerges safely (15:00-16:34). We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 26193 PeriscopeFilm
PENN CENTRAL RAILROAD 1968 PROMOTIONAL FILM  "CALL US PENN CENTRAL"  52184 MD
 
19:12
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm “Call Us Penn Central” is a circa 1968 color promotional film about the Penn Central Transportation Company, a railroad company created by the 1968 merger of the Pennsylvania and New York Central railroads that operated from 1968 until 1976. The film was likely prepared for the benefit of investors and possibly Wall Street, in an era of uncertainty. In 1970, the company filed for what was, at that time, the largest bankruptcy in US history. The first few minutes are filled with scenes of railroad yards and locomotives before the narrator presents a litany of locations and job occupations ranging from resort complexes, basketball games, and amusement parks to research scientists and locomotive engineers before finally revealing at mark 03:38 that such scenes “and many many more are parts of the Penn Central, America’s largest transportation company.” Accompanied by graphics, the narrator goes on to say how the company has more than 20,000 miles of tracks serving 100 million people in 14 states, two Canadian provinces, and the District of Columbia. We see scenes of the company’s rail operations starting at mark 04:00 while being reminded that the company’s passenger service lines had lost revenue due to changing patterns in pubic travels. As a result the company would be refocusing efforts on shorter “Metroliner” commuter routes between Washington, D.C. and New York City, we are told, as scenes of workers reconfiguring tracks are shown. “Freight traffic, of course, is the backbone of the Penn Central,” the narrator says at mark 06:45. As scenes of rail yard traffics is shown, the narrator explains how the company is also working toward improving that aspect of the business, particularly in reaching out to new coal markets in Ohio and Pennsylvania, as well as the grain and automobile industries. A newly acquired diesel locomotive (one of 250 added to the fleet) is paraded before the camera at mark 09:30, considered another step in improving service, as is the addition of more than 3,000 freight cars. The film continues with a look at a new electronic classification yard in Albany, New York starting at mark 10:20, and automated car identification system in Denholm, Pennsylvania. There are scenes of research scientists working on new equipment and techniques (mark 12:25) and news of how the construction of Penn Center in Philadelphia over an existing station led to a successful urban redevelopment. The same is said of property in Pittsburgh, at Madison Square Garden, at Penn Plaza at a rebuilt Pennsylvania Station in NYC (mark 13:56), and around Grand Central Station. We visit Union Station in Washington, D.C. at mark 14:29, to learn of a planned redevelopment, as well as Chicago’s Union Station (14:52) for a quick look at new office buildings constructed over existing tracks. Penn Central also has diversified to hold partial ownership in everything from amusement parks to resorts, we are told. “We know that much remains to be done to reshape our rail system to meet its challenges, but we are on the move,” the viewer is assured at mark 17:40. The Penn Central Transportation Company, commonly abbreviated to Penn Central, was an American Class I railroad headquartered in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, that operated from 1968 until 1976. It was created by the 1968 merger of the Pennsylvania and New York Central railroads. The New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad was added to the merger in 1969; by 1970, the company had filed for what was, at that time, the largest bankruptcy in U.S. history. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 39488 PeriscopeFilm
THE JOB OF THE EA-6B PROWLER  GRUMMAN AVIATION FILM 81802
 
13:58
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm Dating to the late 1970s or early 1980s, this U.S. Navy film shows THE JOB OF THE PROWLER. It shows A-6s, F-14 Tomcats, E2-Cs, A-7 Corsairs flying off the USS Independence CVA-62. The Northrop Grumman (formerly Grumman) EA-6B Prowler is a twin-engine, four-seater, mid-wing electronic warfare aircraft derived from the A-6 Intruder airframe. The EA-6A was the initial electronic warfare version of the A-6 used by the United States Marine Corps in the 1960s. Development on the more advanced EA-6B began in 1966. An EA-6B aircrew consists of one pilot and three Electronic Countermeasures Officers, though it is not uncommon for only two ECMOs to be used on missions. It is capable of carrying and firing anti-radiation missiles (ARM), such as the AGM-88 HARM missile. Prowler has been in service with the U.S. Armed Forces since 1971. It has carried out numerous missions for jamming enemy radar systems, and in gathering radio intelligence on those and other enemy air defense systems. From the 1998 retirement of the United States Air Force EF-111 Raven electronic warfare aircraft, the EA-6B was the only dedicated electronic warfare plane available for missions by the United States Navy, the U.S. Marine Corps, and the U.S. Air Force until the fielding of the Navy's EA-18G Growler in 2009. Following its last deployment in late 2014, the EA-6B was withdrawn from U.S. Navy service in June 2015. The EA-6A "Electric Intruder" was developed for the U.S. Marine Corps during the 1960s to replace its EF-10B Skyknights. The EA-6A was a direct conversion of the standard A-6 Intruder airframe, with two seats, equipped with electronic warfare (EW) equipment. The EA-6A was used by three Marine Corps squadrons during the War in Vietnam. A total of 27 EA-6As were produced, with 15 of these being newly manufactured ones. Most of these EA-6As were retired from service in the 1970s with the last few being used by the Navy with two electronic attack "aggressor" squadrons, with all examples finally retired in the 1990s. The EA-6A was essentially an interim warplane until the more-advanced EA-6B could be designed and built. A Marine EA-6A Intruder over Cherry Point, 1978. The two-seat EA-6A would be followed by the four-seat EA-6B Prowler. The substantially redesigned and more advanced EA-6B was developed beginning in 1966 as a replacement for EKA-3B Skywarriors for the U.S. Navy. The forward fuselage was lengthened to create a rear area for a larger four-seat cockpit, and an antenna fairing was added to the tip of its vertical stabilizer.Grumman was awarded a $12.7 million contract to develop an EA-6B prototype on 14 November 1966. The Prowler first flew on 25 May 1968, and it entered service on aircraft carriers in July 1971. Three prototype EA-6Bs were converted from A-6As, and five EA-6Bs were developmental airplanes. A total of 170 EA-6B production aircraft were manufactured from 1966 through 1991. The EA-6B Prowler is powered by two turbojet engines, and it is capable of high subsonic speeds. Due to its extensive electronic warfare operations, and the aircraft's age (produced until 1991), the EA-6B is a high-maintenance aircraft, and it also has undergone more frequent equipment upgrades than any other aircraft in the Navy or Marine Corps. Although designed as an electronic warfare and command-and-control aircraft for air strike missions, the EA-6B is also capable of attacking some surface targets on its own, in particular enemy radar sites and surface-to-air missile launchers. In addition, the EA-6B is capable of gathering electronic signals intelligence. The EA-6B Prowler has been continually upgraded over the years. The first such upgrade was named "expanded capability" (EXCAP) beginning in 1973. Then came "improved capability" (ICAP) in 1976 and ICAP II in 1980. The ICAP II upgrade provided the EA-6B with the capability of firing Shrike missiles and AGM-88 HARM missiles. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 94300 PeriscopeFilm
U.S. AIR FORCE THUNDERBIRDS HISTORIC FILM 1953-1969   23754
 
05:40
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm Made by McDonnell Douglas, this historic U.S. Air Force film shows the first flight of the Thunderbirds in 1953, just six years after the formation of the USAF, to the advent of the F-4 in 1969. In between it shows various iterations of the stunt team. This includes spectacular footage of the F-84 to the swept-wing F-84, to the North American F-100, to the Republic F-105 and finally the McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom. After six months training in an unofficial status, the Thunderbirds were activated on 25 May 1953 as the 3600th Air Demonstration Team at Luke AFB, just west of Phoenix. The team had flown 26 shows by that August. The first team leader was Major Richard C. Catledge (1953–1954), and the first plane used by the unit was the straight-wing F-84G Thunderjet. Because the Thunderjet was a single-seat fighter, a two-seat T-33 Shooting Star served as the narrator's aircraft and was used as the VIP/Press ride aircraft. The T-33 served with the Thunderbirds in this capacity in the 1950s and 1960s. The next year the Thunderbirds performed their first overseas air shows, in a tour of South and Central America, and added a permanent solo routine to the demonstration. In the spring of 1955, under their second commander/leader (September 1954 – February 1957), Captain Jacksel M. Broughton,[ they moved to the swept-wing F-84F Thunderstreak aircraft, in which they performed 91 air shows, and received their first assigned support aircraft, a C-119 Flying Boxcar. The Thunderbirds' aircraft were again changed in June 1956, to the F-100C Super Sabre, which gave the team supersonic capability. This switch was accompanied by a relocation of their headquarters to Nellis AFB, Nevada on 1 June because of maintenance and logistical difficulties of basing the F-100s at Luke, with their first show after the move being held on 23 June. It also signaled a shift in their performance routine—for example, the Cuban 8 opening routine was dropped, and emphasis was placed on low, screaming flyovers and demonstrations of takeoff performance. For a time, if the show's sponsor permitted it, the pilots would create a "sonic boom;" this ended when the FAA banned supersonic flight over the continental United States. The move to Nellis also resulted in the first assignment of buildings and hangar space to the team. This practice remained in force through the 1973 season. In 1961, the team was compelled to discontinue the vertical bank maneuver due to an FAA regulation prohibiting aerobatics that pointed the nose of the aircraft toward the crowd. The year 1962 saw the introduction of dual solo routines, and the Thunderbirds went on their first European deployment in 1963, the year after the disbanding of the "Skyblazers." The team switched to the F-105 Thunderchief for the 1964 season, but were forced to re-equip with the F-100D after only six airshows due to a catastrophic structural failure of the No. 2 aircraft during a pitch-up maneuver that resulted in the death of Capt Gene Devlin at Hamilton Air Force Base. The F-100D Super Sabre was retained through the 1968 season. By 1967, the Thunderbirds had flown 1,000 shows. In 1969, the squadron re-equipped with the front-line F-4E Phantom which it flew until 1973, the only time the Thunderbirds would fly jets similar to those of the Blue Angels as it was the standard fighter for both services in the 1960s and 1970s. A special white paint had to be developed to cover high-temperature metals, replacing the bare metal paint scheme of past planes. The white paint scheme has been continued to the present. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 16834 PeriscopeFilm
GEORGE S. PATTON AND THE THIRD ARMY   1960 DOCUMENTARY FILM  25894
 
25:50
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm “Patton and the Third Army” is an episode of the documentary series “The Twentieth Century” originally airing March 20, 1960. Hosted by revered newsman Walter Cronkite, the program looks at “Old Blood and Guts” — US Army General George S. Patton — who is first seen at mark 00:30 in full dress uniform addressing an assembled crowd. That is followed by archival footage from World War II and scenes of Patton (mark 02:10) from November 1942 as he leads his Third Army into North Africa during his first campaign. By spring 1943 most of the Germany troops have been overrun thanks to his aggressive, “almost medieval” style of attack. Patton’s tanks are shown rolling through the sand until the general is again shown at mark 03:30 arriving in Sicily to command of the Seventh Army during the Allied invasion in 1943. Patton meets with his “natural rival” British Field Marshall Bernard Montgomery at mark 04:25, and at mark 04:48, US Army General S.L.A. Marshal, a combat historian, recounts an infamous incident in Sicily where Patton slapped two shell-shocked soldiers under his command and was temporarily removed from battlefield command. The incident was linked to Patton’s “physical repulsion to men he thought to be cowardly,” Marshall says. By mark 07:10, Patton is returned to command the Third Army following the invasion of Normandy in June 1944, where he led a highly successful rapid armored drive across France, including liberating 40,000 square miles in just seven weeks. Battle scenes are interspersed with images of American soldiers being joyfully greeted by residents who offer hugs and handshakes (mark 09:00). During a respite from the fight, Patton conducts an inspection of his troops at mark 11:33 as he is joined by General Dwight D. Eisenhower and later dines with Ike and General Omar Bradley. The film moves on with images from the Battle of Metz in France (mark 13:34), although strong German resistance resulted in heavy casualties for both side. At mark 16:15 is is shown leading the relief of beleaguered American troops at Bastogne during the Battle of the Bulge, and advance his Third Army into Nazi Germany by the end of the war. German soldiers are shown surrendering as Allied troops eventually enter concentration camps to view the atrocities, shown at mark 19:36. “You don’t have to be dead to be a hero,” Patton explains at mark 21:38 as the film returns to assembled crowd shown at the opening. “People always talk about the heroic dead but goddammit there are a lot of heroic alive ones.” He assumes command of the 15th Army at mark 22:53, and Cronkite explains that although Patton had expected a glorious death in battle, the general’s demise would actually come as the result of an automobile accident shortly after the end of WW2. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 444837 PeriscopeFilm
NEW SERIES H D8 CATERPILLAR POWER TRACTOR 1950s PROMOTIONAL FILM    52564
 
09:25
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm The 1950s Caterpillar film This New Series H D8 touts the new 225-horse power tractor (00:37). The D8 has been the yardstick of big tractors for decades, and more than 1,000 improvements have been made since the first D8 was built. For the new D8, engineers design lifetime lubricated tracks and test the product on proving grounds; the H Series D8 is then tested vigorously on Caterpillar’s proving grounds (02:25). The film discusses new features and improvements to design with the new Series H D8, including size, undercarriage, drive and speeds, and other specifications. Operators enjoy the comfortable deck (04:20) with increased visibility on the revamped tractor. The film gives an overview of operations from the deck (04:50), then shows a D8 undertaking a land-clearing job in Central Florida (05:34) and another D8 working a stripping operation at an Arizona mine (07:00). The new D8 is easy to maintain and features some other notable features, including the double reduction final drive gears, a new direct drive transmission, and the advanced lube system. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 34845 PeriscopeFilm
WWII DESTROYER ESCORT ANTI-SUBMARINE WARFARE FILM 24712
 
16:45
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm This film is about the story of the destroyer escorts and their services in the U.S. Navy it shows the construction and launch of the USS Frament (DE-677) in June 28 1943 and USS Brennan (DE-13) in August 22 1942. The Destroyer Escort was the United States Navy mid-20th century classification for a 20-knot (23 mph) warship designed with endurance to escort mid-ocean convoys of merchant marine ships. Kaibōkan were designed for a similar role in the Imperial Japanese Navy. The Royal Navy and Commonwealth forces identified such warships as frigates, and that classification was widely accepted when the United States redesignated destroyer escorts as frigates in 1975. Destroyer escorts, frigates and kaibōkan were mass-produced for World War II as a less expensive anti-submarine warfare alternative to fleet destroyers. Post war destroyer escorts and frigates were larger than those produced during wartime, with increased anti-aircraft capability, but remained smaller and slower than post war destroyers. As Cold War destroyer escorts became as large as wartime destroyers, the United States Navy converted some of their World War II destroyers to escort destroyers. This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2K. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 80905 PeriscopeFilm
CARVING .45 CALIBER AUTOMATICS OUT OF STEEL  WWII UNION SWITCH AND SIGNAL MOVIE  44524
 
10:56
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm Made during WWII by the Union Switch and Signal Company, which converted to manufacturing firearms as part of the war effort, this silent 16mm film documents the production of .45 automatics. These weapons are "carved out of steel" through a variety of techniques including machine forging. The film traces all aspects of manufacture, testing, and finally railroad shipping of the completed and tested weapons. Union Switch & Signal company of Swissvale Pennsylvania, primarily made railroad signaling equipment but received a contract on May 5, 1942 for the manufacture of 200,000 M1911A1 pistols. The first pistols were accepted by Ordnance inspectors in January 1943, but the company received word that their contract would be canceled. The last of the pistols was shipped on November 27, 1943. 55,000 U.S.&S. pistols were delivered serial numbered from 1041405 to 1096404 with peak production reaching 650 pistols a day. The company continued producing carbine parts under another contract. U.S.& S. produced high quality pistols that consistently rated high in the interchangeability tests. Many of these pistols were shipped to the Navy and the OSS. The M1911 is a single-action, semi-automatic, magazine-fed, recoil-operated pistol chambered for the .45 ACP cartridge. It served as the standard-issue sidearm for the United States Armed Forces from 1911 to 1986. It was first used in later stages of the Philippine–American War, and was widely used in World War I, World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. The pistol's formal designation as of 1940 was Automatic Pistol, Caliber .45, M1911 for the original model of 1911 or Automatic Pistol, Caliber .45, M1911A1 for the M1911A1, adopted in 1924. The designation changed to Pistol, Caliber .45, Automatic, M1911A1 in the Vietnam era. In total, the U.S. procured around 2.7 million M1911 and M1911A1 pistols in military contracts during its service life. The M1911 was replaced by the 9mm Beretta M9 pistol as the standard U.S. sidearm in October 1986, but due to its popularity among users, it has not been completely phased out. Modernized derivative variants of the M1911 are still in use by some units of the U.S. Army Special Forces, the U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps. Designed by John Browning, the M1911 is the best-known of his designs to use the short recoil principle in its basic design. The pistol was widely copied, and this operating system rose to become the preeminent type of the 20th century and of nearly all modern centerfire pistols. It is popular with civilian shooters in competitive events such as USPSA, IDPA, International Practical Shooting Confederation, and Bullseye shooting. Compact variants are popular civilian concealed carry weapons, because of the design's relatively slim width and the power of the .45 ACP cartridge. World War II and the years leading up to it created a great demand. During the war, about 1.9 million units were procured by the U.S. Government for all forces, production being undertaken by several manufacturers, including Remington Rand (900,000 produced), Colt (400,000), Ithaca Gun Company (400,000), Union Switch & Signal (50,000), and Singer (500). New M1911A1 pistols were given a parkerized metal finish instead of blueing, and the wood grip panels were replaced with panels made of brown plastic. The M1911A1 was a favored small arm of both US and allied military personnel during the war, in particular, the pistol was prized by some British commando units and the SOE as well as Commonwealth South African forces. So many 1911A1 pistols were produced during the war that the government cancelled all postwar contracts for new production, instead choosing to rebuild existing pistols with new parts, which were then refinished and tested for functioning. From the mid 1920s to the mid 1950s thousands of 1911s and 1911A1s were refurbished at U.S. Arsenals and Service depots. These arsenal rebuilds consisted of anything from minor inspections to major overhauls of pistols returned from service use. Pistols that were refurbished at Government arsenals will usually be marked on the frame/receiver with the arsenal's initials, such as RIA (Rock Island Armory) or SA (Springfield Armory). Among collectors today, the Singer-produced pistols in particular are highly prized, commanding high prices even in poor condition. This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 47562 PeriscopeFilm
SECRET REPUBLIC F-105 THUNDERCHIEF ARMAMENT CAPABILITY SPIN TEST 79334
 
10:07
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm Made by Republic Aviation around 1960, this F-105 Thunderchief promotional film — originally classified "Secret" according to a card at the end — focuses on the aircraft's armament capability and spin tests. The film begins with astonishing shots of the aircraft's wide array of ordnance, and shows the supersonic aircraft's large bomb bay, equipped with an ejection system. The bay can also carry an extra fuel tank or small training bombs. The aircraft is shown performing supersonic maneuvers at the 4:00 mark, with precision bomb release, including 1000 lb bombs. Sidewinder capable racks are shown installed at the 4:50 mark. A sidewinder vs. HVAC rocket is seen at the 5:40 mark. The F-105's 20mm Vulcan gun is seen at the 5:50 mark. Spin maneuvers are seen at the 7:30 mark, the location of many of the tests appears to be Edwards Air Force Base. The Republic F-105 Thunderchief was a supersonic fighter-bomber used by the United States Air Force. The Mach 2 capable F-105 conducted the majority of strike bombing missions during the early years of the Vietnam War; it was the only U.S. aircraft to have been removed from combat due to high loss rates. Originally designed as a single-seat, nuclear-attack aircraft, a two-seat Wild Weasel version was later developed for the specialized Suppression of Enemy Air Defenses (SEAD) role against surface-to-air missile sites. The F-105 was commonly known as the "Thud" by its crews. As a follow-on to the Mach 1 capable North American F-100 Super Sabre, the F-105 was also armed with missiles and a cannon; however, its design was tailored to high-speed low-altitude penetration carrying a single nuclear weapon internally. First flown in 1955, the Thunderchief entered service in 1958. The F-105 could deliver a greater bomb load than some American heavy bombers of World War II such as the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress and Consolidated B-24 Liberator. The F-105 was one of the primary attack aircraft of the Vietnam War; over 20,000 Thunderchief sorties were flown, with 382 aircraft lost including 62 operational (non-combat) losses (out of the 833 produced). Although less agile than smaller MiG fighters, USAF F-105s were credited with 27.5 kills. The Thunderchief was the largest single-seat, single-engine combat aircraft in history, weighing approximately 50,000 pounds (23,000 kg). It could exceed the speed of sound at sea level and reach Mach 2 at high altitude; the F-105 could carry up to 14,000 lb (6,400 kg) of bombs and missiles. The Thunderchief was later replaced as a strike aircraft over North Vietnam by both the McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II and the swing-wing General Dynamics F-111 Aardvark. However, the "Wild Weasel" variants of the F-105 remained in service until 1984 after being replaced by the specialized F-4G "Wild Weasel V". The initial reaction of the fighter pilot community to their new aircraft was lukewarm. Between its massive dimensions and troubled early service life, the F-105 had garnered a number of uncomplimentary nicknames. In addition to the aforementioned "Thud", nicknames included the "Squat Bomber", "Lead Sled", and the "Hyper Hog" and/or "Ultra Hog". The latter two names arose from the F-105's predecessors, the Republic P-47 Thunderbolt and F-84 Thunderstreak, nicknamed "Hog" and "Super Hog", respectively. According to F-105 pilots and crews, the "Thud" nickname was inspired by the character "Chief Thunderthud" from the Howdy Doody television series. The aircraft's offensive capabilities were sarcastically referred to as a "Triple Threat" — it could bomb you, strafe you, or fall on you. Positive aspects, such as the F-105's responsive controls, strong performance at high speed and low altitude, and its outfit of electronics won over some pilots. For some, "Thud" was a term of endearment; retroactively the RF-84F Thunderflash became known as "Thud's Mother". F-105 pilot Colonel Jack Broughton said of the nickname: "The Thud has justified herself, and the name that was originally spoken with a sneer has become one of utmost respect through the air fraternity". We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 21321 PeriscopeFilm
USAF TACTICAL WEAPONS EFFECTS TESTS  CENTURY SERIES AIRCRAFT VIETNAM ERA 74282
 
21:12
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm Produced in 1964, this awesome U.S. Air Force film shows tactical weapons tests against various types of targets using F-100 Super Sabre and other aircraft. Over 100 target complexes were built to simulate enemy positions including anti-aircraft missiles sights similar to those used in Cuba. Tests were also conducted of air to air missiles, air to ground and anti-tank weapons, and bombs. At the 3 minute mark, a radio-controlled drone is destroyed flying at 180 miles per hour. A sidewinder missile fired from the F-104 sidewinder is seen destroying an F-80 at the 3:30 mark. The F-105 Thunderchief is also seen performing ground attacks, including attacks with napalm. F-84F Thunderstreaks are also seen in the film. The Zuni rocket is seen at the 6:30 mark. At 11:40 four Starfighters are seen dropping napalm on a simulated enemy convoy. Barges were also used in the test to simulate enemy landing forces (see 14:30). At the 15 minute mark a terrible accident is seen, in which the chase aircraft and primary in a test strike were destroyed by fragments, forcing both pilots to eject. At the 16 minute mark, F-100s and F-104s fire Bullpup missiles at a parked train including a steam locomotive. The Fairchild C-123 Provider, shown in 123H prototype form with wide track undercarriage and two underwing J85 booster engines is also shown being tested at the 17:30 mark. The C-130 is also shown being put through its paces as part of combat testing. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 32071 PeriscopeFilm
BOEING 377 STRATOCRUISER AIRCRAFT -- TOMORROWS AIRPLANE TODAY 70942
 
19:03
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm Created by acclaimed filmmaker Jerry Fairbanks for the Boeing Co. in the immediate post-WWII era, "Tomorrow's Airplane Today" celebrates the 377 Stratocruiser, the company's new entry into the civilian aviation market. The Boeing 377 Stratocruiser was a large long-range airliner developed from the C-97 Stratofreighter military transport, a derivative of the B-29 Superfortress. The Stratocruiser's first flight was on July 8, 1947. Its design was advanced for its day, its innovative features included two passenger decks and a pressurized cabin, a relatively new feature to transport aircraft. It could carry up to 100 passengers on main deck plus 14 in lower deck lounge; typical seating was for 63 or 84 passengers or 28 berthed and five seated passengers. The Stratocruiser was larger than the Douglas DC-6 and Lockheed Constellation and cost more to buy and operate. Its reliability was poor, chiefly due to problems with the four 28-cylinder Pratt & Whitney Wasp Major radial engines and their four-blade propellers. Only 55 Model 377s were built for airlines, along with the single prototype. At the head of the film you will see rare views of the Boeing plant in Seattle as it looked during WWII -- completely covered in camouflage netting and paint. It also shows various Boeing products including the B-29 upon which the Stratocruiser was based. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 87562 PeriscopeFilm
F-14 TOMCAT AIR COMBAT TOP GUN MIRAMAR NAVAL AIR STATION 22334
 
17:41
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm Made by Grumman to promote the new F-14 Tomcat, this film takes place at Miramar, California and Fighter Town USA. At mark 0:33, Fighter Town USA is seen with various front line Naval aircraft including F-4 Phantoms. Here, pilots are now using lessons from the war in S.E. Asia in developing F-14 combat maneuvering syllabus, using the variable wing at different speed ranges, and getting use to the plane's sophisticated electronic packages. The multiple weapon systems include Phoenix missiles which can be launched simultaneously at targets more than 15 miles away. A two man crew divides responsibilities that range from visual tracking and navigation to kill assessment in a tough ECM environment. At mark 3:57, we have all the crews learning about the F-14 and how to use it to their advantage. This is a full time job for them. Every working day a routine of debriefings and flying, flying and debriefings. Beginnings before dawn and also at nights. Soon enough its time to fight, at mark 4:18, we see pilots preparing for fight against Top Gun fighters. Each plane has its special abilities. At mark 5:08, F-15 versus T-38 Talon, a lesson in defensive maneuvering. The T-38 Is one of the tightest turning aircraft in the inventory. We have the instructor teaching the pilots on how to defend and maneuver. He sets up the rule of engagement and recognize when they should make their move and engage. He teaches them how to counter when locked on the weapon system. From the class room to the real world and back to the classroom. Here at mark 7:57, we have the instructor who flew the T-38 conducting the debriefing. Briefing them on his turnings and maneuverings on the air. At mark 9:10, we also have the F-14 flying crew preparing against the A-4 Skyhawk, another good turning low wing craft. The tag team instructor also instruct on the defense. Again the F-14 is on the defensive, the A-4 rolling into a good gun position. The instructor at mark 9:40 instructs on maneuvering and how he will counter attacks on the engagement to make the kill. At mark 10:35, both crews return to the class for debriefing. This is to remind the F-14 pilots of the capabilities of their aircraft and that it will respond after been pushed beyond the limits of other aircrafts and to instill confidence in them. The instructor gave them instructions on their aircraft and its maneuvering capabilities. At mark 12:40, we have the F-4 Phantom opposing the F-14. Both are high thrust away fighters. Unlike the F-14 however, the Phantom has divided high speed to be effective and thus is vulnerable to the tight turning Tomcat. Both will use radar to find one another then engage. The F-14 is the aggressive. At mark 13:22, the instructor gives the crew some ideas. Having heard it from the class room of course is a lot easier from been there. We have both aircrafts on the air maneuvering and trying to engage attacks. At mark 14:20, we see them briefing each other in the class about their engagement and maneuvering after the air flight. At mark 15:17, pilots have been impressed about the F-14 after putting its capabilities to test and using it to their advantage. The different pilots tried the F-14 to check its amazing capabilities. With the confidence the pilots have, they can now translate F-14 real capabilities into real performance. The F-14 can also stand on its tail. The aircraft performance, flexibility and wide varieties of weapons can be adapted to any foreseeable threat and take the fight to the enemy and to win. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 62732 PeriscopeFilm
PRIVATE SNAFU "SPIES"  WWII CARTOON   CHUCK JONES  76164
 
03:57
A brilliant cartoon, Spies is part of the Private Snafu series of animated shorts produced by Warner Bros. during World War II. Released in 1943, the cartoon was directed by Chuck Jones and features the vocal talents of Mel Blanc. Plot: Private Snafu has learned a secret, but the enemy is listening and he'd better zipper his lip. However, Snafu - little by little - lets his secret slip (by telling the audience, calling his mom, and drunkenly relaying it to a bar girl who works as a Nazi spy): His ship is about to set sail for Africa at 4:30. The information is picked up by spies and quickly relayed to Adolf Hitler, who orders the Nazis to attack the American fleet - which they do, shooting Snafu with torpedoes when he falls in the water. He then ends up in Hell boiling in a cauldron, demanding to know who leaked the secret. Adolf Hitler as well as Hitler's staff then appear as demons and reveal that he gave away the secret he was entrusted to keep, and then showed him a mirror that revealed a horse's ass. A scene in which Private Snafu becomes drunk is musically accompanied by an excerpt from Raymond Scott's composition, Powerhouse. Private Snafu is the title character of a series of black-and-white American instructional cartoon shorts, ironic and humorous in tone, that were produced between 1943 and 1945 during World War II. The films were designed to instruct service personnel about security, proper sanitation habits, booby traps and other military subjects, and to improve troop morale. The series was directed by Chuck Jones and other prominent Hollywood animators, and the voice of Private Snafu was performed by Mel Blanc. The character was created by director Frank Capra, chairman of the U.S. Army Air Force First Motion Picture Unit, and most were written by Theodor "Dr. Seuss" Geisel, Philip D. Eastman, and Munro Leaf. Although the United States Army gave Walt Disney the first crack at creating the cartoons, Leon Schlesinger of the Warner Bros. animation studio underbid Disney by two-thirds and won the contract. Disney had also demanded exclusive ownership of the character, and merchandising rights. The goal was to help enlisted men with weak literacy skills learn through animated cartoons (and also supplementary comic books). They featured simple language, racy illustrations, mild profanity, and subtle moralizing. Private Snafu did everything wrong, so that his negative example taught basic lessons about secrecy, disease prevention, and proper military protocols. Private Snafu cartoons were a military secret—for the armed forces only. Surveys to ascertain the soldiers' film favorites showed that the Snafu cartoons usually rated highest or second highest. Each cartoon was produced in six weeks. The shorts were classified government documents. Martha Sigall, employed at the ink and paint department, recalled the government security measures imposed on the staff working on them. They had to be fingerprinted and given FBI security clearances. They also had to wear identification badges at work. Workers at the ink and paint department were given only ten cels at a time in an effort to prevent them from figuring out the story content. The name "Private Snafu" comes from the unofficial military acronym SNAFU ("Situation Normal: All F*cked Up"), with the opening narrator merely hinting at its usual meaning as "Situation Normal, All ... All Fouled Up!" We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 3585 PeriscopeFilm
1940s LAPD POLICE MOTORCYLE PATROLMAN RECRUITMENT FILM HARLEY DAVIDSON PANHEAD MOTORCYCLE 54074
 
08:28
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm The Los Angeles Police Department presents “Your Traffic Officer,” a late 1940s black-and-white training film that shows what it takes to be a motorcycle patrolman on the new freeways in post-World War II California. Six people lost their lives on a “modern highway” in the past year (probably the 110 Freeway) the narrator explains at the film commences. The efficient execution of traffic regulations is key to keeping the roads safe. A motorcycle officer zooms across the screen (mark 00:53) as the narrator explains how a well-trained officer can make the difficult job look easy, and are offered the position only after passing physical and educational requirements. Mark 01:45 takes the viewer to a training class as instructors are shown teaching “the safe way to ride.” The training film offers detailed information on each part of the motorcycle, from carburetor to siren. Trainees are shown how to run the engine and operator the speedometer (mark 04:50), as well as how to operate the front and rear wheel brakes. Each element is put together starting at mark 05:30 as the training officer starts his engine, and then shown how they operate together on the road (mark 06:37). New recruits are encouraged to also learn from veterans as part of their on-the-job training (mark 07:45) “and learn your job by doing,” we are told. The motorcycle shown at 1:29 appears to be a Harley 74 cubic inch panhead. This was the sport bike of its time as it featured overhead valves instead of a flathead. It was 1200 cc or 74 cubic inches with a 3 speed transmission. It had no rear suspension in those years unlike the Indian Chiefs. They had six volt systems unlike todays 12 volts. Supposedly they were not preferred by police as the indian motorcycle could be set up having the accelerator on the left, freeing up the gun hand. Their top speed was around 89 mph but could be modified to go faster later on, but on the roads of the day that was much faster than any car of the times could maintain. They ran a chain in both the primary and final drive and had an oil piston under the seat for comfort. Although the Knucklehead was one of Harley's crowning achievements, by the mid 1940's the Big-Twin was in need of an update. Harley engineers updated the Knuck's upper-end with aluminum heads which reduced operating temperatures, and added hydraulic valve lifters which reduced engine noise. The new heads were topped off by redesigned rocker covers which resembled upside-down roasting pans, prompting the nickname "Panhead." The V-twin engine displaced 73.73 cubic-inches (advertised as 74ci), which was derived from a 3.44" x 4" bore and stroke. With 7:1 compression ratio, 50 horsepower was produced at 4,800 rpm. The bottom end was basically unchanged, but the engine cases were modified for the new cylinders, and a new camshaft was designed for the new valve system. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 35782 PeriscopeFilm
LCVP HIGGINS BOAT 1944 U.S. NAVY LANDING CRAFT TRAINING FILM 81614
 
14:45
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm This film about the LCVP provides an introduction and look at the nomenclature (00:44) of systems aboard these vessels. The film dates to 1944. LCVP is short for Landing Craft, Vehicle-Personnel, also known as a Higgins boat (named after its creator Andrew Higgins). The film begins by detailing the stats of the LCVP while showing footage of LCVPs skipping along the water then landing on shore (02:11), where they unload soldiers (02:15), vehicles (02:23), and cargo—such as ammunition (02:35). LCVPs are a crucial part in land-sea operations, which can involve ships as well as aircraft, such as dirigibles (03:04). The LCVP’s exterior construction details are recounted while one of the vessels is suspended by a crane (03:17), allowing the viewer to see every part of the boat, including the scuffle boards (03:53) and the keel-like skeg (04:01). That is followed by a look at the interior of the LCVP (05:08), covering the layout. This overview also briefly discusses the engine, engine controls, and how to operate the LCVP (05:37). The film then shows some of the features of the boat, such as the electric compass repeater (07:12), the adjustable wheel (07:23), and the gun pits in the decked-over aft, called the transom (08:21). Next, the film reviews the essential equipment the LCVP is stocked with (09:33). After covering the boat and necessary gear, the film explains the members and roles of the crew (12:03): the coxswain, engineer, sternman, and bowman. The film ends with the bowman and engineer releasing the ramp and troops deploying onto a beach (13:09), followed by the sternman acting as the signalman (13:47). The landing craft, vehicle, personnel (LCVP) or Higgins boat was a landing craft used extensively in amphibious landings in World War II. The craft was designed by Andrew Higgins based on boats made for operating in swamps and marshes. More than 20,000 were built, by Higgins Industries and licensees. Typically constructed from plywood, this shallow-draft, barge-like boat could ferry a platoon-sized complement of 36 men to shore at 9 knots (17 km/h). Men generally entered the boat by climbing down a cargo net hung from the side of their troop transport; they exited by charging down the boat's bow ramp. At just over 36 ft (11 m) long and just under 11 ft (3.4 m) wide, the LCVP was not a large craft. Powered by a 225-horsepower Diesel engine at 12 knots, it would sway in choppy seas, causing seasickness. Since its sides and rear were made of plywood, it offered limited protection from enemy fire. The Higgins boat could hold either a 36-man platoon, a jeep and a 12-man squad, or 8,000 lb (3.6 t) of cargo. Its shallow draft (3 feet aft and 2 feet, 2 inches forward) enabled it to run up onto the shoreline, and a semi-tunnel built into its hull protected the propeller from sand and other debris. The steel ramp at the front could be lowered quickly. It was possible for the Higgins boat to swiftly disembark men and supplies, reverse itself off the beach, and head back out to the supply ship for another load within three to four minutes. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 19010 PeriscopeFilm
NORTH AMERICAN A3J VIGILANTE / A-5 AIRCRAFT   PROMOTIONAL FILM 81234
 
12:27
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm This film V FOR VIGILANTE is a promotional piece made by North American Aviation to promote the “super sonic rifle”, the Navy's A3J fighter plane known as the A3J Vigilante (1:14). At the time the aircraft was being used as a nuclear weapon delivery platform. According to the film, the plane "contains some of the most advanced electronic equipment created by science" (1:42). The pilot and navigator could fly this plane over thousands of miles (1:56). Unlike missiles or unmanned crafts, this could be redirected to new targets while in flight (2:05). It is flown by television and radar and guided by devices enabling sight in the dark (2:21). The officers of the Bureau of Naval Weapons play a decisive role in choosing which crafts and equipment are used and will direct Aviation personnel to construct them (3:03). The Columbia division was chosen to construct the Vigilante (3:30). It will contain two turbo engines that enable movement faster than the speed of sound (3:55). After thourough plans have been drawn, a scale model is constructed (4:57). In the Columbus Division’s wind tunnel, jet streams will test the planes handling (5:31). The model is able to do everything a regular plane can, save for flight (5:38). Flight conditions are simulated by engineers and they seek ways to improve the craft (5:47). From here, the production of the Vigilante will commence (5:58). Miniscule components are machined (6:31) and in temperature controlled rooms, specific instruments are used for inspection (6:34). On the factory floor, the wings are crafted (6:54) as mechanics and Navy inspectors ensure proper construction (7:11). The craft is 73 feet long (7:35) and tail assembly rises twenty feet in the air (7:45). One unique feature is the linear rejection bomb bay (7:50). After construction, test engineers take over (7:56). In a steel rig, the craft will endure strenuous conditions (8:13). There will be many tests to follow such as how the pilot will save himself in emergency (9:30). After Columbus, it will head westward for the California desert to the North American test facility (10:29). The plane received international awards for flying seventeen miles above the stratosphere (11:04). As the Vigilante has now proven itself, it is sent to join the Fleet (11:34). The North American A-5 Vigilante is an American carrier-based supersonic bomber designed and built by North American Aviation for the United States Navy. Its service in the nuclear strike role to replace the Douglas A-3 Skywarrior was very short; however, as the RA-5C, it saw extensive service during the Vietnam War in the tactical strike reconnaissance role. Prior to the unification of the Navy designation sequence with the Air Force sequence in 1962, it was designated the A3J Vigilante. The Vigilante, designed and built for the U.S. Navy by North American Aircraft Division at Columbus, Ohio, was the only Mach 2 bomber to serve aboard a Navy carrier. Initially designated the A3J-1 attack bomber, it was one of the largest and heaviest aircraft ever accepted for service aboard U.S. Navy carriers. Production began in 1956, and it entered squadron service in June 1961. It was redesignated the A-5 and fully deployed by August 1962, when the USS Enterprise, the Navy’s first nuclear aircraft carrier, made its inaugural cruise. Changing defense strategies marked a change of focus away from carrier-based, heavy-attack squadrons. In 1964, all the Vigilantes were reconfigured as reconnaissance aircraft and designated RA-5C. Reconnaissance gear was mounted in what had been the Vigilante’s bomb bay. Other modifications allowed the RA-5C to carry four external fuel tanks. These additions increased the airplane’s range on reconnaissance missions and allowed it to keep its attack capability with externally mounted bombs and rockets. The RA-5C Vigilante first flew on June 30, 1962, and was capable of all-weather, long-range, carrier- or land-based, multisensor, reconnaissance missions involving high-altitude supersonic, or very low-altitude, high-speed penetrations. Its inertial navigation system provided the precise position location information demanded. The Vigilante pilot and the reconnaissance/attack navigator (RAN) sat in tandem under individual clamshell-type canopies. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 12717 PeriscopeFilm
ALLIS CHALMERS M100 MOTOR GRADER PROMOTIONAL FILM  50774
 
06:48
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm This promotional film for Allis Chalmers' new M100 Motor Grader likely dates to the early 1960s. The 167hp engine and high clearances offered by this machine were touted by AC in the film, which was called the "most productive motor grader in its class". The company hoped that the M100 and its rollaway blade design would represent a new standard in the construction industry. Its design also offered high visibility and ground-hugging stability. Surprisingly, this version of the M-100 is shown without a protective cab, a safety consideration for this type of equipment. Allis-Chalmers was a U.S. manufacturer of machinery for various industries. Its business lines included agricultural equipment, construction equipment, power generation and power transmission equipment, and machinery for use in industrial settings such as factories, flour mills, sawmills, textile mills, steel mills, refineries, mines, and ore mills. The first Allis-Chalmers Company was formed in 1901 as an amalgamation of the Edward P. Allis Company (steam engines and mill equipment), Fraser & Chalmers (mining and ore milling equipment), the Gates Iron Works (rock and cement milling equipment), and the industrial business line of the Dickson Manufacturing Company (engines and compressors). It was reorganized in 1912 as the Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Company. During the next 70 years its industrial machinery filled countless mills, mines, and factories around the world, and its brand gained fame among consumers mostly from its farm equipment business's orange tractors and silver combine harvesters. In the 1980s and 1990s a series of divestitures transformed the firm and eventually dissolved it. Its successors today are Allis-Chalmers Energy and AGCO. A grader, also commonly referred to as a road grader or a motor grader, is a construction machine with a long blade used to create a flat surface during the grading process. Typical models have three axles, with the engine and cab situated above the rear axles at one end of the vehicle and a third axle at the front end of the vehicle, with the blade in between. In certain countries, for example in Finland, almost every grader is equipped with a second blade that is placed in front of the front axle. Some construction personnel refer to the entire machine as "the blade". Capacities range from a blade width of 2.50 to 7.30 m and engines from 93–373 kW (125–500 hp). Certain graders can operate multiple attachments, or be used for separate tasks like underground mining. In civil engineering, the grader's purpose is to "finish grade" (to refine or set precisely). The "rough grading" is performed by heavy equipment or engineering vehicles such as scrapers and bulldozers. Graders are commonly used in the construction and maintenance of dirt roads and gravel roads. In the construction of paved roads they are used to prepare the base course to create a wide flat surface upon which to place the asphalt. Graders are also used to set native soil foundation pads to finish grade prior to the construction of large buildings. Graders can produce inclined surfaces, to give cant (camber) to roads. In some countries they are used to produce drainage ditches with shallow V-shaped cross-sections on either side of highways. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 22789 PeriscopeFilm
CATERPILLAR TRACTOR D8 BULLDOZER  POWERSHIFT TRANSMISSION PROMOTIONAL FILM 52514
 
11:01
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm Made by the Caterpillar Corporation SPLIT SECOND SHIFTS promotes their new D8 tractor bulldozer and the legendary Powershift transmission. The single-lever Powershift allowed the operator to shift quickly, with more power per load being delivered and resulting in more efficiency. The Powershift gives the power of direct drive and torque converter tractors through the planetary gear, as seen through animation at the 3:00 mark. At 7:30 the film shows the Powershift transmission up close, with the torque converter seen at 7:47. At 8:15, the film shows some of the Caterpillar manufacturing facilities including their legendary quality control operations and the Powershift assembly line at 9:10. The Caterpillar D8 is a large track-type tractor designed and manufactured by Caterpillar. Though it comes in many configurations, it is usually sold as a bulldozer equipped with a detachable large blade and a rear ripper attachment. Several types of bulldozer blade can be used on the front of the tractor: Straight ("S-Blade"): A short blade with no lateral curve and no side wings. It can be used for fine grading Angle: held by an U shape frame that has three holes on each side, to set the blade to 3 positions: right, center, and left. Universal ("U-Blade"): A tall and very curved blade with large side wings to carry more material. "S-U" combination: A shorter blade with less curvature and smaller side wings Other blade types include landfill U-Blades, woodchip U-blades, and two-way blades for work inside the holds of ships. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 46072 PeriscopeFilm
RECOGNITION OF THE P-61 AIRPLANE - WWII 81860
 
06:18
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm The Northrop P-61 Black Widow, named for the American spider, was the first operational U.S. military aircraft designed specifically for night interception of aircraft, and was the first aircraft specifically designed to use radar. It was an all-metal, twin-engine, twin-boom design developed during World War II. The first test flight was made on May 26 1942, with the first production aircraft rolling off the assembly line in October 1944. The last aircraft was retired from government service in 1954. Although not produced in the large numbers of its contemporaries, the Black Widow was effectively operated as a night-fighter by United States Army Air Forces squadrons in the European Theater, the Pacific Theater, the China Burma India Theater and the Mediterranean Theater during World War II. This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 36384 PeriscopeFilm
WWII RADIO OPERATOR   VACUUM TUBE TRAINING FILM 77564
 
13:27
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm This WWII training film familiarizes radio operators with Vacuum Tubes. As the film explains, these are the devices used in radios that control electric current between electrodes in an evacuated container. Vacuum tubes mostly rely on thermionic emission of electrons from a hot filament or a cathode heated by the filament. The grid and filament forming the tube are explained, as are some basic circuits, and a couple of electronics packages are shown. In electronics, vacuum tube, electron tube, tube (in North America), or valve (in Britain and some other regions) is a device that controls electric current between electrodes in an evacuated container. Vacuum tubes mostly rely on thermionic emission of electrons from a hot filament or a cathode heated by the filament. This type is called a thermionic tube or thermionic valve. A phototube, however, achieves electron emission through the photoelectric effect. Not all valves/electron tubes are evacuated "vacuum tubes"; gas-filled tubes are similar devices containing a gas, typically at low pressure, which exploit phenomena related to electric discharge in gases, usually without a heater. The simplest vacuum tube, the diode, contains only a heater, a heated electron-emitting cathode (the filament itself acts as the cathode in some diodes), and a plate (anode). Current can only flow in one direction through the device between the two electrodes, as electrons emitted by the cathode travel through the tube and are collected by the anode. Adding one or more control grids within the tube allows the current between the cathode and anode to be controlled by the voltage on the grid or grids. Tubes with grids can be used for many purposes, including amplification, rectification, switching, oscillation, and display. Invented in 1904 by John Ambrose Fleming, vacuum tubes were a basic component for electronics throughout the first half of the twentieth century, which saw the diffusion of radio, television, radar, sound reinforcement, sound recording and reproduction, large telephone networks, analog and digital computers, and industrial process control. Although some applications had counterparts using earlier technologies such as the spark gap transmitter or mechanical computers, it was the invention of the vacuum tube that made these technologies widespread and practical. In the 1940s the invention of semiconductor devices made it possible to produce solid-state devices, which are smaller, more efficient, more reliable, more durable, and cheaper than tubes. Hence, from the mid-1950s solid-state devices such as transistors gradually replaced tubes. The cathode-ray tube (CRT) remained the basis for televisions and video monitors until superseded in the 21st century. However, there are still a few applications for which tubes are preferred to semiconductors; for example, the magnetron used in microwave ovens, and certain high frequency amplifiers. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 42165 PeriscopeFilm
THE NEW YORK NEW HAVEN AND HARTFORD RAILROAD  " SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND"  TRAVEL FILM 52144
 
14:55
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm American Locomotive (Alco), General Electric, and the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad Company teamed up to create this 1950s color film promoting the aforementioned rail line. We see the rolling greens hills and valleys as well as the Atlantic coastline and farmland of Southern New England starting at mark 00:20 as the narrator explains how the region is the cradle of American liberty. Offering “a wholesome way of life” we’re told how the area is also known for its railroads as a train speeds past at mark 01:30, and that the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad Company is a reminder of the trains that made New England great. We learn of the first diesel electric switcher in New England at mark 01:50 and see passenger and freight trains as well as freight yards such as the Cedar Hill Yard in New Haven, Connecticut (mark 02:38) as the narrator touts their various upgrades and associated benefits. We learn how fright line schedules are coordinated with other railroad companies. The film visits a freight yard in Maybrook, New York, as cars are coupled with engines and cabooses. Near mark 06:00 the film looks at some of the obstacles train lines face, including operating at different elevations including within valleys, each presenting a different power need. At mark 06:45 we learn how diesel electric engines (like the one made by Alco and GE) have alleviated some problems and provide more motoring power while taking a detailed look at the behemoths. “What a powerful puller our diesel electric is,” the narrator boasts at mark 11:41, while continuing to explain how diesel engines make better time than steamers because they do not have to routine make stops for water. Such advancements, the viewer is reminded, are symbols of the train line’s “railroad leadership.” We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 33505 PeriscopeFilm
Survival Under Atomic Attack 1951 NUCLEAR BOMB SHELTER FILM 29180 HD
 
08:59
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm Created by the U.S. Government, "Survival Under Atomic Attack" explains the dangers of the atomic bomb, the effects of radiation and how to protect oneself if caught in the open or in the home. The film was made in the era before the hydrogen bomb made nuclear survival impossible. Survival Under Atomic Attack was also the title of an official United States government booklet released by the Civil Defense Office. Released at the onset of the Cold War era, the book and pamphlet were in line with rising fears that the Soviet Union would launch a nuclear attack against the United States, and outlined what to do in the event of an atomic attack. Four of the "myths" examined in the film are: Atomic Weapons Will Not Destroy The Earth Atomic bombs hold more death and destruction than man ever before has wrapped up in a single package, but their over-all power still has very definite limits. Not even hydrogen bombs will blow the earth apart or kill us all by radioactivity. Doubling Bomb Power Does Not Double Destruction Modern A-bombs can cause heavy damage 2 miles away, but doubling their power would extend that range only to 2.5 miles. To stretch the damage range from 2 to 4 miles would require a weapon more than 8 times the rated power of present models. Radioactivity Is Not The Bomb's Greatest Threat In most atom raids, blast and heat are by far the greatest dangers that people must face. Radioactivity alone would account for only a small percentage of all human deaths and injuries, except in underground or underwater explosions. Radiation Sickness Is Not Always Fatal In small amounts, radioactivity seldom is harmful. Even when serious radiation sickness follows a heavy dosage, there is still a good chance for recovery. This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 80275 PeriscopeFilm
CONSTRUCTION OF THE LAKE OROVILLE DAM & SPILLWAY HISTORIC FILM 53054 MD
 
24:05
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm This historic film shows the construction of the Oroville Dam, which has been in the headlines of late. The film provides a fascinating look at how this massive embankment dam was created. The film was likely made by McDowell Wellman, who designed the state of the art excavator shown in the film. Oroville Dam is an earthfill embankment dam on the Feather River east of the city of Oroville, California, in the Sierra Nevada foothills east of the Sacramento Valley. At 770 feet (235 m) high, it is the tallest earthfill dam in the U.S. and serves mainly for water supply, hydroelectricity generation and flood control. The dam impounds Lake Oroville, the second largest man-made lake in the state of California, capable of storing more than 3.5 million acre-feet (4.4 km3). Built by the California Department of Water Resources (DWR), Oroville Dam is one of the key features of the California State Water Project (SWP), one of two major projects passed that set up California's statewide water system. Construction was initiated in 1961, and despite numerous difficulties encountered during its construction, including multiple floods and a major train wreck on the rail line used to transport materials to the dam site, the embankment was topped out in 1967 and the entire project was ready for use in 1968. The dam began to generate electricity shortly afterwards with completion of the Edward Hyatt Pump-Generating Plant, then the country's largest underground power station. Since its completion in 1968, the Oroville Dam has allocated the flow of the Feather River from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta into the State Water Project's California Aqueduct, which provides a major supply of water for irrigation in the San Joaquin Valley as well as municipal and industrial water supplies to coastal Southern California, and has prevented large amounts of flood damage to the area — more than $1.3 billion between the years of 1987 and 1999.[10] The dam has confined fish migration up the Feather River and the controlled flow of the river as a result of the Oroville Dam has affected riparian habitat. Multiple aims at trying to counter the dam's impacts on fish migration have included the construction of a salmon/steelhead fish incubator on the river, which began shortly after the dam was completed. In February 2017, the main and emergency spillways failed, leading to the evacuation of 188,000 people near the dam. After deterioration of the main spillway largely stabilized and the water level of the dam's reservoir dropped below the top of the emergency spillway, the evacuation order was lifted We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 56297 PeriscopeFilm
B-29 HIGH ALTITUDE BOMBING RAID OVER JAPAN   TARGET INVISIBLE  25994
 
08:36
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm Made in 1945 just after WWII ended, TARGET INVISIBLE was produced by the First Motion Picture Unit and features actor Clayton Moore (best known as 'The Lone Ranger') at the end speaking about war bonds. The film follows a squadron of bombers from their base in the Marianas through their mission over Tokyo. Particular emphasis is given on the use of radar for guidance to the target. At this time radar was fairly new and prized as one of the Allies' high tech weapons, and the film explains how it was instrumental in winning the war. At the end of the short, an announcer tells the audience that, while the war is over, Americans can now help win the peace sponsoring science through buying bonds. Radar is an object-detection system that uses radio waves to determine the range, angle, or velocity of objects. It can be used to detect aircraft, ships, spacecraft, guided missiles, motor vehicles, weather formations, and terrain. A radar transmits radio waves or microwaves that reflect from any object in their path. A receive radar, which is typically the same system as the transmit radar, receives and processes these reflected waves to determine properties of the object(s). Radar was secretly developed by several nations in the period before and during World War II. The term RADAR was coined in 1940 by the United States Navy as an acronym for RAdio Detection And Ranging. The term radar has since entered English and other languages as a common noun, losing all capitalization. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 62108 PeriscopeFilm
XB-70 SUPERSONIC STRATEGIC BOMBER MACH 3 FLIGHT TEST FILM 71152
 
09:37
Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm Created by North American Aviation, this historic film shows the flight test program for the XB-70 Valkyrie at Edwards AFB in California including the first flight at supersonic speeds, and the various tests made prior to undertaking a flight at Mach 3.0 -- three times the speed of sound or 2200 miles an hour. It includes footage of test pilot Alvin "Al" White, who was badly injured in an accident that destroyed one of the two prototype aircraft. The North American Aviation XB-70 Valkyrie was the prototype of the B-70 nuclear-armed, deep-penetration strategic bomber for the U.S. Air Force's Strategic Air Command. North American Aviation designed the Valkyrie bomber as a large, six-engine aircraft capable of reaching Mach 3+ while flying at 70,000 feet (21,000 m); these speed and altitude capabilities would allow the evasion of interceptor aircraft, the only effective weapon against bomber aircraft at the time. Due to improved high-altitude surface-to-air missiles (SAMs), the U.S. Air Force's doctrine changed to low-level penetration bombing, the large development costs of the B-70 program, and the introduction of intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) to the U.S. nuclear arsenal, led to the cancellation of the B-70 program in 1961. As such, two prototype aircraft were built, and designated XB-70A; these aircraft were used for supersonic test-flights during 1964–69. In 1966, one prototype crashed after colliding in midair with a smaller jet aircraft; the remaining Valkyrie bomber is in the National Museum of the United States Air Force, in Ohio. The XB-70's maiden flight was on 21 September 1964. In the first flight test, between Palmdale and Edwards AFB, shortly after take-off one engine had to be shut down, and an undercarriage malfunction warning meant that the flight was flown with the undercarriage down as precaution, limiting speed to 390 mph - about half that planned. As seen in the film on landing, the rear wheels of the port side main gear locked, the tires ruptured, and a fire started. The Valkyrie first became supersonic (Mach 1.1) on the third test flight on 12 October 1964, and flew above Mach 1 for 40 minutes during the following flight on 24 October. The wing tips were also lowered partially in this flight. XB-70 No. 1 surpassed Mach 3 on 14 October 1965 by reaching Mach 3.02 at 70,000 ft (21,300 m). The first aircraft was found to suffer from weaknesses in the honeycomb panels, primarily due to inexperience with fabrication and quality control of this new material. On two occasions, honeycomb panels failed and were torn off during supersonic flight, necessitating a Mach 2.5 limit being placed on the aircraft. The deficiencies discovered on AV-1 were almost completely solved on the second XB-70, which first flew on 17 July 1965. On 3 January 1966, XB-70 No. 2 attained a speed of Mach 3.05 while flying at 72,000 ft (21,900 m). AV-2 reached a top speed of Mach 3.08 and maintained it for 20 minutes on 12 April 1966. On 19 May 1966, AV-2 reached Mach 3.06 and flew at Mach 3 for 32 minutes, covering 2,400 mi (3,840 km) in 91 minutes of total flight. A joint NASA/USAF research program was conducted from 3 November 1966 to 31 January 1967 for measuring the intensity and signature of sonic booms for the National Sonic Boom Program (NSBP). Testing was planned to cover a range of sonic boom overpressures on the ground similar to but higher than the proposed American SST. In 1966, AV-2 was selected for the program and was outfitted with test sensors. It flew the first sonic boom test on 6 June 1966, attaining a speed of Mach 3.05 at 72,000 ft (21,900 m). Two days later, AV-2 crashed following a mid-air collision with an F-104 while flying in a multi-aircraft formation.Sonic boom and later testing continued with XB-70A #1. The second flight research program (NASA NAS4-1174) investigated "control of structural dynamics" from 25 April 1967 through the XB-70's last flight in 1969. At high altitude and high speed, the XB-70A experienced unwanted changes in altitude. NASA testing from June 1968 included two small vanes on the nose of AV-1 for measuring the response of the aircraft's stability augmentation system. AV-1 flew a total of 83 flights. The XB-70's last supersonic flight took place on 17 December 1968. On 4 February 1969, AV-1 took its final flight to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base for museum display (now the National Museum of the United States Air Force). This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2K. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 178100 PeriscopeFilm
WWII BRITISH FILM SEA FORT    HORSE SAND FORT    75744
 
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Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm This rare WWII British film shows the operation of a Sea Fort, a fortified tower equipped with anti-aircraft guns and heavy artillery. The fort in question appears to be Horse Sand Fort, one of the larger Royal Commission sea forts in the Solent off Portsmouth, Hampshire, England. It is 73 metres (240 ft) across, built between 1865 and 1880, with two floors and a basement and armour-plated all round. The original armament was to have been 45 10-inch and 44 12.5-inch rifled muzzle-loading (RML) guns on the gun floors and 10 12" RMLs on the roof in five turrets. In fact the turrets were never built and the limited space meant the 12.5-inch guns had to be operated with less than full charges of powder. In 1882, 12-inch rifled breech-loading guns were placed in alternate bays. Horse Sand Fort was built on a ring of masonry consisting of large concrete blocks with an outer skin of granite blocks, the interior being filled with clay and shingle and covered with a thick layer of concrete. The lower foundation walls of the fort are 18 metres (59 ft) thick. The fort is split into three levels with the top measuring 62.4 metres (204 ft 9 in) in diameter. The floors would have originally provided storage of armoury and guns and the things needed to sustain the men that were stationed on site. The top of the fort consisted of a lighthouse and various chimneys and ventilators. The fort has its own Artesian well (aquifer) which provided fresh water. The seaward side of the fort was covered in a heavy iron-armoured plating to protect it from seaborne attack. Access to the fort was by a wooden-decked landing stage supported on cast-iron piles. In the late 19th century the Solent forts were painted in a black/white checkered paint scheme as an early form of dazzle camouflage. In its unrestored state remains of this pattern is still visible on parts of Horse Sand Fort. During the Second World War extensive submarine defences were built in the form of large concrete blocks running about 1.8 metres (5.9 ft) below sea level from the fort to the shore at Southsea. With only a single narrow gap to allow small craft to pass through, this barrier (and a much shorter one running south from No Man's Land Fort towards Ryde Sands) remains as the cost of demolition is deemed too high. In March 2012, the fort was purchased by AmaZing Venues who operate the venue under the Solent Forts brand (owners of No Man's Land Fort and Spitbank Fort) and is to be converted into a museum. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 55574 PeriscopeFilm
1955 INDIANAPOLIS 500  "THE UNFORGETTABLE 500"  INDIANAPOLIS INDIANA 76084
 
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Support Our Channel : https://www.patreon.com/PeriscopeFilm Created by Perfect Circle to promote their piston ring products, THE UNFORGETTABLE 500 presents the 1955 Indianapolis 500. This was the 39th International 500-Mile Sweepstakes held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway on Monday, May 30, 1955. The event was part of the 1955 AAA National Championship Trail, and was included in the 1955 World Drivers Championship. The race is notable to many as the race in which Bill Vukovich was killed in a crash while seemingly on his way to an unprecedented third consecutive Indy 500. The race was won by Robert Charles 'Bob' Sweikert (May 20, 1926 – June 17, 1956), an American racing driver, best known as the winner of this race and the 1955 National Championship, as well as the 1955 Midwest Sprint car championship - the only driver in history to sweep all three in a single season. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 74416 PeriscopeFilm