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Videos uploaded by user “Donald Pugh”
A PERFECT RETIREMENT
 
19:25
John is a retired bachelor in his 70s, although he looks to be about 50 years of age. He lives entirely on an Australian government pension travelling in a self-sufficient motorhome which he usually parks without rent. His life is an exciting and enviable one of continuous travel around Australia and overseas with young female backpackers. This is the story of his lifestyle and how he set it up. It begins with selling his home after retirement at the age of 60 and driving around Australia with a female companion for a number of years. After splitting up, he realized that there are many female backpackers traveling around Australia who would welcome the opportunity of free travel without any expenses in a camper home. He facilitates their travels by taking them wherever they want to go and devoting himself to them. It gives him a purpose and companionship for months at a time. In return, they've reciprocated by inviting him over to their countries such as Korea,Taiwan, Singapore, and Hong Kong and have shown him around. This video outlines his adventures.
Views: 44679 Donald Pugh
CORNWALLIS NS
 
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FROM WHEELCHAIR NOMAD DIARY...2003 CC Leaving Annapolis Royal we followed Highway 1 to Cornwallis and Digby. We drove through Cornwallis, taking photographs. I was amazed at my reality for this naval training base with the reality I saw tonight, a sleepy deserted collection of empty white two storeys H shaped dormitories, and an unkempt parade square along side a quiet country roadway. There wasnt even a fence and we had free access to drive around. Then, as a first year officer cadet in that summer of 1967, the base was a place of incessant stress, scrubbing, waxing and polishing floors, ironing uniforms, spit polishing boots and brass, early morning running, double time marching, saluting, inspections, punishments, classes, and weekly exams. I seldom got off the base, had no transport and a social life limited to drinking with other cadets. The object of the training seemed to be creating a pressure cooker situation to weed out those unsuitable to be naval officers through limited sleep, a hectic schedule and unrelenting humiliations from those in charge. Cadets did quit or were dismissed and sent home but I survived along with three other Queens University friends Martin Perry, Chris Rogers and Jim Rose
Views: 10241 Donald Pugh
SEGWAY WHEELCHAIR BY DREAMFIT
 
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ABOUT THE DREAMFIT FOUNDATION Dreamfit Foundation - Dreamfit makes the dreams of ... www.dreamfit.com.au/ Dreamfit makes the dreams of people with disabilities possible through innovative equipment solutions. Dreamfit Foundation is a not for profit organisation that is making dreams possible for people with disabilities through innovative equipment solutions. Our skilled and passionate team of engineers and therapists are committed to supporting people with disabilities to get out and try new activities, engage in their community and overcome challenges in their everyday life. Segway The Segway PT is a two-wheeled, self-balancing, battery-powered electric vehicle invented by Dean Kamen. It is produced by Segway Inc. of New Hampshire. The name Segway is derived from the word segue, meaning smooth transition. PT is an abbreviation for personal transporter. Computers, sensors, and electric motors in the base of the Segway PT keep the device upright when powered on with balancing enabled. The rider commands the PT to go forward or backward by shifting their weight forward or backward on the platform. The PT uses gyroscopic sensors and accelerometer-based leveling sensors to detect the resulting changes in its pitch angle and, to maintain balance, it drives its wheels forward or backward as needed to return its pitch to upright. In the process, the rider establishes and then maintains a desired speed by modulating the extent and duration of their fore/aft weight shifts. To turn and steer, the rider shifts the handlebar to the left or right. The PT responds by adjusting the speeds of the wheels in opposite directions causing the PT to yaw and, if not traveling forward or backward, turn in place. At speed, the amount of shift of the handlebar corresponds to the amount of left or right lean required by the rider to balance themselves on the platform during a turn. Segway PTs can reach a speed of 12.5 miles per hour (20.1 km/h).
Views: 4059 Donald Pugh
A FEEL GOOD NEWS ITEM RE AN AUTISTIC BOY PLAYING BASKETBALL
 
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AUTISM I was moved by this story! Autism is a brain development disorder that impairs social interaction and communication, and causes restricted and repetitive behavior, all starting before a child is three years old. This set of signs distinguishes autism from milder autism spectrum disorders (ASD) such as Asperger syndrome. Autism is distinguished by a pattern of symptoms rather than one single symptom. The main characteristics are impairments in social interaction, impairments in communication, restricted interests and repetitive behavior. Other aspects, such as atypical eating, are also common but are not essential for diagnosis.[22] Individual symptoms of autism occur in the general population and appear not to associate highly, without a sharp line separating pathological severity from common traits.[23] WIKIPEDIA
Views: 5182 Donald Pugh
brighton england
 
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EE 2003 TRIP From wheelchair nomad diary... We then got into the car and drove along the beach passing a burnt out derelict pier, Brighton pier and the hotel which was targeted for the Brighton bombing, to Jackson Wharf, a large tourist complex of boats, restaurants and stores. Our meal at Potters was delightful, a large prawn entrée for me, followed by Penne Pasta cooked in butter and bacon, and washed down by a South East Australian Shiraz. I paid a hundred pounds or $250.00 for the meal for four people. We explored the Marina admiring a Ferrari Sports car and large yachts. Then we proceeded into Brighton to the Royal Pavilion. The Royal Pavilion is an incredible structure for Brighton, a palace constructed like the Blue Mosque in Istanbul, with multitudinous domes and minarets, constructed by one of Queen Victorias sons, known for profligacy, whom later became King George 4th. We didnt pay the ten-pound entrance fee, and I continued on to a mens clothing store to buy a new belt for $50.00. Things are very expensive here. Then we did visit the nearby museum with excellent displays of Brighton through the ages
Views: 6159 Donald Pugh
VISITING FREMANTLE WA
 
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Fremantle /ˈfriːmæntəl/ is a city in Western Australia, located at the mouth of the Swan River. Fremantle Harbour serves as the port of Perth, the state capital. Fremantle was the first area settled by the Swan River colonists in 1829. It was declared a city in 1929, and has a population of approximately 25,000. Fremantle is renowned for its well-preserved architectural heritage, including convict-built colonial-era buildings, an old jetty and port, and prisons; presenting a variety and unity of historic buildings and streetscapes. These were often built in limestone with ornate façades in a succession of architectural styles. Rapid development following the harbour works gave rise to an Edwardian precinct as merchant and shipping companies built in the west end and on reclaimed land.
Views: 9962 Donald Pugh
PROCESSING COPPER ORE IN  KITWE ZAMBIA
 
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Mopani Copper Mines Mopani Copper Mines Plc (Mopani) is a joint venture company based in Kitwe as 95% of its operations are located there, comprising Glencore International AG (73.1%), First Quantum Minerals Ltd. (16.9%) and Zambian Consolidated Copper Mines Limited (10%). Mopani operates the Mufulira mine, smelter, concentrator and copper refinery and the Nkana mine, concentrator and cobalt plant. MCM produced 134,800 tons of copper and 2,040 tons of cobalt in 2003. MCM is investing in a number of oxide copper projects at several of its properties, including an in-situ leaching project at Mufulira and heap leaching at Nkana, and has achieved significant production increases at its underground mining operations in Kitwe and Mufulira. Copper production from internal sources was supplemented by the purchase of some 18,000 tons of copper in high-grade oxide concentrate bought from the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Nkana Mine Nkana mine is one of the largest in Africa, a copper mine located 1 km south-west of Kitwe. The mine is underground as well as open pit and is in operation since 1932 and has produced 6,000,000 tons of copper so far. Its reserves underground include 69,000,000 tons of grading, 16,000,000 tons of copper, and 98,000 tons of cobalt. Its resources include 126,000,000 tons of grading, 43,000,000 tons of copper, and 300,000 tons of cobalt. Copper and cobalt mineralisation occur within the ore shale. Copper mineralisation in the deposits changes from mostly chalcopyrite in the South Orebody, to chalcopyrite-bornite in the Central area and to bornite-chalcopyrite at Mindola. Cobalt occurs as carrollite and cobaltiferous pyrite in approximately equal proportions. The mine produces copper and cobalt from three sources: Mindola Shaft, Central Shaft and South Orebody Shaft. Vertical crater retreat is the predominant mining method while sublevel open-stopping and sublevel caving methods are also used. Other metallurgical facilities, under a management contract by an affiliate of the Anglo American Group, include the Nkana smelter (not owned by Mopani), acid plant (not owned by Mopani) and copper refinery (not owned by Mopani). There is extensive mine tailings around this mine. Nkana Concentrator Nkana Concentrator of Mopani mines, located in Kitwe, treats copper-cobalt sulphide ore using a bulk flotation and segregation flotation flowsheet to produce separate copper and cobalt concentrates. Nkana Concentrator is the most important mineral processing unit of Mopani, as it contributes about 65% of cobalt concentrates treated at the Nkana and Chambeshi Cobalt plants to produce high purity cobalt metal. Konkola Copper Mine Konkola Copper Mine (KCM) is the largest copper mining company in the country. Although based in Chingola, 15% of its operations—namely Nkana Refinery, Nkana Acid Plants and Nkana Smelter (the largest smelter in the nation) -- are located in Kitwe. The Nkana Smelter is the largest primary copper production plant in Zambia. The plant treats concentrates mainly from Nkana, Nchanga, and Konkola mines, which are wholly owned by KCM to produce up to 150,000 tons of new copper. Nkana Smelter The smelter produces high grade anodes, which are electrolytically refined. Sulphur dioxide gas produced by the converters is converted into sulphuric acid which is then used at the Tailings Leach Plant in Nchanga for recovering oxide copper. The smelter also produces discard slag from the reverbs that is rich in cobalt which is stored for future reclamation. This smelter was part of the Konkola Copper Mine's operation at privatisation and has subsequently closed. Nkana Refinery The Nkana Copper Refinery produces electrolytically refined copper in the form of cathodes. The copper meets the LME premium quality grade. The tankhouse has a capacity of about 180,000 tons of finished copper per annum. Nkana Acid Plants There are two single contact sulphuric acid plants at Smelterco, namely the No.3 and No.4 plants. No.3, the largest, is still operational. The plant has a design capacity of 1,050 tons of acid per day. FROM http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining_in_Zambia
Views: 40860 Donald Pugh
NIMBIN  NEW SOUTH  WALES
 
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Nimbin Located in the hills of the Great Dividing Range of northern New South Wales, Australia, Nimbin's a small town of 500 people. It's as if small avenue of Amsterdam has been reconstructed in the middle of the mountains behind frontier style wooden facades. Nimbin's located about 70 km west of Byron Bay, in rich lush, verdant rain forest. It's rugged hilly country, with some outstanding rock formation. The land has been cleared in the valleys for farmland . The land is highly fertile and great for horses and dairy cattle, as well as permaculture and self-sufficiency farming. Early settlers quickly recognized its potential in the 1800s. They followed the red Cedar timber cutters, of the 1840s who cleared much of the first growth forest, transporting the timber by small steam railways, eastward. By the late 1800s the land was largely denuded of forest and was becoming settled by dairy and banana farmers. Early 1900s photographs show all a well-developed community in nimbin with telegraph office and church. By the 1960s, Nimbin was in decline, with an overproduction of milk. Business moved away from town and shops were empty, and up for sale at bargain prices. In 1973, Nimbin was chosen as the location for the Aquarius Festival, an annual event, attracting war protesters and hippies. 1973 footage of this event shows the sweeping nature of the town and the impact of the festival. Many of the hippies who visited the town chose to stay and communes were established. The festival became an annual event, attracting more and more counter culture adherents. The town has been described as the drug capital of Australia, a social experiment and an escapist subculture. Certainly, a visit to nimbin today gives the impression of a hippie culture celebrating the use of marijuana, particularly with her annual Mardi Grass festival, which seeks iegalisation of marijuana. The fertile soils in the rugged hills around nimbin provide ample opportunity for growing marijuana with the town as a focus point for sales. The Mardi Gras's festival features, such events as rolling your own joint, the gigantic good medicine joint and bong and a prohibition protest rally with ganja faeries. The event occurs along a main street. The Nimbin Hemp Embassy provides drug information and implements. Nearby is the Nimbin Hemp Bar providing coffee and cake, located near the nimbin Museum tracing the rise of the counterculture in Nimbin. With marijuana being illegal in Australia Nimbin is an obvious target for the police with particular police attention being paid to the annual Mardi Grass. Sniffer dogs are employed in and tourists to the town checked. Nimbin shops such as the hemp bar, and museum are periodically closed. In spite of their efforts, the drug culture endures. The police effort to rid Nimbin of marijuana is like trying to rid Queensland of bananas and business continues as usual. At least when the shopkeepers can get out of bed. Nimbin remains an icon in Australia cultural history for the alternative lifestyle.
Views: 21334 Donald Pugh
CREE INDIANS OF THE MOOSE DRAINAGE BASIN, NE ONTARIO CANADA CIRCA 1900 -
 
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Cultural Optimality, A Study of the Rise and Decline of the Cree Culture of North Eastern Ontario .A Thesis Submitted to the Department of Canadian Studies of Carleton University In Partial Fulfilment of the Requirements For the Degree of Master of Arts By Donald E . Pugh .May, 1972 . ABSTRACT Although contact between a western civilization and a primitive culture often leads to the disintegration of the latter, the culture of the Swampy Cree of the Moose River drainage basin appears to have reached its optimal period or cultural climax during the fur trade from their contact with European technology . A complementary perception of the resources of the region permitted a symbiotic division of labour by each culture which strengthened and materially benefited the other without a loss in cultural identity . Cultural disintegration for the. Cree only occurred in the twentieth century when the European culture altered its goals and relationship to the land and introduced a cultural clash through encroachment on Cree hunting grounds, the imposition of European laws, and the suppression of native Cree customs and practices
Views: 25930 Donald Pugh
WITTENOOM WA AUSTRALIA
 
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Wittenoom Western Australia04:06 - 3 years ago AA 1976 Infamous asbestos mining town in the heart of the Pilbara There is something very bitter-sweet about Wittenoom. This near ghost town set at the mouth of the Wittenoom Gorge is the home of Australia¹s greatest industrial disaster and yet it is located in one of the most beautiful areas of the Pilbara. Located 1450 km north of Perth and 460 m above sea level this once thriving settlement is in the heart of the beautiful Hamersley Range. It is ideally located for people wishing to visit the numerous gorges which cut through the range. However, as everyone in Australia now knows, Wittenoom is also in a valley of death. The signs around the town call attention to the problem: ŒDANGER - Asbestos Tailings Risk Area. Inhaling Asbestos Fibres May Cause Cancer
Views: 5788 Donald Pugh
RIDGETOWN ONTARIO  PAST AND PRESENT
 
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Ridgetown is a community located in south-east Chatham-Kent, Ontario, Canada.It has a population of roughly 3,500 and is one of many small farming communities in Chatham-Kent. Ridgetown was incorporated as a village in 1875 with just over 2,000 citizens. In 1975, with well over 3,220 residents, Ridgetown celebrated its centennial. Residents celebrated by dressing in 1875 costumes, conducting beard-growing contests, barbecues, and other activities. Today, with over 3.500 residents, Ridgetown proudly shares the outlying areas that produce major crops such as soybeans, corn, wheat, grains, apples and peaches. There is also a large percentage of dairy farms that are operated mostly by eastern European settlers. The railway tracks of the Canada Southern/Michigan Central/New York Central and Detroit River and Lake Erie/Pere Marquette/C&O railways used to run through Ridgetown, though these are both gone now – the last steam train through Ridgetown was in 2005. In 2007, plans to install a line of electricity-generating wind turbines several kilometres to the south of town, along Highway 3 between Morpeth and Blenheim, were in development. This was one of four wind turbine projects approved for Chatham-Kent in 2007. The high school in Ridgetown, Ridgetown District High School (RDHS), has just under 300 students in grades 7-12 The former Ridgetown College has been part of the University of Guelph since 1997 and is now University of Guelph, Ridgetown Campus. It is a venue for OAC- the Ontario Agricultural College. About 900 students presently attend 2 and 3-year courses on agriculture, veterinary technology, graphical information systems, horticulture and environmental management. Ridgetown has a thriving manufacturing industry, mainly serving the automotive market, which employ hundreds of local and area people. Thyssen-Krupp, KSR International, Waltron Trailers, Trak Tool Machines, and Challenger Pallet are the larger plants. Hundreds of smaller service businesses thrive in the area, including many long-established and unique stores in the downtown area. Wikipedia Source
Views: 1765 Donald Pugh
TWO BOUNDERS AND A BICYCLE
 
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A Bounder is a belt drive wheelchair made by http://www.21stcenturyscientific.com/. With the addition of a larger front drive pulley, it will cruise at 20 k/h. This Gopro video is about a 30 km trip from Shenton Park WA, across Perth to Guilford WA and the Swan River Valley. The trip ended at a delightful boutique brewery. http://ironbarkbrewery.com.au/.
Views: 815 Donald Pugh
GOLD TOWN GHOST TOWN PARKHILL MINE WAWA ONTARIO CANADA 1974
 
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CC Cracked cement foundations, grey tailings and tangled bush give little indication today of the existence of the prosperous little boom village of Goldpark. Located only three miles from Wawa on the Surluga Road, next to the lucrative Parkhill Mine, the Communitys 250 miners between 1929 and 1944 produced 54,301 ounces of gold valued at $1,691,000 ...
Views: 6527 Donald Pugh
WHEELCHAIR VS BICYCLE
 
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I've modified the bounder wheelchair (21st Century Scientific, Inc.) by replacing the small drive pulley with a smaller one driving the speed to 20 km/hr on the level and even 30km/hr down a steep hill. The wheelchair manufacturer here. http://wheelchairs.com/ Route foll.owed Irvine St Peppermint Grove (Perth WA Australia) to Freshwater Bay, Mosman Park, North Fremantle to Clancys Fish Pub in Fremantle.
Views: 784 Donald Pugh
FARMING IN SOUTHERN CROSS WA WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
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Southern Cross is located on the Great Eastern Highway, three hours drive west of Kalgoorlie. It is the centre for the Yilgarn Shire (Yilgarn is the Aboriginal word for white stone or quartz). The area includes Bullfinch, Marvel Loch, Moorine Rock, Bodollin and Koolyanobbing. Southern Cross is situated in a prosperous, well established farming area including some of the largest farms in the state. The history that surrounds the district complements the beauty and adventure of the Shire of Yilgarn. Gold was discovered in Southern Cross in 1888 by Tom Risely and Mick Toomey. They named the place after the stars that had been their guide. Today all the streets and the salt lake of the town are named after stars or constellations. The land is spectacularly beautiful in spring with wildflowers. Popular attractions within the Southern Cross area include Baladje Rock, Frog Rock, Karalee Dam and Hunts Soak; all interesting to visit and ideal picnic spots. For a panoramic view of the area, head up to Wimmera Hill Lookout which overlooks the township, the surrounding farmland and goldmines. Just east of town is the old cemetery which was developed as a Pioneer Memorial. The early settlers relied on horse and camel teams to transport goods. Chaff to feed them was expensive and so crops were grown on the 160 acre Miners Homestead blocks. Later, in the 1920s a number of blocks were opened up as a Soldier Settlement, followed by the Miner's Settlement project establishing miners suffering from "Miners' Phthisis on the land. The Depression coupled with the low rainfall proved disastrous for the farmers. Only a few managed to survive. Today, the Yilgarn is a prosperous well established farming area comprising grain, wool, sheep, cattle and pigs with some of the largest farms in the state. The history that surrounds the district complements the beauty and adventure of the Shire of Yilgarn. CARAVAN TRIP 2008 DON PUGH
Views: 9894 Donald Pugh
TRAIN TRIP TO MERREDIN WA WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
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The first AvonLink left Northam at 6.55am on September 24, 1995. The event attracted considerable fanfare, it being the first new country passenger train service in Western Australia for 47 years. It arrived in Perth at 8.27am to more celebrations, not the least because it was the States first dedicated, long-distance commuter train. However, it was always seen as more than a commuter exercise in that it opened up the whole Avon Valley-Toodyay-Northam area for long-term growth in tourism and regional development. In late June 2004, the AvonLink introduced extended journeys three days a week through to Merredin. This service has become known as the MerredinLink. These extra train services provide a new transport option for people in communities such as Cunderdin, Tammin, Kellerberrin, Merredin as well as other smaller rural towns in the region. The new $12 million AvonLink train made its maiden trip from Northam to the city on August 1, 2005 - in the process officially marking the end of service for the 'old' Prospector railcars, which have travelled the route for more than 30 years. Now that the new AvonLink has come into service, passengers can expect a smoother, faster and more comfortable ride aboard Australias latest commuter train. This upgraded commuter service represents a major investment by the WA Government into powered railcars. The new AvonLink is the final part of a $56 million contract with NSW-based United Goninan, covering the delivery of nine railcars, configured into four trains - the two-car AvonLink, two two-car Prospectors and a three-car Prospector. The new AvonLink will provide one of the most comfortable commuter train rides in Australia with air conditioning throughout, cloth seats with footrests (and some with power outlets for laptop computers), and background music. It operates twice daily, Monday to Friday between Midland, Toodyay and Northam. Passengers arriving at Midland will be able to connect with Perths suburban electric train services. The MerredinLink operates from the East Perth Rail Terminal through to Merredin on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Like the new Prospector, the AvonLink was built in Newcastle and was put through extensive local testing before its introduction to service. The AvonLink joins the Prospector and Australind Train services as part of Transwa regional rail service don pugh may 2009
Views: 2285 Donald Pugh
josephine mine Hawk Junction Near WAWA ONTARIO CANADA  1973
 
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Story about exploring an abandoned iron ore mine in Norhern Ontario. See http://donpugh.dyndns.org/ABOUT%20DON/wawa/NEWSPAPER3/STUDENTS%20VISIT%20JOSEPHINE%20MIE%2000001.pdf
Views: 2250 Donald Pugh
Mundaring Weir Historical DAM CONSTRUCTION 1898-1901 PERTH WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
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ARCHIVAL PHOTOS FROM BATTYE LIBRARY HISTORY Mundaring Weir is the name of a dam (and historically the adjoining locality) which are located 39 km from Perth, Western Australia in the Darling Scarp. It is currently located in the Mundaring locality. The dam crosses the Helena River. The town of Mundaring was gazetted in 1898, the same year as the commencement of construction of the dam. A soldier, Ensign Robert Dale, became the first European to explore the region in 1829. European populations did not grow significantly until construction of the dam in the late 1890s. This involved the building of a railway line from Mundaring to the Mundaring Weir site. The Irish Australian engineer C. Y. O'Connor was involved the design of a scheme that transported water to the Eastern Goldfields of Coolgardie and Kalgoorlie in the eastern part of Western Australia. Work commenced to raise the dam in the late 1940s, which was completed in November 1951. In the early 1970s the downstream dam from the weir — the 'pipehead dam' was constructed. Mundaring Weir was the terminus of the Mundaring Weir Branch Railway, which was originally constructed by the Public Works Department of WA for the transport of materials for the construction of the dam. It was not only after the completion of the weir that the location became popular with picnickers and sightseers, the project caught the imagination of the public in Perth. The landscaped grounds of the weir, and the lower zig-zag section of the end of the railway line (which can still be seen when the capacity of the dams falls below approximately 35%) feature prominently in post cards of numerous weekend and special picnic excursion trains that travelled to the weir until the late 1940s. The steepness of the Mundaring weir railway line restricted the capacity of the railways to conduct the picnic trains, as the Msa Garratt steam engines were the most suitable, but in short supply, at times when the weir was overflowing in the 1940s. The railway line was closed in 1952. DON PUGH
Views: 6156 Donald Pugh
WHEAT SHEEP FARMING  GAMBLING IN WESTERN AUSTRALIA.mp4
 
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300 KM EAST OF PERTH NEAR MERREDIN LIES A 4000 HECTAR FARM PRODUCING WHEAT AND SHEEP. THE FARMER EXPLAINS SOME OF THE CHALLENGES OF FARMING; DROUGHT, FROST, HEAT, AND LOW WHEAT PRICES. WIKIPEDIA The Wheatbelt region is one of the nine regions of Western Australia. It partially surrounds the Perth metropolitan area, extending north from Perth to the Mid West region, and east to the Goldfields-Esperance region. It is bordered to the south by the South West and Great Southern regions, and to the west by the Indian Ocean, the Perth metropolitan area, and the Peel region. Altogether, it has an area of 154,862 square kilometres (59,793 sq mi) (including islands), and a population of about 72,000 people. The population is widely distributed, with only about 16,000 people living in the main towns of Northam, Narrogin, Merredin and Moora. The Wheatbelt encompasses a range of environments and industries. Near the coast, it receives relatively high rainfall and mild temperature, and its 150 kilometres (93 mi) of coastline is a significant tourist area. In contrast, the eastern fringe is very arid, and is mainly used for mining of minerals including gold, nickel and iron ore. The remainder to the region is highly suited to agriculture, and is the source of nearly two thirds of the state's wheat production, half of its wool production, and the majority of its Lamb and mutton, oranges, honey, cut flowers and a range of other agricultural and pastoral products.
Views: 8819 Donald Pugh
THE GHOST TOWN THAT WOULDNT DIE  ORA BANDA  WA 2011a
 
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Ora Banda is a townsite, now a virtual ghost town, located 66 kilometres (41 mi) north east of Kalgoorlie. According to folklore, the town name is Spanish meaning 'band of gold'.[1] History The Ora Banda Hotel was the place to meet up.‎ Gold was discovered in the district in 1893 and in 1909 the Ora Banda Progress Committee requested the Government make additional lots available, but it was 1911 before a decision was made to declare a townsite there The survey of lots was made in 1911, and the townsite gazetted in 1912[2]. By 1910 there were approximately 2,000 miners and their families living in the area. The town had two stores, two butchers, two bakers, a town hall, dining halls, a post office, a police station, churches, boarding houses and billiards saloons. The once famous Huntington Mills Bank was situated there. Which in its time it was the largest bank in the Southern Hemisphere. In 1911 the Ora Banda Hotel was constructed by Alfred E Garnett using stone and brick. On 17 June 1913, Eileen Walls (13yrs old) led a procession of school children up the main street, and had the honour of cutting the ribbon and so officially opened the Ora Banda State Battery. The five head battery ran three shifts and in 1936 another five head had to be added. Water was supplied to the town by dams until the town was connected to the Goldfields Water Supply Scheme from Kalgoorlie in 1933 The Ora Banda school burnt down Living conditions were rough. Mine shafts were scattered across the area [edit] Current Today's goldmining companies are still working the same sites discovered nearly a century ago, and on the outskirts of town you will find the Ora Banda State Battery which is still used to crush ore. Annually in September the population swells for a day for the Ora Banda Race Day. The race track is opposite the historical Ora Banda Inn. The town hit the headlines in 2000 when Gypsy Joker, Billy Grierson, was fatally shot while sitting at a camp fire on the old town site. Former Criminal Investigation Bureau chief and Ora Banda hotel owner Don Hancock was suspected of the shooting and his properties were later fire-bombed. Hancock was later killed in a car bombing in 2001 in Perth, Western Australia in a revenge attack by other Gypsy Jokers.[3
Views: 3568 Donald Pugh
MIDLAND RAILWAY WORKSHOPS PERTH WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
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Midland Railway Workshops AA 2006 The Midland Railway Workshops ran for close to a century on the Eastern fringe of Perth, Western Australia. Large and multifaceted, the Workshops were vital to the development and maintenance of the WA rail system, and a crucial training ground for skilled tradespeople. Their closure in 1994 brought to an end not only a specific industrial complex but also a complex social community. Despite the harsh, dirty and often dangerous working conditions, many thousands of former workers regretted the loss of the traditions, camraderie and pride in workmanship that characterised their Midland working lives. RAILWAYS from http://wwwmcc.murdoch.edu.au/midland/
Views: 5580 Donald Pugh
Copper Production in Kitwe Zambia 2011a
 
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Mopani Copper Mines Mopani Copper Mines Plc (Mopani) is a joint venture company based in Kitwe as 95% of its operations are located there, comprising Glencore International AG (73.1%), First Quantum Minerals Ltd. (16.9%) and Zambian Consolidated Copper Mines Limited (10%). Mopani operates the Mufulira mine, smelter, concentrator and copper refinery and the Nkana mine, concentrator and cobalt plant. MCM produced 134,800 tons of copper and 2,040 tons of cobalt in 2003. MCM is investing in a number of oxide copper projects at several of its properties, including an in-situ leaching project at Mufulira and heap leaching at Nkana, and has achieved significant production increases at its underground mining operations in Kitwe and Mufulira. Copper production from internal sources was supplemented by the purchase of some 18,000 tons of copper in high-grade oxide concentrate bought from the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Nkana Mine Nkana mine is one of the largest in Africa, a copper mine located 1 km south-west of Kitwe. The mine is underground as well as open pit and is in operation since 1932 and has produced 6,000,000 tons of copper so far. Its reserves underground include 69,000,000 tons of grading, 16,000,000 tons of copper, and 98,000 tons of cobalt. Its resources include 126,000,000 tons of grading, 43,000,000 tons of copper, and 300,000 tons of cobalt. Copper and cobalt mineralisation occur within the ore shale. Copper mineralisation in the deposits changes from mostly chalcopyrite in the South Orebody, to chalcopyrite-bornite in the Central area and to bornite-chalcopyrite at Mindola. Cobalt occurs as carrollite and cobaltiferous pyrite in approximately equal proportions. The mine produces copper and cobalt from three sources: Mindola Shaft, Central Shaft and South Orebody Shaft. Vertical crater retreat is the predominant mining method while sublevel open-stopping and sublevel caving methods are also used. Other metallurgical facilities, under a management contract by an affiliate of the Anglo American Group, include the Nkana smelter (not owned by Mopani), acid plant (not owned by Mopani) and copper refinery (not owned by Mopani). There is extensive mine tailings around this mine. Nkana Concentrator Nkana Concentrator of Mopani mines, located in Kitwe, treats copper-cobalt sulphide ore using a bulk flotation and segregation flotation flowsheet to produce separate copper and cobalt concentrates. Nkana Concentrator is the most important mineral processing unit of Mopani, as it contributes about 65% of cobalt concentrates treated at the Nkana and Chambeshi Cobalt plants to produce high purity cobalt metal. Konkola Copper Mine Konkola Copper Mine (KCM) is the largest copper mining company in the country. Although based in Chingola, 15% of its operations—namely Nkana Refinery, Nkana Acid Plants and Nkana Smelter (the largest smelter in the nation) -- are located in Kitwe. The Nkana Smelter is the largest primary copper production plant in Zambia. The plant treats concentrates mainly from Nkana, Nchanga, and Konkola mines, which are wholly owned by KCM to produce up to 150,000 tons of new copper. Nkana Smelter The smelter produces high grade anodes, which are electrolytically refined. Sulphur dioxide gas produced by the converters is converted into sulphuric acid which is then used at the Tailings Leach Plant in Nchanga for recovering oxide copper. The smelter also produces discard slag from the reverbs that is rich in cobalt which is stored for future reclamation. This smelter was part of the Konkola Copper Mine's operation at privatisation and has subsequently closed. Nkana Refinery The Nkana Copper Refinery produces electrolytically refined copper in the form of cathodes. The copper meets the LME premium quality grade. The tankhouse has a capacity of about 180,000 tons of finished copper per annum. Nkana Acid Plants There are two single contact sulphuric acid plants at Smelterco, namely the No.3 and No.4 plants. No.3, the largest, is still operational. The plant has a design capacity of 1,050 tons of acid per day. FROM http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining_in_Zambia
Views: 9542 Donald Pugh
ALGOMA CENTRAL RAILWAY ONTARIO 1973-4
 
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1973 TO 1974 WITH HISTORICAL PHOTOS COMPLETED WHILE A TEACHER AT MICHIPICOTEN HIGH SCHOOL WAWA, NEAR HAWK JUNCTON, ONTARIO PHOTOS MONTREAL RIVER, OBA, AGAWA CANYON RAILWAYS
Views: 2475 Donald Pugh
EARLY GOLD MINING IN SOUTHERN CROSS WA WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
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Southern Cross, Western Australia From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Southern Cross Western Australia Southern Cross townsite Population: 708 [1] Established: 1890 Postcode: 6426 Elevation: 355 m (1,165 ft) Location: 371 km (231 mi) E of Perth 225 km (140 mi) W of Kalgoorlie 110 km (68 mi) E of Merredin LGA: Shire of Yilgarn State District: Eyre Federal Division: Kalgoorlie Mean Max Temp Mean Min Temp Annual Rainfall 25.5 °C 78 °F 10.7 °C 51 °F 294.9 mm 11.6 in Coordinates: 31°15′14″S 119°20′38″E/31.254°S 119.344°E/-31.254; 119.344 Southern Cross is a town in Western Australia, 371 kilometres east of Perth on the Great Eastern Highway. It was founded by gold prospectors in 1888, and gazetted in 1890.[2] It is the major town and administrative centre of the Shire of Yilgarn.[3] At the 2006 census, Southern Cross had a population of 708.[1] The town of Southern Cross is one of the many towns which run along the Mundaring to Kalgoorlie Goldfields Water Supply Scheme engineered by C. Y. O'Connor.[4] A succession of gold rushes in the Yilgarn region near Southern Cross in 1887, at Coolgardie in 1892, and at Kalgoorlie in 1893 caused a population explosion in the barren and dry desert centre of Western Australia. It is named after the Southern Cross constellation,[2] and the town's most significant streets are named after stars. Southern Cross is on the standard gauge railway from Perth to Kalgoorlie and beyond. The Prospector and Indian Pacific passenger trains service the town. The former narrow gauge railway reached Southern Cross on 1 July, 1894.[5] DON PUGH CARAVAN TRIPP 2008
Views: 2804 Donald Pugh
CUNDERDIN WA
 
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Cunderdin, Western Australia From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia LGA: Shire of Cunderdin State District: Central Wheatbelt Federal Division: O'Connor Coordinates: 31°39′22″S 117°14′38″E/31.656°S 117.244°E/-31.656; 117.244 Cunderdin is a town located in the Wheatbelt region of Western Australia 156 km east of Perth,[2] on Great Eastern Highway. Contents [hide] [edit] History The first European visitor to the area was Charles Cooke Hunt, who explored the area in 1864 and recorded the name Cunderdin, from the Aboriginal name of a nearby hill. The meaning of the name is unknown but is thought to mean "place of the bandicoot". Like many small towns in the area, Cunderdin developed as a stop-off town during the gold rush in the WA Goldfields. Significantly in 1894 the railway arrived signalling the earliest settlement in the town. Later, in 1901, the Goldfields Water Scheme designed by C. Y. O'Connor led to a renewed increase in population of the town. The townsite was gazetted in 1906.[3] [edit] Economy As part of the wheatbelt, the economy of Cunderdin is primarily agricultural. There is an agricultural college 3 km north of the town; it is one of the six campuses of the Western Australia College of Agriculture. There are approximately 110 students supported by 50 staff and their families.[4] Cunderdin Airstrip is situated next to the agriculture college.[4] It was built early in the Second World War as a base for the RAAF flying school and bomber base.[5] [edit] Farming Cunderdin is mostly a farming community. Former Chairman of the WA Colleges of Agriculture, Alan Carter, is one of the many farmers to occupy land in the region. His produce consists of wheat, lupins, canola and also livestock. There is also great livestock production. The Jolma Poll Dorset Stud, run by Perry Jasper and Co., has been very successful when competing in exhibition shows in Perth and Adelaide. [edit] Places of interest Ettamogah Pub, CunderdinCunderdin Museum [6] Youndegin, 19 km south of Cunderdin, has the ruins of the earliest settlement in the area Cunderdin Hill Lookout - panoramic views of the area Railway Water Tower Ettamogah Pub Cunderdin mini-golf course, which is situated next to the Cunderdin Reservoir, itself part of the Goldfields water supply scheme Cunderdin Pool Historic sites of Youndigin and Doonananning Cunderdin Town Oval Rick Hart Seconds Golden Pipeline C Y O'Connor Park Cunderdin daviesia (Daviesiacunderdin) is a small to medium sized shrub, which grows to 1.6 m high. It appears that it is isolated to the Cunderdin area.[7] Visitors cannot help but notice the large Ettamogah theme hotel and pub when driving through the town, due to its redness and a car on its roof. It is based on the comics of Ken Maynard and is one of a few of these pubs scattered throughout Australia. There are similar venues in Sydney, Albury-Wodonga,[8] The Sunshine Coast, Queensland and Morley. Cunderdin also serves as a stop on the Prospector and Avonlink rural train services. wa CARAVAN TRIP 2008 DON PUGH WESTERN AUSTRALIA
Views: 1497 Donald Pugh
Growing Up in Belleville Ontario, CANADA (Moira River, Bay of Quinte) 2003
 
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CC 2003 Belleville (2004 population 49,060, metropolitan population 88,025) is a city located at the mouth of the Moira River on the Bay of Quinte in southeastern Ontario, Canada, in the Quebec City-Windsor Corridor. It is the seat of Hastings County. Originally the Native settlement Asukhknosk, the city was settled by United Empire Loyalists in 1789, after which it became known as Meyer's Creek after prominent settler and industrialist John Walden Meyers. It was renamed Belleville in honour of Lady Arabella Gore in 1816, after a visit to the settlement by Sir Francis Gore and his wife. Belleville became an important railway junction with the completion of the Grand Trunk in 1855. Procter & Gamble, Lipton, Wilson Sports, Sears and Nortel are among the internationally known companies with industrial operations in Belleville. Belleville is the home of Loyalist College and Albert College. There are four publicly funded and two separate (Catholic) high schools names St. Teresa's and Nicholson Catholic College. Belleville is the home of the Belleville Bulls Ontario Hockey League club. The Belleville Bulls play at the Yardmen Arena located at Highway 401 and Cannifton Road. Wikipedia Reference
Views: 9559 Donald Pugh
GOLD MINING IN SOUTHERN CROSS THE LAST THIRTY YEARS
 
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Thomas Risely¹s account of the discovery gives an insight into the hardships which were to confront the settlers of the area. Myself, Toomey and Charlie Crossland, started out from our camp at Barcoyton. After prospecting the belt for some days our water gave out. Our blackboy whom I call Wheelbarrow, said he knew plenty of Gabby (water) at Koorkoordine. When we got to Koorkoordine we found one of Hunt¹s dry wells, just as dry as we were. We decided to start back through the night and return to our camp, distance about 40 miles, and we travelled by the Southern Cross - taken to stars to the north - thanks to Charlie Crossland¹s knowledge of the stars. Or our bones would be bleaching in the scrub now, as we were two days without water at this time. We had to remain at our camp until rains came, them myself and Mick Toomey set out again. We discovered gold four miles from Koorkoordine. I named the place Southern Cross.¹ There was a small goldrush but it was short-lived (this was an area of reef gold not alluvial gold) because on 17 September 1892 a young Queenslander, Arthur Wellesly Bayley, rode into Southern Cross with 554 oz of gold which he had discovered at Fly Flat (now Coolgardie). The discovery started the greatest gold rush in West Australian history. Overnight the miners who had flocked to the Southern Cross diggings moved to the more lucrative eastern fields. The town¹s growth was dramatic but it was never a boisterous centre like Coolgardie or Kalgoorlie. In 1891 the Eastern Goldfields first courthouse was built. By 1893 it had become a municipality. And in 1894 the railway arrived giving the town fast and reliable access to the coast. Today the area produces oats, barley, wheat, sheep and gold but the average annual rainfall of 279 mm means that the land is marginal. In recent times the fluctuating price of gold has seen renewed interest in the Southern Cross area with both Broken Hill Metals NL and Golden Valley Mines NL being the main operators in the region
Views: 1412 Donald Pugh
BAMIYAN KABUL AFGHANISTAN 1975
 
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DON departed for a five month overland trip with Exodus Expeditions in a Bedford truck to teach abroad in Sept., 1975. Don visited Istanbul and enjoyed the Blue Mosque, Santa Sophia and the Tokapi Palace and the gold and silver bazaar at Hasht Behesht Esfahan, Iran. Don traveled through northern Afghanistan to Mazar-e-Sharif, Bamiyon and Kabul. Don went trekking for a week in Nepal in November, 1975. Sherpa's carried his pack, erected his tent, and awoke him with coffee and breakfast in the morning. A plentiful supply of chung, a local corn beer added spice to the trekking up and down steep hills. Don spent a month in India around Christmas, 1975.« Don traveled through northern Afghanistan to Mazar-i-Sharif, Bamiyan and Kabul in Nov., 1975, on his way from Canada to Australia. Bamian is first mentioned in 5th Century A.D. Chinese sources and was visited by the Chinese travelers Fa-hsien around 400 A.D. and Hsüan-tsang in 630 A.D.; it was by that time a centre of commerce and of the Buddhist religion. Two great figures of Buddha there date from this period; the larger is 53 m high and the smaller is 120 feet. These statues are carved from the living rock and are finished with fine plaster. When Hsüan-tsang saw the figures, they were decorated with gold and fine jewels. The two Buddha figures, together with numerous ancient man-made caves in the cliffs north of the town, have made Bamian a major Afghan archaeological site. The caves are of various forms, and the interiors of many bear traces of fine fresco painting that links them with contemporary caves in Sinkiang, China. The modern town lies below the caves.«
Views: 9212 Donald Pugh
MAGPIE MINE NEAR WAWA ONTARIO 1973
 
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Michipicoten's Magpie Mine Canada's first commercial venture at iron ore beneficiation occurred at the Magpie Mine. Located 15 miles north of Wawa, the crumbling and blackened cement foundations of this mine can be reached by a narrow, rocky, four-wheel drive road from Highway 17, The mine's former size and industrial importance are evident in the gigantic chimneys, now lying crumbled on the ground like discarded drinking straws, their concrete flaking from the intricate network of rusted, twisted reinforcement rods. Two parallel cement walls, thirty feet in height, 200 feet long, and 100 feet apart mark the former coal and ore stock piles. Large circular holes on the southern wall outlines former feed ducts from the. kilns, whose foreboding six brick-lined interiors crouch like beasts amidst dark piles of coal. In 1909, prospector Bert Blackington discovered traces of the siderite ore and succeeded-in interesting the Algoma Steel Company in developing the claim. BY 1911 a railway spur wound north from the A.C.R. over a douglas fir trestle bridge spanning the Magpie River, to snake at Mile 7 precariously along a 900 foot trestle.
Views: 2422 Donald Pugh
Meckering WA WESTERN AUSTRALIA 2008
 
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wa CARAVAN TRIP 2008 DON PUGH Meckering, Western Australia From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Meckering Western Australia Population: 116 (2006 Census) [1] Established: 1895 Postcode: 6405 Elevation: 203 m (666 ft) Location: 130 km (81 mi) East of Perth 32 km (20 mi) East of Northam 22 km (14 mi) West of Cunderdin LGA: Shire of Cunderdin State District: Central Wheatbelt Federal Division: O'Connor Coordinates: 31°37′41″S 117°00′36″E/31.628°S 117.01°E/-31.628; 117.01 Meckering is a town 130 km east of Perth, Western Australia along the Great Eastern Highway. Meckering is located within the Shire of Cunderdin. A railway line was completed in the area in 1895 and Meckering was selected as a station site. The first name chosen for the townsite was Beebering, the Aboriginal name for the hills just north of the town. The townsite of Beebering was gazetted in 1895.[2] The name of the town was changed to Meckering in 1897 to agree with the station name and the name for the town that was used locally. Meckering is an Aboriginal word thought to mean "moon on the water" or "good hunting". At 10:59 am on 14 October 1968, a 40-second earthquake measuring 6.9 on the Richter Scale destroyed the town, and had effect on a considerable area in the south western region of Western Australia.[3] As it was a public holiday, the risk of casualties was reduced. Buildings in the metropolitan area of Perth were damaged as a result of the earthquake, and tremors were felt as far away as Geraldton, Kalgoorlie, Esperance, and Albany.[3] The building codes and various structural issues for Western Australia were modified as a result of the earthquake and further development of earthquake engineering.[4] [5] The memory and significance of the event is commemorated by the local and wider community in a number of ways.[6] [7] [8] [9] A later earthquake at Cadoux in 1979 was on a par with the Meckering event in some people's memories, although less damage occurred in Perth. Meckering is a main stopping point for freight trucks on the way to the eastern states
Views: 1812 Donald Pugh
COTTESLOE TO BUNBURY WA VIA THE AUSTRALIND TRAIN TRANSWA RAILWAY
 
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The City of Bunbury is a Local Government Area in the South West region of Western Australia, covering an area of 65.7 square kilometres (25.4 sq mi) along the coast about 180 kilometres (112 mi) south of Perth, the capital of Western Australia. The council is responsible for just over half of the Greater Bunbury metropolitan area, and the Port of Bunbury. The City of Bunbury has a population of 29,702 (2006). [edit] History In 1871, the Bunbury Municipal Council was gazetted, and in 1899 the Bunbury Suburban Road Board (which became the Bunbury Road Board in 1908) followed. The two entities merged in 1950. On 1 July 1961, Bunbury Municipal Council became a Town Council following changes to the Local Government Act. In 1979 it attained City status. Transwa Australind From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Australind in Transwa livery at the Bunbury Passenger Terminal.The Transwa Australind is a diesel railcar train operated by Transwa that runs between Perth, Western Australia, and the south-west city of Bunbury on the South Western Railway (Western Australia). The Australind fleet consists of three powered railcars ADP101, ADP102 and ADP103, with two non-driving trailers ADQ121 and ADQ122. These units form one railcar with an ADP car at each end, and the two ADQ cars in the center. The remaining ADP car is normally stowed at the maintenance depot for servicing. [edit] History The Australind service began in 1947 and was hauled by a steam locomotive. In the mid 1960s, diesel-electric locomotive power took over the route. The current self-powered diesel railcars were introduced in 1987. In July 2003 the railcars were painted in a new livery in line with the creation of the Transwa name. In 2007 the railcars were again given a facelift and painted white as part of an overall refurbishment of the fleet. Australind in original Westrail livery at suburban Claisebrook station. The now removed footbridge is also visible. The Australind at Perth station on Platform 3. The other train is a Transperth Thornlie bound train on Platform 4. [edit] Australind stops Perth railway station Armadale railway station Byford Mundijong Serpentine North Dandalup Pinjarra Waroona Yarloop Cookernup Harvey Brunswick Junction Bunbury Passenger Terminal
Views: 5428 Donald Pugh
TOODYAY:  HERITAGE TOWN PAST AND PRESENT
 
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Toodyay, Western Australia From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Population: 674 (2001 census) Established: 1860 Postcode: 6566 Location: 25 km (16 mi) NW of Northam 85 km (53 mi) NE of Perth LGA: Shire of Toodyay State District: Moore Federal Division: Pearce Coordinates: 31°33′04″S 116°27′50″E / 31.551°S 116.464°E / -31.551; 116.464 Toodyay is a town located in the Avon Valley, 85 km north-east of Perth, Western Australia. History The Old Gaol Old Court House in Fiennes Street, now used as Shire of Toodyay offices (2004) Memorial to James Drummond, botanist, in Pelham Reserve, overlooking the Toodyay townsiteThe original village of Toodyay was one of the earliest inland towns in the State, established along the Avon River in 1836 after settlers including James Drummond, Captain Francis Whitfield and Alexander Anderson explored the area; Drummond established his homestead Hawthornden nearby. However, the location was subject to flooding which lead to its abandonment in the 1850s, and a new townsite was established on higher ground 2 km upstream. This was gazetted in 1860 as 'Newcastle' and the original settlement came to be referred to as 'Old Toodyay'. In May 1910 due to confusion with the New South Wales city of Newcastle, Newcastle became known as 'Toodyay', and the original townsite, which had by this time declined substantially, became 'West Toodyay'.[1] The meaning of the name is uncertain, although it is Noongar Indigenous in origin - maps in 1836 referred to "Duidgee", while some believe it was named for a local woman named Toodyeep who accompanied early explorers in the area.[2] Another source suggests it could mean "place of plenty". The name "Duidgee" is preserved in the riverside recreation area, "Duidgee Park". In 1861, Western Australia's best known bushranger, Moondyne Joe, was imprisoned in Toodyay for stealing a horse, but escaped. After a series of crimes and jail terms, he was on the run again, returning to Toodyay in 1865 to steal supplies for an attempt to escape overland to South Australia. The annual Moondyne Festival is a light-hearted celebration of this darker side of Toodyay's history. The Newcastle Gaol, in Clinton Street, was completed in 1864 and in use as a state gaol until 1909. It is now preserved as the Old Gaol Museum; an historic building and tourist attraction. In 1870, a steam-driven flour mill, Connor's Mill, was built on Stirling Terrace by George Hasell. The mill was also used to generate electricity in the early part of the twentieth century. Saved from demolition in the 1970's, and restored to demonstrate the milling process and machinery, the mill now forms the museum section of the Toodyay Visitors Centre.[3] The State Register of Heritage Buildings includes the Gaol, Connor's Mill, Toodyay Public Library (built 1874), Toodyay Post Office (designed by George Temple-Poole, built 1897) and the Toodyay Fire Station (designed by Ken Duncan, built 1938), as well as several other historic sites in Toodyay.[3] Some of the historic architecture of shops and residences along Stirling Terrace, the main street, form a distinctive frontage described as the Stirling Terrace Streetscape Group.[4] [edit] Transport Toodyay, being an historic township and an hour's distance from Perth, is a venue for daytrippers, tourists and motorcyclists. The circuit - Toodyay Road through Gidgegannup / Toodyay / Chittering Valley and Great Northern Highway - is a favourite with motorcyclists. On most weekends, Toodyay's main street is lined with cruisers and sportsbikes of many models, makes and vintages, their riders relaxing in the increasing number of pavement cafes that are springing up to accommodate the burgeoning tourist trade. Toodyay also serves as a stop on the Avonlink and Prospector passenger trains from Perth to Northam and Kalgoorlie. DON PUGH CARAVAN TRIP 2008
Views: 6333 Donald Pugh
NANUTARRA Roadhouse WA WESTERN AUSTRALIA ASBURTON
 
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The Ashburton River is located within the Pilbara region of Western Australia. The river mouth with the Indian Ocean is located 45 km ESE of the town of Onslow. The river crosses the North West Coastal Highway at Nanutarra. The river has a length of approximately 680 km. The river basin covers an area of 66,850 km2 and includes the towns of Paraburdoo and Tom Price. [1]. Fauna The river supports a wide variety of fish including barramundi and Mangrove Jack. [4] The occasional salt water crocodile is also spotted in the river.[5] Bird species such as Back swans, the Striated Heron [6], Australia bustard and Bush Stonecurlew can be found along the rivers banks. WIKIPEDIA CARAVAN TRIP 2007
Views: 4019 Donald Pugh
EARLY SETTLEMENT IN PIONEER WAWA ONTARIO CANADA 1900
 
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cc (HISTORY OF VERY EARLY SETTLEMENT) wAWA, Ontario is a town in the north of Ontario, Canada. Its population (2004) is approximately 3,700. The town is known for its 28-foot-tall metal statue of a Canada goose, built in 1963. Wawa takes its name from the Ojibwe word for "wild goose", wewe. In 1897, gold was discovered on nearby Wawa Lake which led to a rush to the area. Production had slowed by 1906 but as mining technology improved, additional amounts began to be extracted from the area. Iron ore extraction has also been an important industry in the area. The community was served by the Algoma Central Railway. Wawa suffered a population decline after the Helen Mine and Algoma Ore Division sinter plant shut down, leaving its main industries as forestry and tourism. In recent months, diamond prospecting and exploration of creating a trap rock mine on the shore of Lake Superior have created new excitement in the town. (WIKIPEDIA)
Views: 4919 Donald Pugh
BELLEVILLE ONTARIO A HISTORICAL TOUR VIA OLD POSTCARDS
 
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RESIDENT 1950 TO 1966, VISITS 1975 1988 2003 History WIKIPEDIA http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belleville%2C_Ontario Originally the site of a Native settlement known as Asukhknosk, the future location of the city was settled by United Empire Loyalists in 1789, after which it became known as Meyer's Creek after prominent settler and industrialist John Walden Meyers. It was renamed Belleville in honour of Lady Arabella Gore in 1816, after a visit to the settlement by Sir Francis Gore and his wife. Belleville became an important railway junction with the completion of the Grand Trunk Railway in 1855. Economy Procter & Gamble, Lipton, Wilson Sports, Sears and Nortel are among the internationally known companies with industrial operations in Belleville. The central Canadian Forces Post Office (CFPO) is located here. As this post office is the gateway between the civilian and military postal systems of Canada, Belleville serves as the mailing address for Canadian Armed Forces Bases and Ships abroad. Education Belleville is the home of Loyalist College, the local community college. There are three public high schools in the City of Belleville: Centennial, Moira and Quinte secondary schools and two publicly funded Roman Catholic high schools: St. Theresa and Nicholson Catholic College. Finally, Belleville has two private schools: Albert College, a private boarding school and Quinte Christian High School aka, the Dutch High School, which opened in 1977 and moved into new facilities in September 2006. Sports Belleville is home to the Belleville Bulls of the Ontario Hockey League. The Belleville Bulls play at the Yardmen Arena located at Highway 401 and Cannifton Road. A major summer event which attracts thousands of people to Belleville each year is the Waterfront & Ethnic Festival. NHL stars Bobby Hull, Brett Hull, Matt Cooke, Andrew Raycroft, and Marc Crawford were born in Belleville. Susanna Moodie moved there with her husband in 1840, after several years spent "roughing it in the bush," and it was also home to Sir MacKenzie Bowell, Canada's fifth Prime Minister as well as author Farley Mowat. DON PUGH
Views: 2615 Donald Pugh
Bangor NORTHERN IRELAND
 
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County Down NI 2003 FROM WHEELCHAIR NOMAD DIARY... We then drove along the coastline, through a series of villages, threaded together like beads on a necklace; including Groomsport, North Down, Donaghadee, Millsle, Ballywater, Portavogie, Cloghy, Kearney, and Portaferry. Each village was highly scenic, built on the seafront, usually with a long sandy beach, with an artificial breakwater creating a yacht harbour. Yachts are moored along the coast, reflecting off the blue water below cloud-flecked skies. Buildings lining the stone breakwater walls are usually three or four stories in height and like most Irish buildings are usually freshly painted, usually a bright white colour. At Portavogie we encountered a genuine fishing harbour with twenty or so ocean-going trawlers crowded into the harbour, sporting a confusion of masts, radio antennas and booms. Each boat flew a union jack, the breakwater was painted red, white and blue and murals were painted on the roadway and nearby buildings. There can be no mistaking the loyalty to England offered by this small fishing village or the strength of the local Ulster Volunteer Brigade. We moved further south passing local pubs, but Richard was getting tired of driving these very narrow roads with sharp curves, and a constant stream of oncoming threatening traffic hogging the tarmac
Views: 5020 Donald Pugh
Boys of the Lake Memoirs of Growing Up in Shenton Park, Western Australia
 
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This is the docudrama about Steven, and his mischievous misadventures as a young boy. Separated from his parents by a domestic dispute, he was placed in a Salvation Army's boys' home in the working class suburb of Shenton Park, in Perth, WA. Facing challenges, Stephen develops a relationship with the Rosalie boys and with the land, which was to sustain him throughout a productive life. SYNOPSIS This is the docudrama about Steven, and his mischievous misadventures as a young boy. Separated from his parents by a domestic dispute he was placed in a Salvation Army's boys' home in the working class suburb of Shenton Park, in Perth, WA. Steven develops a relationship with the Rosalie boys and with the land. This connection was to sustain him throughout a productive life. The viewer watches as he engages in many fun filled activities at the lake, including playing games and exploring the surrounding territories. We see him get up to mischief with his young friends in many ways, such as launching fruit raids, stoning roofs, and breaking lights. We watch as he progresses through school and obtains part-time employment. We finally see him reach adulthood and join with him as an old man when he reflects those early days with nostalgia.
Views: 2561 Donald Pugh
MINING TOUGH AT EARLY HELEN MINE WAWA ONTARIO CANADA 1900S
 
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ALGOMA-CHAPLEAU NEWS Review Life Hazardous, Rough in Early Helen Mine DON PUGH 1973 Olden days in the early Helen Mine between 1898 and 1918 were vastly different from present. The 250 to 400 miners, mostly Finns, Italians and French, freshly ar rived from Europe, and unable to speak English must have felt bewildered and shocked as they first climbed the 187 wooden steps to the Helen plateau. There they viewed the dark grey crusher, hoist house and tall wooden head-frame, surrounded by 35 quickly constructed frame buildings. Far below, in the distance ran mile after mile of billowing dark green sprue, broken by white mountains of tough granite rock and the scattered blue of nurthern lakes and Lake Superior. As the frigid November winds cut off the weekly Manitou and Caribou steamer service, the miners were isolated till Spring, working 12 hours a day, sleeping in company bunkhouses, eating meals of meat and potatoes at the company cookery and buying food and clothing at the company general store. For married men a rough log cabin hewn from the surrounding bush and heated by iron stoves provided accommodation while a small public school and a library of 500 books educated their children.
Views: 2768 Donald Pugh
JASNA GORA BLACK MADONNA Czestochowa Poland 2003
 
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FROM WHEELCHAIR NOMAD DIARY... 2003 PP We drove to the cathedral, called Jasna Gora or the illuminated hill. My guidebook gave me insight into the significance of this site for the Polish. The church contains a painting of the Virgin Mary and baby Jesus, on a wooden board, painted in the Byzantine icon style of the sixth to ninth century. It was donated to the Pauline Monks in 1382 with a gift of an elevated two hundred and ninety three-metre limestone hill with chapel in Czestochowa near the Warta River. Catholic myth accepts that Christs disciple Saint Luke did the painting on a tabletop during dinner with the holy family. Prayer to this picture of Saint Mary, as mother of Jesus, is believed to lead to Saint Mary becoming mother of every man,
Views: 14339 Donald Pugh
MT WHALEBACK MINE TOUR NEWMAN WA AUSTRALIA
 
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CARAVAN TRIP 2007 From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Newman Western Australia Location of Newman in Western Australia (red) Population: 5,139 [1] Established: 1960s Postcode: 6753 Elevation: 544 m (1,785 ft) [2] Location: 1189 km (739 mi) N of Perth 452 km (281 mi) S of Port Hedland 424 km (263 mi) N of Meekatharra 277 km (172 mi) SE of Tom Price LGA: Shire of East Pilbara State District: Murchison-Eyre Federal Division: Kalgoorlie Mean Max Temp Mean Min Temp Rainfall 31.4 °C 89 °F 17.4 °C 63 °F 310.2 mm 12.2 in Newman, located about 1120 km northeast of Perth and 9 km north of the Tropic of Capricorn, is a town in the Pilbara region. It can be reached by the Great Northern Highway. With a population at the 2006 census of 5,139.[1], it is a modern mining town with leafy suburban-style homes providing a stark contrast to the surrounding reddish arid desert area. Originally marginal cattle country, Newman was built in the 1960s with the discovery of rich iron deposits on nearby Mt Whaleback. The discovery marked the start of the resource boom in the WA in the 1970s. A privately owned railway was constructed linking it to Port Hedland which itself was upgraded to handle shipment of the ore to the world market. On June 21, 2001 a train 7.353 km (4.568 miles) long, comprising 682 ore cars and 8 locomotives made the Newman--Port Hedland trip and is listed as the worlds longest train ever [1]. The ore trains are typically over 2 km long. Newman is also a service town to the nearby mining settlements like Tom Price and Paraburdoo. Typical of company towns, Newman is laid out with a core, where shopping and hotels are located, surrounded by residential areas, with more industrial activities on the outskirts. There is one shopping mall in the town, two shopping plazas, three hotels, and three bars/restaurants outside of those contained in the hotels. One public outdoor pool serves the town's population. DON PUGH
Views: 10846 Donald Pugh
EAST ALLIGATOR RIVER ABORIGINAL CULTURAL TOUR KAKADU NATIONAL PARK NT AUSTRALIA
 
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CARAVAN TRIP 2007 The East Alligator River is approximately 160 kilometres long. After rising in the northern part of the Arnhem Land Plateau, it flows with tributary streams towards the northwest through magnificent canyons towards the Van Diemen Gulf which it meets at Point Farewell. The South Alligator River is also about 160 kilometres long. It rises north of Mount Stow also on the Arnhem Land plateau. It flows northwesterly in a valley containing a number of disused uranium mines developed between 1955 and 1965. It also finishes in the Van Diemen Gulf of the Timor Sea. The West Alligator River rises in the lowlands and is 80 kilometres long. The Wildman River also flows in the region. The river system has a number of spectacular waterfalls including the Jim Jim Falls on Jim Jim Creek and the Twin Falls on Twin Falls Creek. The rivers have created the alluvial plains including the mangrove swamp in the past 20,000 years. [edit] Climate Waterfall - Kakadu National Park after rainLike much of northern Australia, the Alligator Rivers region has a monsoon climate. The dry season lasts between May and September while the wet season lasts between November and March. April and October are transitional periods between the two months. Annual rainfall at Jabiru is approximately 1540 mm with almost all of it falling during the wet season. During the wet season, the prevailing winds are westerly to north-westerly while they are easterly to south-easterly during the dry season. The three Alligator Rivers are perennial rivers flowing even during the dry season as is the Wildman River. All of the tributaries dry up in places during that period. The land dries out, and the wildlife concentrates around the permanent water sources such as the rivers, springs, waterholes and billabongs. The duration of the dry period depends on the rainfall during the wet season. In a normal year, the tributaries will start flowing around the middle of December and finish at the end of June, but the flow will start in November and finish in August if the rainfall has been particularly heavy. During the wet season, the savanna turns green, the wildlife spreads out, the bird life returns and the streams flood into adjacent lands turning them into swamps. The flood plains leave behind silt when they gradually dry up during the wet season. WIKIPEDIA
Views: 1229 Donald Pugh
SANDFIRE ROADHOUSE WA  WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
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SAND FIRE ROAD HOUSE flats caravan trip 2007 Sandfire, Western Australia From Wikipedia, Sandfire is a location and roadhouse in Western Australia between Port Hedland and Broome. It is the only fuel station in the 610km between those two towns. In April 2007, the Sandfire Roadhouse was extensively damaged by fire leaving a $1.5 million damage bill.
Views: 3573 Donald Pugh
INDUSTRIAL GERALDTON WA AUSTRALIA
 
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I used a Gopro for this four minute video. Geraldton is a city in the Mid West region of Western Australia, located 424 kilometres (263 mi) north of Perth. Geraldton's population was 38,030 in June 2012.[1] Geraldton is the seat of government for the local government district, City of Greater Geraldton, which also incorporates the town of Mullewa and large rural areas previously forming the shires of Greenough and Mullewa. The town is an important service centre for regional mining, fishing, wheat, sheep and tourism industries. Iluka Resources is involved in mineral sands exploration, project development, operations and marketing. The company is the major producer of zircon globally and the highest producer of titanium dioxide products of rutile and synthetic rutile. The company mines heavy mineral sands and separates the concentrate into its individual mineral constituents rutile, ilmenite, and zircon. Some of the ilmenite is then processed into synthetic rutile.
Views: 673 Donald Pugh
GOLDFIELDS PIPELINE (golden) Perth Mundarng to Kalgoorlie Western Australia
 
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ONE OF A SERIES ON KALGOORLIE SEE http://video.google.com.au/videosearch?q=DON+PUGH+KALGOORLIE The Goldfields Water Supply Scheme, also known by names such as the Goldfields Pipeline, Goldfields and Agricultural Water Supply Scheme (GAWS), and originally known as the Coolgardie Goldfields Water Supply Scheme, is perhaps the world's longest water main. It connects Mundaring Weir, near Perth, Western Australia with the Mount Charlotte Reservoir, at Kalgoorlie, 530 km (330 miles) away. The pipeline indirectly serves towns further afield. The pipeline was commissioned in 1896 and was completed in 1903. It was established to deliver water to communities that had rapidly grown in Western Australia's "Eastern Goldfields", such as Coolgardie and Kalgoorlie. During the early 1890s, thousands of settlers had swarmed into the barren and dry desert centre of Western Australia in search of gold, but existing infrastructure for the supply of water was non-existent and an urgent need arose. The scheme enabled the benefits of the gold discovery to be realised and brought immense wealth into the previously struggling economy. Abundant water became available at a cost of three shillings and sixpence per thousand gallons, compared to water which had been carted by rail to Coolgardie previously at the rate of over £3 per thousand gallons. The position was even worse at Kalgoorlie. The pipeline continues to operate today, supplying water to over 100,000 people and more than six million sheep; in 33,000 households, mines, farms and other enterprises. The scheme was devised by C. Y. O'Connor who oversaw its design and most of the construction project. Although supported by Premier Forrest, O'Connor had to deal with widespread criticism and derision from members of the Western Australian Parliament as well as the local press based on a belief that scope of the engineering task was too great and that it would never work. There was also a concern that the gold discoveries would soon dry up and the state would be left with a significant debt to repay but little or no commerce to support it. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goldfields_Pipeline DON PUGH producer: Don Pugh
Views: 5395 Donald Pugh
SOUTHERN CROSS WA  SETTLEMENT
 
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Tourism The Shire of Yilgarn is 30,720 square km in area and has a population of approximately 3,000. Yilgarn is known by many as the Gateway to the Wheatbelt and the Goldfields. The name "Yilgarn" is aboriginal for "white stone" or "quartz". Southern Cross is the major town centre of the Shire of Yilgarn and is 370km east of Perth along the Great Eastern Highway. Other townsites in the Shire include Bodallin, Bullfinch, Ghooli, Koolyanobbing, Marvel Loch, Moorine Rock and Yellowdine. The two major industries in the area are Mining and Rural. Gold, gypsum, salt and iron are mined, while grain, wool, sheep, cattle and pigs are the focus of the rural industry. The co-existence of mining and agriculture has balanced the Yilgarn economy, with the two activities supplementing and complementing each other through their respective boom and bust cycles. Tourism is another growing industry in the Yilgarn. There are many wonderful places of attraction throughout the Shire including Baladjie Rock, Frog Rock, Karalee Dam, Hunts Soak, Yilgarn History Museum, just to name a few. The wildflower season is an excellent time to visit the Yilgarn to see the may beautiful colours of the area. The people and places make the Yilgarn a place to remember. The long history surrounding the Shire is famous to many throughout the State and complements the existing beauty and adventure of the Shire of Yilgarn. For more information on any tourist attractions in the area, as well as booking train tickets and tourist brochures visit the Shire Office, the tourism information centre DON PUGH CARAVAN TRIP 2008
Views: 1124 Donald Pugh
YORK MINISTER ENGLAND CLIFFORD TOWER ST MARY'S ABBEY SHAMBLES
 
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EE York Minster, ENGLAND, the historic cathedral church stands at the city's centre. The city centre is nearly surrounded by walls, pictured. To walk the entire circuit (including parts where walls never existed) is about 3 miles. The Shambles is perhaps York's most iconic street. Formerly the lamb-butchers district, it retains most of its feel from around 4-500 years ago. It contains the shrine of Margaret Clitherow, and many gift shops. The city has many museums, including the Castle Museum, Yorkshire Museum & Gardens, Richard III Museum and the York Dungeon. The National Railway Museum is situated just behind the station, and is home to the largest static collection of railway locomotives in the world, including the world's fastest steam locomotive LNER 4468 Mallard.
Views: 1101 Donald Pugh
Bunbury Old Timber Jetty WA WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
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DON PUGH CARAVAN TRIP 2008 Old Bunbury Timber Jetty The Old Bunbury Timber Jetty is located in Koombana Bay in Bunbury, Western Australia. Construction of the original jetty commenced in 1864 using convict labour. The jetty has been extended over the years to accomade the increased shipping. The jetty was closed in 1982 following the construction of Bunbury's Inner Harbour. Sections of the originally bridge dating from 1864-1906 have all but perished. The sections were either demolished or are lying at the bottom of the harbour. Railway trucks were used along the railway line to transport goods for export. 1990's Fire A fire in the 1990's threatened the demolishment of the jetty, however public outcry saved the structure. A decking restoration plan was undertaken by the Bunbury Timber Jetty Environment and Conservation Society (formerly the Bunbury Timber Jetty Preservation Society) in 1995. The society is responsible for the maintainence the jetty . In 1999 an engineers report on the condition of the jetty revealed that a third of the timber jetty piles were completely severed at the waterline. Redevelopment and Restoration In 2004 the State Government announced the Landcorp redevelopment project for the Outer Harbour which included the Bunbury Timber Jetty. Currently the jetty is supported on timber and concrete pylons and is 590m in length. However following the Boxing Day Tsunami in 2004 the jetty has been showing signs of ongoing deteriation with timbers from the end portion of the jetty falling into the ocean. With concerns raised about boat and ship safety in the harbour, plans are under way to demolish 200m of the badly damaged section. Restoration of the jetty is expected to continue up to row 106. Access to the jetty is no longer permitted to the general public.
Views: 1437 Donald Pugh
Mandurah WA WESTERN AUSTRALIA JAN 2008 PART 1 OF 3
 
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Mandurah (32°31′S, 115°43′E) is a city sixty minutes' drive (72 km) south of Perth, Western Australia. Mandurah is the fastest-growing regional city in Australia, having experienced hypergrowth for several years. The city grew from isolated holiday communities along the shores of the Peel-Harvey Estuary, and, with the growth of Perth, it has become a popular lifestyle alternative. Mandurah's connection with the Perth CBD has been strengthened with the opening of the Perth-Mandurah railway line in December, 2007. A housing affordability survey of 227 cities in the 2008 ranked it the least affordable city in Australia. [2] The city centre foreshore is home to a variety of wildlife including dolphins, pelicans, shags, and an abundance of marine life including the blue manna crab which has become synonymous with the area. The city welcomes thousands of tourists every year, including many international visitors. Mandurah is famous for its protected waterways, superb beaches and excellent boating and fishing activities. A photograph of Mandurah adorns the cover of the 1986 album Born Sandy Devotional by The Triffids Geography Peel Inlet and Old Mandurah Bridge.The waters of the Peel Inlet and Harvey Estuary (one of Australia's larger inlet systems) form the centre of Mandurah. The estuary is approximately twice the size of Sydney Harbour. The city lies in and around this freshwater system which in turn feeds into the Indian Ocean. The city and its suburbs have many kilometres of ocean coastline most of which is sandy beaches. Mandurah also has a number of suburbs built around artificially created canal systems that extend from the Peel Inlet. The area is governed by the City of Mandurah. WIKIPEDIA
Views: 2437 Donald Pugh